BeyondSlavery https://www.opendemocracy.net/taxonomy/term/17588/all cached version 20/11/2018 09:04:08 en Decriminalisation and labour rights: how sex workers are organising for legal reforms and socio-economic justice https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/luca-stevenson/decriminalisation-and-labour-rights-how-sex-workers-are-organising-for- <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The decriminalisation of sex work must be made central to the future of work, but that should only ever be a beginning rather than an end.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/PA-38700796.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Demonstration in Paris on 22 September 2018 in memory of Vanessa Campos. Apaydin Alain/ABACA/ABACA/PA Images. All rights reserved.</p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>Political and public debates regarding sex work have intensified and crystalised into two apparently irreconcilable positions. On the one hand, we have calls for the recognition of sex work as work, with the primary goal being the end to criminalisation and legal oppression. On the other, we have the view that prostitution should be regarded as intrinsic violence against women. From this perspective criminalisation – and especially the criminalisation of clients – is an important part of larger efforts to disrupt, decrease, and ultimately abolish prostitution. This debate has important ramifications for efforts to grapple with the future of work, as opposition to the basic notion of sex work as work like any other continues to undercut efforts to improve rights and protections for sex workers. </p> <p>The abolitionist model of criminalising clients has recently gained considerable ground across Europe. France, Norway, Sweden, Ireland and Northern Ireland have all criminalised the purchase of sex. Israel and other countries are debating similar laws, and Spain officially announced a ‘feminist abolitionist’ government. Despite this negative trend, sex workers continue to self-organise and formulate collective demands against their precariousness and exploitative working conditions. </p> <p>By way of further illustration, I’d like to share three current examples from different European countries that demonstrate both the breadth of sex workers’ organising and the obstacles they face. </p> <h2>Snapshots of oppression, snapshots of solidarity – Autumn 2018</h2> <p>In September, Spanish media reported that a new sex worker union, Organización de Trabajadoras Sexuales (OTRAS), had been created and officially registered by the Department of Labour. In response, the Spanish government announced its decision to disband it. Pedro Sanchez, the Spanish president, confusingly justified this annulment on Twitter by saying prostitution is illegal in Spain. It’s not, and despite the political pressure OTRAS followed through with the launch of their union and continued their project of to self-organisation. </p> <p>In the United Kingdom, a grassroots campaign led by sex workers and allies from diverse sex worker-led organisations coordinated the launch of the DecrimNow campaign at the fringe Labour Party Conference in Liverpool. British and migrant sex workers – both street-based and indoors – denounced the impact of criminalisation, austerity and poverty on their living and working conditions and called for the Labour Party to support them as precarious and informal workers.</p> <p>In France, sex workers recently mourned the murder of Vanessa Campos, a migrant transgender sex worker from Peru who had worked in France for two years. Vanessa was killed in August 2018 by a group of men as they attempted to rob her client. For several months prior to that attack, Vanessa and her colleagues had tried to report these aggressors to the police who ignored them. The apathy and silence of the political class was denounced by sex workers and trans organisations such as STRASS and ACCEPTESS-T through demonstrations, vigils and articles. Sex workers and allies had previously warned of the dangerous implications of the 2016 French law criminalising the purchase of sex, which has increased the vulnerability and precarity of sex workers and forced them to work in more dangerous areas.</p> <p>Her murder sparked a wave of global protests from Amsterdam to Bogotá. In each city, sex workers and their allies stood in solidarity with sex workers in France whilst also linking Vanessa’ s murder to local struggles against racism, transphobia, police harassment and violence against sex workers. </p> <h2>Demands for a better future</h2> <p>Taken together, these three examples provide visible and concrete examples of the ongoing self-organisation of sex workers as workers and their united and unequivocal demands for decriminalisation, labour and human rights. Sex workers are also calling for: justice for all in their community; documentation and the right to work for all migrant workers; an end to transphobia and greater access to education and other forms of economic activity for trans people; reform of the welfare state; and an end to austerity. While the call for decriminalisation captures the headlines, it should be clear that there is much more going on here.</p> <p>The European network for sex workers’ rights, ICRSE, supports and amplifies the voices of sex workers in Europe. It also develops resources analysing exploitation in the sex industry and violations of sex workers’ rights. Over the next two years, thanks to the support of the Oak Foundation, ICRSE will coordinate a project aiming at supporting migrant sex workers to tackle exploitation and trafficking in the sex industry in partnership with several of our member groups. The project is a response to the continued criminalisation of migration and sex work, and to the negative effects of increasingly repressive ‘security measures’ on migrant sex workers. Sex workers aren’t unique in this struggle. Precarious workers everywhere face similar types of challenges, and the voices and experiences of sex workers can contribute greatly to larger campaigns for greater rights and protections for all workers and migrants. Greater solidarity between migrant and labour organisations and the sex workers’ movement is the future. </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/global-alliance-against-traffic-in-women/organising-beyond-silos-confronting-common-ch">Organising beyond silos: confronting common challenges amongst migrants and workers</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BORISLAV GERASIMOV</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Luca Stevenson Tue, 20 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Luca Stevenson 120619 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Salir de las sombras: el personal del hogar habla en los Estados Unidos https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ai-jen-poo/salir-de-las-sombras-el-personal-del-hogar-habla-en-los-estados-unidos <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>El personal del hogar de los Estados Unidos, hace tiempo excluido de la mayoría de las leyes de protección laboral, puede mostrar a una fuerza laboral cada vez más flexibilizada cómo sobrevivir en la nueva economía. <strong><em><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/dws/ai-jen-poo/out-from-shadows-domestic-workers-speak-in-united-states">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/6804492384_3727cbf199_o-bw.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Carlos Lowry/Flickr. Creative Commons.</p> <p>Nuestros hogares son nuestros santuarios. Allí regresamos para comer y descansar tras un día de trabajo. Allí es donde nos sentimos más a salvo. Pero para muchas personas, nuestro hogar es un lugar con riesgos.</p> <p>Para el personal del hogar – niñeras, personal de limpieza, cuidadoras y cuidadores, quienes realizan el trabajo para que todos los otros trabajos sean posibles –, nuestro hogar es su lugar de trabajo. Detrás de las puertas cerradas de los hogares de nuestro vecindario es donde esta fuerza laboral invisible (en su mayoría compuesta por mujeres migrantes) pasa su día alimentando a nuestras hijas e hijos, limpiando nuestras cocinas y cuidando a nuestras personas mayores o personas amadas con alguna discapacidad. Hay 100 millones de personas que trabajan como personal del hogar, ocultas del mundo exterior, excluidas de muchas legislaciones laborales que protegen a otros rubros de personal laboral, y vulnerables en las sombras de la economía.</p> <p>Si escuchan al personal del hogar, oirán historias que evocan todo tipo de emociones, desde humorísticas hasta humillantes y angustiosas. Personas obligadas a dormir en el sótano junto a un tanque de aguas residuales desbordado. Personas sin ningún recurso a quienes se les retiene el pago total. Personas a las que se les pide pasear a un perro y a una niña por el vecindario en un cochecito doble. El dolor de tener que dejar que otra persona cuide a tu propia hija o tu propio hijo. También hay muchas historias positivas, historias de independencia y de relaciones que crecen hasta volverse más fuertes que las de sangre. Pero en el contexto de este campo laboral tan íntimo, cada historia incluye vulnerabilidad, y casi todo el personal del hogar tiene alguna historia de abuso.</p> <p>La cruel ironía es que el personal del hogar realiza uno de los trabajos más importantes de nuestra economía. A medida que las personas de la generación del «baby boom» envejecen y disfrutan de una mayor esperanza de vida, con la idea de envejecer en sus hogares en vez de asilos y otras instituciones, crece la necesidad de contar con personal del hogar para el cuidado de personas mayores. Además, hay más mujeres dentro de la mano de obra, lo que significa que la capacidad para el cuidado del hogar es menor y, por ende, surge una necesidad de servicios y ayuda en el hogar sin precedentes. Entre el desplazamiento del trabajo en los sectores actuales de la economía por la automatización y la inteligencia artificial, y el incremento de la necesidad de la atención y servicios del hogar, se anticipa que en 2030 el trabajo de cuidado de personas será la ocupación más numerosa de la economía.</p> <p>Algo tiene que pasar.</p> <h2>Un desarrollo a paso firme</h2> <p>La exclusión del personal del hogar de las leyes básicas de protección laboral en los Estados Unidos, incluyendo el derecho a organizarse, negociar de manera colectiva y formar sindicatos, se arraiga en el legado de la esclavitud. En la década de 1930, cuando se debatían las políticas laborales fundamentales en el Congreso de los Estados Unidos, miembros de los estados sureños se negaban a firmarlas si el personal del hogar y agrícola (en su mayoría personas afroamericanas en esa época) era incluido en las nuevas leyes de protección. Para tranquilizar a estos miembros, la Ley Nacional de Relaciones Laborales (1935) y otras leyes laborales fundamentales se aprobaron especificando esas exclusiones.</p> <p>Con este trasfondo legal e histórico, hace 20 años empecé a reunirme con personal del hogar de la ciudad de Nueva York como parte de una iniciativa para conectar a mujeres asiáticas inmigrantes con trabajos mal remunerados. Fue imposible ignorar al ejército silencioso de mujeres de color, principalmente migrantes, paseando en cochecitos a niñas y niños de raza diferente por las calles de Manhattan.</p> <p>A pesar de la necesidad, fue un desafío hacer que un pequeño grupo de mujeres se acercase. La mayoría de quienes conocí era la fuente principal de ingresos de sus familias y vivían bajo una presión económica extrema para llegar a fin de mes. Superar la idea de asistir a una reunión que podría poner en riesgo sus trabajos no les resultó fácil. La presión en las mujeres migrantes se veía agravada por el temor a ser deportadas y separadas de sus familias y comunidades. Pero insistimos, y finalmente nos abrimos camino para crear espacios seguros en los que las mujeres pudieran reunirse, conectar y gestar un sentimiento de comunidad y pertenencia.</p> <p>Las trabajadoras que vinieron se dieron fuerza y poder entre sí. Se corrió la voz entre otras ciudades donde también comenzaban a organizarse. Reunión tras reunión, en mayor o menor escala, las organizaciones del personal del hogar empezaron a esparcirse de manera local. En el 2007, todo estaba listo para romper el aislamiento de las reuniones locales y conectarnos a nivel nacional; llevamos a cabo nuestra primera reunión nacional y formamos oficialmente la Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras Domésticas («NDWA», por sus siglas en inglés).</p> <p>Diez años después, somos una alianza de 64 organizaciones locales de personal del hogar en 36 ciudades y 17 estados de todo el país. Entre nuestros miembros hay niñeras, personal de limpieza, cuidadoras y cuidadores de personas mayores o con discapacidades cuyo entorno laboral es un hogar. Las trabajadoras y los trabajadores pueden unirse a través de una organización afiliada local o de forma particular desde cualquier parte del país, pagar las cuotas y tener acceso a capacitaciones, beneficios y otros recursos.</p> <p>Nuestro recién descubierto sentimiento de poder se volvió tangible a medida que presentábamos demandas y organizábamos encuentros en contra de personas empleadoras abusivas. Las demandas nos permitieron comprender las limitaciones de la ley, ya que el personal del hogar había estado sometido a numerosas exclusiones en la legislación laboral. Quedó claro que necesitaríamos organizarnos para cambiar las leyes y promulgar nuevas políticas.</p> <p>Introdujimos entonces la Carta de Derechos del Personal Doméstico: una legislación estatal que establece las protecciones básicas para la mano de obra, por ejemplo cuestiones contra la discriminación o el derecho a tener un día de descanso por semana y vacaciones pagadas. Nuestro primer gran logro llegó en 2010 cuando, tras siete años de campaña, el gobernador del estado de Nueva York convirtió el proyecto en ley. Desde entonces, otros seis estados aprobaron leyes para proteger los derechos del personal del hogar, y el Ministerio de Trabajo federal cambió sus normas para incluir a dos millones de personas que trabajan como personal de atención del hogar, previamente excluidas de las protecciones federales de salario mínimo y de horas extras.</p> <p>Además, el trabajo pionero con trabajadoras del hogar que han sobrevivido a situaciones de trata de personas con fines laborales, empezó a modificar la conversación sobre la trata incluyendo el espectro de vulnerabilidades que enfrentan las mujeres con trabajos de bajos salarios. Se recuperaron millones de dólares de salarios impagados y miles de personas que trabajan como personal del hogar se han unido a las campañas desarrollando toda una nueva generación de líderes para los movimientos de cambio social.</p> <h2>El futuro del trabajo</h2> <p>Aunque nuestra década de trabajo se enfocó en mejorar las condiciones laborales del personal del hogar, su importancia en el resto de la mano de obra no debe subestimarse. En los primeros años de organización, las condiciones y vulnerabilidades que el personal del hogar enfrentaba parecían marginales comparadas con el resto de la mano de obra. Hoy, estos problemas afectan a un grupo mucho mayor de personas. La falta de seguridad laboral, la falta de caminos hacia el desarrollo profesional y la falta de acceso a redes de protección sociales son problemas que enfrentan las trabajadoras y los trabajadores de muchos sectores. De hecho, a medida que una mayor parte de la fuerza laboral se vuelve temporal, de medio tiempo o autónoma, el «trabajo no tradicional» se torna más habitual. </p> <p>A medida que la economía de los Estados Unidos se ajusta frente al incremento de la «economía de los pequeños encargos», y las empresas y las personas trabajadoras tratan de descubrir cómo aprovechar los beneficios y evitar los peligros de este tipo de trabajos signados por avances tecnológicos, solo es necesario mirar al personal del hogar para darnos cuenta de cómo se desarrollará. Las trabajadoras del hogar somos las primeras trabajadoras de la economía de los pequeños encargos: hemos experimentado su dinámica, luchado frente a sus desafíos y, más importante aún, hemos encontrado algunas soluciones para sobrevivir como una fuerza laboral vulnerable.</p> <p>Todo el mundo podría beneficiarse, por ejemplo, de una nueva declaración de derechos para las personas trabajadoras del siglo XXI. Además del personal del hogar, existen millones de trabajadoras y trabajadores en ambientes no tradicionales a quienes se les niega el acceso a beneficios. Todas las fuerzas laborales podrían beneficiarse de un sistema de formación reinventado que una la creciente brecha entre trabajadoras y trabajadores con ingresos altos y bajos. Y, si logramos averiguar cómo darle voz y voto real a esta fuerza laboral desagregada, con una organización sostenible y ampliable de trabajadoras y trabajadores del siglo XXI, podríamos crear un contexto en el que las personas trabajadoras puedan ocupar un lugar en la discusión y ayudar a forjar el futuro de la economía global de una vez por todas.</p> <h2>Una alianza del siglo XXI</h2> <p>En la Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras Domésticas estamos desarrollando soluciones enfocadas al futuro.</p> <p>Estamos construyendo una asociación nacional de personas voluntarias en la que cualquier trabajadora del hogar puede unirse y obtener acceso a capacitación y beneficios. Estamos desarrollando nuevos programas de formación y desarrollo profesional para la fuerza laboral y haciendo accesible la capacitación en diferentes idiomas, y desde los teléfonos celulares. Hemos desarrollado un <a href="http://www.goodworkcode.org/">Código de Buenos Empleos</a>, un marco de referencia para que los trabajos sean buenos dentro de la economía virtual, que ayude a las empresas a diseñar sus negocios teniendo en cuenta el bienestar de su personal. Y estamos desarrollando un programa portátil de beneficios que brinde a contratistas independientes y a trabajadoras del sector informal los medios necesarios para recaudar contribuciones sociales y utilizarlas para recibir los beneficios que deseen.</p> <p>Como fuerza laboral mayoritariamente femenina, el modo en que desarrollamos las soluciones es crítico. Debemos asegurarnos de que la fuerza laboral indocumentada y migrante esté totalmente incluida en nuestras soluciones y estrategias. Cuando queramos organizar la fuerza laboral, debemos tener en cuenta cómo los legados de la esclavitud y del colonialismo moldean la fuerza laboral presente. Por suerte, este es precisamente el modo en que nuestro movimiento ha evolucionado. Trabajando en la intersección de muchas identidades y experiencias, tenemos el desafío de crear modelos organizativos en los que todas las personas tengan voto y dignidad, donde todas las personas tengan una sensación de pertenencia.</p> <p>El movimiento mundial de personal del hogar surge en el momento preciso, no solo para traer dignidad y respeto a las personas que se dedican a esto, sino para moldear el futuro del trabajo a nivel mundial, para que sea un mundo de oportunidades y seguridad económica real para todas las familias. El personal del hogar se ubica en el centro de muchos cambios en la economía global y también debe estar en el centro de las soluciones. Nosotras creemos que la investigación, la organización y las soluciones que emergen del movimiento mundial de personal del hogar son claves para muchas de las cuestiones críticas a las que debemos responder para lograr dignidad y oportunidades en el futuro.</p> <p>Así que la próxima vez que vea a una trabajadora entrar silenciosamente en una casa con sus artículos de limpiezas o a una niñera tranquilizando a una niña que llora y que no es de ella o a una cuidadora llevando lentamente a una persona anciana en silla de ruedas hacia el sol, tome nota.</p> <p>Es probable que pasen desapercibidas, pero su importancia para todas nosotras y nosotros no se puede subestimar. Sus luchas son las luchas del futuro laboral. Sus soluciones son las soluciones del futuro laboral. No solo nos están salvando de las condiciones laborales del trabajo del hogar del pasado y del presente, sino que también podrían salvarnos de un futuro laboral que no aprende de los errores del pasado.</p> <p>Y así es como construimos un futuro laboral con dignidad y respeto hacia todas las trabajadoras y todos los trabajadores, un futuro laboral del que nos enorgullezcamos. </p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi">«Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LOURDES ALBÁN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en">Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/bridget-anderson/entender-el-contexto-interpersonal-y-estructural-del-trabajo-del-hoga">Entender el contexto interpersonal y estructural del trabajo del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BRIDGET ANDERSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ilana-berger/aliados-o-coconspiradores-qu-necesita-el-movimiento-de-trabajadoras-del-h">Aliados o coconspiradores: ¿qué necesita el movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ILANA BERGER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sameera-hafiz/m-s-all-de-la-supervivencia-lecciones-aprendidas-de-las-trabajadoras-del">Más allá de la supervivencia: lecciones aprendidas de las trabajadoras del hogar en la organización de campañas contra la trata de personas y la explotación laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SAMEERA HAFIZ</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Ai-jen Poo BTS en Español Mon, 19 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Ai-jen Poo 120214 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Organising beyond silos: confronting common challenges amongst migrants and workers https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/global-alliance-against-traffic-in-women/organising-beyond-silos-confronting-common-ch <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Only a coordinated challenge can make work better for all. We are all in this together.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/14635612963_ac87be4852_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Carlos LV/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/fotos_de_carlos/14635612963/in/photolist-oiikQx-vZBqb-2aeeUGi-8Djbqc-8Ff3dn-6QAP3-5wHsGf-c8Qhuh-5hSQ55-tsimC-974qeL-aAMVX-p41q-4nCixM-7F8E1g-HxAXk-fLCXSH-g5Ev7H-ncrvi5-US34A1-Qu42WL-s8ErCA-Wbuzrm-dNTzna-272Za8S-KBzHNr-kc2sps-Sy9Sw7-DTZymv-d91FhC-MjrYND-49eeGq-Aayrto-6HqTeW-6z2wWj-23V1UQG-gYkhY-UuR1RC-72Xjpv-8Acaav-6FYShs-4qKEnL-W1wdr5-8xH3Sw-8r5zbr-566Q1P-58ryBT-5UiWxN-4Merhf-3zQrvT">Flickr. (cc by-nc)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>We thank the BTS editors for convening this roundtable and this call for contributions. It may come as a surprise to some to see a contribution from an anti-trafficking organisation. Yet for us at GAATW, trafficking has always been an issue of labour and labour migration. Our efforts to challenge exploitation and trafficking must therefore be grounded in a deep understanding of the world of work. This means taking stock of how and why work has changed globally, identifying the specificities of each sector, and finding ways to enable workers to organise and build alliances. </p> <p>It has long been clear that trafficking, exploitation, and labour rights violations occur in sectors where women, often migrants or of lower socio-economic status, work. These sectors include domestic work, the sex industry, the garment industry, and agriculture. Each of these comes with particular conditions that enable abuse and exploitation. Domestic work takes place in private homes. Sex work is criminalised and highly stigmatised in most countries. Agriculture and the garment sector are rarely monitored effectively.</p> <p>We also know that the experiences of women who have been trafficked or exploited in these sectors tend to be very similar. They endure long working hours, unfair wage deductions, physical, psychological, verbal or sexual abuse, control on their movement, confiscation of documents, and so on. The strategies that can reduce exploitation in these sectors are very similar too: stronger and better enforced labour regulations; oversight and accountability of employers; firewalls between labour inspections and immigration; and the ability of workers to organise and bargain collectively. </p> <p>Despite these common experiences and challenges, there remains a tendency towards fragmentation – or siloing – of the efforts of different groups that support women working in these sectors. Many anti-trafficking organisations view trafficking from a criminal justice perspective, and some continue to employ a harmful “raid-rescue-rehabilitation” model despite <a href="http://gaatw.org/resources/publications/908-collateral-damage-the-impact-of-anti-trafficking-measures-on-human-rights-around-the-world">extensive evidence</a> that it does not work. Migrant rights groups typically exclude citizens. Local workers’ groups typically exclude migrants. Trade unions tend to be male-dominated. Many do not allow migrants to join or lead them, and usually exclude informal workers. All of these groups can and have been hostile to sex workers. And domestic worker organisations and sex worker organisations don’t often talk to each other, despite the fact that many women move between domestic work and sex work or engage in both at the same time. </p> <h2>Towards a united front</h2> <p>To address this fragmentation, GAATW organised a <a href="http://gaatw.org/events-and-news/68-gaatw-news/945-knowledge-sharing-forum-on-women-work-and-migration">Knowledge Sharing Forum on Women, Work and Migration</a> in April 2018. The participants included more than 60 representatives from trade unions, academia and NGOs, and their expertise spanned anti-trafficking, migrant rights, women’s rights, sex worker rights, and domestic worker rights. The primary aim of the forum was to share strategies for protecting women’s rights and reducing the risks of exploitation and trafficking, and to forge new alliances between these diverse groups. </p> <p>Our discussions centred on decent work, migration, and gender-based violence in the workplace. They brought to light how a woman’s access to opportunities and knowledge and her ability to negotiate depend on her geographical location and social standing in the patriarchal structure. Given this realisation, we also focused upon the importance of cross-sectoral movement building for all women workers. On the final day, participants came up with a joint <a href="http://gaatw.org/events-and-news/68-gaatw-news/949-statement-on-violence-and-harassment-in-the-world-of-work">statement on violence and harassment in the world of work</a>. This was released ahead of the 107th Session of the International Labour Conference in Geneva, where delegates met to deliberate on an international instrument to address violence and harassment in the world of work. </p> <p>We hope to make these forums an annual event and to hold them in different parts of the world. Now more than ever there is an urgent need for social justice movements to come together. There is a need to build and strengthen movements across issues and across sectoral and geographical borders. Civil society organisations focusing on different issues need to come out of their silos and share their work. In doing so, they will gain a deeper understanding of each other’s concerns, challenges, and successes, and find out where their meeting points are.</p> <p>Some of this cross-movement building is already happening. If GAATW had not talked to migrants and sex workers, we would not have understood how anti-trafficking laws are now being used to justify border controls and other repressive policies. If our members had not engaged with trade unions such as the Self-employed Women’s Association, the Asia Floor Wage Alliance, or the International Domestic Workers Federation, they would have missed out on many lessons for how to unionise informal workers at grassroots level.</p> <p>Quite naturally, all these different groups have different priorities, different strategies, and different opinions. But our goals are same. We all want to see a world free of exploitation, where people can move freely and are not criminalised or discriminated against because of their migrant status. We want to see a world where everyone can realise their rights. Above all, we want a world that is safe, secure, and peaceful for all. </p> <p>As this Future of Work round table has shown, the state of the world of work requires a coordinated challenge. We need to find new ways to organise ourselves and legitimise diverse forms of worker mobilisation. Anti-trafficking NGOs, women’s rights, migrant rights, domestic worker organisations, sex worker organisations, and trade unions need each other at this moment. No single group has the answer. No single group on their own can effect the change that is needed.&nbsp; </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women Thu, 15 Nov 2018 10:36:17 +0000 Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women 120580 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Más allá de la supervivencia: lecciones aprendidas de las trabajadoras del hogar en la organización de campañas contra la trata de personas y la explotación laboral https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sameera-hafiz/m-s-all-de-la-supervivencia-lecciones-aprendidas-de-las-trabajadoras-del <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Las campañas contra la trata de personas pueden ayudar a inclinar la balanza hacia la justicia, pero solo serán exitosas si se basan en las vivencias de las personas supervivientes y se enfocan en soluciones sistémicas. <strong><em><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sameera-hafiz/beyond-survival-lessons-from-domestic-worker-organising-campaigns-agains">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/PA-21845760.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Migrant domestic workers hold posters demanding the same basic labour rights as those of the Lebanese workers during a march in Beirut, Lebanon, in 2014. Hussein Malla/AP/Press Association. All rights reserved.</p> <p>Muchas campañas convencionales contra la trata han logrado efectos favorables: han planteado el problema de la trata de personas a escala mundial y han ayudado a incentivar la acción nacional e internacional para la protección de las víctimas. No obstante, tienen también limitaciones graves; lo que significa que, algunas veces, sus aportes generales pueden ser poco positivos.</p> <p>Principalmente, se ven limitadas por una tendencia generalizada a organizarse exclusivamente en torno al problema de la trata de personas, lo que a menudo debilita la relación entre la trata de personas y otras formas de opresión y marginación. Muchas de las campañas incorporan la idea de la trata como un problema excepcional que requiere soluciones excepcionales, en vez de una opresión sistemática que requiere soluciones sistemáticas para todas las personas trabajadoras. Además, demasiadas campañas contra la trata utilizan relatos de vulnerabilidad y victimismo para ilustrar el alcance del problema, pero no logran colaborar de manera significativa con las personas supervivientes en la creación y manejo del discurso.</p> <p>Las campañas de concienciación tienen potencial, pero este todavía está por verse. El aprendizaje de los errores pasados y de las lecciones de las trabajadoras del hogar organizadas permitirían a las campañas contra la trata inclinar la balanza hacia la justicia y hacer frente al desafío de garantizar un trabajo digno para todas las personas.</p> <h2>La trata de personas no es un problema aislado</h2> <p>La Alianza nacional de trabajadoras del hogar (NDWA, por sus siglas en inglés) considera la trata de personas como el caso extremo de un patrón constante de explotación laboral que afecta a muchas personas trabajadoras en condiciones de vulnerabilidad. Tal explotación comienza con salarios bajos, ausencia de vacaciones pagadas, horarios imprevisibles y falta de acceso a programas de seguridad social. Puede luego continuar con robo de salarios, acoso sexual, discriminación, abuso verbal y horas extraordinarias involuntarias. También sabemos —por las vivencias de las trabajadoras del hogar, quienes en muchos casos enfrentan altos índices de trata de personas en los Estados Unidos y en el extranjero— que las políticas inhumanas de inmigración, la injusticia racial, la desigualdad entre géneros, la desigualdad económica y otras barreras sistémicas juegan un papel central en el aumento de la vulnerabilidad ante los abusos en este patrón constante de explotación laboral. Las campañas contra la trata de personas deben prestar la debida atención a todas las formas de opresión y de desigualdad.</p> <p>A través de numerosas estrategias, las campañas de la NDWA (aún aquellas que no se enfocan específicamente en la trata de personas) han luchado por romper este patrón constante de explotación y vulnerabilidad. Por ejemplo, siete estados de los EE.UU. han promulgado leyes de derechos del personal del hogar. Estas campañas legislativas son complejas y requieren de mucho esfuerzo, y son las que básicamente han creado nuevos derechos y protecciones laborales para el personal del hogar, aportando reconocimiento y dignidad a la mano de obra. Estas leyes han reforzado las normas mínimas para el personal del hogar, tales como el derecho a un salario mínimo y la regulación de las horas extraordinarias. Además, la fuerza de estas campañas se basa en el liderazgo de las trabajadoras del hogar quienes están dispuestas a incorporar sus historias personales a la acción política.&nbsp;</p> <h2>Discurso desarrollado y manejado por las personas supervivientes</h2> <p>En 2013, la NDWA lanzó <a href="https://www.domesticworkers.org/beyondsurvival">Más allá de la supervivencia</a>, la primera campaña nacional de organización de trabajadoras del hogar que sobreviven a la trata de personas. La campaña surgió de las lecciones aprendidas de los años de experiencia de las trabajadoras del hogar organizadas, durante los cuales las mujeres inmigrantes y de color afectadas directamente estuvieron al frente del movimiento a nivel local y nacional. Así que desde un comienzo, <em>Más allá de la supervivencia</em> ha estado arraigada en las voces y el liderazgo de las personas supervivientes comprometidas con el activismo político. Su liderazgo genera conciencia acerca de la trata de personas sin incorporar historias de victimización, puesto que las personas supervivientes manejan por sí mismas el discurso y la agenda.</p> <p>Tal espíritu está presente en todos los esfuerzos de <em>Más allá de la supervivencia</em>. En un encuentro reciente, las participantes en la campaña – muchas de las cuales son supervivientes de trata – realizaron un ejercicio de análisis de las noticias y titulares actuales sobre la trata de personas. Muchas notaron el discurso sensacionalista predominante de los medios que retratan las experiencias traumáticas de las víctimas, negando su voz y marginalizándolas, sin ningún control ni consentimiento para la divulgación de sus experiencias personales.</p> <p>Las personas participantes en <em>Más allá de la supervivencia</em> se sintieron molestas ante titulares tales como los de <em><a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2016/07/18/chinese-nanny-beaten-starved-treated-like-a-dog-in-wealthy-minn-suburb-authorities-say/?utm_term=.9f327e183922">The Washington Post,</a></em> «Niñera china golpeada, privada de alimentos, “tratada como un perro” en un suburbio adinerado de Minnesota». Estas historias no solo horrorizaban sino que a menudo se interrumpían sin aclararse completamente, y concluían con el victimismo y no con la supervivencia, la cual es pieza clave en las historias de nuestras miembros. Como coordinadora de esta campaña, una de las experiencias más extraordinarias de mi vida ha sido presenciar a las personas supervivientes en su interacción con las y los responsables políticos, al compartir estrategias de sensibilización para identificar a personas objeto de trata o ampliar el círculo cuando una nueva persona superviviente se vincula a la campaña y comparte su historia por primera vez. </p> <h2>Soluciones sistémicas para todas las personas trabajadoras</h2> <p>En el contexto político actual de los EE.UU., las campañas promovidas por las voces de las personas supervivientes de la trata deben desempeñar un papel central en la formación del discurso sobre los derechos humanos. La era Trump promete un incremento sustancial del control de la inmigración, un aumento de la discriminación y la violencia basada en el odio, la vigilancia policial incontrolada de las comunidades de color y la supremacía de los intereses empresariales que debilitará aún más la protección de las personas trabajadoras. Las supervivientes son verdaderas expertas en la sensibilización de otras trabajadoras del hogar, y en identificar quienes puedan ser víctimas de trata. Garantizarán desde primera línea que las trabajadoras del hogar recién identificadas como víctimas de trata puedan dar un paso al frente e iniciar la dura tarea de convertirse en supervivientes. Innovarán y experimentarán para definir la mejor forma de lograrlo de cara a la creciente hostilidad de los sistemas diseñados para ayudar a las víctimas. Invertir en este liderazgo y valorar la experiencia de la vivencia es hoy más importante que nunca.</p> <p>Aún en este momento político divisor, sigue existiendo un consenso generalizado sobre la trata como una violación a los derechos humanos; y un compromiso, por lo menos de carácter retórico, sobre la necesidad de ponerle fin. Las personas supervivientes de la trata están en condiciones no sólo de sensibilizar sobre la trata de personas sino de formular un argumento convincente sobre la necesidad de continuar con los esfuerzos para enfrentar las desigualdades sistémicas. Mediante la creación estratégica y visionaria de campañas de sensibilización pública, las personas supervivientes pueden llevar el mensaje de que las políticas migratorias inhumanas, el exceso de vigilancia policial y la carencia de condiciones laborales decentes promueven un clima que posibilita la trata de personas. De este modo, pueden mejorar las condiciones no solo para las personas que sobreviven a la trata, sino en general para todas las personas trabajadoras migrantes con salarios bajos.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi">«Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LOURDES ALBÁN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en">Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/bridget-anderson/entender-el-contexto-interpersonal-y-estructural-del-trabajo-del-hoga">Entender el contexto interpersonal y estructural del trabajo del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BRIDGET ANDERSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ilana-berger/aliados-o-coconspiradores-qu-necesita-el-movimiento-de-trabajadoras-del-h">Aliados o coconspiradores: ¿qué necesita el movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ILANA BERGER</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Sameera Hafiz BTS en Español Thu, 15 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Sameera Hafiz 120213 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Aliados o coconspiradores: ¿qué necesita el movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ilana-berger/aliados-o-coconspiradores-qu-necesita-el-movimiento-de-trabajadoras-del-h <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Mejorar las condiciones de trabajo en las relaciones laborales individuales no es suficiente. Hacen falta cambios sistémicos en la industria de cuidados. <strong><em><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/ilana-berger/allies-or-co-conspirators-what-does-domestic-workers-movement-need">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/4Z1B2643.jpg" alt="" width="100%" /><span class="image-caption" style="font-size: 10px; font-style: italic;">Photo by Jennifer N. Fish.</span></p><p>¿Son «aliadas y aliados» lo que necesita realmente el movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar? Alicia Garza, cofundadora del movimiento Black Lives Matter y directora de proyectos especiales para la Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras del Hogar («NDWA», por sus siglas en inglés) prefiere utilizar el término «coconspiradores».</p> <p>«La coconspiración se refiere sobretodo a lo que hacemos, no a lo que decimos», <a href="https://www.movetoendviolence.org/blog/ally-co-conspirator-means-act-insolidarity/">explica Garza</a>. «Se trata de superar la culpa y la vergüenza, y de reconocer que nosotras no creamos nada de esto. Por lo que sí aceptamos responsabilidad es por el poder que poseemos para transformar nuestras condiciones».</p> <p>Garza nos pide que reconozcamos una dinámica de poder y busquemos corregirla, en vez de inquietarnos y culparnos. Al emplear trabajadoras del hogar, participamos de un sistema que es fundamentalmente injusto; por tanto, debemos tomar posesión de él y trabajar para cambiarlo.&nbsp;</p> <p>Para que las personas empleadoras se conviertan en coconspiradoras, deben empezar a reconocer múltiples verdades. Primero, que la industria del trabajo del hogar en los Estados Unidos está conectada directamente con un legado de esclavitud, y que la supremacía blanca y el patriarcado están profundamente arraigados en su estructura.&nbsp;</p> <p>Segundo, que sin trabajadoras del hogar, muchas personas no podríamos vivir la vida que vivimos. Necesitamos de ellas, ya sea para el cuidado infantil que nos ayuda a balancear nuestro trabajo y nuestras necesidades familiares, o bien para el cuidado que permitirá a nuestros padres envejecer con dignidad. Parte del trabajo que hacemos en Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Network («HIH», por sus siglas en inglés) es ofrecer ayuda a las empleadoras y empleadores para que colaboren en mejorar las condiciones de las trabajadoras en esta industria y, en el mejor de los casos, para convertirse en coconspiradores y transformarla.</p> <p>HIH es una red nacional de empleadoras y empleadores de trabajadoras del hogar para realizar tareas de limpieza, atención y cuidados, que saben que las condiciones laborales respetuosas y dignas benefician tanto a quienes emplean como a quienes son empleadas. En conjunto con organizaciones locales de trabajadoras del hogar y nuestros principales socias, National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA) y Caring Across Generations (CAG), promovemos una visión común de cómo deberían ser el cuidado y apoyo en los hogares para las personas tanto trabajadoras como empleadoras, y de cómo debería ser una sociedad que cuida de su población. Para alcanzar esto, ofrecemos ayuda a las personas empleadoras para mejorar sus prácticas de contratación y para que colaboren con sus trabajadoras en la creación de políticas y directrices culturales que las dignifiquen y respeten tanto a ellas como a todas nuestras comunidades.&nbsp;</p> <p>Nuestro «ingrediente especial» es nuestra interdependencia fundamental. Esto es especialmente relevante frente a la narrativa dominante de una individualidad tóxica que desciende desde los más altos niveles gubernamentales.</p> <p>En una industria donde las cosas suceden —en su sentido más literal— detrás de puertas cerradas, la aprobación de leyes no es suficiente para mejorar las condiciones laborales de las trabajadoras del hogar. La aprobación de la declaración de derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar en siete estados fue una victoria histórica para cientos de miles de personas; sin embargo, su implementación sigue siendo un reto puesto que en esta industria existen condiciones laborales diarias que no han sufrido cambios sustanciales. La materialización de condiciones dignas y justas en los lugares de trabajo depende del conocimiento que tengan las trabajadoras de sus derechos y las personas contratantes de sus obligaciones. La información pública respecto a leyes relevantes ha sido insuficiente y en este punto recae fuertemente sobre los hombros de las organizaciones comunitarias de base. En la mayoría de los casos, las trabajadoras del hogar permanecen aisladas y quienes las contratan siguen siendo quienes fijan los términos del contrato.</p> <p>Por esta razón, HIH inició una campaña pública de información para apoyar la implementación de la Declaración de derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar: My Home is Someone’s Workplace –MHSW (Mi casa es el lugar de trabajo de otra persona). Sus objetivos son: (1) garantizar la implementación de los estándares legales mínimos existentes y ampliados en la Declaración de Derechos, y (2) promover «estándares comunitarios» que establezcan directrices más allá de aquellas legales, y que representen la visión de nuestro movimiento sobre las mejores prácticas laborales en el trabajo del hogar.&nbsp;</p> <p>MHSW es una campaña intensiva y de alto impacto dirigida a las comunidades para aprovechar el ímpetu generado por las victorias de la declaración de derechos en todo el país.&nbsp;Así, esperamos desarrollar un modelo replicable para aprovechar la visibilidad de estas iniciativas legislativas, las cuales enfocan la atención en lugares de trabajo que han estado desatendidos por mucho tiempo. </p> <p>Por medio de esta campaña, se motiva a las personas empleadoras para reconocer que sus hogares son realmente lugares de trabajo y se les incentiva a dejar de referirse a las trabajadoras del hogar como «parte de la familia» (un cambio de paradigma que ofrece un punto de partida muy necesario para la implementación de mejores estándares). Para tener éxito en esta lucha de una industria del trabajo del hogar más justa, HIH debe ir más allá e involucrar al mayor número de personas empleadoras posible. </p> <p>La mayor limitación para nuestro trabajo en MHSW ha sido no poder cambiar la estructura de poder: esta se basa en que las personas empleadoras hagan lo correcto de forma individual, pero no democratiza la distribución de poder en la industria entre quienes contratan y quienes son contratadas. Además, puede limitar a las personas empleadoras que no pueden pagar más y aquellas que tienen dificultades para pagar los servicios que ya reciben. A pesar del mito de que quienes contratan trabajadoras del hogar son personas blancas y ricas, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/lucero-herrera-saba-waheed/dispelling-myths-why-domestic-employer-worker-solidarity-is">las empleadoras y empleadores son un grupo mucho más diverso de lo que pensamos</a>, y los trabajos de cuidado bien pagados son una opción que pocas personas pueden permitirse.</p> <p>Por tanto, aunque cada persona empleadora estuviera perfectamente informada y deseara implementar salarios y condiciones de trabajo justas para sus trabajadoras del hogar, esto no sería posible debido al problema sistémico reinante, sobre cómo se valoran y pagan estos servicios. Las personas empleadoras no deberían soportar la carga que resulta de la ausencia de una infraestructura integral de cuidado para apoyar a las familias, pero tampoco deberían hacerlo las trabajadoras del hogar. Por lo tanto, además de nuestro trabajo informativo, HIH está involucrada en campañas para transformar la industria del cuidado de manera que todos los cuidados a lo largo de la vida sean razonables y accesibles para quienes los necesiten. Los esfuerzos para expandir la asequibilidad son cruciales para conseguir triunfos importantes a nivel legislativo, incluyendo la declaración de derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar.</p> <p>Por consiguiente, HIH organiza a las personas empleadoras para ampliar el acceso y la asequibilidad de los cuidados, con especial atención al apoyo y los cuidados a largo plazo para las personas mayores y con discapacidad en California y Nueva York. Todo esto mientras se construyen los cimientos para campañas de mayor duración por la transformación de este sector en uno que provea de apoyo universal a las necesidades de las familias. Al igual que sucede con la reforma del sistema de salud —y tantas otras problemáticas—, la primera victoria en políticas estatales expande las posibilidades disponibles.&nbsp;</p> <p>Tras las elecciones del 2016, líderes y personal de HIH comenzaron a pensar en cómo las personas empleadoras de trabajadoras del hogar, quienes en su mayoría son mujeres de color y migrantes, podrían ayudar a personas migrantes y otras poblaciones que han sido blancos de esta administración. Creamos y divulgamos los<a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1iM696_2aZGSwV-UpmSgBC_uQgFpY4Vu1T1lg-sXgyR8/edit"> Consejos para personas empleadoras luego de las elecciones</a>, que fueron compartidos y vistos por miles de personas. También lanzamos nuestra campaña Sanctuary Homes en conjunto con NDWA (#SanctuaryHomes) tras haber conversado con nuestras empleadoras y empleadores miembro, así como con personas asociadas y aliadas que representan a las principales comunidades, incluyendo National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA), Cosecha, Mijente, Make the Road NY, y The California Domestic Workers Coalition.</p> <p>La participación en una industria que está tan conectada con la esclavitud y la supremacía blanca es complicada. Sin embargo, creemos que quienes contratan pueden aliarse o coconspirar con las trabajadoras del hogar, cambiar sus prácticas de empleo particulares y organizarse con las trabajadoras para transformar la industria y nuestra sociedad. En nuestro trabajo, continuamos moldeando valores centrales como la interdependencia y accesibilidad y pretendemos cambiar la cultura del movimiento y nuestras comunidades hacia estos valores en común.&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Para efectos de este artículo, utilizamos el término «personas empleadoras» en forma general. En esta categoría incluimos personas que contratan trabajadoras del hogar, aunque estas sean pagadas a través de agencias, el programa Medicaid u otros fondos públicos, de manera que la clientela puede no estar pagando directamente a las trabajadoras.</em></p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi">«Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LOURDES ALBÁN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en">Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/bridget-anderson/entender-el-contexto-interpersonal-y-estructural-del-trabajo-del-hoga">Entender el contexto interpersonal y estructural del trabajo del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BRIDGET ANDERSON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Ilana Berger BTS en Español Wed, 14 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Ilana Berger 120212 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Philanthropy can have blind spots and red lines. We must resist the temptation to sidestep difficult issues when it comes to workers’ rights.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/8763225240_45a9aa466d_k%20%281%29.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Wood factory in Viet Nam. Aaron Santos for ILO/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/iloasiapacific/8763225240/in/photolist-jwqh5i-UT5N3X-eYwS5Y-UFxXKg-TDzbZc-raks3M-dg44wY-dyZiRW-emoyXL-dbRh3Y-mXrJTa-e5zMst-dMJ67e-jwFfkY-NUC2b2-emhF2i-jwzFSk-n9TDCB-dwGqKL-jyQ49Q-dMSY9E-UNJDsQ-qe3k5Z-dkFawY-dkF5Hc-emnPym-cBtGRu-eLEpj8-cBtCgm-dM1axD-nsRUBf-dM1kxg-oQrDFC-mgxogB-hJVQX9-eZxoRU-bwXuNV-dM78dE-dkF7b8-eDG33A-dbPV5R-uSyvhp-dcqpbY-mgEi6H-dMz4eo-drFc6d-ft35aC-dM5xN3-drRB2w-dyYMjJ">Flickr. (cc by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>As a funder working at the intersection of human trafficking and workers rights, I greatly value the landscape analysis and call for collaboration found the new report <a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MklmEG5tOK0XbOIkdFucYTqUddVplR7M/view?usp=sharing">‘Quality Work Worldwide’</a>, recently released by the Ford Foundation and SAGE Fund. As another funder recently reflected, it is especially helpful as a directional map which identifies specific sites for improving the quality of work globally. Equally importantly, it also includes an analysis of specific barriers which can be anticipated, such as investors’ short horizon on profits and lack of global governance, when it comes to changing the direction of our global economy. </p> <p>While both funders and NGOs can benefit greatly from this map, there are still some uncharted areas. &nbsp;In this piece, I identify two additional themes that merit further consideration: </p> <h2>Recognise sex work in the analysis</h2> <p>When we talk about informal work, we too often leave out the sex industry. Like many within society, funders can turn away from sex workers. Because of criminalisation and stigma, even labour rights funders often forget about this large sector, or gravitate towards more palatable causes. </p> <p>Sex workers have been in conditions of precarity long before recent shifts in the economy made headlines. Operating in a hostile environment and without any of the benefits attached to legal employment, sex workers have nevertheless found ways to better their conditions. They’ve done this through collectivisation, unionisation, law reform, self-regulation, peer protection, sharing resources, and early and constant innovation in their use of the internet. Many sex workers embrace the hustle and creativity that is possible in informal work, but also face exploitation and violence that comes from being so marginalised.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Foundations themselves only have money to give away because of corporate profits.</p> <p>As the report states, “informality itself is not a challenge; rather, the lack of rights and protections for these workers – and the stigma surrounding informality – is impeding quality work for billions of workers around the world.” &nbsp;Many of the strategies offered in the report for informal workers, from facilitating peer exchange to tailoring responses to specific sectors, would be valuable for sex workers. Promising work by sex workers to protect their rights should be brought to scale. Including these workers would push the boundaries of our analysis, help us think about who else we are leaving out because of our moral judgments, our undervaluing of feminised labour, or our inability to see all the ways that labour and capital circulate. </p> <p>&nbsp;We should not leave sex workers off the map when it comes to any exploration of the risks and opportunities in the future of work. </p> <h2>Challenging ourselves to challenge corporate power</h2> <p>The power of corporations permeates every aspect of our lives, our economy, and our democracy. The legal buffers separating corporations at the top from workers in their supply chains mean they can turn a blind eye to forced labour and other violations, even while benefitting from this race to the bottom. This report explicitly names the power of corporations, along with the need to build worker power to challenge it through leading models such as worker-driven social responsibility (WSR).</p> <p>But corporate power reaches far beyond the workers whom they employ. Foundations themselves only have money to give away because of corporate profits, and their endowments (usually 95% of their assets) are invested in the world’s capital markets. Corporate foundations are even more tied to the interests of corporations. As Anand Giridharadas argues in his recent book Winner Takes All, philanthropic foundations may talk about “systemic change,” but most philanthropists benefit too much from the system as it stands to really want to change it. &nbsp;</p> <p>A funder strategy to promote workers’ power must acknowledge this tension. This report from the Ford Foundation and SAGE Fund will have even more impact if it compels funders to explore how philanthropy’s relationship with corporations could be used for good. More foundations could be screening for workers’ rights offenders in their investment portfolios, or using their position as shareholders to hold corporations to account. &nbsp;Foundations must also be challenged to move outside our comfort zone: to fund more campaigns that directly challenge corporations and public policy change that puts limits on corporate power. &nbsp;</p> <p>Supporting the kind of transformation that will give everyone access to quality work will require funders to eliminate blinds spots such as sex work, and to confront corporate power, and our own relationship to it. </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Sienna Baskin Tue, 13 Nov 2018 11:09:08 +0000 Sienna Baskin 120556 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Investing in frontline communities builds resilience and increases opportunities for non-exploitative work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/8550275501_11ed58a07c_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Rug-making in Mongolia. Byamba-ochir Byambasuren for ILO/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/iloasiapacific/8550275501/in/photolist-e2yp28-p5jzHH-TAEEfd-drFwmo-drFcrP-nbh6P3-RGgNck-UT6xWZ-e2yp54-jwtc1L-qqZ2sG-dM4eGu-nrwkiA-emoGUE-dM6VFU-U7rJD9-emosuC-cAoiWN-emoyAU-TDymZ4-gJowe7-UFxXWi-jwCFfm-NPUUB6-gJgGGp-dksj9D-dbPJE3-dkF9Ga-drCwfD-dg4Bbp-dbPiQ3-hJVRDu-dMMquT-cAoiTC-dg4GvH-UNJMy9-fTEke3-hJVNb7-emhVvx-V9v4df-cGUjwU-eatEAQ-dM4ixb-gxB6xR-VHLdKY-2cAae28-jYrExA-dMSHSy-jwta75-dMPFx1">Flickr. (cc by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>Our economic globalisation has raised hundreds of millions out of abject poverty. It has also left far too many with far too little. The global labour market teems with workers seeking employment to lift their lives beyond subsistence, yet the contexts in which they search for work make them highly vulnerable to exploitation and abuse. The predatory and pernicious side of economic globalisation thrives on an endless supply of fragmented, marginalised and invisible labour. No sector is immune to this reality because it is a hallmark of our market system. It’s a design feature of the global economy, but it need not be.</p> <p>The statement by the Ford Foundation, Open Society Foundation and Sage Fund properly underscores the challenges presented by our current economic paradigm and draws attention to the various levers that drive and reinforce inequalities. Helpfully, the statement also articulates “opportunity areas” that are primed to address the design feature mentioned above.</p> <p>The Freedom Fund supports work across these opportunity areas. Working towards our mission to end modern slavery, we have a front-row seat to the emergence of powerful solutions for ensuring fairness, equity, and justice for all workers. </p> <p>In Thailand, we work in the seafood sector where labour abuses, including forced and bonded labour, are rife. Migrant workers in the seafood sector scour the seas on fishing vessels for weeks at a time, catching the seafood served in restaurants and sold by retailers across the world. These workers have no bargaining power, no formal recognition and very little social protection. </p> <p>In Ethiopia, we focus on a population of women and girls who, seeking economic opportunity, migrate to the Middle East for domestic work. In transit and on arrival, these women are at high risk of being abused and falling into situations of slavery. Most emigration takes place within an unsafe, irregular system that leaves emigrants vulnerable to physical abuse and sexual violence. </p> <p>In southern India, we work with frontline communities to address labour exploitation in parts of the garment industry. Across the region, tens of thousands of girls and young women have been recruited into fraudulent employment schemes in some of the industry’s cotton spinning mills. These workers are buried so deep in apparel supply chains that global retailers trying to address abuses across their operations claim they have little influence against these instances of exploitation. </p> <p>Across all these contexts, we see how the opportunity areas in the joint funders statement are present. Supporting work along these lines can drive real and meaningful reform.</p> <p>First, we see the drivers that lead to abuse. These include the decentralised nature of economic production; the lack of meaningful economic opportunities in communities around the world; weak education about rights; low commitment and resources from governments to enforce protections; and targeted and destructive efforts to undermine worker organising and power.</p> <p>Next, we see how frontline communities themselves are best placed to address these challenges. It is therefore crucial to invest in the frontlines, including workers and civil society, and to develop solutions with them to tackle the drivers of abuse. This could be by investing in efforts to build worker power, and by supporting workers to organise, claim their rights, and challenge the systems that lead to abuse as we are doing in Thailand. This could also mean investing in community-based economic models, or supporting prevention programmes and alternative livelihoods to build resilience among vulnerable groups as we’re doing in Ethiopia. Finally this could include supporting civil society to advocate and engage with factory owners, global retailers and local officials to drive reforms as we’re doing in southern India. </p> <p>As we embark on this fourth industrial revolution, we must take note of the challenges of work – and their effects on vulnerable workers specifically – in the present. Exploitation thrives across sectors and regions, and our efforts as funders aren’t adding up to enough. We need more action, faster and at scale, to ensure that the future of work is less bleak than the present. The key to success is understanding the contexts and consequences of current economic models, and directing resources to frontline efforts that confront the drivers of exploitation. Only then can we possibly ensure that the future of work is a hopeful one.</p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Amol Mehra Tue, 13 Nov 2018 11:01:48 +0000 Amol Mehra 120554 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Entender el contexto interpersonal y estructural del trabajo del hogar https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/bridget-anderson/entender-el-contexto-interpersonal-y-estructural-del-trabajo-del-hoga <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>La relación entre las trabajadoras del hogar y quienes las emplean puede ser difícil; pero no tiene por qué serlo. <strong><em><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/bridget-anderson/understanding-interpersonal-and-structural-context-of-domestic-work">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/16099754179_6d3caf1989_o.jpg" alt="" width="100%" /><span class="image-caption">Freaktography/Flickr.&nbsp;<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">(CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)</a></span></p><p>Mi interés en el trabajo del hogar surgió cuando dejé la universidad y comencé a ser lo que ahora se llama una trabajadora del hogar interna para una familia adinerada en el oeste de Londres. Por ese entonces, era «la chica de arriba». A cambio del departamento independiente en el piso de arriba, limpiaba y lavaba la ropa durante cuatro horas de lunes a viernes y hacía el té cuando la hija menor llegaba a casa. Pulía la plata y planchaba las sábanas. Después de las fiestas limpiaba el vómito de las personas que luego se convertirían en ministras y ministros del Partido Laborista.</p> <p>Mi empleadora me explicó que alquilaba el departamento a cambio de estos servicios, en vez de ofrecer un salario, porque pensaba que eso sería explotación y ella no quería explotar a nadie. Cuando comencé a trabajar me pareció justo, pero nuestra relación se fue deteriorando. Ella y su esposo estaban en medio de un divorcio. A veces ella se desahogaba conmigo y me contaba todo, para después llamarme la atención al día siguiente por no haber doblado las sábanas correctamente. Cumplía las funciones de confidente y de sirvienta alternativamente según su estado de ánimo.</p> <p>En esa misma época comencé a trabajar con trabajadoras del hogar indocumentadas. No pretendo comparar mi situación con la de ellas: eran mujeres que podían estar escapando de situaciones de vida o muerte, ser golpeadas por poner un suéter en la lavadora o por comer un pedazo de pan, tener prohibido contactar a sus seres queridos, sin tener un salario, sin tener un espacio para dormir, etc.</p> <p>Las empleadoras, quienes con frecuencia les gritaban u obligaban en forma deliberada a realizar tareas humillantes, perpetuaban la mayor parte de la violencia física no sexual. «El esposo, él es muy bueno, pero la mujer es una fiera» me confesó una vez una mujer. La representación de los esposos como los buenos y los reproches hacía las esposas por abusar de sus trabajadoras me dejaba intranquila, al igual que las críticas de algunas trabajadoras del hogar hacia sus empleadoras: «Si yo fuera tan rica como ella, sería ama de casa y no dejaría a mi hijo o hija al cuidado de una extraña».</p> <p>«¿Por qué el patriarcado ha quedado libre de culpa?» Reflexionaba sobre ello incluso cuando yo también prefería al esposo de la familia para la que trabajaba que a la esposa. Sin embargo, tenía claro que las personas que nos empleaban nunca podrían ser nuestras aliadas.</p> <p>Ahora veo que el tema es más complicado. Primero, porque no siempre es fácil distinguir quién es la persona que nos emplea. En muchos hogares heteronormativos, la mujer puede administrar el trabajo del hogar, pero es el hombre quien firma el contrato. Cuando se trata de un trabajo de cuidado, la persona que utiliza el servicio es a veces la empleadora o el empleador y a veces un familiar, y cada persona tiene relaciones e interacciones distintas con la trabajadora. En ocasiones, una agencia emplea formalmente a una trabajadora del hogar, y puede también mediar entre la trabajadora y la persona usuaria del servicio. Asimismo, trabajadoras y empleadoras no son categorías exclusivas o binarias: muchas trabajadoras del hogar inmigrantes utilizan los servicios de trabajadoras del hogar en sus países de origen. Quién contrata, por qué, en qué etapa de la vida, y con qué implicaciones sociales, todo esto varía cultural e históricamente, al igual que la relación de poder entre trabajadora y empleadora.</p> <p>Además, es importante reconocer que incluso en los países ricos, no todos las personas empleadoras son de clase media. Cuando estaba investigando la expansión de la Unión Europea de 2004, realizamos una serie de entrevistas con «au pairs». Recuerdo a una mujer que había trabajado como «au pair» para una familia por más de seis años. Su empleadora era una madre soltera que tenía dos hijos y tenía un trabajo por turnos en un hospital donde le pagaban poco. No tenía familia cerca y su vida habría sido insostenible si no hubiera tenido acceso al apoyo de una persona que viviera en su casa y la ayudara a cambio de un sueldo inferior al salario mínimo. La «au pair» explicó que no se había ido porque le preocupaba qué sería de la familia si ella se iba.</p> <p>El problema de la explotación en el trabajo del hogar no es solo el resultado de personas empleadoras moralmente censurables. Se trata de la dependencia del capitalismo patriarcal en el trabajo reproductivo gratis o de bajo costo, el deterioro de las redes de seguridad social y la feminización de las políticas de austeridad. En este ejemplo, la «au pair» y su empleadora podrían haber sido aliadas en la lucha por mejorar los salarios y las condiciones laborales de trabajadoras y trabajadores en el sector salud, y para mejorar la provisión estatal de guarderías como requisitos necesarios para asegurar que las trabajadoras del hogar no sean explotadas. El truco es comenzar con los derechos de las trabjadoras del hogar, en vez de decir que se garantizarán sus derechos tan pronto como se resuelva todo lo demás.</p> <p>No se puede negar que en los hogares particulares existen conflictos de intereses entre las empleadoras y las trabajadoras del hogar. Estos no se limitan a cuestiones de pago, horario y condiciones de trabajo, sino que también se relacionan con las emociones. La empleadora puede sentirse insegura por el cariño de sus hijas e hijos hacia su niñera o tener ansiedad sobre el estado de envejecimiento de sus padres, sentirse culpable por no estar en casa, frustrada porque la casa no se ha limpiado de la manera que lo habría hecho ella, y preocupada por las atenciones de su esposo. La trabajadora también puede sentirse celosa de las relaciones personales, sentir resentimiento al encontrarse alejada de sus seres queridos mientras está cuidando de otros, o sentirse enfadada por la desigualdad global que hace que ella preste servicios para personas con un estilo de vida inalcanzable para ella. Pero también pueden haber sentimientos positivos en ambos lados y un entendimiento que surge de la convivencia diaria, aunque se debe destacar que esto no necesariamente se refleja en el pago o en las condiciones laborales.</p> <p>He hablado con empleadoras para varios proyectos de investigación, y la mayoría no querían verse como explotadoras que se aprovechaban de una mujer en una situación más vulnerable. Para reconciliar este punto, con frecuencia se apoyan en la noción de «empleo como un favor»: la trabajadora necesita un trabajo y la empleadora beneficia a la trabajadora al proporcionarle un empleo. Entonces la empleadora interpretará la capacidad de su empleada de comprar medicamentos, pagar la escuela de sus hijas e hijos o dejar a un esposo alcohólico como resultado del salario que ha ganado como trabajadora del hogar. En consecuencia, expresan que no solo no perpetúan la desigualdad, sino que también son partícipes de la vida privada de sus trabajadoras y que estas confían en ellas como si fueran algo más que una empleadora.</p> <p>¿Qué tipo de alianza se busca de parte de las empleadoras —a diferencia de otras partes interesadas— en la promoción de los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar? En todo el mundo, las personas empleadoras tienden a ser reacias a reconocer el derecho de las trabajadoras de afiliarse a un sindicato. Pueden dar a las trabajadoras la flexibilidad para asistir a reuniones y eventos políticos; brindarles apoyo para la legalización y la regularización; estar dispuestas a firmar documentos de patrocinio, a pagar impuestos y seguridad social; y tener capacidad de reflexión y discusión. He conocido a trabajadoras del hogar que dicen que ellas sí tienen esta clase de empleadoras o empleadores. Educar y motivarlos para que contribuyan de estas formas y para que entiendan la relación entre lo que sucede en el hogar y las desigualdades estructurales constituye un pequeño paso hacia la eliminación de las desigualdades nacionales, económicas y de género que caracterizan tanto la demanda como la oferta del trabajo del hogar en el mercado.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi">«Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LOURDES ALBÁN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en">Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Bridget Anderson BTS en Español Tue, 13 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Bridget Anderson 120211 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>If philanthropic foundations want to positively affect the lives of workers, then they should use their money to hold the powerful to account and to help workers be heard.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/37446145875_b42f29e792_b.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Overview shot of the 2017 Salzburg Global Seminar 'Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy'. Salzburg Global Seminar/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/salzburgglobal/37446145875/in/photolist-Z3ZhyK-85Gv4R-qq1oA1-bWmD5u-bULE7a-YMLZVW-hbx8uc-XKFBYb-9y5Dsn-YLdtJh-9pnkpB-XKFztG-9pqrc3-W9coMq-Z3Zf5B-2aNpLwZ-9pnpkg-9pqpbq-9iVGax-e6iBzj-7Q41D9-jCvvmb-6GRZ35-k7kDgn-6GLHUX-hbvWHh-5GpZNt-e6cYDg-9pppXv-hfjjsN-bzDrxx-zhGzy-9Fy2Fb-YMM16f-5HLmt9-8ebPRk-6TyeUF-dAoRnd-dYmQn3-4pwt1h-9pqn6U-yt2vf-xSr8Bj-6s921h-6GS6EL-6dPHPq-yNsvqG-8ccmVP-6V72hz-zhGR5">Flickr. (cc by-nc-nd)</a> </p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>Three funders – the Ford Foundation, the Sage Fund, and Open Society Foundations – <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement">recently wrote about their strategic priorities when funding interventions</a> in the world of work. The Ford Foundation was the most detailed, identifying their five areas for strategic interventions as follows:</p> <style> ol li {margin-bottom:12px;} </style> <ol> <li>Changing company practices and behaviour;&nbsp;</li> <li>Influencing investment;&nbsp;</li> <li>Establishing international standards and norms;&nbsp;</li> <li>Strengthening and enforcing labour laws;&nbsp;</li> <li>Organising workers to build voice and power.</li> </ol> <p>My assessment is that the conventional human rights framework – the third strategy on this list – requires reinforcing. Despite all of the talk of new and different approaches, there remains considerable value to actually holding governments accountable for existing standards which they&nbsp; have agreed to uphold, yet frequently fail to do so. The final strategy – organising workers – also deserves special emphasis and needs further funding to amplify and transmit workers’ voices.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Despite all of the talk of new and different approaches, there remains considerable value to actually holding governments accountable for existing standards.</p> <h2>We still need more accountability!</h2> <p>Reinforcing the human rights framework means holding governments to account for: </p> <ol> <li>Their failure to implement the positive measures required to protect certain human rights. There is much more to this than criminalising human trafficking, forced labour, and other workplace abuses; </li> <li>The measures they <em>have implemented</em> that effectively prevent certain categories of workers from exercising their rights, such as migrant workers and domestic workers.&nbsp; </li> </ol> <p>Like all strategies, this approach needs some fine-tuning. It should avoid supporting initiatives at the United Nations that go around in circles or do not result in binding agreements. Instead, it should explicitly identify what all governments must do in order to stop gross exploitation and discrimination. Some judgments by regional human rights courts are already doing this.</p> <p>Furthermore, as labour inspectors around the world are routinely under-resourced, this is a sector that requires monitoring, as well as technical innovation. Monitoring both the resources provided to labour inspectors (and other enforcement agencies operating in the world of work) and the way they perform is crucial, but they can only begin to function properly with adequate funding. We shouldn’t assume that only rich businesses or philanthropists can take on the job of enforcing laws against extreme exploitation and labour abuse. </p> <p>Interventions are already underway on all five strategic areas. There is a danger that the first four of the five result too easily in ‘top down’ approaches and ‘one size fits all’ solutions, when the world’s cultural diversity requires more heterogeneous solutions. This diversity tends to be glossed over, especially when global capital as a whole is held responsible for most ills. Priority should be given to ‘horizontal’ rather than ‘vertical’ approaches, whereas today it’s too often the other way around.</p> <p>We have learned from experience that ‘one size fits all’ solutions tend to be deformed once they are implemented at local level. A small business supplying a global brand might, for example, satisfy the brand’s requirement of “no child labour” by discriminating against young workers (banning anyone under 18 from its workplace). Similarly, we hear of migrants who spend fortunes to move from one part of the world to another, only to be sent home again in the name of ‘saving’ them from the clutches of traffickers or other criminals. Such stories demonstrate how some programmes or policies do tremendous damage to the individuals involved. Yet it remains surprisingly difficult to secure funding to document these negative effects. There needs to be an open acknowledgment when interventions do not work, yet funders and civil society organisations tend to close ranks in ways which make it hard to change course when mistakes have been made. </p> <h2>Workers need a greater voice!</h2> <p>The fifth strategy listed by the Ford Foundation – amplifying the voice and influence of young and old workers, migrant workers, and returnee migrants – is vital. Conventionally this was done by promoting freedom of association and collective bargaining, and trusting that trade unions would transmit the workers’ voices. However, experience has shown that this is not enough: many workers go unrepresented and the trade union structures at the international level are sometimes part of the top-down problem.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">It is relatively easy to be accurate about the abusive experiences reported by workers. It is more dangerous when intermediaries impose their own bias on the proposed remedies.</p> <p>Paying attention to “workers’ voice” implies an openness to alternatives outside of conventional trade unions. Such methods include, for example, consulting workers confidentially (i.e. without their employers or supervisors being aware of the consultations) and summarising their messages in different ways for different audiences. This should prevent packaging their words only for people who have influence (i.e. vertical communication), and help make relevant messages available to other workers (the horizontal audience). Improving access to accurate information empowers workers. We saw this in the way farmers in parts of Africa were empowered when they first obtained mobile telephones. Once they were able to check on prices in different markets, they were able to reduce their dependence on the buyers who came to their farms. &nbsp;</p> <p>Transmitting workers’ voice raises numerous ethical issues, especially if support for alternatives has the side effect of undermining the influence of unions. Is it possible for either workers’ leaders or non-workers (such as activists and researchers) to interpret workers’ voice correctly and honestly? It is relatively easy to be accurate about the abusive experiences reported by workers. It is more dangerous when intermediaries impose their own bias on the proposed remedies. Further finance is needed to develop innovative methods to transmit and amplify workers’ voices, focusing on methods that do not leave workers or migrants dependent on yet another broker who manipulates the message. The popular refrain of ‘giving voice to the voiceless’ misses the point entirely. People who are exploited are not voiceless, so we need to be cautious when we claim to speak on their behalf. </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/tom-hunt/new-podcast-future-of-trade-unions">NEW PODCASTS: The future of trade unions – masterclass series</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/igor-bosc/round-about-solutions-to-forced-labour-don-t-work">Why roundabout solutions to forced labour don’t work</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/michael-dottridge/eight-reasons-why-we-shouldn-t-use-term-modern-slavery">Eight reasons why we shouldn’t use the term ‘modern slavery’</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/mike-dottridge-neil-howard/how-not-to-achieve-sustainable-development-goal">How not to achieve a sustainable development goal</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Mike Dottridge Mon, 12 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Mike Dottridge 120462 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Aprender de la historia del trabajo de las mujeres puede ayudarnos a superar la discriminación y mejorar las condiciones laborales en la economía de los pequeños encargos. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/abigail-hunt/back-to-future-women-s-work-and-gig-economy">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/32847731616_351931eb4c_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">An Ethiopian domestic worker in Beirut, Lebanon. Joe Saade for UN Women/Flickr. (CC 2.0 by-nc-nd)</p> <p>«El futuro del trabajo» es <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/issue/magazine/2017/02/24/magazine-index-20170226">noticia</a> y el debate capta interés en los círculos políticos. Y con razón: una falta persistente de trabajo digno a nivel global está afectando en forma negativa los ingresos y, por consiguiente, los estándares de vida. Encarar esto es un desafío cada vez más crítico para la clase política alrededor del mundo, a la luz del latente cambio demográfico y la aceptación del aumento del desempleo como algo habitual.</p> <p>En la <a href="http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_protect/---protrav/---travail/documents/publication/wcms_443267.pdf">economía de los pequeños encargos</a>, en la cual las compañías teconológicas desarrollan plataformas a través de las cuales se puede contratar a personas para realizar tareas definidas, el debate suele centrarse en las maneras en las que la «Uberización» está diseñada para cambiar profundamente las formas tradicionales de organizar el consumo y el empleo. Pero no deberíamos permitir que el resplandor de la nueva tecnología nos ciegue: la economía de los pequeños encargos es, a la larga, un vino viejo en botella nueva.</p> <p>Un evento de la <a href="http://www.ethicaltrade.org/events/future-work-what-does-it-hold-workers-rights">Iniciativa de Comercio Ético</a> —naturalmente, acerca del futuro del trabajo— constituyó un espacio importante para la reflexión. Apoyándose en décadas de investigación, el profesor <a href="http://www2.le.ac.uk/colleges/ssah/research/cswef/staff/professor-peter-nolan">Peter Nolan</a> sentó las bases para argumentar que la «futurología» (o el negocio de predecir tendencias y resultados en el mundo laboral) suele estar disociado del análisis de las tendencias del mercado laboral histórico y de un estudio empírico de lo que ocurre en el presente.</p> <p>Asimismo, en nuestra investigación en el <a href="https://www.odi.org/">Instituto de Desarrollo de Ultramar</a> (ODI por sus siglas en inglés) sobre las experiencias de las mujeres en la economía de pequeños encargos, descubrimos que en muchos aspectos esta economía reproduce los desafíos de género existentes en el mundo laboral, aunque en nuevas formas facilitadas por la tecnología. A continuación, ofrecemos un par de ejemplos.</p> <h2>Los perfiles en las plataformas perpetúan la discriminación</h2> <p>El diseño de la plataforma suele perpetuar la discriminación existente contra las trabajadoras y los trabajadores. Nuestra <a href="https://www.odi.org/publications/10658-good-gig-rise-demand-domestic-work">investigación</a> inspeccionó plataformas de trabajo del hogar —como cocinar, limpiar y a veces de cuidado personal— en India, Kenia, México y Sudáfrica. El trabajo del hogar ya es uno de los sectores más inseguros y explotadores a nivel global, en el que la fuerza laboral está formada de manera desproporcionada por mujeres de grupos marginalizados o minoritarios.</p> <p>Descubrimos que, como en muchos modelos de la economía de los pequeños encargos, las plataformas de trabajo del hogar permiten a la clientela acceder a <a href="https://domestly.com/cleaners/cape-town/city-bowl/">los perfiles</a> de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores y que estas muestran sus imágenes y otra información demográfica. Esto significa que los hogares que contratan personal del hogar pueden realizar su selección en base a características diferentes de sus capacidades para la tarea, como la edad, el género, la raza o su origen étnico.</p> <p>Además, los sistemas de evaluación que se utilizan en los hogares para calificar la calidad de la tarea completada suelen estar integrados a los perfiles de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores. Aun así, <a href="https://lawreview.uchicago.edu/page/social-costs-uber">estos sistemas pueden exponer a las personas trabajadoras a la discriminación</a> ya que las evaluaciones son muy subjetivas y probablemente estén influenciadas por las parcialidades de la persona que evalúa y sus actitudes discriminatorias. Los efectos de esto en las personas trabajadoras que suelen tener dificultades son reales porque las críticas negativas afectan las decisiones de otros hogares para contratar a esa persona o no. En resumen, una crítica que no sea elogiosa puede desfavorecer seriamente a las oportunidades económicas de las personas trabajadoras en el mercado de las plataformas abarrotadas, donde el suministro de personal suele sobrepasar la demanda de sus servicios.</p> <h2>Trabajo digital a destajo desde casa </h2> <p>El «crowdwork» (subcontratación masiva en proyectos colaborativos) digital también comporta desafíos. Contempla plataformas en línea que conectan globalmente a las personas trabajadoras con tareas como etiquetar imágenes, desarrollar bases de datos o transcribir documentos. Estas son completadas y entregadas por internet a compradores —frecuentemente anónimos— dentro de un sistema de remuneración sobre la base del número de tareas completadas. En muchos aspectos, este trabajo es muy parecido al trabajo a destajo desde casa que se extendió a lo largo de los países en desarrollo varias décadas atrás, cuando la producción en el exterior y las cadenas de producción globales se afianzaron. El trabajo del hogar suele ser trabajo de mujeres, y <a href="http://www.wiego.org/sites/wiego.org/files/publications/files/IEMS-Sector-Full-Report-Street-Vendors.pdf">recientemente fue valorado en </a>&nbsp;un porcentaje estimado del 32% del empleo total de las mujeres en India.</p> <p>Al igual que el trabajo del hogar tradicional, los datos precisos de «crowdwork» son difíciles de conseguir. Los estudios sugieren que entre el <a href="http://www.feps-europe.eu/assets/778d57d9-4e48-45f0-b8f8-189da359dc2b/crowd-working-survey-netherlands-finalpdf.pdf">46</a>% y el<a href="http://www.uni-europa.org/2016/02/16/crowdworking-survey-reveails-the-true-size-of-the-uks-gig-economy/">54</a>% de las trabajadoras y trabajadores colaborativos de los países desarrollados son mujeres. Este porcentaje suele ser menor en los países en desarrollo debido a <a href="http://webfoundation.org/2016/10/digging-into-data-on-the-gender-digital-divide/">las diferencias de género significativas en</a> la actividad digital. Sin embargo, lo más importante es que mientras <a href="http://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/employment-and-growth/independent-work-choice-necessity-and-the-gig-economy">los datos disponibles</a> sugieren casi una igualdad de género en la participación, los hombres tienen más posibilidades de participar por voluntad propia.</p> <p><a href="https://www.odi.org/comment/10498-international-calls-innovation-support-women-refugees-who-want-work">Nuestra investigación actual</a> sobre la economía de los pequeños encargos en Jordania sugiere que es probable que la participación de las mujeres en esta nueva variedad de trabajo desde casa aumente rápidamente. Se percibe como particularmente adecuado para las mujeres, debido a las normas socioculturales que restringen la movilidad y el compromiso con trabajos remunerados fuera del hogar, y su flexibilidad también permite a las mujeres continuar con el cuidado no remunerado del hogar. Aun así, <a href="http://www.wiego.org/informal-economy/occupational-groups/home-based-workers">la historia de las trabajadoras del hogar</a> a nivel global nos dice que aunque el trabajo colaborativo pueda proporcionar una oportunidad para que las mujeres aumenten su participación en el mercado laboral, puede que este trabajo ni sea digno ni fortalecedor.</p> <p>Las condiciones laborales pueden ser extremadamente malas, las ganancias del trabajo a destajo suelen ser bajas y las desiguales debido al valor fluctuante de la cadena de demanda, y la invisibilidad y el aislamiento de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores complica la organización y las negociaciones.&nbsp;<a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1024258916687250">La evidencia emergente</a> sobre el trabajo colaborativo no contradice esta experiencia. Superar las barreras de la participación femenina en el mercado laboral y administrar el trabajo remunerado y no remunerado no debería significar el desplazamiento de las mujeres a un trabajo remunerado precario y aislado.</p> <p>La economía de pequeños encargos también presenta nuevos ángulos en desafíos antiguos. En particular, la organización de trabajo colaborativo supone un desafío para regular la mejora de las condiciones laborales en las cadenas de valor digitales facilitadas por el trabajo colaborativo. Las plataformas son conocidas por evitar la regulación laboral al usar modelos de «contratistas independientes», la naturaleza transnacional del trabajo colaborativo hace que sea difícil identificar la jurisdicción nacional responsable, y las leyes de trabajo nacionales rara vez se aplican a las trabajadoras y los trabajadores. Esto, sumado a los desafíos históricos afrontados por las trabajadoras y los trabajadores del hogar en la organización y su invisibilidad (no ajena) a los encargados, sugiere que se necesitan medidas urgentes si se pretende que las trabajadoras y los trabajadores colaborativos progresen.</p> <h2>Cómo triunfar en la economía de los pequeños encargos </h2> <p>Como las plataformas de la economía de pequeños encargos se vuelven cada vez más prominentes, se necesita prestar suma atención a las políticas para garantizar que los derechos laborales ganados con esfuerzo no retrocedan, y que las oportunidades de esta economía beneficien a todas y todos – y no solo a las compañías y a quienes consumen en las plataformas servicios baratos con solo oprimir un botón.</p> <p>Como se argumentó en esta serie, garantizar que <a href="http://speri.dept.shef.ac.uk/2017/04/18/its-time-to-regulate-the-gig-economy/">las regulaciones laborales</a> sean adecuadas para su propósito en la era de la economía de los pequeños encargos es crítico. Pero la tecnología de las plataformas también es prometedora para superar los desafíos y mejorar las condiciones laborales, si aprendemos de la historia. Las compañías de las plataformas podrían incorporar igualdad y justicia en las plataformas al omitir la información demográfica y sólo incluir la experiencia laboral y otra información relacionada al trabajo en las páginas de perfiles. Este sería un buen comienzo para abordar la discriminación arraigada.</p> <p>La falta de estadísticas sobre las trabajadoras y los trabajadores del hogar ha contribuido a su invisibilidad frente a quienes diseñan y aprueban las políticas. Las plataformas podrían cambiar esto ya que son una gran fuente de datos. Contienen información detallada de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores y de sus actividades, y por lo tanto podrían ofrecer una gran oportunidad para entender y mejorar las condiciones laborales si esa información estuviera disponible. Además, las trabajadoras y los trabajadores del hogar que entrevistamos apreciaron, por primera vez, la posibilidad de poder monitorear las horas trabajadas y sus ganancias a través de la plataforma. Desarrollar otros aspectos orientados a las personas trabajadoras como los <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2016/04/26/all-mobile-phones-in-india-to-have-panic-buttons-to-improve-wome/">botones de emergencia</a> puede aumentar su seguridad de forma inmediata.</p> <p>La tecnología digital también proporciona nuevas maneras para que las trabajadoras y los trabajadores se comuniquen y se organicen para mejorar las condiciones. Los sindicatos como la <a href="http://www.sewa.org/index.asp">Asociación de Trabajadoras Autónomas (SEWA)</a> de India han organizado a personas trabajadoras marginalizadas cuando los sindicatos tradicionales les han fallado. Ayudarles a adaptarse a la economía de los pequeños encargos es crítico, en particular porque sus partidarias y partidarios principales se encuentren trabajando cada vez más a través de estas plataformas.</p> <p>Finalmente, las &nbsp;personas trabajadoras se están integrando cada vez más en las <a href="http://platformcoop.net/">cooperativas de plataformas</a> que se adueñan de y controlan la tecnología como <a href="https://www.upandgo.coop/">Up &amp; Go</a>, una plataforma de servicios de limpieza del hogar en la ciudad de Nueva York. Si la economía de los pequeños encargos actual controlada por compañías le falla a las personas trabajadoras, por qué no brindar un modelo de trabajo bien establecido y actualizado en un mundo cada vez más digital.</p> <p>Si se puede aprender algo del pasado no hay ninguna razón por la cual las mujeres no puedan beneficiarse de la llegada de la tecnología digital que conecta a las trabajadoras y los trabajadores a oportunidades económicas. Como muestra nuestra investigación, existen pasos positivos que las personas trabajadoras, las plataformas, los sindicatos, las asociaciones de mujeres y la clase política pueden dar. Si podemos adoptar medidas, y rápido, entonces podremos garantizar que las mujeres puedan gozar de un trabajo de buena calidad en la economía de los pequeños encargos.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Abigail Hunt BTS en Español Mon, 12 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Abigail Hunt 120210 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Change incentives, change the outcomes: three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Companies have little reason to prioritise workers’ rights over profit. It’s up to us to change that.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/3467605421_1c09647ce4_b.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Ranjit Bhaskar for Al Jazeera English/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/aljazeeraenglish/3467605421/in/photolist-6hqohn-fomiSx-8Cr6Cr-fomGee-fomT6x-22nh4RN-6nJCtC-7y6n8-fmw21Y-bHpHZx-jEcFMe-29xG6V-f7Y6iq-oc7eTH-f7GEHD-f7Hjjk-bdhaJF-dwAXpx-buuVmE-f7H5ik-63GpYj-f7WULN-f7XQfy-fmgRpz-jpXKnz-qi8oVC-bqw8Am-f7WTk9-fDfJ6v-buuWfo-poqJ87-aHEc7p-eKqBkZ-XkoJvZ-bs58aM-izaKV-nT92hX-oV87TZ-dwGqYo-p9RsaS-9hxxyE-nwDE8Z-o8LKT6-ofis8H-fomwQB-prsRQh-6huxSj-oaQ5VD-ffhzX5-2cpffYk">Flickr. (cc by-sa)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>When I co-founded the fair labour company FSI Worldwide in 2006, my colleagues and I thought that we were in the vanguard of an ethical business revolution. The illegal and unethical practices of recruiters were well known by then, and we sensed that the tide was turning on the issue of workers’ rights in global supply chains. It seemed there was a growing willingness and ability on the part of governments, businesses, and consumers to properly invest in better protections for vulnerable workers. </p> <p>We were wrong. </p> <p>Global corporate demand for our services, which seek to provide migrant workers to employers willing to offer safe and protected employment, remains a tiny fraction of the overall market. Only a handful of multinational companies have been prepared to elevate ethical practice over rhetoric and invest in the services provided by companies like ours.</p> <p>While we applaud the companies that have invested, it is troubling that 12 years after our founding we are still offering plaudits to businesses simply for acting within the bounds of legal and ethical compliance. Yet this remains the case, in large part because those of us working for greater corporate responsibility and accountability have little in the way of leverage. We are effectively reduced to appealing to the better angels of corporate nature. While some companies engage, too many others conclude that the financial costs of cleaning up their supply chains outweigh any potential benefits in tackling the abuse of workers. </p> <p>There are no easy or quick fixes to this problem. Progress will only come when we have fully appreciated the scale of the challenge and identified effective levers for change. There have been many thoughtful and helpful responses to this round table so far, most of which I agree with wholeheartedly. The problems we face are multi-dimensional and require several layers of intervention. In my view three potential levers of change stand out.</p> <style> ol li {margin-bottom:12px;} </style> <ol> <li><strong>Concerted political action:</strong> Three decades of neo-liberal deregulation have resulted in a transnational race to the bottom on consumer price. Worker welfare and environmental protections have been sacrificed in the cause of higher shareholder returns. Frameworks like the <a href="https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/2">United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights</a> have attempted to arrest this fall, but national politicians generally remain either unable to meaningfully restrain corporate activity or choose not to do so. This needs to change, but no one country can do it in isolation. We need to see serious, multilateral engagement between governments in the Global North and the Global South to produce and robustly enforce common standards of protection for workers and the environment. </li> <li><strong>Smarter laws, better enforced:</strong> There has been some progress – notably in the United States, the United Kingdom, and France – on transnational corporate accountability legislation. However, these laws have little power to enforce standards, and the transparency provisions in the UK Modern Slavery Act 2015 are especially light-touch. We need to see more ‘failure to prevent’ provisions that penalise inaction and shift the evidential burden onto companies. There is precedent for this in Section 7 of the <a href="https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/23/contents">UK Bribery Act 2010</a>, which states that a company is automatically liable for any bribery discovered in their operation, unless they can prove that they had in place reasonable measures to prevent such bribery. This could be applied to cases of modern slavery and doing so would compel companies to take much greater responsibility for the protection of workers in their operations.</li> <li><strong>Nudging better behaviour:</strong> The procurement practices of very large buyers can reshape how suppliers are treated and how they, in turn, recruit and manage their workers. Since governments are frequently very large buyers, they have the capacity, currently under-utilised, to shift markets in ways that prioritise ‘best value’ outcomes that incorporate human rights concerns over lowest cost bids. One way this could work is via a points system: demonstrably ethical companies are rewarded with better payment terms and procurement selection priority when it comes to government contracts. Companies who consistently fail to demonstrate proper compliance would be downgraded or blacklisted from government contracts. A standardised system would need to be created and effective monitoring imposed, but these procedural challenges can be overcome with sufficient, if currently lacking, political will.</li> </ol> <p>Ultimately, we should not be facilitating competition on worker welfare. We need global minimum standards that are robustly enforced to create a level commercial playing field. This would allow ethically minded entrepreneurs to compete and would decrease the advantages currently accruing to companies engaged in a race to the bottom. This is a long way from the current system of deregulation, global corporate impunity, and fig-leaf attempts at reform. Yet it is possible if we are willing to disrupt entrenched, privileged, and powerful vested interests. </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/ilc/benjamin-selwyn/promoting-decent-work-in-supply-chains-interview-with-benjamin-selwyn">Promoting decent work in supply chains? An interview with Benjamin Selwyn</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/ilc/sharan-burrow/global-supply-chains-what-does-labour-want">Global supply chains: what does labour want?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery James Sinclair Fri, 09 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 James Sinclair 120463 at https://www.opendemocracy.net «Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Un enfoque crítico del trabajo del hogar basado en nuestras experiencias vividas. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/dws/lourdes-alb-n/few-steps-forward-still-long-way-to-go-old-issues-new-movements">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img width="100%" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/9686358644_75690ebe36_o.jpg" /><span class="image-caption">Members of the Asociacion de Trabajadoras Remuneradas del Hogar outside Ecuador's national assembly. IDWF/Flickr. (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)</span></p><p>La situación de las trabajadoras del hogar remuneradas en Ecuador ha sido, y sigue siendo, un tema crítico. A pesar saber que nuestros derechos como seres humanos y personas trabajadoras son violados diariamente, muchas de nosotras elegimos soportar condiciones de abuso, explotación y discriminación por la necesidad económica y la responsabilidad de cuidar de nuestras familias.</p> <p>Además del cuidado de los hogares de las familias que nos emplean, muchas somos cabeza de familia de nuestros hogares, lo cual implica una gran cantidad de responsabilidades adicionales. Cada mes, tenemos que pagar el alquiler y otros costes de la vivienda social (es decir, si tenemos la suerte de obtener vivienda asistida por el gobierno). Además de estos gastos, debemos contabilizar los costos de salud, alimentos y vestimenta, así como gastos básicos de electricidad, agua, teléfono, internet —con el avance de la tecnología, el internet se ha vuelto indispensable para la educación de nuestras hijas y nuestros hijos— y el costo del transporte diario para nuestras familias y para nosotras mismas. Para cubrir estos gastos, necesitamos una fuente de ingresos, y sin educación o capacitación profesional nuestra única opción es encontrar trabajo en hogares, lo que no garantiza condiciones adecuadas, ni un tratamiento y pago justos.</p> <p>Muchas de nosotras migramos desde áreas rurales a las grandes ciudades desde una edad muy temprana en busca de oportunidades laborales, con la intención de lograr estabilidad económica para nuestras familias y para nosotras mismas. Debemos educar a nuestras hijas e hijos, ya que no queremos que estén sujetos a las mismas condiciones de trabajo, humillación y abuso tanto psicológicos como físicos, incluido el abuso sexual por parte de quienes nos emplean o sus hijos. Queremos que nuestras hijas e hijos estén cualificados, tengan una profesión, mejores oportunidades laborales y una mejor calidad de vida.</p> <p>El trabajo del hogar comporta una multitud de responsabilidades: estamos a cargo de cocinar alimentos, tareas domésticas generales y cuidar de las mascotas y familiares de quienes nos emplean. No es la naturaleza del trabajo del hogar lo que es terrible, sino las condiciones y circunstancias que enfrentamos en él: la falta de suministros adecuados para realizar nuestras tareas, la exposición a los riesgos y las enfermedades profesionales que pueden resultar de este tipo de trabajo. Quienes nos emplean deben entender que somos personas como ellas, con derechos y responsabilidades, y que también tenemos familias que nos necesitan y nos esperan. Deben empezar a tratar nuestro trabajo con la dignidad e importancia que merece, y reconocer que también contribuimos a la economía del país. Después de todo, es nuestro trabajo lo que les permite salir, trabajar y mejorar su propia condición económica.</p> <h2>Trabajo del hogar bajo relaciones de poder</h2> <p>Las mujeres realizan la mayor parte del trabajo del hogar, lo cual no sorprende dado que históricamente se ha considerado que sus funciones son en gran parte reproductivas. Han sido perpetuamente subestimadas por un sistema y una cultura patriarcales, en las cuales los hombres son vistos como los únicos agentes sociales, económicos, culturales y políticamente productivos en sus hogares. Esto provoca con frecuencia que las mujeres, ya sean niñas o jóvenes adultas, se sienten inferiores y dependientes de los hombres, con independencia de la importancia de la contribución económica que hagan a sus familias. Esto es especialmente cierto para las mujeres de bajos ingresos, que son más vulnerables a la explotación, la discriminación y las violaciones de los derechos humanos.</p> <p>También se espera que las trabajadoras del hogar muestren gratitud por su trabajo en hogares de élite, en lugar de abogar por mejorar sus condiciones laborales. La «<em>patrona»</em> es la señora de la casa, es decir, la que tiene poder, dinero y respeto. Ella decide cuánto y cuándo le pagará a la «<em>criada</em>» o «<em>sirvienta</em>», que no puede protestar por miedo a ser echada a la calle. El hecho es que esta fórmula de poder en gran parte no se cuestiona, y contribuye a que el trabajo del hogar sea infravalorado e invisibilizado.</p> <p>Además, este desequilibrio de poder facilita el camino hacia la discriminación, el racismo, la desigualdad —con respecto a la clase, la etnia y el género—, el acoso sexual y el abuso; no solo en el hogar, sino también a nivel sistémico. Estas relaciones de poder desiguales, que a menudo generan violencia de género y discriminación de mujer a mujer, han sido reproducidas y normalizadas por nuestra sociedad. Como tal, han transcurrido décadas sin ningún intento serio de crear y respetar leyes para proteger a las mujeres en este sector.</p> <h2>Organizándonos como un camino para reclamar nuestros derechos</h2> <p>Históricamente en Ecuador, los derechos de las trabajadoras domésticas no han sido reconocidos. Hemos tenido que soportar largas jornadas de trabajo, inestabilidad laboral, falta de acceso a la seguridad social, no tener contratos ni días de vacaciones ni acceso a los beneficios que otras personas trabajadoras reciben del gobierno y de la sociedad.</p> <p>Ha habido muchos casos de empleadoras y empleadores que violan nuestros derechos humanos y laborales. Actualmente, a muchas de nosotras no se nos paga el salario mínimo legal y no tenemos contratos de trabajo en los cuales confiar para nuestra protección. Muchas de nuestras empleadoras y empleadores exigen que trabajemos a través de contratos de servicio informal, los cuales les exime de su responsabilidad de proporcionarnos bonos del 13º mes, vacaciones pagas y seguro de salud.</p> <p>Estos temas y la precariedad general del trabajo del hogar inspiraron en 1997 a un grupo de <em>compañeras</em> a reunirse en la ciudad de Guayaquil, Ecuador, para crear la Asociación de Trabajadoras Remuneradas del Hogar (ATRH), una asociación que lucha por la defensa del trabajo, el género y los derechos humanos de las trabajadoras del hogar con miembros de Guayas, Manabí, Los Ríos, Pichincha, y Esmeraldas, entre otras provincias.</p> <p>A través de diferentes medios de comunicación, las personas miembros y fundadoras de la ATRH han podido informarse sobre los derechos laborales y la seguridad social, entre otros temas de interés, y han educado a sus pares. También pudieron utilizar este conocimiento para proporcionar orientación gratuita a las miembros que sufrieron diversas violaciones de los derechos humanos.</p> <p>Otras ONG como FOS Solidaridad Socialista, Centro de Solidaridad Sindical de Finlandia SASK y Care International nos han proporcionado asesoría y apoyo económico, lo que ha desempeñado un papel crucial en el desarrollo y funcionamiento de nuestras actividades. En la actualidad, la organización está luchando por mantenerse económicamente ya que su única fuente de financiamiento es limitada y proviene de SASK.</p> <p>Hemos tenido reuniones con el Ministerio de Relaciones Laborales de Ecuador, el Instituto Ecuatoriano de Seguridad Social y otros departamentos para abogar por los derechos de las trabajadoras de nuestro sector. El 20 de junio de 2016, después de una larga lucha de 18 años, se estableció el Sindicato Único Nacional de Trabajadoras Remuneradas del Hogar (SINUTRHE) con el objetivo de garantizar el cumplimiento de los derechos de las trabajadoras en el sector del trabajo del hogar.</p> <p>Además, en 2013, Ecuador ratificó el Convenio sobre las trabajadoras y los trabajadores del hogar de la OIT (C 189) con el apoyo unánime de la Asamblea Nacional. Nosotras, las mujeres de ATHR, también somos parte de la Central Única de Trabajadores (CUT). Estos hitos indican que el gobierno de Ecuador y sus diferentes ministerios, así como varias ONG importantes, están dispuestas a apoyar la lucha por los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar.</p> <h2>Progreso, paso a paso</h2> <p>En 2008, el marco jurídico legal para las trabajadoras del hogar cambió de manera positiva bajo el mandato del presidente Rafael Correa y la nueva constitución escrita de la República del Ecuador. El gobierno elevó y reglamentó los salarios de nuestra clase trabajadora, de un salario injusto a uno básico, unificando el salario de todas las trabajadoras y trabajadores. No existen normas específicas para el sector del cuidado del hogar, ya que las trabajadoras del sector se rigen por el Código del Trabajo y, por lo tanto, se supone que tienen los mismos derechos que el resto.</p> <p>De 2008 a 2017, el salario mínimo aumentó de 180 a 375 dólares estadounidenses por mes. De acuerdo con el código, lo mínimo que podemos hacer es un salario básico unificado para un día completo de trabajo, además de horas extras después de ocho horas de trabajo, independientemente de si la trabajadora es interna. De manera adicional, ahora tenemos derecho a afiliarnos al Instituto Ecuatoriano de Seguridad Social, bonificaciones, fondos de reserva, vacaciones pagadas, derechos de salud y otros beneficios establecidos por la ley.</p> <p>Las trabajadoras del hogar también están protegidas por los artículos 243 y 244 del Código Penal Orgánico Integral en Ecuador, que penaliza a quienes al emplearlas no las afilien al Instituto Ecuatoriano de Seguridad Social o no cumplan con las inspecciones de trabajo a nivel nacional. Las trabajadoras del hogar también pueden tener contratos permanentes a tiempo parcial, y así tener acceso a los mismos derechos y beneficios que las trabajadoras a tiempo completo.&nbsp;</p> <p>El avance continuo de los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar depende en gran medida de un esfuerzo conjunto entre las personas asociadas y las trabajadoras de nuestra asociación, el SINUTRHE, el gobierno y la sociedad en general, para garantizar que se cumplan las leyes y se respeten nuestros derechos laborales y humanos.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Lourdes Albán BTS en Español Thu, 08 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Lourdes Albán 120209 at https://www.opendemocracy.net From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Sex workers in the UK are by now just another part of the online, freelance, customer-reviewed digital economy. Their story of how they got there exposes a dangerous shift.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/43661673852_dce214ea7b_o_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Sex workers demonstrate in London in July 2018 against a possible prohibition of online advertising for sex work. juno mac/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/166033858@N08/43661673852/in/photolist-9SFECN-H2DgGv-avdgZ5-aDycRR-aDycRH-4vdnxD-aDycRT-aYodsg-eLptJB-T2fsqi-RJHAkw-8KSFid-SXCD31-SqwS4-SMu3aC-5tkWTc-GmbpgL-ZXFvNq-Z4wU5Z-GqDrPr-6DLTVA-28v7E3m-9q8uJr-C2dBA-6DGJXP-8FkN4F-dNDTBt-aDycRP-dNKuKy-7VjGYW-dNKuSW-35ay3E-aYLS7z-dNDUk2-RJHAsW-Ak8sQ-dNDSYR-28dz5ZX-28v7E1C-dNDUs6-Lgq9Gg-LgrvRD-sRj9r-YD5yEG-28dz68T-x7MQNb-28dz6CF-28v7E5q-29weuud-aDy9it">Flickr. (cc by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>For decades, the British sex industry has straddled both informal and illegal work. This is because while the buying and selling of sex is technically legal in the UK, everything that produces the exchange of sex for money – advertising, employing support staff, renting premises, working collectively – is criminalised. As a result, our workplaces in ‘flats’ (small scale brothels), saunas, and hostess clubs have never been stable or safe places.</p> <p>There has never been any job or income security in the sex industry. You only make money if it is busy, and the ‘house’ takes a percentage of your earnings – sometimes as high as 65-70%. However, up until recently, the way the system usually worked was that the flat manager would cover overheads. Buildings come with rent, utilities, and maintenance costs. Venues also need interior decorating, furniture, bedding, towels, equipment, and cleaning, and in our corner of the service industry also condoms and lube. Bosses would produce and place ads in newspapers and cards in red telephone boxes. They would provide security and often a receptionist, who would screen clients either on the phone or at the door. Similar arrangements existed for escort agencies, although in their case workers were often required to sort out somewhere to receive ‘in-calls’. </p> <p>While we were never paid for the hours spent waiting for clients, and while we had to cover the cost of our own work clothes and grooming, sex workers were not expected to invest time, money, and skills into our work when we were not on the job. Our only investment in marketing was the construction of a work persona. This persona existed in clearly demarcated ways. It appeared when we came into direct contact with clients – either in the room, when actively earning money, or when introducing ourselves to potential clients – and disappeared just as quickly. This meant that sex work was clearly defined as a labour practice within time and space. A job with its uniforms and costumes, tools and office politics. A performed role, which you could stop performing when not actively working. In the past five to ten years, this has changed completely.</p> <h2>The rise of the ‘entrepreneurial’ sex worker</h2> <p>In the last decade, working in flats and saunas has become increasingly risky and difficult. This is in part due to increased immigration raids, neighbourhood gentrification, and the closure of many premises by police with the help of abolitionist feminists. It is also partly a consequence of the broader incorporation of informal service work into the online, freelance, customer-reviewed ‘gig’ economy.</p> <p>Today an increasing number of sex workers in Britain – although certainly not all – are ‘independent’. They are ostensibly self-employed, freelance entrepreneurs. It is a shift that has affected every aspect of sex workers’ lives. Unlike ‘flat’ managers, individual sex workers can rarely secure and afford to rent long term work premises. Instead they hire hotels or rooms by the hour and go to clients’ hotels and homes. And with expensive print advertising out of the question, sex workers must now drum up clients online. They maintain profiles on platforms such as AdultWork, promote themselves on social networks, and many even have their own websites. </p> <p>The work of digital self-promotion is never-ending. Online marketplace websites require constantly updated picture galleries; a ‘personal’ story; details of services available; an active blog; reviews of clients; accepting clients’ reviews of you; and often a web-cam presence. Platforms like AdultWork penalise you or delete your profile if your response time isn’t quick enough, or if your phrasing isn’t to their liking.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">As an ‘independent’ sex worker, you are not exploited by a single employer within a capitalist framework, but by the nebulous yet crushing demands of an entire market.</p> <p>If you have your own website, you also need to spend money on web hosting and web design, or, if you have the skills, spend hours doing it yourself. You need to pay for photographers, outfits, and work tools. You need to spend hours on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram. You need to communicate with clients via phone, Whatsapp, Skype and email. You need to have and engage with a work phone, which you are expected to check constantly. All this before you make one penny.</p> <p>To understand how sex work has changed requires thinking through how both our labour conditions and the political economy of the industry has been transformed. We are no longer forced to hand over hefty house fees to a boss, but our overheads are now much higher. The economic risk of investment has been shifted onto the worker. At the same time, we are now required to invest nearly infinite amounts of unpaid labour into our ‘businesses’. Working hours now stretch into every waking moment and working spaces become everywhere and nowhere.</p> <h2>The isolation of ‘independence’</h2> <p>The term ‘independent’ brings to mind freedom and agency, but the very opposite is often the case. As an ‘independent’ sex worker, you are not exploited by a single employer within a capitalist framework, but by the nebulous yet crushing demands of an entire market. Independent workers are constantly on display while being dangerously isolated. They work alone in spaces hired by the hour, with no cleaners, drivers, or security, and with no check-in/check-out practices. Many new workers don’t even know the ‘buddy’ safety system, and lots of workers don’t have friends who can do this for them due to stigma, immigration, parenting or employability concerns.</p> <p>You can no longer go to work in an anonymous destination. Your activities are all registered online. They are connected to your IP address, and in many cases, to your email and social media accounts. Many workers report clients mysteriously appearing on their private social media profiles. In order to access adult websites, you need to provide your full identity details and passport. In most cases, your face and body are also plastered all over the internet. In neoliberal speak you can ‘choose’ to not show your face in these images, but the price will be lost work. That means only workers who can afford to pick and choose can take this protective measure.</p> <p>When many of us started working – in brothels, flats, peep shows, escort agencies or outdoors – we had the benefit of other workers showing us the ropes. We received recommendations or warnings about workplaces along with other imparted knowledge. How to take and store the money; how to define and protect boundaries; how to give a good service while minimising strain and risk; how to guard against dangerous clients; how to recognise burnout symptoms; how to get out of hairy situations. This shared community knowledge encompassed not just toys, tools, and anatomy, but how to handle the job psychologically and physically.</p> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/42805443385_3d62b720fd_o_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Sex workers demonstrate in London in July 2018 against a possible prohibition of online advertising for sex work. juno mac/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/166033858@N08/42805443385/in/photolist-9SFECN-H2DgGv-avdgZ5-aDycRR-aDycRH-4vdnxD-aDycRT-aYodsg-eLptJB-T2fsqi-RJHAkw-8KSFid-SXCD31-SqwS4-SMu3aC-5tkWTc-GmbpgL-ZXFvNq-Z4wU5Z-GqDrPr-6DLTVA-28v7E3m-9q8uJr-C2dBA-6DGJXP-8FkN4F-dNDTBt-aDycRP-dNKuKy-7VjGYW-dNKuSW-35ay3E-aYLS7z-dNDUk2-RJHAsW-Ak8sQ-dNDSYR-28dz5ZX-28v7E1C-dNDUs6-Lgq9Gg-LgrvRD-sRj9r-YD5yEG-28dz68T-x7MQNb-28dz6CF-28v7E5q-29weuud-aDy9it">Flickr. (cc by-nc-nd)</a></p> <h2>Safety in numbers</h2> <p>Working in flats and brothels, sex workers could also share health concerns. We showed each other symptoms we are worried about, and shared information about treatment, prevention, and the best clinics. The long-established sex workers’ knowledge and vigilance regarding our health has been alarmingly diluted over the past five years.</p> <p>Rarely do public discussions of sex work actually reach into the practicalities of the work. However, it is crucial that we do so. Oral sex without a condom is quickly becoming normalised, often with very little extra charged for this service. The perils of STDs are either poorly understood or viewed as an unavoidable hazard by many new ‘independent’ workers.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">The alarming decline in safety and the reduction of prices is directly related to workers’ isolation.</p> <p>Vaginal sex without a condom used to be almost non-existent. It was something workers would do in secret, charging a hefty sum for the risk. It is now becoming common. Anal sex, hitherto a very specialised and high price service in the case of cis women sex workers, has also become a much more widespread and cheaper practice. The alarming decline in safety and the reduction of prices is directly related to workers’ isolation. New workers no longer come into contact with more experienced workers, and they are deprived of the knowledge, support, and pressure of their peers.</p> <p>This is not to say that everything used to be roses. Of course some flat managers used to put indirect pressure on workers to provide oral without a condom. They behaved like any other bad contractor or manager who wanted workers to comply with unsafe conditions in order to keep the client happy and increase their cut. However, in our experience this was relatively rare and never compulsory. Moreover, such flats quickly acquired bad reputations as workplaces to be avoided. The pressure on ‘independent’ workers is much more subtle and oppressive. If oral sex without a condom becomes a common service, you feel that you have no one but yourself to blame if you can’t make ends meet when not offering it.</p> <h2>At risk for less and less</h2> <p>Platforms such as AdultWork are major contributors to the decline in workers’ safer sex standards. Their ‘check list’ of services is particularly damaging. This list contains a long list of practices, many of them unsafe. It indicates to new workers – and, crucially, clients – that risky practices are no longer seen as exceptional. And while a sex worker can certainly ‘choose’ to opt out of them, doing so now seems oddly limiting – to quote many clients, ‘conservative’.</p> <p>Who profits from this new arrangement? Many clients are taking more health risks now, but they are also getting much more for their money. Workers also face increased risks yet earn less for their labour. Prices have dropped dramatically over the past few years. This is partly due to stiffer competition, austerity, and a lack of industry standards due to the vanishing of flats. However, there is another, perhaps more important reason: the illusion that we are making more money thanks to the elimination of the middle-person.</p> <p>As ‘independents’, we are no longer obliged to give the lion’s share of our hourly rate to mediators and managers. The sum we charge the client is all ours. As a result, we feel we can afford to charge less in order to get more clients. However, the sums don’t add up. ‘Independent’ workers, in fact, invest a lot of money and labour in getting and maintaining clients. The long hours of unpaid marketing and admin work, and the stress caused by constantly being at the client’s beck and call, aren’t neither visible nor financially accounted for.</p> <p>Sitting in a flat waiting for clients was also unpaid labour. But at least when we worked in this system we knew when we were working. We were able to calculate our real hourly wage by dividing our take by the actual time we were <em>at work</em>. We could see if we were earning enough at a specific workplace, and if we weren’t we could try somewhere else. So, as is often the case with neoliberal notion of freedom and choice, the consumer pays less, and the worker puts in more invisibilised, unwaged labour. And this time there’s no recourse, since, allegedly, we are all our own bosses.</p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sam-okyere-essi-thesslund/false-promise-of-nordic-model-of-sex-work">The false promise of the Nordic model of sex work</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/global-network-of-sex-work-projects/why-decriminalise-sex-work">Why decriminalise sex work?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fraser-crichton/decriminalising-sex-work-in-new-zealand-its-history-and-impact">Decriminalising sex work in New Zealand: its history and impact</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/nicola-mai-calogero-giametta-h-l-ne-le-bail/impact-of-swedish-model-in-france-chronicl">The impact of the &#039;Swedish model&#039; in France: chronicle of a disaster foretold</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sws/georgina-orellano/creative-protests-of-sex-workers-in-argentina">The creative protests of sex workers in Argentina</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sws/we-don-t-do-sex-work-because-we-are-poor-we-do-sex-work-to-end-our-poverty">We don’t do sex work because we are poor, we do sex work to end our poverty</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Ava Caradonna Sex workers speak: who listens? Wed, 07 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Ava Caradonna 120476 at https://www.opendemocracy.net La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Las redes informales de autoayuda y cuidados mutuos en el Líbano han dado lugar a una alianza liderada por trabajadoras para luchar por los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/dws/rose-mahi/difference-self-organising-makes-creative-resistance-of-domestic-workers">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img width="100%" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/WhatsApp%20Image%202017-05-03%20at%20%202.39.11%20PM%20%281%29.jpeg" /><span class="image-caption">Photo provided by author.</span></p><p>Hay muchas circunstancias implicadas en la explotación de las trabajadoras del hogar migrantes (THM) en el Líbano. La mayoría de las veces las THM somos mujeres, y algunas no sabemos leer ni escribir. A veces, este analfabetismo alimenta la explotación existente que ya está integrada mediante el sexismo, el clasismo y el racismo. Estos factores están presentes en nuestros lugares de procedencia, y la migración nos hace aún más vulnerables a ellos.</p> <p>Nuestros empleadores creen que las personas migran porque no tienen nada que hacer, no están capacitadas o no tienen oportunidades en sus países de origen y que, por tanto, estamos en deuda con ellos por salvarnos. El círculo vicioso de la explotación empieza en los lugares de procedencia de las THM, donde existen agencias que captan a las trabajadoras del hogar y facilitan su migración a cambio de una comisión. Hablando claro, los «tratantes» se aprovechan de las trabajadoras del hogar y las venden a familias hostiles que continúan con esta práctica de explotación. Por ejemplo, las familias para las que trabajamos pueden quedarse con nuestro dinero, porque nos menosprecian o porque piensan que no tenemos ninguna factura que pagar de manera urgente ya que vivimos en su casa.</p> <p>Siempre habrá gente que se beneficie de la explotación de los demás. Esto quiere decir que siempre habrá quien se oponga al cambio de las leyes relacionadas con los derechos de las THM, porque hay gente que se enriquece a costa de ellas. Al final, siempre son las trabajadoras del hogar las que pagan, tanto material como metafóricamente. Aunque la discriminación legal puede terminar con la adopción de las leyes adecuadas, la discriminación personal no terminará de manera repentina; los estereotipos que existen en las mentes de las personas no pueden borrarse de forma fácil. Sin embargo, las leyes tienen el poder de influir en las personas (independientemente de sus prejuicios) y cambiar sus comportamientos hacia las THM por miedo a recibir un castigo.</p> <h2>Esperanza y activismo</h2> <p>Aun así, creemos que llegará el día en que todo cambiará, la jaula se abrirá y el pájaro podrá volver a volar en libertad. Nos organizamos en colectivos, sindicatos y alianzas para poder luchar por nuestros derechos y así estar preparadas para ese momento, en el que obtengamos nuestra tan ansiada libertad. Hay un proverbio que dice que «una mano no puede aplaudir sola». Si yo estuviera&nbsp; sola exigiendo mis derechos con respecto a mi sueldo, mis vacaciones y mi seguro, se me consideraría una excepción y nadie se tomaría en serio mis demandas. Pero si cada vez somos más las THM que unimos fuerzas y empezamos a alzar la voz exigiendo nuestros derechos, puede que nos escuche una persona, y después otra, y después otra, hasta que nuestro movimiento logre un efecto de bola de nieve. ¿Y quién sabe? Un día: ¡pum! Las autoridades decidirían que están cansadas de oírnos y que tienen que respetar nuestros derechos.</p> <p>He sido activista desde que era una niña. Cuando estaba en primaria, era una marimacho y siempre defendía a las demás. Cuando estaban acosando a mis amigas, me buscaban y mis puños iban en busca de los chicos responsables de tales acosos. Crecí así. Cuando llegué al Líbano, no podía aceptar las atrocidades que se cometían contra las THM. Aunque no puedo decir que la primera familia con la que estuve fuera la peor, sin duda no era perfecta. Miraba a mí alrededor y pensaba que no era posible que la gente viviera en esas condiciones. Así que empecé mi activismo en la casa de mi empleadora.</p> <p>Empecé siendo sincera con ella, pero ella no valoró mi honestidad. Me gritaba y nos peleábamos, pero eso no evitó que yo expresara mis ideas y mis necesidades. Un día me preguntó qué era lo que yo esperaba de ella, y cuando se lo expliqué, me dijo que no había nada que ella pudiera hacer para cambiar la situación. Aunque entendí las limitaciones a las que se enfrentaba, le pedí que al menos usara su influencia para hablar con otras mujeres empleadoras que eran amigas suyas. Por ejemplo, faltaba poco para mi cumpleaños y le pedí que convenciera a sus amigas de que dieran el día libre a sus trabajadoras del hogar para que me visitaran en su casa y pudiéramos celebrar mi cumpleaños. Así, poco a poco, mis hermanas y yo empezamos a formar una comunidad de líderes de THM.</p> <h2>Resistencia creativa</h2> <p>Con el tiempo, desarrollamos formas sutiles de resistencia. Había una THM de Sri Lanka que vivía en el edificio frente al mío, y otra de Etiopía que vivía en la planta de abajo. Nos podíamos ver desde nuestros respectivos balcones, pero no podíamos hablar debido a la distancia. Empezamos a comunicarnos a través de gestos para no atraer la atención no deseada de nuestras empleadoras. Podíamos entendernos entre nosotras sin haber acordado previamente el significado de los gestos que utilizábamos.</p> <p>Yo vivía en la quinta planta de mi edificio y usábamos una cuerda para mandar comida a la chica que vivía en la segunda, a la que su empleadora estaba matando de hambre. Ponía la comida en una bolsa de plástico, la ataba a la cuerda y la deslizaba lentamente hacia abajo por la pared externa del edificio. Cuando llegaba la comida, hacía ruido con las sartenes de la cocina para que ella supiera que había llegado. Luego, cuando había terminado de comer, me enviaba el recipiente de vuelta a mi planta usando la misma cuerda.</p> <p>De esta forma se las arreglaba para comer sin que nadie se diera cuenta. A veces también usábamos el ascensor: yo llamaba al ascensor, ponía el envase dentro y ella lo recibía en la segunda planta. Se lo comía rápido, sin que nadie se diera cuenta: ojos que no ven, corazón que no siente. Después me devolvía el envase el mismo día en que se lo había enviado. Siempre hay una manera. Aunque no nos pudiéramos comunicar verbalmente, nos las arreglamos para desarrollar estas técnicas de cuidados mutuos. Pudimos alcanzar esta manera orgánica de comunicar nuestras necesidades porque nuestras experiencias de vida eran similares: yo vivía lo mismo que ella y viceversa. Ella no tenía que explicarme su situación con palabras: sus gestos bastaban para hacerme saber si tenía problemas, si la habían dejado sin comer el día anterior o si todavía no había desayunado.</p> <h2>Resistencia organizada</h2> <p>Hemos desarrollado técnicas para remediar las condiciones que aumentan la explotación de las THM en el Líbano. Ofrecemos clases de inglés, francés y árabe, y también cursos para que la gente aprenda a utilizar ordenadores y a tocar la guitarra, tanto para hombres como para mujeres, ya sean personas jóvenes o ancianas. Nuestros contratos laborales están escritos en árabe en vez de en francés o inglés, pero si sabes cuáles son tus derechos y están escritos en alguna parte, puedes respaldar tus afirmaciones cuando exiges tus derechos, independientemente de que sepas leer árabe o no.</p> <p>De no ser así, estás obligada a creer y aceptar todo lo que te diga tu empleador, ya que ellos saben leer mejor que tú. También empezamos a dar cursos sobre los derechos de las THM y difundir este conocimiento a través de redes de personas a las que podíamos llegar. Es muy difícil desarrollar técnicas para combatir aquellos tipos de discriminación que son invisibles o están codificados. Intentamos ofrecer apoyo para estos casos, pero, hasta ahora, solo hemos podido ofrecer apoyo moral operando a través de redes de cuidados mutuos. El trabajo en Internet y el «boca a boca» se incluyen entre nuestras formas de publicidad. Establecemos relaciones de confianza con las comunidades y nuestras trabajadoras les hablan a sus amigas y círculos sobre nosotras para que se unan, o les cuentan casos que pueden requerir ayuda e intervención en el futuro. Es como una burbuja que va creciendo y expandiéndose con el tiempo, y eso requiere confianza en las líderes que están en el núcleo de la alianza.</p> <p>En mayo del 2016 nos empezamos a organizar como alianza: la Alianza de trabajadoras inmigrantes y del hogar en Líbano. Aunque nuestras oficinas centrales están en Beirut, nuestras socias trabajan en diferentes regiones del Líbano. Somos un grupo de mujeres que comparten una sola voz, porque todas tenemos problemas similares y ya estamos hartas de cómo son las cosas. Confiamos las unas en las otras y estamos listas para el largo camino que debemos recorrer. En esta etapa somos una organización de pequeño tamaño y no tenemos acceso a ningún fondo, pero eso no evita que seamos muy activas en el desarrollo de estrategias y en la planificación. &nbsp;</p> <p>El trabajo de nuestra alianza es diferente al trabajo de las distintas organizaciones que hemos visto en el Líbano, y esto se debe principalmente a una razón: nosotras somos trabajadoras del hogar. Muchas organizaciones que trabajan por nuestra causa están formadas por personas que nunca han estado sometidas a lo que nosotras hemos experimentado en nuestras propias carnes, huesos y sangre. Nuestra alianza refleja quiénes somos y las experiencias que hemos compartido. Es nuestro pan y nuestra vida con sangre, sudor y lágrimas.</p> <blockquote> <p><em>El «nosotras» de esta historia se refiere a la voz común de los y las personas miembro de la alianza y sus camaradas que también son trabajadoras del hogar; el «yo» se refiere a la voz personal y a la historia de Rose Mahi.</em></p> </blockquote> <h2>Sobre la Alianza de trabajadoras inmigrantes y del hogar en el Líbano</h2> <p>Nosotras —las trabajadoras del hogar inmigrantes en el Líbano— nos hemos unido y organizado como una alianza en pos de nuestra causa. Compartimos una voz. Somos trabajadoras del hogar migrantes activistas que luchamos por defender nuestros derechos. Luchamos contra la opresión y la explotación en todos los aspectos por ser mujer y trabajadora del hogar. Nos consideramos una sola a pesar de nuestras diferentes nacionalidades porque compartimos las mismas luchas y dificultades, tanto en el trabajo como en los espacios públicos. Creemos firmemente que trabajar colectivamente fortalece la unidad y solidaridad de todas las trabajadoras, lo que contribuye al empoderamiento de las mujeres. Por ahora, la alianza es autofinanciada.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Rose Mahi BTS en Español Wed, 07 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Rose Mahi 120208 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The Sexelance: red lights on wheels https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A converted ambulance, the Sexelance is a mobile sex clinic offering harm reduction to the street sex workers of Copenhagen.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/sexelancen_640.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">The Sexelance. Malene Anthony Nielsen/Scanpix. Used with permission.</p> <p>When you open the doors to the Sexelance, you step into a sterile looking room. There’s lube in containers attached to the walls and condoms in boxes. There’s a blue folding chair – usually used for blowjobs – mirrors, and a little red light on the back door that illuminates the interior when the doors are closed. Though thoroughly transformed, it’s obvious that this first ever Danish sex clinic on wheels was once an ambulance riding through the streets of Copenhagen to aid the sick.</p> <p>Today, the Sexelance serves as an alternative to the harsh realities facing street sex workers. In the car, they can sell their services under safer, more hygienic, and more dignified conditions than those on the streets. It’s an easy sell for to sex workers, but their clients rarely find it as appealing. Many do not want to come with them into the car, and then the sex workers must choose: lose the customer or follow them out into the night. </p> <p class="mag-quote-right">The moral discussion over prostitution keeps many good ideas for protecting sex workers from getting off the ground.</p> <p>The sterility of the experience is off-putting. It’s not as if the sex workers want it that way. They’d prefer for the Sexelance to be more cozy and ‘sexy’, but laws make that easier said than done. One of the reasons behind the clinical looking interior is that the Sexelance runs the risk of being accused by police, critics, and the judicial system of encouraging prostitution. That’s illegal in Denmark, even though prostitution itself is not. It’s a distinction rooted in the moral discussion over prostitution that keeps many good ideas for protecting sex workers from really getting off the ground. </p> <p>“Don’t come knocking if the car is rocking” is a phrase often used by the volunteers of the car. But the motivation behind the car is no joke, and the last thing it is trying to do is to encourage prostitution. It’s instead trying make the sex already being sold safer by giving it a secure place to take place. During the many years I have researched migrants and sex workers in the streets of Vesterbro, Copenhagen – an area known for its red-light district – the hotels there have shut their doors to the sex workers and their clients. Places where sex workers used to take their clients have been shut down because they were accused of aiding prostitution.</p> <p>For the sex workers who aren’t working in a licensed brothel, this means they have little choice but to do their job in the customer’s cars, in dark alleyways, and between dumpsters in back yards. It goes without saying that working alone at night with often inebriated customers is dangerous. In comparison, not a single violent incident has been reported to have taken place in the Sexelance. &nbsp;</p> <h2>No research says that safety for sex workers creates more sex workers </h2> <p>The Sexelance delivers an immediate and hands-on solution to a real problem: the lack of safety for street sex workers who, for many different reasons, do not have other ways of making money to support themselves and their families. </p> <p>The Sexelance is not a brothel. It is serious harm reduction on four wheels. Harm reduction means reducing the harms that marginalised people face, and many humanitarian organisations work with harm reduction in areas such as sex work, drug use, and migration. </p> <p>Harm reduction as a tactic has come under increasing critique in recent times. Rather than viewed as a neutral and apolitical act, it has been recast as a way of abetting or encouraging something viewed by many as undesirable. In this case, the act of making sex work safe is re-cast as a method of encouraging prostitution. Similar dynamics are at work when the NGO Doctors Without Borders pulls people out of the water in the Mediterranean and then is accused of encouraging migration. The logic seems to be that the threat of grievous personal harm – being raped behind a dumpster or drowning in the blue waters of the Mediterranean – is the only force capable of keeping these practices in check. Provide a cushion and everybody will soon be doing it.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Is the possibility of a small potential rise morally worse than insisting that those already suffering continue to do so?</p> <p>But people don’t sell sex for safety reasons and people don’t migrate across oceans to be rescued. No research shows that more safety for sex workers creates substantially more sex workers, just as no research shows that more lifeboats create substantially more migrants. The vast majority of people sell sex or migrate because of unemployment, war, and poverty. In relation to these factors, a bit more safety might save lives but it certainly won’t tip the balance.</p> <p>There is a chance that effective harm reduction strategies result in marginally more people entering sex work. People who have worked with harm reduction for years do not reject this possibility. But even if it would be possible to measure a small rise in overall numbers, exclusively due to safety measures, we are still left with a moral philosophic question: is the possibility of a small potential rise morally worse than insisting that those already suffering continue to do so?</p> <p>The Danish philosopher K. E. Løgstrup said that we each have an ethical obligation to help the person standing in front of us in the situation they are in, regardless of the political context. That is the core principle of harm reduction. It does not, in any way, suggest that we cannot also work on sustainable and long-term political solutions for marginalised groups of people. </p> <p>The Sexelance has taken a stand. In the future, the interior in the car will be cozier and ‘sexier’ so more sex workers and their clients will want to frequent it. This change will put the service at risk, but as long as it remains in operation it will create more safety for more people. As Line Haferbier, chairman of the coalition behind the Sexelance, says: </p> <p>“Our goal is that no sex worker have to work in unsafe conditions and risk assault when they are working. Sex workers are experts in their own life and it is upon requests from them that we are now changing the interior of The Sexelance.” &nbsp;</p> <p><strong>A previous version of this article was published in Danish in <a href="https://politiken.dk/debat/klummer/art6619186/Sexelancen-er-gadens-svar-p%C3%A5-pragmatisk-n%C3%B8dhj%C3%A6lp">Politiken</a>. </strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sine-plambech/my-body-is-my-piece-of-land">My body is my piece of land</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sine-plambech/drowning-mothers">Drowning mothers</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sine-plambech/becky-is-dead">Becky is dead</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/anne-gathumbi/helping-sex-workers-help-themselves">Helping sex workers help themselves</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sws/ava-caradonna-x-talk-project/we-speak-but-you-don-t-listen-migrant-sex-worker-organisi">We speak but you don’t listen: migrant sex worker organising at the border</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sws/we-don-t-do-sex-work-because-we-are-poor-we-do-sex-work-to-end-our-poverty">We don’t do sex work because we are poor, we do sex work to end our poverty</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sws/georgina-orellano/creative-protests-of-sex-workers-in-argentina">The creative protests of sex workers in Argentina</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sws/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/power-of-putas-brazilian-prostitutes-movement-in-time">The power of putas: the Brazilian prostitutes’ movement in times of political reaction</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fraser-crichton/decriminalising-sex-work-in-new-zealand-its-history-and-impact">Decriminalising sex work in New Zealand: its history and impact</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Dy Plambeck Sine Plambech Tue, 06 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Sine Plambech and Dy Plambeck 120466 at https://www.opendemocracy.net ¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>En los últimos años, las trabajadoras del hogar de Colombia han conquistado muchas mejoras. Ahora apuntan más alto. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/dws/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/how-do-we-make-labour-rights-real">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/Asamblea%20UTRASD%202014.JPG" width="100%" /><span class="image-caption" style="font-size: 10px; font-style: italic;">Photo provided by authors.</span></p> <p>Hoy en día en Colombia, la gente y el gobierno están hablando por fin de los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar. Resulta extraño que esto solo suceda ahora, dado que es un tema tan fundamental. Históricamente, se ha relegado a estas mujeres a los márgenes menos visibles de la sociedad, y sus trabajos han sido subestimados de forma sistemática, a pesar de su enorme contribución a la sociedad. Estas mujeres – porque hablar de trabajadores del hogar masculinos es nombrar la excepción, lo cual en sí representa un problema – han sido objeto de todas las formas posibles de discriminación: horarios laborales extensos<sup><a id="ffn1" href="#fn1" class="footnote">1</a></sup>, salarios muy por debajo del salario mínimo<sup><a id="ffn2" href="#fn2" class="footnote">2</a></sup> y falta de protecciones sociales, sin mencionar los casos de abuso sexual y laboral. A pesar de que los últimos siete años han estado marcados por una serie de pasos hacia la mejora de las condiciones de vida y trabajo de las trabajadoras del hogar, es necesario trabajar mucho para frenar siglos de discriminación.</p> <p>Nuestro camino en esta lucha comenzó hace ocho años, después de acordar con otras personas y organizaciones preocupadas por este tema que la única manera de avanzar era a través de acciones colectivas y trabajo de equipo: combinando nuestro conocimiento, los pocos recursos económicos a los cuales teníamos acceso y cientos de horas de trabajo voluntario. Nuestro objetivo era conseguir que las personas en nuestro país valorasen la gran contribución de las trabajadoras del hogar pagadas – nos referimos en femenino ya que constituyen el 96%<sup><a id="ffn3" href="#fn3" class="footnote">3</a></sup> – así como también comprender que subestimar estas trabajadoras contribuye estructuralmente a la desigualdad social.</p> <p>A pesar de sus propias dificultades sociales y financieras, estas trabajadoras del hogar líderes optaron por un enfoque democrático (comprometido con el proceso de paz<sup><a id="ffn4" href="#fn4" class="footnote">4</a></sup> para ser conscientes de sus derechos y exigirlos por medio del sindicalismo. Estas mujeres valientes han tenido el apoyo constante de la <a href="http://www.ens.org.co/">Escuela Nacional Sindical</a> (ENS) y la <a href="http://www.bienhumano.org/">Fundación Bien Humano</a>.</p> <h2>Un sector organizado</h2> <p>En 2017 en Colombia existían tres sindicatos de trabajadoras del hogar: Sintrasedom, Sintraimagra y la Unión de Trabajadoras Afrocolombianas del Servicio Doméstico (UTRASD). La última tiene su sede en Medellín y es la más influyente a nivel político. Las integrantes del consejo de UTRASD, María Roa, Claribed Palacios, Flora Perea, Nydia Díaz, Gloria Céspedes y Reynalda Chaverra han sido importantes figuras y voces defensoras de los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar. Específicamente, <a href="http://www.trabajadorasdomesticas.org/mar%C3%ADa-roa,-una-de-las-mejores-l%C3%ADderes-de-colombia-2015.html">María Roa fue reconocida como una de las líderes más importantes de Colombia en 2016</a>.</p> <p>UTRASD fue fundada oficialmente en 2013, como resultado de dos acontecimientos importantes. En primer lugar – algunos años antes de 2010 – las líderes afrocolombianas de Medellín comenzaron a movilizarse por sus derechos. Posteriormente, en 2011, la ENS y <a href="https://carabantu.jimdo.com/">Carabantú</a>, una organización para el empoderamiento de las mujeres afrocolombianas de la región, realizaron una investigación titulada <em>«Barriendo la invisibilidad de las trabajadoras domésticas afrocolombianas en Medellín</em>». Las conclusiones de esta investigación motivaron a la ENS a apoyar firmemente al sindicato de trabajadoras de UTRASD en sus tareas durante los últimos siete años. El grupo que comenzó en 2013 con 23 mujeres ha crecido rápidamente y hoy en día tiene casi 400 miembros, una junta directiva dinámica, dos subsecciones en Cartagena y Apartado, nueve comités, tres proyectos de cooperación activos y un ambicioso plan de acción.</p> <h2>Con fundamentos jurídicos</h2> <p>A nivel gubernamental y legislativo, podemos decir que el trabajo del hogar atrajo la atención del público en 2009, cuando el Congreso colombiano comenzó a debatir la <em>Ley de economía del cuidado</em>, promovida por las senadoras Cecilia López y Gloria Inés Ramírez. En 2010, gracias a ellas, la ley 1413 ordenó la medición, por primera vez, de la contribución de las mujeres al desarrollo social y económico del país mediante el trabajo del hogar no remunerado.</p> <p>En 2011, la Organización Internacional del Trabajo causó revuelo en el tema de manera global con el Convenio sobre las trabajadoras y los trabajadores domésticos (C189), el primer llamado internacional a abordar las condiciones de las trabajadoras del hogar. Al año siguiente, Colombia promulgó la ley 1595 para incorporar el C189 y expresar la voluntad del gobierno de proteger a las trabajadoras del hogar, antes de ratificar el convenio en el año 2014.</p> <p>En 2013, se promulgó el decreto 2616 que regulaba la seguridad social, el cual fue seguido por el decreto 721, que otorgaba a las trabajadoras del hogar acceso al sistema de beneficios familiares. Como resultado, de casi un millón de trabajadoras del hogar en Colombia, «en febrero de 2016, más de 19.000 personas se registraron para tener seguridad social de acuerdo a sus ingresos. Según la <a href="http://www.mintrabajo.gov.co/medios-julio-2016/6167-mintrabajo-celebro-sancion-de-la-ley-que-otorga-primas-al-servicio-domestico.html">Superintendencia de Subsidios Familiares en marzo de 2016</a>, el número de trabajadoras del hogar que acceden a beneficios familiares aumentó a más de 104.000 personas».</p> <p>En 2014, la Corte Constitucional de Colombia emitió el fallo C-871 solicitando al Congreso colombiano penalizar la discriminación sufrida por las trabajadoras del hogar en relación con la negación de la bonificación por servicio, es decir, el derecho a un salario mensual por año como bonificación. El año pasado, la Corte Constitucional también reconoció la violación de los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar en el <a href="http://www.corteconstitucional.gov.co/relatoria/2016/t-185-16.htm">fallo 186-16</a>, mediante el cual se las reconocía como sujetos en necesidad de protección constitucional especial. Cinco años exactos después de la adopción del C189 en Suiza, el Congreso de Colombia – liderado por las legisladoras Ángela María Robledo y Angélica Lozano – aprobaron por unanimidad la <a href="https://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline3/latest/embed/index.html?source=1mg28LDWG17bL8n6CUUoSk2E8R3pcIw4Jww9C-J_mTpE&amp;font=Default&amp;lang=en&amp;initial_zoom=2&amp;height=650">Ley de prima 1788</a> , que reconoce la misma bonificación por servicio para las trabajadoras del hogar que para el resto de las personas trabajadoras en Colombia.</p> <p>Estos avances jurídicos y legislativos han contribuido a demostrar a las personas en Colombia que las trabajadoras del hogar tienen los mismos derechos que cualquier otra trabajadora o trabajador.</p> <h2>Los próximos pasos</h2> <p>En 2011, la Fundación Bien Humano comenzó un proyecto denominado «Hablemos de empleadas del hogar» como una estrategia para dar mayor visibilidad a las trabajadoras del hogar y posicionarlas como sujetos con derechos. El proyecto incluye apoyo para el empoderamiento y el posicionamiento público de las organizaciones de base, como la UTRASD. </p> <p>Bien Humano también creó una sólida red de comunicaciones a través de su cuenta en Twitter; <a href="https://twitter.com/Empleadas_hogar">@Empleadas_hogar</a>; una página de Facebook; <a href="https://www.facebook.com/TrabajadorasDomesticas/">Trabajadoras Domésticas</a>; un canal de YouTube: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCr2XcagoAtwQ0xpRglB04LA">Hablemos de Empleadas Domésticas</a>; y la página web: <a href="http://trabajadorasdomesticas.org/">trabajadorasdomesticas.org</a>, para difundir recursos de información. Con la convicción de que «la unidad hace la fuerza», Bien Humano unió fuerzas con la ENS y UTRASD en 2011 como parte de una estrategia que les ha permitido llegar al más alto funcionariado, a otras organizaciones internacionales y nacionales, a medios de comunicación masivos, a los líderes y lideresas y a la ciudadanía de Colombia con el mensaje de que la dignidad y la ley deben comenzar en casa con nuestras trabajadoras.</p> <p>El último acontecimiento político en Colombia fue la creación de una mesa redonda tripartita, un escenario ideal codificado en la Ley de Prima para promover el Convenio C189. En este comité hay espacio para representantes del gobierno nacional (Ministerio de Trabajo), trabajadoras y trabajadores (sindicatos y la UTRASD) y personas empleadoras de la Asociación nacional de empresarios, lo que da lugar a muchas preguntas: ¿cómo es que las personas que contratan a trabajadoras del hogar son representadas por el empresariado? ¿Son comparables los problemas que se enfrentan en el hogar, en la esfera privada, con aquellos en la industria empresarial? ¿Por qué no existe en Colombia una asociación que represente a las personas empleadoras de trabajadoras del hogar? ¿Cómo puede crearse tal asociación?</p> <p>En Colombia, las trabajadoras del hogar han iniciado un camino formal a la organización; el tema se ha introducido en la agenda política y de los medios; los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar han ganado mayor visibilidad a través de los medios de comunicación; las organizaciones de la sociedad civil han demostrado eficazmente su apoyo; y existen bases legítimas para lograr un trabajo digno para las trabajadoras del hogar pero su cumplimiento todavía es limitado, y el camino para lograr los objetivos es largo e incierto. Sin embargo, hay mucho potencial en las tecnologías modernas de la comunicación y la información, y en los medios de comunicación.</p> <p>A pesar de que el gobierno nacional ha manifestado su voluntad política de abordar estos temas ocasionalmente a lo largo de los últimos años, carece de una estrategia permanente, líderes designados y recursos económicos para llevarla a cabo. En el futuro, también es necesario adoptar un plan de inspección para registrar los cambios en los hogares, sancionar el incumplimiento de las normas y poner un fin a la tendencia cultural del abuso de las trabajadoras del hogar. Es de igual importancia crear campañas masivas permanentes para concienciar sobre estas novedades legislativas, así como también que el gobierno apoye a los sindicatos de trabajadoras del hogar más allá de las palabras.</p> <p>Es cierto que en Colombia ahora se habla más de los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar, y que esta causa ha recibido el apoyo de muchas personas y organizaciones, pero el verdadero interrogante es: ¿cómo podemos hacer que el gobierno y las personas empleadoras apliquen en la vida diaria los derechos que actualmente están en papel?</p> <p><em>Este artículo fue redactado en representación del Sindicato de Trabajadoras Afrocolombianas del Servicio Doméstico - UTRASD, Escuela Nacional Sindical - la ENS y la fundación Bien Humano.</em></p> <style> #footnotes li {margin-bottom:12px;} </style> <ol id="footnotes"> <li id="fn1">La «Investigación para erradicar la invisibilidad» fue realizada en 2012 por la Escuela nacional sindical (ENS) y la Corporación afrocolombiana de desarrollo cultural y social (CARABANTÚ) con la misión de describir las condiciones laborales y la discriminación racial hacia mujeres afrocolombianas que trabajan como trabajadoras del hogar en la ciudad de Medellín. Se reportó que el 91% de las trabajadoras del hogar internas trabajaron diariamente entre 10 y 18 horas y el 89% de las trabajadoras no internas trabajaron entre 9 a 10 horas, sin percibir pagos por horas extras en el 90.5% de los casos. <a href="#ffn1">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn2">La misma investigación reveló que el 62% de las trabajadoras del hogar perciben entre 300.000 y 566.000 pesos mensualmente; el 21%, entre 100.000 y 300.000; y el 2.4%, entre 50.000 y 150.000 (el valor del dólar USD en ese momento era de 1.750 pesos). <a href="#ffn2">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn3">De acuerdo con los datos más recientes del Departamento administrativo nacional de estadísticas (DANE) en 2015, en Colombia había 725.000 personas contratadas como trabajadoras del hogar, de las cuales el 96% son mujeres, lo que representa el 7.4% del total de las mujeres empleadas del país. <a href="#ffn3">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn4">Durante los últimos cinco años, en Colombia se ha llevado a cabo un proceso de paz con las Fuerzas armadas revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC), para poner fin a una guerra que ha durado más de 50 años. La población civil, especialmente en las zonas rurales, ha sido muy afectada por el desplazamiento y los abusos tanto de las FARC como del estado. Estos acuerdos se encuentran actualmente en fase de implementación. <a href="#ffn4">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> </ol> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Andrea Londońo Ana Teresa Vélez María Roa BTS en Español Tue, 06 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 María Roa, Ana Teresa Vélez and Andrea Londońo 120207 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The future of work and the future of poverty https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Global production networks create economic growth, and thus are often said to be good for development. But if that’s true, why do so many poor people live in middle-income countries?&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/6872382610_577ddd1ff5_h.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Neil Moralee/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/neilmoralee/6872382610/in/photolist-bthKVm-ciN6gf-7Bp4ma-7AvcSn-dxKE21-cebJq3-bWPoke-D8kxit-q27rVB-dBocCB-2cgBHfV-b8ddh-6u8RFS-4iyE8K-fjwVet-7qeFYE-q8YWfE-bX6Qjo-o3frSh-neJfgP-icVyDe-99Fkjh-jtNjc-9bZtbr-dtxytq-5Jr2T7-9pzDuG-9jjs85-6gwUiU-5YXGX9-oh8nTi-dPsJsh-jtkqZ-8nvL3Q-4T5Mfb-8Z8eHh-gPyJfb-9418VV-n7odV-4bPY4u-cyavfA-M1wUwZ-gB6hFv-LXvNdN-L4ihfq-LQT3HL-LQT2jU-LQSXPh-L4ippA-LQSUiu">Flickr. (cc-by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>In demarcating the most important changes in the nature of work in recent years, Anannya Bhattacharjee, a participant in BTS’s recent Future of Work Round Table, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed#bhattacharjee">rightly points to</a> the emergence of global production networks as a crucial development. Moreover, she is absolutely correct in calling attention to the fact that employment relationships in these global production networks are very often short-term, insecure, and poorly paid. “In India,” she argues, “job creation is really the creation of miserable jobs”. This is no exaggeration. Despite very high levels of economic growth since the early 2000s, more than <a href="https://thewire.in/labour/nearly-81-of-the-employed-in-india-are-in-the-informal-sector-ilo">80% of India’s workers scramble to earn a precarious living in the informal sector</a>. The richest 1% of the population, meanwhile, <a href="https://thewire.in/labour/nearly-81-of-the-employed-in-india-are-in-the-informal-sector-ilo">corner more than 70% of all wealth generated in the economy</a>. </p> <p>In addition to being a sharp diagnosis of the emerging world of work under capitalism in our times, Bhattacharjee’s observations also point us towards an important insight about <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-the-world-banks-optimism-about-global-poverty-misses-the-point-104963?utm_medium=amptwitter&amp;utm_source=twitter">poverty in the Global South</a>. It is created and reproduced through global production networks. </p> <p>The emergence of global production networks since the late 1970s has been propelled by transnational corporations relocating parts of their production process – in particular labour-intensive manufacturing – from the Global North to the Global South. The industrialisation of Southern economies has, in turn, resulted in a massive increase in the size of the global working class. In fact, <a href="https://www.theglobalist.com/what-really-ails-europe-and-america-the-doubling-of-the-global-workforce/">the global workforce doubled between 1980 and 2005</a>.&nbsp; This transformation also accelerated economic growth, and low-income countries became middle-income countries as they were integrated into global production networks. </p> <p class="mag-quote-center">The economic growth lifting countries from low-income status to middle-income status is profoundly unequally distributed.</p> <p>Consequently, actors such as <a href="https://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/trade/publication/global-value-chain-development-report-measuring-and-analyzing-the-impact-of-gvcs-on-economic-development">the World Bank</a> and the <a href="http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/newapproachtoglobalisationandglobalvaluechainsneededtoboostgrowthandjobs.htm">OECD</a> consider participation in global production networks to be an important precondition for successful development. However, there is an inconvenient fact that is often left out of these policy narratives.&nbsp; As development economist <a href="https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/did/people/academic-staff/sumner/index.aspx">Andy Sumner</a> demonstrated in his book <a href="https://global.oup.com/academic/product/global-poverty-9780198703525?cc=za&amp;lang=en&amp;"><em>Global Poverty</em></a>, as many as 70% of the world’s poor currently live in what the World Bank refers to as middle-income countries. Put slightly differently, one billion poor people live in countries that, since the early 1990s, witnessed economic growth precisely because of their integration into global production networks. These countries are, in principle, capable of ending poverty among their citizens. </p> <p>This paradox reveals that the economic growth lifting countries from low-income status to middle-income status is profoundly unequally distributed. It also reveals a fundamental aspect of global production networks: they are comprised of different value tiers, and that different groups capture different amounts of the value created in these networks. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4dQGl_lswYY">Workers in the Global South capture the least value</a>. The work they carry out is poorly paid, temporary, and unstable. Their working conditions are poor and their access to social protection is restricted. Indeed, the share of national income paid to workers in Southern economies <a href="https://blogs.imf.org/2017/04/12/drivers-of-declining-labor-share-of-income/">has been falling</a> since the 1990s. We also know that some <a href="https://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/newsroom/news/WCMS_601903/lang--en/index.htm">55% of workers in the world economy have no access to social protection</a>, while <a href="https://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/multimedia/maps-and-charts/WCMS_369618/lang--en/index.htm">60% lack a permanent contract</a>. The majority of these workers are citizens of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. In short, precarious workers live in poverty in middle-income countries in the Global South. </p> <p>This means that to discuss the future of work is to discuss the future of poverty. In a context where the livelihoods of the majority of the world’s population are dependent on wage labour, the struggle against poverty <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_tuvBHr6WU">has to be a struggle for decent, stable, and well-paid work</a>. It must be a struggle for social citizenship that advances redistribution in favour of the working classes in the Global South. I use the word struggle quite deliberately, for it is nothing short of delusional to think such changes will come about without organising and mobilising workers to challenge the power of transnational corporations and political elites. Power, as we know all too well, concedes nothing without a demand. It never has, and it never will. </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Alf Gunvald Nilsen Mon, 05 Nov 2018 09:22:19 +0000 Alf Gunvald Nilsen 120461 at https://www.opendemocracy.net El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Hoy quiero reclamar mis derechos y los de mis compañeras mediante este texto. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/dws/marcelina-bautista/work-is-not-undignified-but-how-you-treat-domestic-workers-is">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img width="100%" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/IMG_20170308_164843796_HDR.jpg" /><span style="font-size: 10px; font-style: italic;">Photo provided by author. All rights reserved.</span></p> <p>En mi país, el trabajo del hogar remunerado no tiene reconocimiento social ni económico. Las miles de mujeres que realizan este tipo de trabajo experimentan esta falta de reconocimiento, y el valor que se nos da (o no) se ve reflejado en los términos utilizados para describir nuestro trabajo.</p> <p>Los términos que se suelen utilizar para referirse a las personas que realizan trabajo del hogar remunerado son con frecuencia peyorativos. Un ejemplo es «<em>servidumbre</em>», un término que se originó en el feudalismo y cuyo significado no se corresponde con la noción de trabajadoras y trabajadores como sujetos de derecho. Otro término utilizado normalmente es «<em>doméstica</em>», el cual evoca a la domesticación de los animales para que vivan en los hogares.</p> <p>Por estos motivos, hace algunos años comenzamos a insistir en que nos llamaran trabajadoras del hogar, ya que este término implica que sí somos sujetos de derecho. Sin embargo, nuestro reconocimiento como personas trabajadoras no debería verse reflejado solo en la forma en la que nos nombran, sino que también de forma concreta en los niveles económico y social. En otras palabras, queremos que consideren nuestro trabajo como a cualquier otro tipo de trabajo.</p> <p>Yo soy una de las más de dos millones de trabajadoras del hogar del país. Este valor representa al 10% de las mujeres empleadas en México que no cuentan con beneficios laborales ni seguro social. Y hoy, mediante este texto, quiero reclamar mis derechos y los de mis <em>compañeras</em>.</p> <h2>Mi historia, tu historia</h2> <p>La defensa de mis derechos como trabajadora del hogar ha sido un proceso de creación de conciencia, superación de obstáculos y empoderamiento personal.</p> <p>Cuando era niña, experiencias como la pobreza y la falta de oportunidades (incluyendo la oportunidad de estudiar) me marcaron la vida. Pero estas experiencias también me permitieron tomar decisiones importantes para mi futuro.</p> <p>Mi padre me envió a trabajar para una familia a los diez años para que pudiera continuar con mis estudios. Sin embargo, la gran carga de trabajo que tenía implicaba que trabajaba mucho más de lo que estudiaba, y la posibilidad de recibir una educación era cada vez más distante.</p> <p>A los catorce dejé Oaxaca, el estado donde nací, y me mudé a la Ciudad de México, una ciudad tan grande como diversa que estaba plagada de discriminación. Como era menor de edad y había recibido muy poca educación, mi única opción era trabajar en los hogares. Hoy en día, muchas de las mujeres de nuestro país aún experimentan estas mismas restricciones. De hecho, las trabajadoras del hogar tienen un promedio de dos o tres años menos de educación que el resto de la población empleada y la mayoría comienzan a trabajar cuando aún son menores de edad.</p> <p>Cuando abandoné mis sueños, me comprometí a cuidar niñas y niños, a mantener las casas limpias y organizadas, a tener el desayuno preparado y a esperar a mis «<em>patrones</em>» con la mesa lista y la comida recién hecha. Durante muchos años, mis días eran así: atendía a profesionales de la abogacía, legisladoras y legisladores, profesorado, feministas y funcionariado e, irónicamente, ninguna de las personas a la que cuidaba tomó en serio mis derechos. Muchas de las personas que me empleaban temían que las dejara. Decían que era como parte de la familia pero me daban las sobras de la comida o me exigían que usara un uniforme. Se iban de vacaciones pero a mí me dejaban trabajando, puesto que era entonces cuando había que limpiar la casa o hacer todo el trabajo acumulado.</p> <p>En este ámbito laboral, las relaciones afectivas suelen desdibujar las líneas entre el trabajo y los actos voluntarios de amabilidad, pero lo que nosotras queremos son relaciones laborales basadas en el respeto mutuo.</p> <p>En cuanto al aspecto psicológico, muchas trabajadoras del hogar sufren chantaje por parte de las empleadoras y los empleadores que no quieren que les dejen. Sobre todo cuando se trata del cuidado de niñas y niños, con quienes formamos relaciones estrechas que a veces conllevan que toleremos el maltrato por parte de sus madres y padres.</p> <p>No solo abandoné mis sueños y la seguridad de mi entorno, sino que también experimenté discriminación racial y de clase, además de explotación y salarios bajos por ser menor.</p> <p>Pero un día, cuando ya era adolescente, decidí liberar a mis sueños de las cuatro paredes de una casa. No porque el trabajo no fuera decente, sino porque aun siento tan joven, sentí que necesitaba luchar para lograr mis objetivos. Muchas de mis <em>compañeras</em> viven en condiciones de marginalidad y explotación, y su trabajo y su persona son muy poco valoradas.</p> <p>Me di cuenta de que el trabajo del hogar, aunque sea subestimado e invisible para muchas personas, es importante para las trabajadoras, pero también para quienes las emplean. Trabajar para alguien no era lo que atentaba contra mi dignidad ni violaba mis derechos como persona y trabajadora; lo que lo hacía era el modo en el que la mayoría de nosotras hemos sido y seguimos siendo tratadas. Entonces aprendí a reclamar esos derechos y a buscar condiciones laborales dignas.</p> <p>Quería derribar las barreras y convencer a otras trabajadoras del hogar, a quienes nos emplean y al gobierno de que la regulación y el trabajo digno son una responsabilidad conjunta, y de que debemos recibir la protección y el apoyo de un marco jurídico justo e igualitario. Con todo esto, y tras haber sido discriminada, maltratada y explotada como una empleada del hogar durante más de 20 años, decidí convertirme en una activista de derechos humanos.</p> <h2>Una lucha para todas nosotras</h2> <p>Formo parte de la <a href="http://www.idwfed.org/en/activities/mexico-conlactraho-elected-new-leadership-adopted-a-4-year-action-plan">Fundación Conlactraho</a> desde los 29 años, la cual funciona como una escuela sindical. Trabajé allí como secretaria general 18 años después de su creación, y asumí varios roles que me permitieron participar en la creación del Convenio 189 sobre trabajadoras y trabajadores del hogar de la OIT. También tuve la increíble oportunidad de colaborar con colegas de otros continentes en la creación de la Federación Internacional de Trabajadoras del Hogar («IDWF», por sus siglas en inglés). En el año 2000 fundé el <a href="http://www.caceh.org.mx/">Centro de Apoyo y Capacitación para Empleadas del Hogar</a> (CACEH), con el objetivo de crear un espacio alternativo para implementar estrategias para el reconocimiento de los derechos de las trabajadoras y trabajadores del hogar y para fomentar la organización colectiva y el diálogo social a nivel nacional. Hasta diciembre de 2016, fui la coordinadora regional de América Latina para la FITH.</p> <p>Esta lucha no ha sido un proceso sencillo, pero llevar los asuntos de las trabajadoras del hogar a la agenda pública ha sido muy satisfactorio y estimulante. Esto es así porque mientras que la esfera pública está destinada a los hombres, la esfera privada suele estar destinada a las mujeres, y esta a menudo incluye problemas de discriminación, maltrato, abuso, explotación y, en algunos casos, trabajo infantil.</p> <h2>Mi experiencia</h2> <p>Tuve la gran oportunidad de representar a las trabajadoras del hogar en los debates que tuvieron lugar en la OIT en Ginebra, Suiza, para la creación del Convenio 189. Este convenio se aprobó el 16 de junio de 2011 y su ratificación en México sigue siendo una promesa gubernamental. Si bien el gobierno aparenta estar abierto a ratificar el convenio, no parece dispuesto a incorporar ninguna de sus estipulaciones a las leyes mexicanas existentes.</p> <p>Gracias a la creación del primer sindicato nacional de trabajadoras del hogar en la historia de México, ahora contamos con una organización nacional colectiva donde las trabajadoras y los trabajadores pueden ejercitar sus derechos individuales y colectivos. Esto representa un avance muy importante. Estos derechos incluyen la autonomía, los contratos colectivos, y el derecho a realizar una huelga o protesta si se violan los derechos de una compañera, por ejemplo, si la despiden sin justificación. Esto fue el resultado de más de 15 años de lucha por parte de nuestro sector, que siempre ha sido invisible para la sociedad.</p> <p>Nuestro objetivo es dignificar el trabajo de las 2,4 millones de personas que ejercen como trabajadoras del hogar, y estamos convencidas de que nos escucharán. Por todo esto promovemos la ratificación del Convenio 189. Con su ratificación, las millones de trabajadoras y trabajadores del hogar podrán abandonar las condiciones laborales informales y tendrán la posibilidad de ejercitar sus derechos como personas trabajadoras, de ser reconocidas por la justicia y de tener acceso a ella.</p> <p>No queremos que ninguna de nuestras trabajadoras o nuestros trabajadores sufra injusticias, ni que ninguna de las personas que las emplea tenga que realizar procedimientos complicados para inscribir a sus empleadas y empleados en el seguro social, aunque por el momento no hay métodos apropiados para hacerlo.</p> <p>Debido a la falta de legislación que hay en México para proteger a las trabajadoras y los trabajadores del hogar, y para apoyar la ratificación del Convenio 189, llevamos a cabo una campaña de forma sistemática: <em>«¡Ponte los guantes por los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar!»</em></p> <p>Nuestra lucha llegó a nivel internacional y hoy en día las trabajadoras del hogar de América Latina, Asia, África y Europa están unidas mediante la FITH, quien tiene la misión de convertir nuestros derechos en una realidad.</p> <p>El apoyo de la comunidad ha sido fundamental durante todo el proceso de creación del <a href="http://www.idwfed.org/es/relatos/sindicato-nacional-de-trabajadores-y-trabajadoras-del-hogar-sinactraho-201cpor-un-trabajo-digno-para-los-y-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar201d">Sindicato Nacional de Trabajadores y Trabajadoras del Hogar</a> (SINACTRAHO), con más de 100 miembros al momento de su creación en 2015. Esto incluye el apoyo de otros sindicatos, de organizaciones de derechos humanos y feministas y del colectivo de empleadoras y empleadores <a href="http://idwfed.org/es/actividades/hogar-justo-hogar">Hogar Justo Hogar</a>, una organización que se formó recientemente para generar conciencia acerca de cómo el hecho de mejorar las condiciones laborales y de vida de las trabajadoras del hogar también puede beneficiar a las personas que las emplean y a la sociedad.</p> <p>Muchas de ustedes emplean a trabajadoras del hogar. Tras leer estas palabras, les ruego que comiencen a llamarnos trabajadoras del hogar, porque somos sujetos de derecho. Y les invito a reflexionar acerca de nuestro trabajo, porque aunque es un asunto que nos afecta todas las personas, quizás hasta ahora era invisible para ustedes.</p> <p><em>¡Ponte los guantes por los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar!</em></p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Marcelina Bautista BTS en Español Mon, 05 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Marcelina Bautista 120204 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>La experiencia de Nueva Zelanda de despenalización del trabajo sexual ofrece una alternativa práctica al frecuentemente citado Modelo Sueco. ¿Podría apuntar a una forma de avanzar más general? <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fraser-crichton/decriminalising-sex-work-in-new-zealand-its-history-and-impact">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none caption-xlarge'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/fc-20150809-00026-DSC_4554.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/fc-20150809-00026-DSC_4554.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="307" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload caption-xlarge imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>Photo provided by author.</span></span></span></p><p>El «modelo sueco» en la política de prostitución penaliza la compra de servicios sexuales bajo la creencia de que solo se puede proteger a las trabajadoras sexuales terminando con la demanda. Países como Suecia, Irlanda del Norte y Noruega han adoptado este modelo, y la cobertura de los medios de comunicación con frecuencia cita el enfoque de forma positiva. Organizaciones feministas como la <a href="http://www.catwinternational.org/">Coalición Contra la Trata de Mujeres</a> («CATW», por sus siglas en inglés) y el Grupo de Presión de Mujeres Europeas también promueven este enfoque. Su postura es que el trabajo sexual contribuye a la violencia contra las mujeres, ya que fomenta la deshumanización de la mujer y las ideas de privilegio masculinas.</p> <p>Las trabajadoras sexuales, sin embargo, creen que el modelo sueco pone sus vidas en riesgo y menoscaba sus derechos humanos. Si bien existen críticas a este modelo, es raro encontrar cobertura del mismo sobre la base de evidencia empírica y auténticas experiencias de vida alternativas. Desde el 2003 la sociedad neozelandesa ha experimentado silenciosamente un exitoso modelo radicalmente diferente y singularmente tolerante que despenaliza el trabajo sexual.</p> <p>La <a href="http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2003/0028/latest/DLM197815.html">Ley de reforma de la prostitución de Nueva Zelanda</a> («PRA», por sus siglas en inglés) despenalizó por completo el trabajo sexual en 2003. En este país, es legal para cualquier nacional mayor de 18 años vender servicios sexuales. El trabajo sexual en la calle es legal, como lo es administrar un burdel. Los derechos de las trabajadoras sexuales están garantizados a través de la legislación laboral y de derechos humanos.</p> <h2>El camino a la despenalización</h2> <p>Tim Barnett y Catherine Healy saben más que nadie sobre la batalla por la despenalización, y este artículo se basa en las entrevistas que llevé a cabo con ambos a principios de este año. Barnett, un antiguo miembro del Parlamento y el actual secretario general del Partido Laborista, se involucró con la PRA poco después de ganar su primera campaña por el escaño parlamentario de Christchurch Central en 1996. Lo hizo a solicitud de Catherine Healy, la coordinadora nacional del <a href="http://www.nzpc.org.nz/">New Zealand Prostitutes Collective</a> (Colectivo de Prostitutas de Nueva Zelanda, NZPC por sus siglas en inglés), quien solicitó activamente su apoyo para la despenalización. El NZPC fue fundado en 1987 como parte de una estrategia nacional para combatir el VIH/SIDA. Es un organismo financiado por el gobierno que trabaja para mejorar la salud, la educación y los derechos de las trabajadoras sexuales. Tim Barnett accedió, y se adentró en un ámbito político ya vibrante.</p> <p>Casi una década después de su implementación, la Ley de salones de masaje de 1978 estaba causando controversia porque la policía había anunciado que la legislación efectivamente permitía el trabajo sexual comercial en espacios interiores. Como resultado, un grupo compuesto por el NZPC y grupos feministas liberales bien establecidos, como el <a href="http://www.ncwnz.org.nz/">Consejo Nacional de Mujeres de Nueva Zelanda</a> y el <a href="https://www.womensrefuge.org.nz/">Colectivo Nacional de Refugios de Mujeres Independientes</a>, empezó a trabajar en una enmienda de ley a favor de la despenalización. Barnett presentó ese proyecto de ley a su partido, que lo respaldó como un voto de conciencia. Posteriormente, poco después de la elección de 1999, se encontró a sí mismo en la situación de poder presentar el proyecto de ley al parlamento. Fue aprobada en el primer debate con 87 votos frente a 21.</p> <p>Un comité escuchó 222 presentaciones de aportaciones durante los dos años siguientes, de las cuales 56 podrían considerarse feministas. Cuarenta de estas presentaciones, que vinieron de grupos tan diversos como NZPC, la <a href="http://bpwnz.org.nz/">New Zealand Federation of Business and Professional Women</a> (Federación de mujeres de negocios y profesionales de Nueva Zelanda), la <a href="http://ywca.org.nz/">Young Women’s Christian Association</a> (Asociación de mujeres jóvenes cristianas), y la <a href="https://www.nzaf.org.nz/">AIDS Foundation</a> (Fundación SIDA) apoyaron la despenalización. Las otras 16 apoyaron el modelo sueco y vinieron de CATW internacional, Ruth Margerison de CATW NZ, y la defensora anti-aborto Marilyn Prior, entre otras. Al final, el comité se pronunció a favor de la despenalización, y el proyecto de ley fue aprobado por un escueto margen de 8 votos en su segundo debate en 2002.</p> <p>En 2003 Nueva Zelanda estaba gobernado por un parlamento más conservador y el proyecto de ley generó una intensa oposición de la comunidad cristiana evangélica. «Se podría escribir un libro entero sobre la última semana, con gente cambiando de opinión a favor y en contra», dijo Barnett. Sin embargo hubo un amplio apoyo público a favor de la despenalización por parte de la Asociación de Planificación Familiar, el sector de salud pública y la comunidad homosexual. En el tercer y final debate, la PRA fue aprobada por 60 votos contra 59 y una abstención.</p> <p>Barnett cree que el apoyo se debe a una variedad de motivos, «esto suponía quitar el peso del estado de los hombros de las personas, lo que apelaba a los liberales», explicó. «Al mismo tiempo promovía la igualdad de las mujeres, y la gran mayoría de trabajadoras sexuales son mujeres, y dirige los recursos de la policía hacia donde pueden ser utilizados más provechosamente».</p> <h2>En retrospectiva</h2> <p>Quienes se oponían a la PRA, temían que su introducción llevara a una explosión de burdeles y de trata de personas, y en respuesta a esto se incorporó una revisión en la nueva legislación. Diez años después de su introducción el <a href="http://www.justice.govt.nz/policy/commercial-property-and-regulatory/prostitution/prostitution-law-review-committee">Comité de revisión de la Ley de prostitución</a> concluyó:</p> <blockquote> <p><em>La industria del sexo no ha aumentado en tamaño, y muchos de los males sociales vaticinados por quienes se oponían a la despenalización de la industria sexual no se han hecho realidad. En general, la PRA ha sido efectiva en lograr su propósito, y el Comité tiene confianza en que la vasta mayoría de personas involucradas en la industria del sexo están mejor con la PRA de lo que estaban previamente.</em></p> </blockquote> <p>El comité de revisión también encargó a la Escuela de Medicina de Christchurch la tarea de llevar a cabo una <a href="http://www.otago.ac.nz/christchurch/otago018607.pdf">revisión independiente</a>. Métodos cuantitativos y cualitativos concluyeron que el 90 por ciento de las trabajadoras sexuales creían que la PRA les había dado empleo, derechos legales y de salud y seguridad. Un sustancial 64 por ciento encontró más fácil rechazar clientes. Significativamente, el 57 por ciento dijo que las actitudes de la policía hacia las trabajadoras sexuales habían cambiado para mejor.&nbsp;</p> <p>Healy ve estos resultados como evidencia de éxito. «Nueva Zelanda ha tenido quince años para implementar la despenalización», dijo. «Creo que hay situaciones que necesitan ser mejoradas, pero creo que en general hemos visto una industria que ha evolucionado y desarrollado nuevas e importantes relaciones». Barnett fue más conciso en su evaluación de la PRA: «Protege los derechos de las personas que se propuso proteger».</p> <p>De hecho, uno de los impactos legislativos más significativos ha sido la relación entre la policía y las trabajadoras sexuales. «Antes de la despenalización, existían relaciones, pero usualmente no eran de confianza», explicó Healy. «No sentías que la policía estuviera ahí para protegerte». Esta relación desafortunada obviamente no es exclusiva de Nueva Zelanda, algo que demuestra ampliamente el informe de 2009 <em><a href="http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/reports/arrest-violence-human-rights-violations-against-sex-workers-11-countries-central-and-eastern">Frenar la violencia: violaciones de los derechos humanos de trabajadoras sexuales en 22 países en Europa Central y Oriental, y Asia Central</a>.</em>&nbsp;Sin embargo, Healy detectó un marcado cambio en las relaciones entre la policía y las trabajadoras sexuales después de la promulgación de la PRA. «Con la despenalización la dinámica cambió de forma radical y, lo más importante, el foco de atención ya no estaba en la idea de las trabajadoras sexuales como delincuentes, sino en sus derechos, su seguridad y su bienestar».</p> <h2>Erosionar el estigma, exigir derechos</h2> <p>Si bien la despenalización no ha resultado la cura para todos los males —empleadores todavía discriminan sobre la base de ocupación previa; recientemente ha surgido controversia por trabajadoras de la calle menores de edad en Auckland—, las trabajadoras sexuales en Nueva Zelanda están empezando a hacer valer sus derechos, ahora que el estigma asociado con el trabajo sexual ha comenzado a disminuir.</p> <p>El año pasado, por ejemplo, una trabajadora sexual de Wellington demandó con éxito al propietario de un burdel por acoso sexual a través del Tribunal de revisión de derechos humanos. Se le concedieron 25.000 dólares neozelandeses por daño emocional. «A medida que una nueva generación de trabajadoras sexuales empiece a trabajar en un entorno más justo», explicó Barnett, «se irán dando cuenta poco a poco de que ese comportamiento no es tolerable».</p> <p>Barnett ve como desacertada la persistente campaña por el modelo sueco puesto que la criminalización de las trabajadoras sexuales aumenta su vulnerabilidad al reforzar la percepción de que de alguna manera son víctimas. «Algunas de las personas que venden servicios sexuales son personalmente realmente vulnerables, pero es la ley la que puede protegerlas. Es la ley y su estatus legal lo que puede defender sus derechos», dijo. «[Su] falta de humanidad es reforzada por leyes perjudiciales. [En estos casos,] el estado en realidad está promoviendo el que sean vistas como objetos, el estado está favoreciendo la opresión». Barnett se opone a una legislación enfocada en la demanda ya que cree que su único efecto es empujar a las trabajadoras a la clandestinidad.</p> <p>Healy tampoco tiene mucha paciencia con quienes continúan defendiendo el modelo sueco. «Hay un esfuerzo determinado por parte de algunas feministas radicales de socavar los derechos de las mujeres que son trabajadoras sexuales por decisión propia en el contexto del trabajo sexual&quot;, dijo. «Afortunadamente la ley de NZ ensalza los derechos de las trabajadoras sexuales y no busca debilitarlos».</p> <p>El modelo sueco fue considerado pero rotundamente rechazado en Nueva Zelanda. En cambio, el parlamento dio prioridad a los derechos de las trabajadoras sexuales y escuchó las voces de las feministas y de las trabajadoras sexuales antes de votar por la despenalización, confiando en que ellas estaban mejor preparadas para hablar sobre su propio trabajo. En verdad, la importancia de escuchar es, con diferencia, la lección más importante que se puede extraer de la experiencia de Nueva Zelanda. «A menudo las comunidades afectadas saben mejor cómo mejorar sus vidas», dijo Healy. «Como trabajadoras sexuales pudimos llevar nuestras ideas a un miembro del parlamento comprensivo y trabajar de cerca con otras personas, dentro y fuera del gobierno, para influir en los cambios legislativos que afectarían directamente no solo nuestro trabajo, sino también nuestras vidas».</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Fraser Crichton BTS en Español Thu, 01 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Fraser Crichton 120203 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Las operaciones de redada y rescate se retratan muy a menudo como esfuerzos heroicos para salvar a personas inocentes de personas malvadas, pero la realidad no resulta tan clara. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters/beyond-raid-and-rescue-time-to-acknowledge-damage-being-done">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/8055637893_696509e1d0_o.jpg" alt="" width="100%" /><span class="image-caption">Thien/flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/thienv/8055637893/">(CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)</a></span></p> <h2>El movimiento abolicionista trabajando</h2> <p>La policía grita. Irrumpen en una casa de lujo con chalecos antibalas y con pistolas preparadas para disparar. Gritan en español y la gente en el interior se tira al suelo. La cámara apunta hacia el suelo, donde varios hombres y mujeres negros yacen tumbados boca abajo. La policía empieza a esposar a las personas en el suelo una por una. Entre las piernas de un policía, la cámara graba a dos hombres blancos de pelo rubio. Ellos también están tumbados boca abajo, pero uno de ellos levanta la cabeza, mira a su alrededor, encuentra al cámara, le guiña un ojo con entusiasmo y sonríe.</p> <p>Este <a href="http://www.ldsliving.com/Rescuing-Children-from-Sex-Slavery-One-Mormon-s-Inspired-Mission/s/78169">hombre es un estadounidense</a> que ha orquestado esta redada en la República Dominicana como un operativo encubierto para «rescatar a niñas y niños víctimas de la trata con fines sexuales». En un breve <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkhA0dIUGs8">vídeo</a> que documenta los hechos, podemos seguirle a él y a sus amigos estadounidenses mientras se infiltran de incógnito en el país isleño como turistas sexuales. Vemos cómo pagan por tener sexo a través de una barra plagada de botellas de cerveza, y después fingen que la policía los pilla con los «tratantes» en el operativo encubierto. Nos enteramos de que horas más tarde los estadounidenses vuelven a sus hogares en EE.UU., mientras que a los dominicanos los encierran en prisión por acceder a venderles sexo. El vídeo termina con unas letras blancas muy marcadas sobre un fondo negro que dicen: «26 víctimas liberadas, 8 tratantes arrestados. Todo gracias a vuestras donaciones».</p> <p>La <a href="https://ourrescue.org/">ONG «abolicionista»</a> responsable de este vídeo es una de las muchas que se involucran en la infiltración de incógnito de forma profesional, y la presentan como una forma de intervención humanitaria. En una red social del fundador de la ONG, nos enteramos de que él «<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUUnclKiSjI&amp;t=199s">arriesga su vida para salvar a niñas y niños de todo el mundo</a>». Este tipo de organizaciones invitan al público a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCviapJdufw">«unirse al equipo del salto»</a> para participar en estas aventuras internacionales contra la trata de personas apoyándoles mediante la donación de dinero. Las ONG especializadas en redadas encubiertas se asocian con otras que afirman ofrecer refugio y rehabilitación a las víctimas liberadas. ¿Pero cuáles son los verdaderos impactos de sus iniciativas?</p> <h2>Seis investigaciones ofrecen algunas perspectivas sobre las operaciones de redada y rescate</h2> <p>Kemala Kempadoo ha demostrado que la «guerra contra la trata de personas» ofrece un nuevo vehículo para <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/kamala-kempadoo/white-man%E2%80%99s-burden-revisited">«la carga del hombre blanco»</a>, y permite a los hombres blancos del Norte global llevar a cabo sus fantasías de ser los salvadores de Otros seres cosificados de tez morena del Sur global. Otras investigaciones han resaltado los problemas causados por el <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/garrett-nagaishi/from-utah-to-%E2%80%98darkest-corners-of-world%E2%80%99-militarisation-of-raid-and-re">enfoque militarizado</a> de sus operaciones, mientras que las que se realizan en terreno señalan que algunas de las organizaciones reconocidas en este campo son <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/ronald-weitzer/miscounting-human-trafficking-and-slavery">engañosas</a>, <a href="http://www.newsweek.com/2014/05/30/somaly-mam-holy-saint-and-sinner-sex-trafficking-251642.html">explotadoras</a> o <a href="http://twocircles.net/2012jan13/dharna_against_ngo_defaming_poor_muslim_women_hyderabad.html#.VYHj20ZOPMs">fraudulentas</a>. Lo peor de todo son sus <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/neil-howard/slavery-and-trafficking-beyond-hollow-call">críticas</a> al movimiento contra la trata, el cual, según estas organizaciones, no hace nada para enfrentar las verdaderas causas de la explotación.</p> <p>En el contexto de estas críticas al enfoque dominante hacia la trata de personas y la «esclavitud moderna», las operaciones de redada y rescate plantean una serie diferente de problemas. A pesar de los guiños tranquilizantes de sus promotores, este movimiento requiere un escrutinio serio y continuo, en parte por el impacto perjudicial que puede tener sobre las mismas personas —principalmente mujeres— a las que dicen ayudar. </p> <p>El abolicionismo suele clasificar a la gente que salvan o atrapan como víctimas «puras» o malhechores «puros», sin ningún tipo de neutralidad. Según su sistema de clasificación, todo lo que necesitamos para que prevalezcan la libertad y la justicia es identificar a las personas «esclavistas» y separarlas de las «esclavas». Este es el tipo de lógica que sostienen las fantasiosas intervenciones salvadoras como «<a href="https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/ezzjcw/slavery-from-space">Esclavitud desde el Espacio</a>», que pretende salvar a las personas esclavas haciendo que el voluntariado señale sus lugares de trabajo mediante la utilización de <a href="http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/connectonline/research/2017/fighting-slavery-from-space.aspx">imágenes por satélite</a>.</p> <p>Esa lógica está teniendo consecuencias escalofriantes en todo el mundo. En el mejor de los casos, la gente a la que se rescata por la fuerza podría pensar que la redada y la posterior detención son una forma de «trata secundaria», lo que a menudo deriva en dificultades económicas o en que las <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/nicolas-lainez/modern-vietnamese-slaves-in-uk-are-raid-and-rescue-operations-appropria">personas rescatadas huyan</a> de quienes las rescató. En el peor, los rescates forzosos han provocado las <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/kimberly-waters/rescued-from-rights-misogyny-of-anti-trafficking">muertes</a> de aquellas personas a las que se ha rescatado y retenido contra su voluntad. Incluso quienes no han resultado heridas ni física ni económicamente por el rescate a menudo son tratadas con indiferencia, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/runa-lazzarino/freeloaders-blackmailers-and-lost-souls-rescued-sex-trafficking-survivo">desprecio</a> y <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/barnali-das/rescue-by-force-or-rescue-by-choice">hostilidad</a> por las personas encargadas de su cuidado a largo plazo. No resulta sorprendente que demasiado a menudo, la lógica rígida y precisa del movimiento de redada y rescate identifique erróneamente a la gente, ignorando <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/using-intersectional-approach-to-raid-and-rescue">a quienes quieren ser rescatadas</a> y «rescatando» a quienes no desean serlo.</p> <h2>Las operaciones de redada y rescate como violencia contra la mujer</h2> <p>El tan documentado <a href="https://www.zedbooks.net/shop/book/sex-slaves-and-discourse-masters/">énfasis sobre las mujeres</a> de los movimientos contra la trata hace que, aunque las redadas no se dirijan solo a mujeres, sean estas principalmente las que se vean <a href="http://sexworkersproject.org/downloads/swp-2009-raids-and-trafficking-report.pdf">arrastradas por la violencia que a veces ejercen estas redes, </a>y <a href="http://www.antitraffickingreview.org/index.php/atrjournal/article/view/28/48">retenidas en refugios contra su voluntad</a>. Esto significa que las mujeres son principalmente las que experimentan las consecuencias de ser «salvadas» y separadas de sus amistades, de sus familias y de sus fuentes de ingresos. Pero también son sometidas a tratamientos impuestos por los refugios, a veces amables y a veces ambivalentes; pero en general abusivos. Con mayor frecuencia son mujeres las que <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/vibhuti-ramachandran/rescued-but-not-released-%E2%80%98protective-custody%E2%80%99-of-sex-workers-in-i">pierden meses —y a veces años</a>— de sus vidas mientras permanecen encerradas en centros de rescate esperando a que unos tribunales determinen si merecen volver a sus vidas o no. ¿No es razonable entonces plantearse si los movimientos de redada y rescate no son en sí mismos una forma de violencia contra las mujeres?</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Kimberly Walters BTS en Español Wed, 31 Oct 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Kimberly Walters 120202 at https://www.opendemocracy.net No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos- <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Muchas mujeres tailandesas se convierten en trabajadoras sexuales no porque sean pobres, sino para escapar de la pobreza. Al hacerlo, se transforman en proveedoras y cabezas de familia, y merecen respeto por esos logros. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sws/we-don-t-do-sex-work-because-we-are-poor-we-do-sex-work-to-end-our-poverty">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none caption-xlarge'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/Empower3_460.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/Empower3_460.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="236" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload caption-xlarge imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>Photo by author. All Rights Reserved.</span></span></span></p> <p>Las mujeres en Tailandia asumen la responsabilidad y el orgullo de mantener a la familia. En los tiempos modernos las necesidades de la familia no se pueden cultivar a mano, sino que las mujeres deben encontrar el dinero en efectivo para el sustento. Las oportunidades para las mujeres sin formación y sin recursos financieros son limitadas. El trabajo que podemos encontrar está infravalorado y es siempre el mismo, todos los días. Hay pocas sorpresas y no hay primas.</p> <p>Algunas de nosotras, después de muchos trabajos con salario mínimo, decidimos solicitar trabajo en salones de karaoke, salones de masajes, burdeles o bares: decidimos convertirnos en trabajadoras sexuales. Elegimos entre las opciones que tenemos a nuestra disposición. No podemos elegir opciones que no existen.</p> <p>Como trabajadoras sexuales obtenemos como mínimo el doble del salario mínimo. Ganamos lo suficiente para mantener a otras cinco personas adultas de nuestras familias. El trabajo puede ser duro, y a veces aburrido, pero rara vez es repetitivo. Hay muchas sorpresas y muchas gratificaciones.</p> <p>En la forma moderna de trabajo sexual en Tailandia, pedimos trabajo y nos contratan o nos rechazan. Nuestros lugares de trabajo cuentan con reglamentos. No existe el proxeneta, la mafia o la pandilla, sólo está el tipo de la moto-taxi y el gerente del negocio. Nuestras preocupaciones laborales son similares a las de otras trabajadoras, por ejemplo: permisos laborales con retribución inadecuada, falta de cobertura de seguridad social, de salud y de seguridad en el trabajo.</p> <p>Trabajamos para comprar terrenos y construir casas. Trabajamos para pagar impuestos (incluyendo sobornos a policías corruptos), para pagar las tasas universitarias de nuestros hermanos o los costos de alquiler de tiendas para nuestras hermanas y para cubrir cualquier otra emergencia. Nos convertimos en el sostén de la familia y, por lo tanto, tomamos muchas de las grandes decisiones familiares. Las trabajadoras sexuales también construyen el país. Ya en 1998, la <a href="http://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/media-centre/press-releases/WCMS_007994/lang--en/index.htm">Organización Internacional del Trabajo </a>informaba de que estábamos enviando 300 millones de dólares a las zonas rurales cada año, mucho más que cualquier proyecto de desarrollo. También somos la columna vertebral de la industria turística, que representa alrededor del 10% del PIB anual de Tailandia.</p> <p>Para nosotras y nuestras familias el trabajo sexual se ha convertido en una forma de salir de la pobreza generacional, además de ayudar a nuestro país a enriquecerse. No hacemos trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, hacemos trabajo sexual para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</p> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none caption-xlarge'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/Empower (2).jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/Empower (2).jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="367" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload caption-xlarge imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>Photo by author. All Rights Reserved.</span></span></span></p> <h2>Adaptarse para sobrevivir</h2> <p>Las trabajadoras sexuales en Tailandia se han estado organizando, resistiendo y respondiendo al cambio durante siglos.</p> <p>Cada generación de trabajadoras del sexo <a href="https://search.socialhistory.org/Record/1466255">ha tenido que ingeniárselas y aprender nuevas habilidades nunca imaginadas en años anteriores</a>. Nos adaptamos al final de la esclavitud y a la llegada de la economía monetaria. Seguimos de cerca los acontecimientos mundiales, la política, la economía y los deportes para entender a nuestros clientes. Aprendimos sobre pasaportes, visados y viajes. Utilizamos tarjetas postales, telegramas, buscapersonas, correos electrónicos, teléfonos móviles, cámaras web y ahora aplicaciones.</p> <p>También hemos dado la bienvenida a numerosos nuevos clientes a lo largo de los años. Comenzando con los inmigrantes chinos de finales de 1700, la lista también incluye soldados japoneses durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial, soldados de los EE.UU. durante la guerra de Vietnam, tropas estadounidenses y de otros países aliados de permiso durante sus conflictos bélicos en los países del Golfo. A pesar de que se nos negó la escolaridad, aprendimos nuevos idiomas: chino, japonés e inglés. Aprendimos a lidiar con el trauma de la guerra. Aprendimos las costumbres de muchos países. Hoy en día trabajamos con más de 15 millones de hombres de todos los rincones del mundo cuando visitan Tailandia cada año.</p> <p>La sociedad ha dependido de que las trabajadoras del sexo continúen trabajando y ganando el dinero necesario para solucionar sus problemas.</p> <p>En 1960, cuando la «Ley de supresión y prevención de la prostitución» prohibió por primera vez comprar o vender sexo, tuvimos que aprender otra nueva habilidad: ingeniárnoslas para trabajar a pesar del derecho penal. Rápidamente aprendimos que las autoridades corruptas usan la ley para hacernos pagar por nuestros derechos humanos básicos: el derecho al trabajo, el derecho a la seguridad y el derecho a la justicia. Aprendimos que el derecho penal no está diseñado para promover nuestros derechos sino que es una forma de suprimirlos.</p> <p>A finales de los años ochenta, el turismo y la industria comenzaban a desarrollarse en el país. Tailandia recibía millones de turistas. Las trabajadoras sexuales tailandesas viajaron por todo el mundo, mientras nuestras vecinas de Laos, Camboya, Vietnam, Myanmar y China venían a Tailandia para construir una vida mejor. Trasladarnos para trabajar es nuestra forma de resistencia. Nos negamos a aceptar las situaciones o condiciones en las que nacimos y soñamos con una vida mejor. La migración es nuestra solución, no nuestro problema.</p> <p>Sin embargo, en lugar de que los gobiernos trabajasen para promover la migración segura, fue la «Ley contra la Trata» lo que cayó sobre nosotras. Aprendimos que la ley contra la trata no mejora nuestras condiciones de trabajo, no aumenta nuestras opciones ni acaba con nuestra pobreza. No reduce los conflictos armados en nuestros países de origen. No reduce la corrupción. No aumenta el apoyo destinado a las niñas, niños y adolescentes. No exige que los gobiernos o la sociedad respeten nuestros derechos humanos. Es importante dejar claro que las leyes y los métodos de lucha contra la trata no reducen la «trata» ni hacen justicia a las trabajadoras y trabajadores en esas circunstancias en ninguna industria, tampoco en la industria del sexo. Sabemos esto porque nuestra organización detalló el impacto de la ley y la práctica contra la trata para los derechos humanos de las trabajadoras sexuales en su informe de investigación comunitaria de 2012, «<a href="http://www.empowerfoundation.org/sexy_file/Hit%2520and%2520Run%2520%2520RATSW%2520Eng%2520online.pdf">Hit &amp; Run</a>».</p> <h2>La necesidad de estar unidas</h2> <p>En lugar de ser admiradas como activistas, líderes, trabajadoras y proveedoras, nos llaman malas mujeres, delincuentes y víctimas. Somos representadas como mujeres débiles, estúpidas e infantiles. Se ignora nuestra contribución a las familias y al país, o se la define como una carga o como explotación.</p> <p>El aumento del estigma y de la ley han destruido los vínculos entre nosotras. Nuestras amigas que se quedaron trabajando en la fábrica, en la tierra o en una tienda, se han vuelto distantes y tienen miedo de asociarse con mujeres malas y delincuentes. Las organizaciones que solían cooperar entre sí, ahora se encuentran confundidas tanto a nivel nacional como internacional. Los grupos de mujeres no están seguros si trabajar con las organizaciones de trabajadoras sexuales o no. No están seguras si deben considerar a las trabajadoras sexuales y a sus organizaciones como delincuentes, como víctimas de delincuentes o como compañeras en igualdad de condiciones que merecen respeto. El movimiento de mujeres está fragmentado. La financiación de los proyectos se vio amenazada cuando George W. Bush, el ex-presidente de Estados Unidos, introdujo el «compromiso contra la prostitución» en el año 2003. Este acuerdo fue declarado inconstitucional en 2013, pero sólo para las organizaciones que trabajan en los Estados Unidos. Exige que las organizaciones financiadas por USAID no tomen ninguna acción o posición que pueda «promover, apoyar o abogar por la legalización o la práctica de la prostitución». La información sensacionalista y la histeria han reforzado la confusión, lo que ha derivado en que muchos grupos temen apoyar abiertamente a las trabajadoras sexuales.</p> <p>Así que debemos permanecer unidas.</p> <p>Durante 30 años nos hemos estado organizando como Empower, la organización nacional de trabajadoras sexuales de Tailandia. Alrededor de 50.000 profesionales del sexo han formado parte de Empower. Abogan por sus derechos y contra el estigma, y sus esfuerzos se ven facilitados por su presencia en los lugares de trabajo y en los centros de salud, y por la capacitación en ámbitos como la alfabetización, la educación sanitaria, inglés, informática y derechos legales. Somos trabajadoras sexuales que ejercemos en todos los sectores de la industria. Nos gusta nuestro trabajo, odiamos nuestro trabajo, y, como la mayoría de las personas trabajadoras de cualquier sector, con frecuencia nos encontramos en un punto intermedio. Apenas estamos empezando o tenemos años de experiencia, estamos pensando en cambiar de trabajo o en jubilarnos. Somos tailandesas, pertenecientes a minorías étnicas e inmigrantes de países vecinos.</p> <p>Nos gustaría saber qué leyes y regímenes podrían concebirse si se pidiera a la sociedad en general que nos considerara, no como mujeres delincuentes, inmorales o víctimas indefensas, sino como seres humanos, madres, trabajadoras y proveedoras. ¿Cómo debería tratar el Estado a las mujeres que son cabezas de familia?</p> <p>Mientras esperamos las respuestas en todo del mundo, el público en general seguirá preguntándose: «La prostitución... ¿es buena o mala?» «Legal, ilegal, despenalizada... ¿qué es lo mejor?» El debate continúa mientras seguimos manteniendo a nuestras familias, construyendo el país, asesorando a cada uno de los gobiernos que se acercan, tratando de colaborar con otros colectivos mientras seguimos trabajando en la cima de una montaña de estigmas y leyes.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Empower Foundation BTS en Español Tue, 30 Oct 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Empower Foundation 120201 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>El trabajo sexual en Argentina es legal, pero desde 2011 la agenda contra la trata de personas ha amenazado cada vez más ese estatus. Esta amenaza ha forjado nuevas alianzas y estrategias de resistencia entre las trabajadoras sexuales. <strong><em><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sws/georgina-orellano/creative-protests-of-sex-workers-in-argentina">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/argetinabatwoman.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Photo provided by author. All Rights Reserved.</p> <p>La Asociación de Mujeres Meretrices de Argentina, <a href="http://ammar.org.ar/">AMMAR</a>, nació en 1995 como consecuencia de la criminalización del trabajo sexual en los espacios públicos de la Capital Federal, una subsidiaria de Buenos Aires. Nosotras las trabajadoras sexuales nos organizamos para luchar por nuestros derechos después de haber sido sometidas a todo tipo de abusos como exclusión, discriminación y ser tratadas como marginadas. Meses más tarde, nos unimos a la <a href="http://www.cta.org.ar/">Central de Trabajadores de la Argentina</a> (CTA), donde continuamos activas hasta el día de hoy. En 1997, también nos convertimos en parte de la Red de Trabajadoras Sexuales de América Latina y el Caribe (<a href="http://www.redtrasex.org/">RedTraSex</a>).</p> <p>Se dice que la Argentina adoptó oficialmente un enfoque abolicionista, lo que significa que, en principio, no penaliza el ejercicio de la prostitución <em>en sí</em>, sino a terceros que explotan la prostitución ajena. Los burdeles fueron prohibidos en 1936 por la ley 12.331, y otra legislación posterior criminalizó efectivamente en 19 provincias el trabajo sexual en la calle y en espacios privados. Esto demuestra los estrechos límites entre los modelos abolicionistas y prohibicionistas.</p> <p>En Argentina, el trabajo sexual se ejerce en apartamentos privados, pubs y clubes de baile, en la calle; de manera autónoma y a través de terceros. En algunos casos, experimentamos explotación laboral —lo mismo puede decirse de muchas otras trabajadoras y trabajadores— y la falta de regulación de nuestra actividad nos expone a persecución y abusos policiales. Para luchar por nuestros derechos, nuestra organización ha adoptado una serie de estrategias como una propuesta de ley, trabajar para construir alianzas políticas; ofrecer asistencia diaria en asuntos legales y de salud, y repartir condones. También difundimos nuestras iniciativas, como protestas públicas o debates, a través de nuestras propias redes sociales y medios públicos. Una de nuestras iniciativas más recientes ha sido la creación del <a href="http://ammar.org.ar/AMMAR-lanzara-linea-telefonica.html">Observatorio de Violencia Institucional hacia el Trabajo Sexual</a> (OVITS) y el lanzamiento de una línea directa a través de la cual las trabajadoras sexuales pueden presentar denuncias de violencia institucional.</p> <p>AMMAR también funciona como un sindicato, aunque legalmente no puede serlo, dada la falta de regulación del trabajo sexual. Esta forma de autoorganización nos permite a nosotras y a nuestras 6000 afiliadas enfatizar el hecho de que somos trabajadoras. También nos ha dado estructura en siete provincias, donde nuestras camaradas seleccionan a nuestras representantes. Para hacer este trabajo, contamos con el respaldo de varias agencias internacionales, incluyendo el Fondo Mundial de Lucha contra el SIDA, la Tuberculosis y la Malaria; la Fundación Sombrilla Roja; la Fundación Friedrich Ebert; ONUSIDA y la Fundación Levi Strauss.</p> <h2>Luchar contra la tendencia regresiva</h2> <p>Es importante destacar que, desde el año 2011, se ha instalado en Argentina un poderoso grupo de presión política contra la trata, junto con nuevas leyes que no diferencian la trata de personas de la explotación sexual y el trabajo sexual. Estas políticas tenían como objetivo abordar el mercado del sexo en su conjunto y nosotras, las «mujeres vulnerables», no sabíamos cómo avanzar contra un monstruo tan grande que venía a quitarnos la voz y ocupar nuestros espacios políticos. El 5 de julio de 2011, la Presidenta Cristina Fernández de Kirchner firmó el Decreto 936, que prohibía la publicación de servicios sexuales en anuncios publicitarios.</p> <p>Con un trazo de birome, restringió, en medio de una democracia, la libertad de expresión de miles de nosotras. Nunca fuimos invitadas a discutir esta legislación. Posteriormente, los lugares de trabajo sexual comenzaron a ser clausurados provincia por provincia, a través de acciones llevadas adelante principalmente por aquellas legisladoras y organizaciones abolicionistas que encabezan la lucha contra la trata. En 2012, otra política diseñada para controlar la trata de personas requirió que personas de República Dominicana obtuvieran una visado para ingresar al país con permiso legal.</p> <p>Los teléfonos de AMMAR no dejaron de sonar; pero no era la prensa que quería escuchar nuestra opinión sobre estas nuevas políticas, eran nuestras camaradas. Nos dimos cuenta de que estábamos lidiando con una decisión política inquebrantable, por lo que nos pusimos a trabajar para organizar a nuestras colegas. Gracias a estas nuevas políticas, ahora hay muchas más trabajadoras sexuales organizadas en Argentina. Qué paradoja: se nos prohibió ejercer el trabajo sexual, pero nos organizamos como trabajadoras sexuales.</p> <h2>Nuevas leyes, nuevas alianzas, nuevas tácticas</h2> <p>Sabiendo que teníamos cada vez menos espacios en los que trabajar sin ser amenazadas por clausuras y sanciones legales, aceleramos el proceso para presentar nuestra propia propuesta de ley. Terminamos en octubre de 2013. Se funda en la premisa de que el estado argentino no considera el trabajo sexual como una actividad ilegal. En consecuencia, propone regular el trabajo sexual en el país y otorgar a trabajadoras sexuales de edad legal —incluidos los trabajadores y trabajadoras transgénero y migrantes— derechos laborales, como el acceso a fondos de jubilación y beneficios de salud. También incluye una forma de gestionar lugares para el trabajo sexual que cumplan con los requisitos de supervisión, salud e higiene.</p> <p>Al principio, presentamos nuestra propuesta solas: ninguna otra organización o sindicato apoyó nuestras demandas. Al contrario, la campaña contra la prostitución se había vuelto tan fuerte que nuestras propias camaradas, que habían presenciado el nacimiento y el crecimiento de la organización, comenzaron a cuestionar nuestras demandas. Fuimos en busca de nuevas posibilidades, pero tropezamos con un feminismo académico tan experimentado que quedamos asustadas, creyendo que incluso el feminismo quería decidir sobre nuestros cuerpos.&nbsp;</p> <p>Durante mucho tiempo, nos mantuvimos alejadas de esos espacios. Pero un día, mientras las redadas, las clausuras y la propaganda contra el trabajo sexual continuaban sin cesar, dos antropólogas se presentaron tímidamente en nuestra organización con una propuesta. Querían ayudarnos a mantener un registro de la indignación institucional que estábamos experimentando. Al principio, dudamos, desconfiamos; pero luego aceptamos, y no nos equivocamos. Nos trajeron de vuelta a espacios que habíamos abandonado, nos mostraron otro feminismo, uno que nos apoyó.</p> <p>Propusimos nuevas alianzas. Ganamos el apoyo de la comunidad <a href="http://www.falgbt.org/">LGBT</a>, entre ellos muchas trabajadoras y trabajadores sexuales trans. Les siguió un grupo queer —que nos apoyó como representantes de una comunidad minoritaria hermana, perseguida por nuestra sexualidad— y sindicatos que nos reconocieron como trabajadoras y trabajadores, algunos de los cuales son miembros de la Central de Trabajadores de la Argentina (CTA). Junto con estas organizaciones, en forma reiterada, hicimos campañas por nuestros derechos laborales en lugares públicos, perseverando a pesar de que a menudo recibíamos reacciones que parecían bofetadas.</p> <p>No nos dimos por vencidas y decidimos continuar con otro tipo de acción: facturar por nuestros servicios, <em>como si</em> el trabajo sexual fuera una categoría legal. El proyecto de ley es <em>el</em> símbolo del trabajo legal y formal en nuestro país, y es por eso que llevamos a cabo una campaña el Primero de Mayo de 2015 —Día del trabajador y la trabajadora— en la que facturamos nuestros servicios sexuales a políticos y periodistas reconocidos. Queríamos demostrar que nuestro acceso a los derechos laborales era posible sin cambiar toda la ley, sino simplemente agregando la categoría de trabajo sexual en el registro del Ministerio del Trabajo, Empleo y Seguridad Social (MTEySS).</p> <p>Los resultados fueron mejores de lo que podríamos haber esperado: representantes políticos que no nos habían escuchado antes nos recibieron, y los medios cubrieron nuestras demandas de derechos laborales como un tema relevante. La campaña de facturación ganó el premio de comunicaciones <a href="http://www.ammar.org.ar/Ammar-y-Sur-Comunicaciones-ganaron.html">EIKON</a> 2015 de la revista Imagen (una revista de relaciones públicas y comunicaciones en español).</p> <p>Todavía no hemos tenido éxito en incluir el trabajo sexual en el registro del Ministerio de Trabajo, y como no estamos seguras de cómo será el contexto político en el futuro, seguimos luchando. También planificamos la presentación de un nuevo proyecto de ley nacional para regular el trabajo sexual autónomo y luchar contra nuevas políticas locales, como multas para clientes de trabajo sexual en la capital de la provincia de Mendoza. Ha habido muchas reacciones negativas a nuestro activismo, pero no nos hemos quedado quietas y nos hemos fortalecido aún más. Aquí estamos, muchas más voces exigiendo acceso a nuestros derechos laborales.</p> <blockquote> <p>Translated by Julieta Mendive</p> </blockquote><p>&nbsp;</p> <div style="background-color: #f9f3ff; width: 100%; float: right; border-top: solid 3px #DAC2EA;" class="partnership-in-article-banner-infobox"> <div style="margin-bottom: 8px; padding: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 1.2em; margin-bottom: 8px;">This article is published as part of the 'Sex workers speak: who listens?' series on Beyond Trafficking and Slavery, generously sponsored by COST Action IS1209 ‘Comparing European Prostitution Policies: Understanding Scales and Cultures of Governance' (<a href="http://www.prospol.eu/">ProsPol</a>). ProsPol is funded by <a href="http://www.cost.eu/">COST</a>. The University of Essex is its Grant Holder Institution.</span></div></div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Georgina Orellano BTS en Español Mon, 29 Oct 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Georgina Orellano 120200 at https://www.opendemocracy.net El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Enfrentadas a leyes regresivas basadas en el pánico moral sobre la explotación sexual y la trata, el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas se ha movilizado para asegurarse un lugar en la mesa de elaboración de políticas. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sws/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/power-of-putas-brazilian-prostitutes-movement-in-time">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <iframe width="460" height="259" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VTaJ4rD6QYk?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">An interview with Gabriela Leite, founder of the sex worker movement in Brazil and the NGO Davida, on prostitution and politics in Brazil conducted in 2013 (4:48 duration)</p> <p>Es un mito que en Brasil la prostitución es completamente legal. Aunque es un trabajo reconocido por el Ministerio de Trabajo y Empleo, y la compra y venta de sexo no es un delito, todo lo que rodea a la prostitución está criminalizado (sobre todo «vivir de los beneficios»). En este entorno, el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas lucha por la despenalización total del trabajo sexual y su regularización como una forma de trabajo.</p> <p>A mediados de los 80 <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sISSYTGViJc">Gabriela Leite y Lourdes Barreto fundaron</a> la Red Brasileña de Prostitutas (BNP, por sus siglas en inglés) en respuesta a la violencia policial en los barrios de prostitución donde trabajaban. En los siguientes 20 años, las profesionales del sexo consolidaron organizaciones por todo Brasil, incluida Davida - Prostitución, Derechos Civiles y Salud en 1992. El BNP se ganó un sitio en la mesa de elaboración de políticas y fue instrumental en el desarrollo de iniciativas lideradas por compañeras para la prevención del VIH. Su asociación con el Programa Nacional de SIDA atrajo una atención especial en 2005 cuando Brasil rechazó más de <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB111498611657721646">40 millones de dólares en fondos estadounidenses </a>porque USAID, la sección de desarrollo de los EE.UU., demandó a cambio que las organizaciones que recibiesen fondos condenasen la prostitución. </p> <p>El abolicionismo ganó fuerza en Brasil a principio del nuevo milenio, avivado por el pánico moral y por el crecimiento del feminismo carcelario (en la izquierda) y el conservatismo cristiano (en la derecha). Los espacios en los que las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual eran bienvenidas para hablar como iguales en lugar de como víctimas disminuyeron, así como su inclusión en los círculos de elaboración de leyes.</p> <p>En 2013, una campaña federal para la prevención del VIH fue atacada por representar a una profesional del sexo declarando que era feliz en su profesión. El Ministro de Salud censuró y <a href="http://www.akissforgabriela.com/?cbg_tz=180&amp;p=3155">retiró la campaña original</a>, publicó versiones modificadas y despidió al director del programa de VIH Brasil. BNP respondió con <a href="http://www.nswp.org/news/statement-the-brazilian-network-prostitutes-federal-government-censorship-intervention-and">declaraciones</a> y <a href="http://www.akissforgabriela.com/?cbg_tz=180&amp;p=3202">campañas de protesta</a>, aunque en la <a href="http://world.time.com/2013/12/12/brazils-world-cup-raises-fear-of-rampant-child-prostitution/">histeria mediática que vino a continuación</a> sus declaraciones y las décadas de formidable trabajo respecto al VIH lideradas por quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual fueron en gran parte ignoradas.</p> <h2>Movilización creativa</h2> <p>El movimiento de las prostitutas ha respondido con una estrategia de doble acción: por un lado participando en las leyes callejeras, el teatro guerrillero y las iniciativas prácticas; por el otro, introduciéndose en foros e instituciones que surgieron en torno a la trata de personas.</p> <p>Estas formas de activismo giran alrededor de un tipo de leyes que yo, Laura, describo como <em>política de putas</em> en mi tesis de investigación sobre el activismo del trabajo sexual en Brasil. Inspirada por Gabriela Leite y su uso político de la palabra «<em>puta</em>» pienso que la política de <em>putas</em> trata de hacer un uso estratégico de los aspectos de la subjetividad sobre la <em>puta</em>en Brasil para movilizar aliadas y aliados, la atención mediática y el poder estatal a favor de los derechos de las prostitutas.&nbsp;La política de <em>putas</em> rechaza la victimización, invierte en el potencial transformativo de lo que siempre ha sido percibido como inmoral e interrumpe las divisiones entre las estructuras institucionales y la calle.</p> <iframe width="460" height="259" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CvKkGPiXv0o?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Gabriela Leite on the word ‘puta’ and why it should be used (3:52 duration)</p> <p>Un excelente ejemplo de la política de <em>putas</em> es <a href="https://www.facebook.com/daspu.paginaoficial"><em>Daspu</em> (De las Putas)</a>, una línea de ropa fundada por Davida en 2005. Daspu produce colecciones de moda y espectáculos con temas provocativos relacionados con la prostitución en una variedad de espacios urbanos. <em>Daspu</em> lanzó una colección de la Copa Mundial de 2014 adornada con peticiones de «burdeles de calidad FIFA» y llamamientos para que los asistentes a la Copa «se marcasen un gol» – un contraste escandaloso con la línea gubernamental prohibiendo el «turismo sexual». Otras organizaciones de trabajo sexual tales como <a href="https://blogdasesquinas.wordpress.com/">GEMPAC</a>, <a href="http://www.nswp.org/featured-member/associa%8D%8Bo-mulheres-guerreiras-warrior-women-association">Mulheres Guerreiras</a>, y <a href="https://pt-br.facebook.com/aprosmig/">APROSMIG </a>también organizaron eventos relacionados con la Copa Mundial, incluyendo <a href="http://correio.rac.com.br/_conteudo/2014/06/capa/campinas_e_rmc/179998-debate-e-desfile-marcam-o-putas-dei-em-campinas.html">espectáculos de moda Daspu</a> y <a href="http://www.otempo.com.br/cidades/prostitutas-jogam-pelada-na-guaicurus-por-registro-da-profiss%E3o-1.864979">partidos de fútbol en las zonas de prostitución</a>.</p> <p>En Rio de Janeiro, lanzamos la colección <em>Daspu</em> con<a href="https://bitchmedia.org/post/sex-workers-stage-protests-against-police-crackdowns-at-the-world-cup"> un espectáculo de moda en la calle</a> para protestar por una <a href="http://www.akissforgabriela.com/?cbg_tz=120&amp;p=3575">redada policial violenta</a> en la ciudad de Niterói. Esto desencadenó el arresto ilegal de más de 100 profesionales del sexo y casos de violaciones, agresiones y robos, eventos que fueron sucedidos por la impunidad policial y la <a href="https://news.vice.com/article/on-the-run-during-the-world-cup-with-brazils-most-wanted-prostitute">persecución de aquellas personas que manifestaron su opinión</a>. La protesta de <em>Daspu</em> acabó en un partido de fútbol amistoso improvisado frente al ayuntamiento que creó un espectáculo mediático. Junto con nuestras y nuestros colegas y colaboradores en <a href="http://www.observatoriodaprostituicao.ifcs.ufrj.br/">Observatorio de Prostitución</a>, también activamos un amplio rango de aliadas y aliados y nos pusimos en contacto con varias personas miembro del congreso que organizaron <a href="http://www.akissforgabriela.com/?cbg_tz=120&amp;p=3608">audiencias públicas</a> sobre la redada. Amnistía Internacional y otros grupos fueron movilizados para denunciar la violencia mientras que las y los profesionales del sexo explicaron lo sucedido a las organizaciones que estaban luchando contra los planes de renovación de Río. La mezcla de calculadas estrategias políticas junto con la organización táctica de manifestaciones alegres y provocativas es lo que hace que la política de <em>putas</em> sea tan efectiva.</p> <h2>Lucha contra la trata de personas en Brasil</h2> <p>El activismo de Davida en el movimiento contra la trata de Brasil es otro área donde la política de <em>putas</em> ha sido efectiva. En 2005, Davida empezó a aparecer en eventos contra la trata, exigiendo que se les escuchara. Dirigidas por Gabriela Leite, las personas activistas y colaboradoras de Davida (incluido yo, Thaddeus Blanchette) sosteníamos que simplemente arrestar a las trabajadoras sexuales y llamarlas «víctimas de trata» no aportaba nada, mientras que involucrarlas en el movimiento contra la trata ayudaría al gobierno a detectar los casos de esclavitud real.</p> <p>Durante su participación en estos debates, Davida calificó de «sandeces» las informaciones erróneas facilitadas por los grupos contra la trata y desafió los discursos que victimizaban a las prostitutas. Rebatió, por ejemplo, los argumentos de que «miles» de mujeres estaban siendo esclavizadas en burdeles con invitaciones para visitar los burdeles y hablar con las mujeres mismas. Poner al activismo contra la trata en contacto directo y cordial con profesionales del sexo fue uno de los mejores medios que Davida encontró para disipar el encantamiento de los mitos mediáticos.</p> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/davida-1.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">“Pelada” (Portuguese for pick up soccer match and a naked woman) in front of City Hall as part of Daspu’s launch of the 2014 World Cup collection and fashion protest against police violence in Niterói.<br />Image by author. All Rights Reserved.</p> <p>La investigación académica sobre la trata de personas continuó durante este periodo, generando nueva información y hallazgos. Mientras los grupos pentecostales relataban historias traducidas del inglés, BNP tenía información de primera mano sobre los abusos que los y las profesionales brasileñas del sexo estaban sufriendo en Europa por parte de ambos, «proxenetas» y quienes pretendían «rescatarlas». Gracias a tales investigaciones académicas –incluido <a href="http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&amp;pid=S0104-83332008000200003">el trabajo de Adriana Pisciteli</a> sobre las inmigrantes brasileñas en Europa; <a href="http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&amp;pid=S0104-83332008000200013">las investigaciones de Flavia Teixeira</a> sobre la prostitución transexual y la inmigración; <a href="http://www.csem.org.br/remhu/index.php/remhu/article/view/277">los estudios de Sprandel y Mansur</a> sobre la inmigración y la trata de personas; y <a href="http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&amp;pid=S1809-43412013000200012">el análisis de Blanchette y Silva</a> sobre los mitos de la trata de personas en Brasil– el activismo pudo elaborar un discurso basado en evidencias para rebatir las historias contra la trata que representaban a mujeres desdichadas y desamparadas y que generalmente eran ficticias.</p> <p>Y lo que es más importante, las prostitutas ganaron escaños en el estado y los consejos federales contra la trata de personas. Aquí establecieron alianzas importantes para centrar la atención del gobierno en lo realmente importante de la trata: la eliminación de la esclavitud, no la del trabajo sexual. Por supuesto, esto no resultó en una victoria clara para el movimiento de los derechos de las prostitutas. Las organizaciones abolicionistas atraen decenas de millones de dólares, miles de horas de trabajo voluntario y muchos medios de comunicación simpatizantes. Sin embargo, la mayoría de los grupos de profesionales del sexo no cuenta con ninguna subvención o viven de pequeños proyectos subvencionados por unas pocas fundaciones nacionales, los departamentos locales o estatales de SIDA y, en muchos casos (incluido Davida), de fundaciones internacionales tales como el Fondo Paraguas Rojo (Red Umbrella Fund). Por tanto el equilibrio de poder está enormemente inclinado hacia el movimiento abolicionista, pero las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual siguen resistiendo.</p> <p>Y lo hacen principalmente convirtiendo en suyo el concepto de que los y las profesionales del sexo están organizadas, reconocidas por el gobierno y preparadas para dialogar. En Brasil el resultado es que se han parado muchos de los peores memes contra la trata. Gracias a la movilización de las prostitutas, Brasil es el único lugar que conocemos donde el discurso oficial contra la trata que está financiado por el estado suele empezar con el aviso de que «no toda la prostitución es trata de personas». Una victoria pequeña pero importante.</p> <blockquote> <p>Este artículo se publicó como parte de «Quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual hablan: ¿Quién está escuchando?» en «Beyond Trafficking and Slavery» (una compilación de artículos y blogs sobre la trata de personas y la esclavitud moderna), generosamente subvencionada por COST Action IS1209 «Comparación de las Leyes de Prostitución Europeas: Entendimiento de las Escalas y la Cultura del Gobierno» (<a href="http://www.prospol.eu/">ProsPol</a>). ProsPol está fundado por <a href="http://www.cost.eu/">COST</a>. La Universidad de Essex es la institución que lo subvenciona.</p> </blockquote> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Laura Murray Thaddeus Blanchette BTS en Español Thu, 25 Oct 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Thaddeus Blanchette and Laura Murray 120199 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Para exigir que Associated Press (AP), una agencia internacional de noticias sin fines de lucro, deje de usar la expresión «trabajador/a sexual», la CATW utiliza afirmaciones exageradas sobre la violencia contra las mujeres tratando así de censurar al sector que representa a quienes realizan trabajo sexual de mutuo acuerdo. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/jason-congdon/speaking-of-%E2%80%9Cdead-prostitutes%E2%80%9D-how-catw-promotes-survivors-to-silence-se">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/4129142.jpg" width="460" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Sex workers and supporters protest on International Women's Day in London. Guy Corbishley/Demotix. All Rights Reserved.</p> <p>La <a href="http://www.catwinternational.org/">Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres</a> (CATW) ha publicado recientemente <a href="http://www.catwinternational.org/Content/Images/Article/587/attachment.pdf">una carta abierta</a> dirigida al editor de la <em>Guía de Estilo de Associated Press</em>, David Minthorn, en respuesta a una <a href="http://www.dailydot.com/lifestyle/ap-style-guide-sex-worker/">campaña que se llevó a cabo en la red</a> para sustituir la palabra «prostituta» por «trabajador/a sexual» en la guía 2015.</p> <p>La CATW y sus simpatizantes se oponen a las expresiones «trabajo sexual» y «trabajador/a sexual» porque consideran que «dichas expresiones han sido creadas por la industria del sexo para legitimar la prostitución como forma de trabajo aceptable y ocultar el daño causado a las personas explotadas en el ámbito del comercio sexual».&nbsp;</p> <p>La carta, que ha sido firmada por «más de 300 grupos defensores de los derechos humanos y activistas contra la trata», incluye una selección de declaraciones de quienes la firman, que creen que la expresión «trabajador/a sexual» obvia el sufrimiento de las personas que se identifican como supervivientes de la explotación sexual. Sin embargo, la carta de la CATW apoya a quienes se identifican como supervivientes, reclamando que se ignore y se silencie a quienes se denominen a sí mismas trabajadoras sexuales.</p> <p>Las sobrevivientes a la violencia tienen derecho a hablar y es fundamental escucharlas con atención y tacto.&nbsp;Pero lo que intentan la CATW y sus aliados es censurar la experiencia de las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual y acallar a los organismos representantes en los medios de comunicación, negándose a nombrar las prácticas de trabajo sexual consensuado como el medio de vida de estas personas.</p> <p>Ambas campañas recogen la idea falsa de que existe una dualidad al sugerir que el periodismo debe elegir entre dos nociones mutuamente excluyentes, la de la prostitución forzada o la del trabajo sexual consentido. La amplia variedad de investigaciones y testimonios demuestra una enorme diversidad de experiencias entre las personas que intercambian servicios sexuales por dinero. Es arrogante creer que un par de etiquetas puedan o deban definir tantas experiencias distintas.</p> <p>La carta utiliza incluso mentiras flagrantes, como una letanía de estadísticas sin referenciar que aparentemente «demuestran que la industria del comercio sexual se basa en la deshumanización, degradación y violencia de género y causa daños físicos y psicológicos para toda la vida». La organización incluye también una declaración muy impactante: «La edad media de mortalidad de una persona que ejerce prostitución es de 34 años».</p> <p>Esta arriesgada afirmación fue difundida en un <em>artículo</em> de <a href="http://www.newsweek.com/growing-demand-prostitution-68493">2011 de Newsweek</a>, en el que se declaraba que «La prostitución siempre ha sido peligrosa para las mujeres. La edad media de mortalidad es de 34 años». La fuente es un <em>artículo</em> de 2004 de la revista <a href="http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/159/8/778.full">American Journal of Epidemiology</a> titulado «La mortalidad en una cohorte abierta a largo plazo de mujeres prostitutas». Se trata de un estudio sobre mujeres fallecidas en el que los autores «identificaron 117 fallecimientos seguros o probables» de «mujeres prostitutas identificadas por la policía y por el Departamento de vigilancia de la salud de Colorado Springs, Colorado, de 1967 a 1999». De paso, los autores afirman que «una pequeña cantidad de esas mujeres murieron por causas naturales, como es de esperar en personas cuya edad media al fallecer era de 34 años».</p> <p>Lo esencial que hay que saber aquí es que este estudio, por su definición y por su diseño, no tuvo en cuenta su forma de vida. De una «cohorte abierta de 1969 mujeres» se identificaron 117 fallecidas. En otras palabras, el 94 por ciento de aquellas mujeres que ejercían la prostitución —1852 mujeres vivas— han sido excluidas de la muestra. «La declaración según la cual &quot;la edad media de fallecimiento es 34 años&quot; es muy inexacta si se observan los resultados reales», <a href="https://maggiemcneill.wordpress.com/2011/07/24/">observó en 2011</a> Maggie McNeill. «¡Es exactamente lo mismo que concluir que &quot;el soldado medio muere a los 21 años&quot; excluyendo de la media a todos los que sobreviven!»</p> <p>La declaración de la CATW es errónea sin que sean conscientes de ello o es deliberadamente engañosa. Da la impresión de que la persona que ejerza la prostitución o que realice trabajos sexuales tiene una alta probabilidad de morir alrededor de los treinta, una suposición sensacionalista, estigmatizadora y falsa.</p> <p>La afirmación errónea sobre la mortalidad es una metáfora del argumento de la CATW que sugiere que la representación del todo debería ser sobrescrita por las vivencias de un único grupo reducido. Tergiversan las estadísticas existentes sobre las mujeres fallecidas que ejercían la prostitución para sugerir que las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual no deberían estar representadas.</p> <p>Esta macabra maniobra configura el juego de poder retórico en la conclusión de la carta, donde la CATW pide que las voces de las sobrevivientes gocen de especial atención en los medios de comunicación:</p> <blockquote> <p><em>«Se adjuntan las palabras de las sobrevivientes sobre el daño que hace el uso de las expresiones &quot;trabajo sexual&quot;, &quot;trabajadora sexual&quot; y &quot;prostituta&quot;. Estas valientes personas están dirigiendo un movimiento global para poner fin a la explotación del comercio sexual y a la trata con fines sexuales. Solicitamos que la AP se comprometa con ellas como expertas en política».</em></p> </blockquote> <p>¿Por qué las conversaciones sobre la prostitución y el trabajo sexual tienen que ser un juego de suma cero? La representación de las experiencias de las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual no tiene que silenciar las experiencias de las personas sobrevivientes, que están ampliamente representadas en los debates sobre la ley relativa a la prostitución en Canadá, Francia y Reino Unido, por ejemplo. Las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual son las principales interesadas en estos debates y también sus vidas merecen contar con una representación justa.</p> <p>Las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual no niegan que la explotación puede ocurrir en relación al intercambio de sexo por dinero, aunque algunas dudan de las declaraciones extremas sobre la omnipresencia de estos males. El intento de la CATW de reivindicar exclusiva atención sobre la experiencia y representación de las sobrevivientes refleja la enorme división entre el discurso sobre la prostitución y el discurso sobre el trabajo sexual, mientras que se niega a reconocer la inmensa diversidad de vivencias que subyace tras la polémica.</p> <p>Necesitamos encontrar otra forma de describir las experiencias que actualmente definimos como trata, prostitución y trabajo sexual. Mientras tanto, la publicidad que está haciendo CATW de las sobrevivientes como expertas en explotación sexual y trata parecería mucho más justa si reconociera también la experiencia y el conocimiento de quienes ejercen trabajo sexual. </p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Jason Congdon BTS en Español Wed, 24 Oct 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Jason Congdon 120198 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>El trabajo sexual y la trata de personas son conceptos que a menudo se mezclan; pero ¿qué pasaría si – en lugar de ser víctimas sin voz – las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual fuesen vistas como agentes activas que trabajan para evitar la explotación en su propio sector? <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/wendelijn-vollbehr/improving-anti-trafficking-strategies-why-sex-workers-should-be-inv">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/7742339592_890905382e_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">The Sex Workers Project at the We Can End AIDS Mobilisation during the 2012 International AIDS Conference in Washington, DC. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/pjstarr/7742339592/in/photolist-cNavPE-92FJmM-6VnuWt-J2Ykh4-iJYKMV-hc1DPZ-92JTRN-92FPHD-biiToa-6rSZ2W-6Vrbao-bjLp2H-92FJMv-92FFwM-9Ti6Fv-92JJLs-92FJa8-5KwXwC-92FKYM-3SHyyb-92FKKn-92JN2Q-92JPz3-92JTCS-6Vsy4L-hc1RKd-92JTvN-92JH2h-92JRrj-92JNgL-92FC9a-92JPDQ-92JCRL-92JEyC-92JT69-5KsKLx-92FzLB-92JugY-buwRSY-92JMVA-6huCow-92JKj7-92FJ26-92FxQa-92JSKY-92JuUb-92FKEe-92JCHW-92FKzR-J2Vaz4">PJ Starr/Flickr</a>. <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/">CC (by-nc)</a></p> <p>El año pasado, realicé una investigación centrada en cómo las organizaciones de personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual están abordando el asunto de la trata de personas. Entrevisté a miembros de 13 organizaciones diferentes de personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual, en 13 países distintos. Al menos ocho de las encuestadas eran personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual. Las entrevistas se basaron en cómo las personas encuestadas definían y abordaban la trata de personas, cómo experimentaban las políticas y prácticas contra este crimen, y cómo sus organizaciones lidiaban con situaciones de trata de personas, si es que lo hacían. La investigación, encargada por el <a href="http://www.redumbrellafund.org/">Red Umbrella Fund</a> (Fondo Paraguas Rojo), mostró que las organizaciones de personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual usan diferentes estrategias para luchar contra de la trata de personas en su sector, y que trabajan a varios niveles para reforzar sus comunidades.</p> <h2>Personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual en contra de la trata de personas</h2> <p>El <a href="http://durbar.org/">Comité Durbar Mahila Samanwaya</a> («DMSC», por sus siglas en inglés), un colectivo de personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual de más de 65.000 miembros en la India, ha <a href="https://academic.oup.com/jpubhealth/article/36/4/622/1528364/Combating-human-trafficking-in-the-sex-trade-can">&nbsp;demostrado el potencial positivo</a> que conlleva involucrar a personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual en iniciativas contra la trata de personas, a través del uso de consejos para la autorregulación. Cada consejo está conformado por personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual así como también por trabajadoras y trabajadores sociales y de la salud, oficiales de la policía y funcionariado gubernamental local. Cuando una persona nueva entra a la zona roja, las personas que ya ejercen el trabajo sexual organizan una entrevista para informarle acerca de sus derechos y de los servicios disponibles. También indagan sobre los motivos de esa persona para dedicarse al trabajo sexual y se aseguran de que no esté siendo obligada, o sea menor de edad.</p> <p>Un modelo similar fue implementado posteriormente por otro colectivo de la India formado por personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual llamado VAMP. Sus comités de resolución de conflictos fueron desarrollados para empoderar y proteger a sus comunidades, así como también para «mantener un registro de las personas nuevas, comprobar que son adultas y que el trabajo sexual responde a su voluntad» VAMP, que es parte de <a href="http://www.sangram.org/">SANGRAM</a>, también publicó <a href="http://www.sangram.org/resources/Daughter-Of-The-Hills-Sangram.pdf">una novela gráfica</a> que muestra la complejidad de la historia de una persona y explica el modelo de los consejos para identificar, apoyar y «restituir» a una mujer que trabajaba en un burdel contra su voluntad.</p> <p>Otros grupos que entrevisté compartieron diferentes historias de cómo las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual y sus organizaciones pueden ayudar a colegas a evitar la explotación, o a desvincularse de este trabajo. Algunos de los puntos mencionados incluyen:</p> <p><strong>• Intercambio de información:</strong> las organizaciones formadas por personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual comparten información con otras personas que trabajan en la industria. Esta información incluye el conocimiento práctico sobre el trabajo, lugares seguros para trabajar, derechos de las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual, así como también las leyes y políticas que regulan el trabajo sexual, y las organizaciones confiables o abogadas y abogados en caso de que surja un problema. La información se comparte a través de sitios web, talleres, panfletos, centros públicos y colegas educadoras. El objetivo es empoderar a las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual para hacerlas menos dependientes de otras y, por lo tanto, menos vulnerables a la explotación o el abuso.</p> <p><strong>• Campañas de descriminalización:</strong> todas las organizaciones de trabajo sexual con las que hablé argumentaron que<a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fraser-crichton/decriminalising-sex-work-in-new-zealand-its-history-and-impact"> la descriminalización plena del trabajo sexual</a> es esencial para un ambiente de trabajo más seguro para quienes lo ejercen, y también para la disminución de la vulnerabilidad y los riesgos. Cuando el trabajo sexual sea despenalizado plenamente, las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual podrán reportar problemas a la policía y ser ayudadas por el sistema legal en caso de cualquier irregularidad. La descriminalización también es un paso necesario para acabar con el estigma y discriminación pública en contra de quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual. Por lo tanto, las organizaciones de personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual están presionando por la descriminalización plena del trabajo sexual y por un ambiente de trabajo seguro.</p> <p><strong>• Señalización:</strong> Muchas personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual trabajan juntas o al menos conocen a otras personas que trabajan en el mismo sector. Las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual se conocen entre ellas también en lugares de trabajo tales como prostíbulos, clubes y otros «puntos calientes» donde encuentran a su clientela. Estos contactos personales directos pueden ser muy valiosos. No solamente pueden trabajar para mantenerse seguras las unas a las otras antes de que algo malo ocurra, sino que en caso de ocurrir, las compañeras trabajadoras sexuales son las más accesibles para buscar ayuda. Esto es especialmente cierto cuando la ley es hostil al trabajo sexual; como colegas del mismo gremio, no es muy probable que se denuncien a la policía o se juzguen por lo ocurrido. A través de este contacto personal, las personas pueden ser referidas a organizaciones de ayuda confiables si es que existen.&nbsp;</p> <p>A pesar de estos esfuerzos, ¿por qué las organizaciones dirigidas por quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual no están presentes durante los procesos de formulación de políticas contra la trata que afectan a su sector?</p> <h2>Los discursos sobre la trata de personas están distorsionados</h2> <p>Algunas organizaciones de personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual son reacias a comprometerse en el marco de la trata de personas o lo hacen principalmente desde una postura crítica. ¿Por qué? Porque el discurso de la trata de personas está impregnado con distorsiones en las cuales el trabajo sexual y la trata de personas están fusionados. Mientras que todas las personas que entrevisté aceptaron que la trata de personas en la industria sexual ocurre, muchas enfatizaron que no sucede a una escala amplia como se sugiere a menudo. Las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual también enfatizaron que la trata no sucede solamente en su sector. Mientras algunos grupos como DMSC y VAMP están comprometiéndose exitosamente con el marco de la trata de personas, otros grupos dictaminaron que su preocupación principal es separar el trabajo sexual de la trata de personas.</p> <p>De acuerdo al <a href="http://www.nswp.org/">sitio web</a> de la Red Global de Proyectos de Trabajo Sexual (NSWP por sus siglas en inglés), muchas organizaciones de personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual indican explícitamente que uno de los asuntos principales es «criticar el paradigma de la trata el cual fusiona las representaciones de trabajo sexual, migración y movilidad». Tal y como me dijo una representante de la Organización liderada por personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual de Kenia, <a href="http://www.bhesp.org/">Programa de Empoderamiento y Apoyo para Anfitrionas de Bares</a> (BHESP por sus siglas en inglés), «como organización de trabajadoras sexuales siempre estamos dispuestas a señalar esa diferencia y a desligarnos de la trata de personas».</p> <p>Otros grupos argumentan que la trata de personas se utiliza como un pretexto para implementar leyes restrictivas de migración o trabajo sexual. Cuando pregunté a una representante de la<a href="http://www.empowerfoundation.org/index_en.html"> Fundación Empoderar</a> (una veterana organización tailandesa de trabajadoras sexuales) acerca de las medidas contra la trata de personas en Tailandia, respondió que «nunca ha sido un tema de protección de las mujeres. Ha sido un tema sobre el control fronterizo, el control migratorio y la abolición del trabajo sexual». Otros grupos con los que hablé expresaron sentimientos similares, señalando repetidamente que la combinación del trabajo sexual y la trata de personas, así como imágenes distorsionadas y <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ronald_Weitzer/publication/228146032_The_Social_Construction_of_Sex_Trafficking_Ideology_and_Institutionalization_of_a_Moral_Crusade/links/54f8c6900cf210398e96ca5f.pdf">estadísticas engañosas sobre la trata de personas</a>, conducen a políticas y prácticas de criminalización. Estas políticas no sólo son perjudiciales para las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual, sino que también son ineficaces para quienes han experimentado algún tipo de explotación incluido bajo el término de «trata».</p> <h2>Leyes restrictivas y políticas nocivas</h2> <p>Algunas organizaciones de personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tampoco tienen la oportunidad de involucrarse en los debates contra la trata porque el hecho de apoyar o comprometerse con el trabajo sexual es penalizado en muchos países. Tal y como Empoderar explicó, la manera en que Tailandia ha implementado el marco de la trata ha provocado políticas ineficaces que, ni hacen el trabajo sexual más seguro, ni mejoran las condiciones laborales:</p> <blockquote> <p><em>Aunque las mujeres están trabajando bajo condiciones laborales mucho mejores que hace 20 años, las condiciones laborales aún necesitan ser mejoradas. Pero todo este marco de la trata de personas no las ha ayudado para nada. La definición que usa la gente, la forma de decir qué es o no es trata de personas, y luego la solución final de ser arrestada, detenida y deportada, no es lo que la gente bajo condiciones laborales precarias quiere.</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Una trabajadora sexual en los Estados Unidos del <a href="http://redumbrellaproject.org/">Red Umbrella Project</a> enfatizó en la importancia de despenalizar el trabajo sexual y en tener una buena relación con la policía cuando se trata de ayudar a quienes han sido objeto de trata. En este momento, las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual en Estados Unidos pueden ser arrestadas y detenidas por la policía cuando reportan algo y en algunos estados hasta les pueden <a href="http://sextraffickingalaska.com/maxine/">imputar cargos como si ellas fueran las tratantes</a>. Explica cómo se podría llevar a cabo un auto-seguimiento más efectivo si esos obstáculos no existieran:</p> <blockquote> <p><em>¡Lo notamos! Las trabajadoras sexuales están todo el tiempo cerca de otras trabajadoras sexuales. Si nos enteramos de un caso de trata o de alguien que ha sido objeto de trata, podemos reportar ese tipo de cosas porque tendríamos un sistema de comunicación.</em></p> </blockquote> <h2>No ser tomadas en serio como aliadas contra la trata</h2> <p>Un tercer argumento para no estar directamente involucradas con el trabajo formal «contra la trata» es que las organizaciones lideradas por trabajadoras sexuales no son consideradas como aliadas en esa lucha. Una de las entrevistadas de los Países Bajos tenía la impresión de que su organización <a href="http://wijzijnproud.nl/en_GB/">Proud</a> (Orgullosa) no es reconocida como «representativa» de las personas que trabajan en la industria sexual, y especialmente de quienes experimentan explotación. Esta persona enfatizó que es difícil cuestionar el discurso actual sobre la trata y al mismo tiempo ser reconocida como aliadas en la lucha contra este crimen. Dijo:</p> <blockquote> <p><em>«Hasta que no desterremos esas ideas estúpidas que no se basan en evidencias, no podremos hacer mucho. Pero queremos hacerlo de una manera que sea respetuosa para aquellas personas que están en esa situación [de explotación]. Y eso es muy difícil. Porque lo que escuchamos, cuando tratamos de matizar esa imagen es &quot;a usted no le importa lo que suceda con ellas [personas explotadas]&quot;. Bueno, esa es la situación de ruptura en la que nos encontramos, ¡Solo hacemos esto porque nos preocupamos por ellas!»</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Esta falta de confianza deriva en un acceso limitado a espacios de toma de decisiones y muy poco apoyo para las organizaciones que defienden los derechos de las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual, mientras que cada año millones de dólares contra la trata de personas van a <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/anne-elizabeth-moore/rich-in-funds-but-short-on-facts-high-cost-of-human-trafficking-a">iniciativas ineficaces y algunas veces dañinas</a>.</p> <h2>Conclusión: sólo los derechos pueden detener las injusticias</h2> <p>Mis entrevistas con miembros de las organizaciones lideradas por trabajadoras sexuales demostraron que estos grupos tienen potencial para ser aliados valiosos en la lucha para proteger a las trabajadoras sexuales de la explotación, incluyendo el tipo de explotación conocida como trata. Sin embargo, esa oportunidad no existirá mientras que estas organizaciones sigan siendo excluidas porque: a) quienes podrían ser colaboradores potenciales no quieren incorporar la postura crítica que las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual tienen sobre muchos aspectos del discurso dominante sobre trata, b) otras partes del sistema jurídico criminalizan su profesión y ponen en riesgo a quienes trabajan en la industria sexual cuando interactúan con la aplicación de la ley; y c) existe una percepción externa de que si son trabajadoras sexuales declaradas y organizadas, entonces no representan a la población objetivo de las políticas contra la trata.</p> <p>El reconocimiento de que todo el mundo está trabajando para el mismo objetivo ostensible —proteger mejor a las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual— es el primer paso hacia una colaboración efectiva y el progreso en la lucha contra la explotación. Esto significa escuchar las opiniones y experiencias de quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual y tomar en serio su crítica frente al discurso dominante de la «trata». Las organizaciones de personas que se dedican al trabajo sexual conocen las realidades de quienes trabajan en el comercio sexual, sus motivos, sus desafíos y su vulnerabilidad. Estas organizaciones pueden facilitar la comprensión de lo que pasa en su sector, explicar las consecuencias y la (in)eficacia de las políticas y leyes actuales contra la trata, y proporcionar una valiosa función de supervisión si se les da el espacio y la seguridad para hacerlo. Por ello, criminalizar el trabajo sexual es contraproducente cuando se trata de la protección y puede causar daños a las personas en situaciones vulnerables. Después de todo, tal y como las organizaciones lideradas por las trabajadoras sexuales manifiestan, «solo los derechos pueden detener las injusticias».</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Wendelijn Vollbehr BTS en Español Tue, 23 Oct 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Wendelijn Vollbehr 120197 at https://www.opendemocracy.net La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido- <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Las críticas a la propuesta de Amnistía Internacional para despenalizar el trabajo sexual ignoran la cuestión fundamental del trabajo y el sustento para las personas que se ven privadas de sus derechos de manera estructural a causa de la pobreza. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/simanti-dasgupta/amnesty%E2%80%99s-proposal-to-decriminalise-sex-work-contents-and-discontents">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/5935277285_e2b8bdb7a1_b.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;"><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/jasonpier/5935277285/in/photolist-a3tR9Z-UPogBE-8azYbV-4zZmdf-65m2iq-4ZQnBH-66CJbs-5TND4k-64Renq-65gHh4-XjCjyV-51qNWm-51qNWh-66yHcF-AU4rhE-5YLqHi-66CGfC-4ZT6qx-66CFos-U5Mis9-66yPcZ-92FEAe-sjvYwu-5KwLfu-6G8w4L-5KwQnE-7ciSkq-92FGFr-5Kstng-92FCHc-s53imq-rgnEmJ-92FDZv-s55FxC-775w5S-6VmTNg-5Kwc9d-nw3fS8-siA7LU-4ZUf7d-5KwTch-s5poDN-5KrYft-92FLxk-s3si7a-3oW7hH-3p1F3Q-5Kx7A3-28cRkYt-5Kx59s">Jason Pier in DC/Flickr. (CC 2.0 by-nc)</a></p> <p>Amnistía Internacional (AI) <a href="https://8859132e-9df1-4061-bca9-5a6d7fb7eb2e/amnesty.org">propuso</a> en 2015 despenalizar el trabajo sexual con la intención de proteger los derechos humanos de quienes se dedican a ello. Esta histórica propuesta atrajo la atención mundial hacia las violaciones de derechos humanos que sufren las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual a diario, y amplió el ya sustancial compromiso de AI en el campo de los derechos humanos. Además, dado que en varios lugares el trabajo sexual todavía no se considera una ocupación legítima, la propuesta de AI hizo hincapié no solo en los derechos humanos de las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual, sino también en sus derechos laborales.</p> <p>El planteamiento de AI suscitó críticas vehementes de feministas que consideran que la legalización del trabajo sexual perpetúa el patriarcado y la violencia contra las mujeres. Entre ellas, posiblemente la más crítica fue la Coalición contra la trata de mujeres («CATW», por sus siglas en inglés). La <a href="http://www.catwinternational.org/Content/Images/Article/623/attachment.pdf">carta abierta</a> de CATW a AI, suscrita por figuras de renombre mundial como Gloria Steinem, alegaba que la política recomendada «[...] propone, incomprensiblemente [...], la despenalización total de la industria del sexo, lo que en efecto legaliza el proxenetismo, la propiedad de burdeles y la compra de sexo». Pese a que Steinem ha liderado de manera tenaz y eficaz el movimiento feminista, su oposición (junto con la de CATW) a la propuesta de AI está basada en una visión un tanto convencional de lo que significa el trabajo sexual para las mujeres pobres en términos laborales y de calidad de vida, especialmente en países en desarrollo.</p> <p>Desde el 2010, he estado participando en una investigación etnográfica con el Comité Durbar Mahila Samanwaya (CDMS), una organización de trabajadoras sexuales con sede en Sonagachhi, el emblemático distrito rojo de Calcuta (India). Steinem <a href="http://www.telegraphindia.com/1120422/jsp/calcutta/story_15393912.jsp#.VfgR_1aEwpE">visitó</a> Sonagachhi en abril de 2012 en una «gira de aprendizaje» de seis días bajo la guía de Apne Aap Women Worldwide, una organización contra la trata que también es claramente antiprostitución. Ella describió esta gira como una «experiencia que te cambia la vida», porque conoció a varias mujeres que fueron objeto de trata y sufrieron abusos indescriptibles. Sin embargo, lo que brilló por su ausencia fue la cuestión del trabajo y el sustento de aquellas personas que no han sido víctimas de trata pero que trabajan en la industria sexual.</p> <p>En los últimos cinco años solo he conocido a un puñado de mujeres en Sonagachhi que fueron objeto de trata. En la fase inicial de esta investigación, reuní historias sobre cómo llegaron a Sonagachhi, y pronto surgió un patrón común: la pobreza extrema, el abandono, el hambre, la maternidad, las responsabilidades familiares y, por último, la supervivencia. La mayoría de ellas me contaron que llegaron a Sonagachhi a través de amistades, familiares o alguien del vecindario que trabajaba o tenía contactos allí. «No sabía qué otra cosa hacer», contaba una mujer, «como no sé leer ni escribir vine aquí para poder comer y vivir». Otra mujer comentó: «Éramos tan pobres que sabía que no había forma de que mi familia pudiera pagar una boda, y había visto tantas mujeres abandonadas en mi pueblo que no quería casarme. Y luego una vecina que había regresado a visitar a su familia me habló de Sonagachhi. Por supuesto nadie sabía lo que estaba haciendo en Calcuta. Ella me ayudó a llegar aquí.»</p> <p>Las mujeres tampoco ven necesariamente su trabajo como «elegir» entre ser forzada o decidir participar de forma voluntaria en la prostitución o trabajo sexual. Más bien, es la ausencia de opciones y las barreras estructurales de la pobreza lo que las lleva al trabajo sexual. «Al igual que las <em>bhadraloks</em> (clase media bengalí educada) como usted, esta no es la vida que siempre quise o imaginé», me dijo una mujer. Otra explicó: «Pero esto (la vida de una trabajadora sexual) es mi <em>jibon-sotto</em> (verdad de la vida). Aquí al menos puedo comer y alimentar a mis hijas e hijos; esta es mi casa». Tales declaraciones apuntan a una realidad compleja que va mucho más allá de los límites de una vida ideal.</p> <p>A fin de forjar un espacio legítimo para el trabajo sexual, CDMS ha adoptado una postura inequívoca contra la trata, y ha establecido una junta de autorregulación en Songachhi para evitar que las menores y las mujeres que no quieren ejercer el trabajo sexual sean obligadas a hacerlo. Mi investigación documenta el arduo proceso a través del cual la junta entrevista a las nuevas trabajadoras en el distrito rojo antes de permitirles trabajar, a fin de determinar: (a) si son menores de edad (menores de dieciocho años); y (b) si han sido víctimas de trata o candidatas reticentes.</p> <h2>La oposición de la CATW a la propuesta de AI</h2> <p>El uso de la palabra «al por mayor» en la carta abierta de CATW a AI (citada anteriormente) es interesante en particular. Sugiere que uno de los principales problemas de la propuesta de AI, según la CATW, es la idea del «todo incluido»: todas las formas de comprar, vender y posibilitar el sexo consensuado entre personas adultas deberían despenalizarse. Sin embargo, adoptar la posición contraria plantea algunos problemas serios. ¿Se puede y se debe tratar de manera fragmentada los derechos humanos de las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual? ¿Qué implicaciones tendría esto para los derechos colectivos de quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual? Discutir el tema del trabajo sexual de forma aislada, sin tener en cuenta sus actividades de apoyo, no es realista en pos de la materialización de los derechos humanos. Al fin y al cabo, los derechos humanos no son meramente <em>una noción</em> de justicia. Los derechos humanos de las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual son una cuestión de práctica social comprometida, en la que todas las personas involucradas en la industria del sexo reconocen y respetan los derechos de quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual como seres humanos que son.</p> <p>CATW también desafía la ineludible repercusión de la propuesta de AI de que el trabajo sexual es un ámbito real de trabajo que necesita protección de los derechos humanos, como cualquier otra forma de empleo. CATW se opone a esta formulación del problema, así como al comercio sexual en general. Para la Coalición el trabajo sexual o la prostitución es el ejemplo paradigmático de violencia de género o sexual. Cualquier esfuerzo por despenalizar la industria del sexo es percibido por la organización como un precursor a la legalización. Existen importantes diferencias entre los conceptos de despenalización y legalización<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/international-committee-on-rights-of-sex-workers-in-europe/amnesty-international-adopt"> que CATW pasa por alto</a>. Amnistía ha propuesto claramente la despenalización, que pone fin a las sanciones penales relacionadas con el trabajo sexual, y también ha expresado su preocupación por la legalización, que se refiere a la regulación estatal del trabajo sexual.</p> <p>La CATW se apoya en las experiencias de supervivientes de la industria sexual —muchas de las cuales también firmaron la carta— para argumentar que esta industria es por naturaleza cruel, y que el daño que causa a las mujeres es una violación directa de sus derechos humanos. Sin degradar de ninguna manera las experiencias de estas mujeres, sostengo que no es acertado por parte de la CATW generalizar las experiencias de sus «valientes sobrevivientes» y extrapolarlas a <em>todas</em> las mujeres en la industria del sexo. Hacer eso no es únicamente ilógico, sino que también es irreal; ya que no logra abordar la cuestión de lo que ese trabajo significa para las mujeres que carecen de otros medios de subsistencia. La postura de la CATW no puede reconciliarse con las experiencias cotidianas de numerosas trabajadoras sexuales a las que he conocido en Sonagachhi y en otros lugares del mundo, quienes no se ajustan o sucumben a ser parte de la categoría de «supervivientes» de la trata. Asimismo, la pretensión de hablar por todas las mujeres conlleva el grave riesgo de silenciar las voces de aquellas en los márgenes sociales, cuyas luchas —si nos dignamos a escuchar— narran una realidad sombría de trabajo y supervivencia.</p> <h2>La salud y los derechos laborales</h2> <p>El CDMS, signatario de la Declaración de apoyo a Amnistía Internacional de <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/global-network-of-sex-work-projects/why-decriminalise-sex-work">NSWP</a>, fue fundado por personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual que opinan que la colectivización es necesaria para exigir el uso del condón a la clientela y prevenir así el VIH/SIDA. La formación del Comité ratifica la inevitable convergencia que existe entre trabajo y salud en la vida de quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual, algo que la propuesta de AI también refleja enérgicamente. En especial, la propuesta subraya la vulnerabilidad de las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual al VIH/SIDA y la necesidad de despenalizar su trabajo para garantizar su derecho a la salud.</p> <p>CATW critica esta postura por ignorar la «interseccionalidad de raza, género y desigualdad» que atraviesa el trabajo sexual, lo que apunta a una superposición con otras formas de discriminación existentes. Ellas señalan, <a href="http://catwinternational.org/Content/Images/Article/617/attachment.pdf">y mi propia investigación</a> parcialmente da testimonio de esto, que los organismos como ONUSIDA están «mucho más preocupados por la salud de los compradores de sexo que por las vidas de las mujeres que se prostituyen o son víctimas de trata». Por el contrario, las mujeres con las que trabajo me dicen irónicamente que ellas «aman al SIDA». Si no fuera por el VIH/SIDA «nadie se preocuparía por nosotras y nunca nos habríamos unido para defender nuestros derechos».</p> <p>La cuestión del trabajo sexual y los derechos humanos de quienes lo ejercen está lejos de resolverse y continuará de esta forma. Si bien la propuesta de AI no pretende resolver el problema de la violencia estructural, sí adopta una visión realista sobre cómo es posible garantizar los derechos humanos de algunas de las personas más marginadas del mundo.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Simanti Dasgupta BTS en Español Mon, 22 Oct 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Simanti Dasgupta 120195 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Ayudando a las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual a ayudarse a sí mismas https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Las leyes que penalizan la prostitución han causado un daño increíble a las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual a lo largo de los años, pero nunca han logrado poner fin al ejercicio. Solo por esta razón deberíamos luchar en su contra. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/anne-gathumbi/helping-sex-workers-help-themselves">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/27663531955_c73668f587_k_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Red Umbrella March for Sex Work Solidarity on 11 June 2016. Sally T. Buck/Flickr. (CC 2.0 by-nc-nd)</p> <p><strong>NAIROBI –</strong> Una vez, cuando estaba reunida con un grupo de trabajadoras sexuales en un prostíbulo en Kenia, las mujeres allí presentes recibieron una llamada que decía que una de sus miembros había sido encontrada abandonada cerca de un río con cortes profundos en la cara, las manos y los muslos.</p> <p>La mujer había sido arrestada bajo custodia policial la noche anterior. Sus compañeras habían ido a la comisaría de policía para rescatarla pero no pudieron encontrarla. Cuando la recogieron de un basurero, descubrieron que había sido violada por la policía, que luego la había dejado en el bosque, donde había sido acosada por otros muchachos, quienes la violaron y golpearon nuevamente. Las trabajadoras sexuales intentaron denunciar el incidente, pero las amenazaron con ser detenidas.</p> <p>El grupo recaudó dinero para llevar a su amiga al hospital donde permaneció durante un mes. Además, se turnaron para alimentar a sus hijas e hijos y asegurarse de que fueran a la escuela. En otras palabras, proporcionaron los servicios sociales que el Estado no proporcionó porque, de no haberlo hecho, su compañera habría muerto y sus hijas e hijos se habrían quedado sin hogar.</p> <p>La mayoría de las trabajadoras sexuales que conocí —no solo en Kenia sino en muchos otros países—, han tenido una mala experiencia con la policía, habitualmente porque les roban su dinero o las chantajean para mantener sexo amenazándolas con denunciarlas. Ese es uno de los motivos por los que apoyo la despenalización del trabajo sexual. Existen muchos otros, pero todos ellos derivan del simple hecho de que penalizar el trabajo sexual —su compra-venta o las actividades necesarias relacionadas— no funciona. Nunca se ha tenido éxito en el afán por eliminarlo. Sí ha servido, en cambio, para llevar a las trabajadoras sexuales a una mayor clandestinidad, dificultándoles aún más el acceso a los servicios de salud, las medidas de seguridad en el trabajo o la denuncia de abusos o explotación a la policía.</p> <p>Al eliminar la amenaza de sanciones legales, la despenalización crea un entorno en el que podemos centrar nuestra atención en promover los derechos humanos de las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual en lugar de castigarles. Esto ya no es una posibilidad abstracta. El 26 de mayo de 2016, Amnistía Internacional <a href="https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2016/05/amnesty-international-publishes-policy-and-research-on-protection-of-sex-workers-rights/">publicó</a> una nueva política de protección de las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual, que incluye una recomendación para despenalizar el trabajo sexual y las actividades asociadas. Así Amnistía Internacional se une a un gran número de organizaciones en todo el mundo que apoyan la despenalización, tales como la Organización Mundial de la Salud, ONUSIDA, Human Rights Watch, y la Alianza Mundial contra la Trata de Mujeres.</p> <p>Son innumerables las pruebas que justifican su apoyo. Nueva Zelanda y Nueva Gales del Sur (Australia) <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fraser-crichton/decriminalising-sex-work-in-new-zealand-its-history-and-impact">eliminaron las sanciones penales</a> relativas al trabajo sexual en 2003 y 1995, respectivamente. Las conversaciones entabladas con las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual reflejan un ambiente de trabajo mucho más seguro, con mayor capacidad para filtrar a la clientela y trabajar en áreas de mayor seguridad; pueden contactar con la policía en casos de violencia y negociar prácticas de sexo seguras y una remuneración justa. Las trabajadoras sexuales se han formado, se han unido a sindicatos, y se han involucrado en la articulación de normas y regulaciones para dirigir su sector.</p> <p>La despenalización también tiene muchos beneficios potenciales para la salud. En un estudio publicado en <a href="mailto:http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2814%2960931-4/abstract"><em>The Lancet</em></a> en 2014 se concluyó que el cambio en la legislación podría conseguir que en la próxima década hubiera hasta un 46 % menos de nuevas infectadas por el VIH entre las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual. Eso es incluso más efectivo que aumentar el acceso a tratamientos antirretrovíricos, porque cuando se despenaliza el trabajo sexual, quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual tienen la potestad de insistir en el uso del preservativo y están en mejores condiciones de acceder a los servicios de prevención, pruebas y tratamiento del VIH.</p> <p>Por desgracia, en algunas partes del mundo está ganando terreno una idea un tanto distinta. De acuerdo con el llamado modelo suizo, implantado en este país, así como en muchos otros, es ilegal comprar sexo o involucrarse en actividades de terceros tales como la publicidad y la gestión de este tipo de trabajo.</p> <p>Aunque bajo este régimen las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual no se enfrentan a la persecución, siguen sufriendo agresiones. Tienen dificultades para alquilar una vivienda porque las personas propietarias temen ser acusadas de administrar un burdel, y deben llevar adelante sus actividades en lugares más peligrosos porque la clientela tiene miedo a la policía. En Noruega, la policía utiliza la posesión de preservativos por parte de quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual como evidencia contra la clientela. En Suecia, una trabajadora sexual me contó cómo la policía se instaló delante de su puerta para arrestar a cualquier cliente que se presentara. Desde el vecindario finalmente le pidieron que se fuera del departamento. Dichas prácticas crean estigma y conducen a la discriminación.</p> <p>Casi todas personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual alrededor del mundo se oponen al modelo sueco, y sin embargo, hay países en la Unión Europea que aún se plantean su activación —una desatención voluntaria a sus demandas que no tiene cabida en las crisis de salud pública a las que nos enfrentamos en muchas partes del mundo. La penalización no hace nada para proteger a las personas que realizan trabajo sexual o las comunidades en las que viven sino que, por el contrario, hace que tanto las primeras como sus familias queden expuestas a riesgos mayores. La despenalización representa un enfoque más acorde, que ofrece a las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual las herramientas necesarias para defenderse a sí mismas como ciudadanas iguales ante la ley.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Anne Gathumbi BTS en Español Mon, 22 Oct 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Anne Gathumbi 117614 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Call for contributions: Towards a better future for precarious workers? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/beyond-trafficking-and-slavery/call-for-contributions-towards-better-future-for-precar <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Future of Work Round Table isn't complete without your input. We warmly invite you to join in the discussion.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/9773614976_22e95c96ac_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Photo by Milorad Drča. Creative Commons BY-NC-ND.</p> <p>On Monday the 9th of October, Beyond Slavery and Trafficking launched <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">a virtual round table on the future of work</a>. Produced in collaboration with the <a href="https://www.fordfoundation.org/work/challenging-inequality/future-of-work/">Ford Foundation</a>, this project brought together 12 leading experts to explore 1) how and why work has changed, 2) the impact of programmes to encourage ethical consumption and investment, 3) ways of encouraging business leaders and policy makers to prioritise&nbsp;working conditions, 4) strategies for effectively responding to the global&nbsp;&#39;race to the bottom’, and 5) practical suggestions for how existing regulations and organisations can keep up with global changes. </p> <p>The round table is not yet complete. To help continue this important conversation, we are now circulating this open call for a second round of contributions which respond to specific issues and challenges from the round table. It is on this basis that we are encouraging submissions which take the following form: </p> <ol> <li>Responses to the individual questions and accompanying answers that featured in the round table. The five questions from the round table are summarized above (1-5), and can be found in full <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">here</a>.<br /><br /></li> <li>Responses to the <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement">joint funders statement</a> which was produced by the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund. This statement speaks to fundamental questions regarding philanthropy and funding, so we are keen to feature responses that address its specific conclusions.<br /><br /> </li> <li>Responses to the original Ford Foundation report –&nbsp;<a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MklmEG5tOK0XbOIkdFucYTqUddVplR7M/view?usp=sharing">Quality Work Worldwide</a>&nbsp;– which identified a number of strategies for improving protections against labour exploitation and vulnerability, and for enabling workers to more effectively participate in shaping their terms of employment. </li> </ol> <p>Since the round table covers so much ground, we are chiefly looking for contributions which focus upon specific issues and questions. Not everything can be covered within a single response.</p> <p>If you are interested in participating, we would welcome a written paper of <strong>between 500-800 words</strong>. Your paper should be in an accessible, op-ed-style and specifically focus upon one of the three core topics which have been listed above. The round table conveners, Joel Quirk and Cameron Thibos, will be primarily responsible for selecting submissions for publication. As per our standard editorial practice, all potential contributions will be edited for language, clarity and structure (which authors then sign off on prior to final publication). Submissions which engage in personal attacks will not be accepted. &nbsp;</p> <p>We welcome submissions <strong>from now until the end of October, 2018</strong>. Given the nature of the topic, we are keen to feature contributions from many different perspectives, including journalists, activists, officials, funders, and researchers. Papers should be sent via email to <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>. You can also consult our <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/info/beyond-slavery-submission-guidelines#0">submission guidelines</a>. For further information or questions please contact <a href="mailto:cameron.thibos@opendemocracy.net">cameron.thibos@opendemocracy.net</a> or <a href="mailto:joel.quirk@wits.ac.za">joel.quirk@wits.ac.za</a>. </p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">ROUND TABLE: the future of work</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement">Future of work round table: joint funders&#039; statement</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed">Future of work round table: how has the world of work changed?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work">Future of work round table: do ethical consumerism and investment work?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board">Future of work round table: bringing business leaders and policy makers on board</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work">Future of work round table: stopping the race to the bottom in the world of work</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up">Future of work round table: how can institutions and regulations keep up?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Beyond Trafficking and Slavery Tue, 16 Oct 2018 11:05:39 +0000 Beyond Trafficking and Slavery 120121 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Future of work round table: how can institutions and regulations keep up? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Organisations and regulations are struggling to keep up with the evolving nature of work. Our panel of experts ends this round table by asking themselves how such institutions can stay relevant.</p> </div> </div> </div> <style> #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 0px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} .breakcontainer {display:flex;wrap:nowrap;clear:both;} .breakedges {flex-grow:1;min-content:100px;margin:auto;} .breakcenter {flex-grow:1;max-width: 300px;font-size:90%;color:#999;margin:0 15px;text-align:center;margin:auto;} .breakline {width:100%;border-top:1px solid #999;} .breakcenter a {color:#999;} </style> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/BTS_Roundtable_Q5_Colour_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Artwork by Carys Boughton. All rights reserved.</p> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <div class="question active">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <p style="color:rgba(255,0,0,0.6);font-size:110%;">Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</p> <div id="respondents"> <div class="respondentsleft"> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#ancheita">Alejandra Ancheita</a></span><br /><span class="affil">ProDESC</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#bader-blau">Shawna Bader-Blau</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Solidarity Center</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#bhattacharjee">Anannya Bhattacharjee</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Asia Floor Wage Alliance</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#cdebaca">Luis C.deBaca</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#dongfang">Han Dongfang</a></span><br /><span class="affil">China Labour Bulletin</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#gonzalo">Lupe Gonzalo</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Coalition of Immokalee Workers</span></p> </div> <div class="respondentsright"> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#haas_kyritsis">Theresa Haas & Penelope Kyritsis</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Worker-driven Social Responsibility Network</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#kenway">Emily Kenway</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Focus on Labour Exploitation (FLEX)</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#nanavaty">Reema Nanavaty</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Self-Employed Women's Association</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#tang">Elizabeth Tang</a></span><br /><span class="affil">International Domestic Workers Federation</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#tate">Alison Tate</a></span><br /><span class="affil">International Trade Union Confederation</span></p> </div> </div> <!--RESPONDENTS--> <div class="break"></div> <!--CONTENTSTART--> <div id="ancheita" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Alejandra Ancheita</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_ancheita.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Alejandra Ancheita is the founder of the Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Project (ProDESC) in Mexico City.</p> </div> <p>In my practice as a human rights lawyer, I can see that the international fora of human rights are trying to evolve. But those institutions are very big institutions, and change is very complicated for them. </p> <p>The International Labour Organisation, for example, is not answering the question of labour rights in the global economy. They are trying, but it&#39;s not enough. The International Organisation for Migration also has to change. They are very bureaucratic and in some context they actually play the role of recruiters, which can be very complicated. The UN is currently pushing for international action plans. Even the OECD, a very conservative institution, has developed international guidelines for in business and human rights for their members.</p> <p>So a lot is happening. These international fora need to become even more proactive, but as a human rights lawyer I can say that the mechanisms and human rights law that they have developed have proven effective tools in our national courts. They might be flawed but they are still very useful.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="bader-blau" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Shawna Bader-Blau</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_bader-blau.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Shawna Bader-Blau is Executive Director of Solidarity Center.</p> </div> <p>There is an important tension to work out between localised democratic control – the sovereignty of people over their food, over their lives, over their land – and the fact that there is no economy anymore, no matter how local, that is unaffected by the rest of the world&#39;s economy.</p> <p>That means we can&#39;t focus all our energy at the local and grassroots levels at the expense of global standards. We need both. Locally we need to reassert democracy and human rights. These are under attack around the world. And then, at the global level, there is a critical need to reimagine a binding, enforceable rights framework. </p> <p>Take, for example, the possibilities of employment discrimination through online platforms. In their current forms, these platforms employers are basically unregulated in terms of how they pick and choose who they employ. You could have a platform one day say, &quot;You know what? Indians, we don&#39;t want to hire them anymore because they&#39;re asking for too much money, and they ask too many questions about employment conditions. So, we want to hire people from some other country.&quot; You&#39;d never know they had made that discriminatory decision.</p> <p>That&#39;s just an example of why we need global regulations based on human rights frameworks. In the future of work in platform employment we can&#39;t have discrimination. We can&#39;t have someone sitting there somewhere deciding they&#39;re not going to hire me because I&#39;m female, but they&#39;re going to hire you because you&#39;re male. Or the opposite. We can&#39;t allow that. So, we need to do both. We need to reassert democracy locally for people, and we need to re-envision existing global human rights institutions and how we&#39;re going to affect them.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="bhattacharjee" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Anannya Bhattacharjee</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_bhattacharjee.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Anannya Bhattacharjee is the International Coordinator of Asia Floor Wage Alliance.</p> </div> <p>The International Labour Organisation is the world&#39;s only tripartite organisation for labour. It is an extremely important organisation, but it is challenging to move things within it. That definitely gives opportunities to people who don&#39;t want to change anything. It gives them the opportunity to not change. It also frustrates people who want change faster, and certainly we can all say that it does not move as fast as one would like.</p> <p>However, let there be no doubt that the ILO&#39;s standard making process and the standards that it has created and upheld since its beginning are golden. They must continue. They have to be protected. They have to be implemented. The ILO&#39;s global standards serve us in extremely good ways when we are talking about global production, because frankly, where else are there standards? National laws do not apply in the international area. While we do agree that national laws have to be followed by global capital, at the same time we need global standards for all kinds of things. Holding global capital accountable by measuring them against the ILO&#39;s labour standards continues to be very important. </p> <p>One of the drawbacks of the ILO, and I think ILO knows this, is that it only recognises certain types of labour organisations. Certain labour unions are in their official membership, while large parts of the labour movement are not seen as being officially part of the ILO. </p> <p>The good thing is that this alternative labour movement has nevertheless made its way into the ILO in many different ways. That has been important. We have done that ourselves in many scenarios. The domestic workers movement did that, although it had no recognition. The ILO, through our own resistance and knocking at the door, has opened its door a little bit wider. That trend needs to continue. </p> <p>We have to always remember that institutions are only as important as the movements. We must strategically use the institutions and push them to become more accountable, to become more open, and to become more inclusive. If we just retreat from institutions, then we would lose the mechanisms that are out there. I am not for that type of a retreat. We have to work through these institutions.</p> <p>We should also not forget that much has happened. We cannot judge these institutions simply by the years of our individual lifetimes, which are quite short. We have to look at them through the historical record. By no means can we just give these institutions up so that they become more and more amenable to those who do not care about our welfare. We have to be there, at the table, and negotiating our positions.</p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="cdebaca" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Luis C.deBaca</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_cdebaca.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Ambassador Luis C.deBaca, of Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center, directed the U.S. Office to Monitor/Combat Trafficking in Persons under President Barack Obama.</p> </div> <p>We no longer have the luxury of the siloed institutional structures that we currently have. The fight against unscrupulous employers sometimes gets stopped by the intermural fights and navel gazing of the modern slavery movement, or the anti-trafficking movement, or the labour movement, or whatever we&#39;re wanting to call it these days. We’ve taken our eye off the ball while trying to figure out which one of us is going to be in charge, or whether something flows from the 1956 convention, as opposed to the 2000 protocol, etc.</p> <p>In the meantime, unscrupulous employers, the folks who tolerate them and their supply chains, and the folks who purposely traffic people, continue to do their work. They are not being distracted by whether this is an issue for the International Organisation for Migration, as opposed to the UN Office of Drugs of Crime, as opposed to the International Labour Organisation, as opposed to UNICEF, or as opposed to the Financial Crimes Task Force. The answer, of course, is that this is a problem for all of those entities. </p> <p>We need to stop thinking of ourselves as separate. Instead, we need to figure out what each of us can bring to the mix and then move forward. Because the other side, whether it&#39;s the corporations or the abusive bosses fuelling their profits, is not taking the time to think about our silos. Except, perhaps, to see how to exploit them.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="dongfang" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Han Dongfang</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_dongfang.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Han Dongfang is the Executive Director of China Labour Bulletin in Hong Kong.</p> </div> <p>Good labour laws are always better than bad laws but the key is implementation. Both China and India have decent labour laws. But due to weak trade union representation and a lack of effective workplace collective bargaining practices, labour laws in both of these countries are not fully implemented.</p> <p>Before talking about changing government attitudes towards the implementation of labour law, however, we need to establish a collective bargaining system tied to trade unions so that workers can then take the lead in enforcing existing labour laws and improving future legislation.</p> <p>No matter how production chains evolve in the future, the focus of labour will remain the same: ensuring the fair and reasonable distribution of profit (salary, social insurance, training programs etc.) through the exercise of collective bargaining and solidarity. For this to happen however, national trade unions need to get back to local organising and strengthening solidarity in the workplace. Without workplace and local organising based on effective collective bargaining, global solidarity will have nowhere to go or no real role to play. In other words, global initiatives will only be effective if there is strong workplace and local organising.</p> <p>It sounds old school but it is time to get back to basics and rebuild workers’ capacity to bargain collectively. Taking a step-by-step approach, one workplace at time, and then one industry or region at a time, workers will be able to gain a fair and reasonable share of the profits and enjoy decent pay for decent work. The is no shortcut to reversing the race to the bottom, only the gradual rebuilding of workplace organising and collective bargaining for workers.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="gonzalo" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Lupe Gonzalo</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_gonzalo.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Lupe Gonzalo works with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.</p> </div> <p>If international institutions are going to have any relevance in this conversation about human rights and global supply chains, they have to hear directly from the people affected. I&#39;ve been in spaces and have talked to people in different countries who have no idea which worker organisations are in their country or which challenges they&#39;re facing. That has to change. If they&#39;re going to be relevant in this conversation, they have to create spaces to hear directly from the people affected by the problems. They need to learn what support these workers need and then act on that information.</p> <p>The dynamics should be that workers first establish which rights need to be protected. They need to have a strong and powerful voice in that process. These other bodies then need to come in behind and figure out how to actually implement and enforce them, and ensure that these rights are now part of the broader landscape. If they&#39;re really going to make a change, if they&#39;re really going to have a impact on labour standards internationally, they have to take that approach. </p> <p><em>Translated by Marley Moynahan at the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.</em></p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="haas_kyritsis" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Theresa Haas & Penelope Kyritsis</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_haas.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Theresa Haas is Director of Outreach and Education at the Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) Network.</p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_kyritsis.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Penelope Kyritsis is Outreach and Education Coordinator at the Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) Network.</p> </div> <p><strong>Penelope:</strong> A lot of discussions around the future and technology sensationalise computerisation and artificial intelligence as a threat, implying that the dynamics leading to the precarity of workers at the bottom of supply chains are somehow new. They aren&#39;t. It’s not technology rendering workers vulnerable to extreme labour exploitation, but the fact that wealth and power are not concentrated in the hands of workers. So if institutions want to keep up, if they truly want to help workers, the only way they can do that is by putting power in workers’ hands. Computers aren&#39;t the problem. </p> <p><strong>Theresa:</strong> ILO conventions remain useful in terms of setting universal standards around these particular issues. Unfortunately the ILO does not have an effect on the enforcement mechanism. Many countries have adopted ILO conventions as part of their national law, but they are not enforced because those governments lack the resources and the political wealth to effectively enforce their own laws. So ILO conventions and international standards are only useful if there is an effective enforcement mechanism component. Absent that, new conventions or standards are not solutions to the problems we&#39;ve been talking about. </p> <p>If you could persuade governments to enforce those laws as a matter of policy that would be wonderful. But we acknowledge that although that is the ideal way for things to happen, it&#39;s not realistic to expect that it’s going to happen anytime soon. If what we want to do in our lifetime is see real change for workers, we have to go after the people at the top of the chain, which are the brands. </p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="kenway" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Emily Kenway</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_kenway.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Emily Kenway is senior advisor on human trafficking and labour exploitation at Focus on Labour Exploitation. Until recently she was private sector adviser to the UK’s office of the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner.</p> </div> <p>Firstly we need to be upfront about what doesn&#39;t work. There was a community organiser in the US named Saul Alinsky who said, &quot;don&#39;t get trapped by your own tactic&quot;. That is something we all need to think about, including the big institutions working on labour issues like the ILO. Are they actually having the impact that is needed, or are they running to catch up while the Amazons of the world run rings around everybody?</p> <p>I think this comes down to being more systemic. Obviously regulations need to be more systemic in terms of crossing national boundaries and addressing supply chains all the way through. But organisations and campaigns also need to focus less on particular companies, particular jurisdictions, or particular issues, and instead work to change the structural pillars underlying all of these problems.</p> <p>In the UK, that could mean something like campaigning to build migration status into anti-discrimination law. Under the Equality Act of 2010 immigration status is not protected while nationality and ethnicity are, yet we know that lots of migrant workers are being discriminated against for that reason. That would immediately enable migrant workers to access their rights in the UK. Or we could push for limits in supply chain tiers like there are in Oslo. These make it easier for workers to claim rights, for companies to ensure there’s no trafficked labour in their supply chains, and for unions to gain ground.</p> <p>Ethical consumerism could evolve in this way too. It needs to turn away from using audits to check up on particular issues and instead toward supporting unions.&nbsp; This just doesn&#39;t exist. Why can’t I tell which supermarket or fast food chain has a recognised union? This matters because unions and worker-led organisations are long-term structures that build power over time, build leadership, and that can continually protect rights and fight for new rights. They are the lynchpin of long-term change, and that is where consumer attention should be directed if we are going to have ethical stamps and that sort of thing. It shouldn&#39;t be possible for a business to stand on a responsibility platform, to win awards for responsibility, and not have a recognised independent union. Yet that happens all the time. </p> <p>Working in this way would have a ripple effect. Take international standards, like those created by the ILO. They are useful for making national governments pay attention to things but then it comes down to how they’re implemented on the ground. It comes back to what all of this always comes back to: the need for national and local organised activity to ensure things are done properly with an eye toward achieving lasting systemic change. Most importantly, trade unions and civil society organisations need to ensure that we don’t play the game of being grateful for consolation prizes from capital. We are bargaining for scraps at the moment against a legislative and global economic framework which empowers capital. That has to change but it won’t unless we make the right sorts of targeted, disruptive, systemic interventions.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="nanavaty" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Reema Nanavaty</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_nanavaty.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Reema Nanavaty is Director of the Self-Employed Women's Association (SEWA).</p> </div> <p>To be perfectly frank, neither the policy makers nor the governments nor the multilateral institutions have any clue how the future of work is going to evolve. What kind of technological advancement is going to happen? Where is it going to happen? How is it going to impact work? Nobody has any idea. This is why there is economic growth but it is jobless. </p> <p>So however well-meaning they are, however more they want to do something for the poor and for informal sector workers, they themselves have no idea what it should entail. This has meant that their views on responsible business and alternative economic models have been heavily influenced by corporations. That&#39;s why I said, right in the beginning, that for informal workers innovation is a crucial part of their coping strategy. They have to keep innovating day in and day out for their own survival.</p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="tang" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Elizabeth Tang</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_tang.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Elizabeth Tang is the General Secretary of the International Domestic Workers Federation.</p> </div> <p>They need to stick to and affirm the ILO&#39;s four principles. They really have to believe in them and never give up. Freedom of association and collective bargaining are the prerequisites for workers&#39; power. These principles are constantly being challenged by corporations. So how we continue to defend them is very important.</p> <p>Secondly, workers&#39; organisation are constantly evolving. These institutions and also more traditional trade unions need to open their eyes to see what is really happening. When we first started IDWF people didn&#39;t really know what to do with us. Our organisation didn&#39;t look like a traditional trade union. We didn&#39;t use the methods they used. Only a few domestic workers&#39; unions are capable of signing collective agreements, the majority cannot. So we had to find other ways to get rights and are our methods are still evolving.</p> <p>People found it very hard to accept that we are not signing agreements. They were afraid that by working with us they would become tainted somehow. That we would be a bad influence on their members. Their sectors were already facing many challenges, and their members were no longer working in the same protected environments. So their members were also looking for new ways of organising and of getting rights, and their leaders felt challenged. This sort of attitude has to change.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="tate" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Alison Tate</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_tate.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Alison Tate is Director of Economic and Social Policy at the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC).</p> </div> <p>I think that the difficulties around intervening through these different institutions suggests that we need more coherence across their policy prescriptions. They are saying all the right things. It&#39;s now about actually taking action and making sure that happens. </p> <p>That&#39;s why building workers’ power and having new models of ways in which workers come together is so important. It acknowledges that workers and the unions that represent them are the foundation for that bargaining and that aligning of power across the economic systems. For us it is about having a foundation of social dialogue.</p> <p>The ILO is a really important institution in that. It&#39;s the international parliament of the workers if you like, the place where employers and governments and workers come together for a process of negotiation and consensus building to create policies and legal standards that need to be applied across the world. That&#39;s why these institutions were founded and they are as relevant today as they ever were. Our job is to make sure that they&#39;re doing that effectively.</p> <p>Discrimination in employment remains a major, major challenge, whether that be for recognition of women&#39;s pay rates, issues around hours of work, issues of the disproportionate number of women working in the informal economy, or whether it&#39;s about access to maternity provisions.</p> <p>These notions still have not become reality for the majority of working women. There is certainly recognition that that is important, and there have been major strides in achieving that. But not in all work places and not in all industries. And not for all women.</p> <p>The ITUC is leading a campaign for a convention on the elimination of violence against women and men in the world of work. This would be a legally binding instrument that governments would then need to support, ratify, and promote. They would need to make sure that the provisions are taken in their own national labour laws and that businesses adhere to it.</p> </div> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. Our support is not tacit endorsement within. The aim was to highlight new ideas and we hope the result will be a lively and robust dialogue.</p><div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Fri, 12 Oct 2018 07:59:20 +0000 openDemocracy 120012 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Future of work round table: stopping the race to the bottom in the world of work https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A lack of labour rights is, for many countries, a serious competitive advantage. What needs to happen in business, politics and organising to stop this race to the bottom?</p> </div> </div> </div> <style> #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 0px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} .breakcontainer {display:flex;wrap:nowrap;clear:both;} .breakedges {flex-grow:1;min-content:100px;margin:auto;} .breakcenter {flex-grow:1;max-width: 300px;font-size:90%;color:#999;margin:0 15px;text-align:center;margin:auto;} .breakline {width:100%;border-top:1px solid #999;} .breakcenter a {color:#999;} </style> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/BTS_Roundtable_Q4_Colour_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Artwork by Carys Boughton. All rights reserved.</p> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <div class="question active">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <p style="color:rgba(255,0,0,0.6);font-size:110%;"><em>‘The mobility of global capital allows firms to easily move operations across borders in search of cheaper labor or more favourable tax or regulatory systems. Therefore, if one country raises labor standards, it risks the loss of business, investment and jobs to another’</em> (Ford Foundation, <a href="https://drive.google.com/open?id=1MklmEG5tOK0XbOIkdFucYTqUddVplR7M&authuser=cameron.thibos@opendemocracy.net">Quality Work Worldwide</a>, 2018 p. 4). What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response this race to the bottom? Are there any promising models emerging which effectively cross national boundaries?</p> <div id="respondents"> <div class="respondentsleft"> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#ancheita">Alejandra Ancheita</a></span><br /><span class="affil">ProDESC</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#bader-blau">Shawna Bader-Blau</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Solidarity Center</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#bhattacharjee">Anannya Bhattacharjee</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Asia Floor Wage Alliance</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#cdebaca">Luis C.deBaca</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#dongfang">Han Dongfang</a></span><br /><span class="affil">China Labour Bulletin</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#gonzalo">Lupe Gonzalo</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Coalition of Immokalee Workers</span></p> </div> <div class="respondentsright"> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#haas_kyritsis">Theresa Haas</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Worker-driven Social Responsibility Network</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#kenway">Emily Kenway</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Focus on Labour Exploitation (FLEX)</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#nanavaty">Reema Nanavaty</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Self-Employed Women's Association</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#tang">Elizabeth Tang</a></span><br /><span class="affil">International Domestic Workers Federation</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#tate">Alison Tate</a></span><br /><span class="affil">International Trade Union Confederation</span></p> </div> </div> <!--RESPONDENTS--> <div class="break"></div> <!--CONTENTSTART--> <div id="ancheita" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Alejandra Ancheita</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_ancheita.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Alejandra Ancheita is the founder of the Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Project (ProDESC) in Mexico City.</p> </div> <p>It&#39;s a very interesting question. One answer is to better explore how unions, which are still very much attached to national contexts, can develop effective alliances with other unions in other countries. There are some global unions, but not many.</p> <p>My friends from the unions are going to hate me, but it is important to remember that worker organisation doesn&#39;t necessarily have to go through traditional unions. What is important is that they are organised. Only the collective power of workers has the possibility to balance the power relationships between the workers and the corporations. </p> <p>We also need to keep working with our governments. We need to keep demanding that governments meet their obligation to protect national laws that give labour rights to the workers, and that strong judiciary systems enforce those rights. We also need to think creatively about how to utilise other types of initiatives to our advantage. For example, many countries have national action plans. How we can develop a new round of national action plans that actually have teeth when it comes to labour protections? There are many possibilities.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="bader-blau" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Shawna Bader-Blau</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_bader-blau.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Shawna Bader-Blau is Executive Director of Solidarity Center.</p> </div> <p>It has to start with all of us on the activist and organising side being really clear that the pursuit of profit at all costs is unsustainable. We need to be able to articulate that, and give examples why, and to create a common mission for addressing that incentive structure. The uncontrollable, unmitigated, unfettered pursuit of profits is not something that God ordained. It is something that men have created. It was made by people and can be unmade by people. Every right that has ever been created or established came through organisation, advocacy, and struggle. We can make these kind of changes. They might be big, major-scale changes, but they can happen because of social organisation of people with common vision. </p> <p>There are, of course, also smaller interventions. The implications of the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh are massive in terms of opening up the realm of the possible for corporate governance. At the same time, in comparison to the size of the garment industry the accord is small. So it&#39;s an effort that we should be, and are, working collectively to try to replicate in different forms. </p> <p>The accord is a negotiated agreement between workers and employers, which is akin to collective bargaining. It is completely replicable, scalable, implementable, and is built on the back of a 100-year history of trade unions and labour organisation. The reason such agreements are rare isn&#39;t because collective bargaining is some old thing that no longer works. It is because the systems that allowed workers to collectively bargain and have a say in their wages and working conditions have been fundamentally dismantled. But the model works. We need to reassert that and not be afraid to say that, especially in the context of the future of work.</p> <p>The future isn&#39;t magically going to be a nice place, a nice time, because all this lovely technology exists and people can just sit around and receive salaries from the banks. All the same disenfranchisement that exists now very likely will exist on steroids in the future if we don&#39;t reassert democracy and democratic control over economies.</p> <p>So there are big movements and smaller efforts. Both should seek to change the incentive structure through the reassertion of democracy. You do this through social movement activism and organising, and by replicating models of corporate accountability and corporate citizenship that work. The ones that work are negotiated with beneficiaries. They&#39;re not imposed by a company.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="bhattacharjee" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Anannya Bhattacharjee</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_bhattacharjee.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Anannya Bhattacharjee is the International Coordinator of Asia Floor Wage Alliance.</p> </div> <p>When you have a situation where the government is not enlightened enough to take on these issues, there&#39;s a lot of work to be done to raise their awareness of the problem. I think it&#39;s something one can attempt, but it&#39;s not being attempted a lot. We are doing some small experiments here and there, but on the whole it&#39;s not something that has been prioritised.</p> <p>What we really need is a movement of people to finally upend the status quo. The movement has to be built by all of us who are in the labour rights, human rights, women&#39;s rights, and migrants&#39; rights movements. And by those who live in the headquarters of global capital as citizens and consumers. This is the only solution I see right now. We need to build a movement of people to hold capital accountable. </p> <p>There are some indicators that things are changing. The International Labour Organisation has definitely been able to organise spaces to begin some of these discussions. In 2016 it held its first tripartite discussion on regulating global supply chains. Last year the discussion was on migration. This year it was on gender-based violence. These discussions are being had, but it&#39;s not going to be an easy road. The employer lobby is really refusing to take responsibility, even though their position is becoming more and more unattainable.</p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="cdebaca" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Luis C.deBaca</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_cdebaca.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Ambassador Luis C.deBaca, of Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center, directed the U.S. Office to Monitor/Combat Trafficking in Persons under President Barack Obama.</p> </div> <p>This is why we recently changed the Tariff Act in the United States. This act from the 1930s, among other things, prevented the importation of slave-made goods. However, it came with something called the ‘consumptive demand exception’. This allowed products to be imported, regardless of whether slave labour was involved in their production, if no one in the US was producing them. Its original purpose was to secure the flow certain, strategically important goods, such as rubber, and was predicated on the idea that most things were still being made in the US. Now, in the globalised economy, almost everything is made somewhere else.</p> <p>We were finally able to get Congress to get rid of the consumptive demand exception. Now, we’re able to actually look to see if slave-made goods are coming in. If so, we&#39;re going to seize them, we&#39;re going to prevent them from coming into the United States. I think you will soon see enforcement around that act.</p> <p>Unless people want to set up two supply chains, one that would come into the US and one that would go everywhere else, they will need to take this into account. They’ve created a new office in Customs and Border Protection to lead on this. It is only about six months old now. They&#39;re bringing in people from the labour world, not just folks from customs and immigration. They’re hiring people who have dealt with MSIs, with companies that show little respect for the law, and who have good, long-term relationships with unions. I think that the seriousness with which they are staffing that office bodes well.</p> <p>The US Trafficking In Persons Report is also meant to catalyse a shift. It has been criticised by many for being a unilateral reporting mechanism. But even the folks over at UN Office of Drugs and Crime, which are supposed to be the keepers of the Transnational Organised Crime Convention which has the trafficking protocol in it, admit they&#39;re dependent upon what each individual state gives them to put in their own report. They assemble all the self-assessments togethers, whereas the TIP report provides an outside assessment along the lines of prevention, protection, and prosecution. It looks at capacity and corruption, and tells some uncomfortable truths every year. That does seem to make a difference. When you turn up the heat for long enough on a country, they start to make change.</p> <p>For example, we’re now seeing in Thailand a different level of training and expectation than before. Not just for the police, but the labour ministry as well. A lot of that would not have happened if we had just left that cosy relationship with seafood industry alone. But, by being a real pest, and by doing it for long enough, we were able to put pressure on the companies buying those goods. I think that we can actually say that there&#39;s been some real changes in Thai shrimp.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="dongfang" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Han Dongfang</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_dongfang.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Han Dongfang is the Executive Director of China Labour Bulletin in Hong Kong.</p> </div> <p>This question is rather misleading because it mixes up two major forces affecting labour standards: organised labour and the government. Government policy on labour standards is highly dependent on whether or not labour is well-organised. If workers are strongly organised with a focus on workplace collective bargaining, the respective government will have to consider the demands of organised labour before changing labour policy.</p> <p>The size of country’s labour force is another major factor. The countries with the biggest labour force will have the biggest impact on international labour standards. China and India provide a huge proportion of labour to the world labour market. Improving labour standards in these two countries will have a significantly larger impact on the world labour market than most other countries. Given the vast size of the labour force in these two countries, there is nowhere else companies engaged in the race to the bottom can go if they want to maintain their same capacity. </p> <p>CLB is lucky enough to be able to focus our strategy on workplace collective bargaining and organising in these two countries. By improving labour standards here through workplace collective bargaining, we may able to slow down and eventually reverse the race to the bottom.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="gonzalo" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Lupe Gonzalo</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_gonzalo.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Lupe Gonzalo works with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.</p> </div> <p>From our perspective the main thing that we have to offer to that question is the broader model that we have developed. The <a href="http://www.fairfoodprogram.org/">Fair Food Program</a> currently exists only within U.S. agriculture. But the model that it established is replicable, not only in agriculture but in other low wage industries. That&#39;s already proven to be true. There are workers in the Vermont dairy industry who have used the same essential elements to create the <a href="https://milkwithdignity.org/">Milk With Dignity</a> programme. They have their own enforcement, their own education, their own agreements. On the global scale there is the <a href="http://bangladeshaccord.org/">Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh</a>, a worker-driven social responsibility model that combats health and safety threats to textile workers. </p> <p>We&#39;re looking to bring this model to workers in other places. We know there are just horrific human rights abuses in other countries, that there&#39;s horrific poverty in other countries. There are migrant workers in other countries who are vulnerable in the same ways that we are here. They also have the possibility of creating a WSR-style programme that can harness the power of the market for good. We would like to see this model take root on an international basis as much as possible.</p> <p>The other important piece is the continued education of allies and consumers. There are consumers in every country and for every product. They will play a critical role in demanding real social responsibility. It is our job to educate them on the power they have to work together to make change. Between expanding the model and continuing to mobilise consumers, there&#39;s a lot of work to do. But if you are willing to really do the necessary work to harness power and to build power, then it is possible to change.</p> <p><em>Translated by Marley Moynahan at the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.</em></p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="haas_kyritsis" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Theresa Haas</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_haas.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Theresa Haas is Director of Outreach and Education at the Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) Network.</p> </div> <p>I don&#39;t know that we&#39;ve quite hit bottom yet. While Bangladesh which is extremely cheap, you also have Burma and Ethiopia where production has been moving. Can you get even cheaper than those two? I don&#39;t know. So I don&#39;t know that we&#39;ve necessarily hit the bottom. I&#39;d like to think we have. </p> <p>To answer your question, you have to figure out ways to mitigate that competition between countries. There are a couple of different strategies to do that. One is to conduct campaigns on a global scale, to go after an entire industry or an entire sector. If you were to have a global effort around wages, the only way would be for it to apply to every country equally. That way no one country would lose out by becoming too expensive. That&#39;s obviously very difficult given the scope.</p> <p>Worker organisations have increasingly been organising cross-border solidarity efforts because they recognise that pitting one country against another hurts workers across the world. They’re seeking to create agreements on a global scale, but we’re obviously not there yet.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="kenway" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Emily Kenway</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_kenway.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Emily Kenway is senior advisor on human trafficking and labour exploitation at Focus on Labour Exploitation. Until recently she was private sector adviser to the UK’s office of the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner.</p> </div> <p>I think the first step is actually challenging the narrative around it. The prevailing narrative is something like a trickle-down theory of labour rights. The more that developed countries develop an ethical conscience and want to consume ethical products, the better rights people at the bottom will have. Research shows that that is not happening. <a href="https://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/uk-supermarket-supply-chains-ending-the-human-suffering-behind-our-food-620428">Oxfam recently dug into the value chains of UK supermarkets</a> and found that the share of value going to the supermarkets at the top has actually increased over time, whilst the workers at the bottom sometimes don’t even have access to drinking water. This is happening in an era of alleged corporate social responsibility and ethical consumerism. So we need to get rid of that story line, which I suspect a lot of people probably buy into if they&#39;re not directly working on this kind of thing. </p> <p>There are also legal mechanisms that need to be used, or private versions of those legal mechanisms. We need to implement joint liability frameworks where the top is responsible for creating the conditions for exploitation lower down. They do exist in some sectors in some countries already, but we need to go bigger and to cross boundaries with them. That&#39;s a big ask, and we are far away from it.</p> <p>In the meantime there are private versions of that, such as the Bangladesh Accord. There you have businesses at the top binding themselves into improving the factories supplying them from halfway around the world. The Fair Food Program is similar. It’s clever because it understands the power dynamics in the supply chain by commercially incentivising tomato farm owners to stay in the program. That gives it teeth. We need many more mechanisms like that, which create joint transnational responsibility even in the absence of a law.</p> <p>In terms of organising, I think we need to see really clever disruptions of capital across supply chains. Really looking at specific supply and logistics chains to identify the nodes and intervention points within them and periodically stop them functioning. This would build worker power to the point where it becomes impossible to ignore. The reason to use those strategies is because they will hit money, at the end of the day, which is the only way to succeed given the legal and cultural structures we’re operating under and the absence of things like capital controls.</p> <p>It isn&#39;t enough to have siloed worker action – we need solidarity links between workers across the world. And we need it at every layer – we have to be wary of prioritising the international and forgetting the need for organised power at national and local levels. If you look at global framework agreements, the most successful ones are those which have strong worker organisation at national and local levels to make sure they were implemented and monitored properly.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="nanavaty" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Reema Nanavaty</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_nanavaty.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Reema Nanavaty is Director of the Self-Employed Women's Association (SEWA).</p> </div> <p>In order to attract foreign direct investment the Indian government has embarked upon economic reforms as well as labour reforms. We are advocating quite strongly around what kind of wage code and labour reforms ought to be there to safeguard the workers at the base of the pyramid. It&#39;s important, because in our experience these workers are not the base of the pyramid but its wheels. They keep the pyramid moving.</p> <p>We&#39;re asking for a floor living minimum wage for informal sector workers. We are also working on what kind of skills development, social development, and social protection programmes need to be put in place, as well as on what kinds of enabling policies are needed so that the enterprises of the informal sector can also grow to scale. </p> <p>Sometimes we must work in the opposite way, and try to prevent unwanted change from taking place. For example, it used to be that companies with 20 workers or more were required to pay certain entitlements. The governments is trying to raise that number to help more companies evade those requirements, so we are trying to make sure that the government doesn&#39;t change it. We have been listened to, and we are doing our best to work on the policies, so we are hopeful. After all, we&#39;re not talking about a few thousand workers. We&#39;re talking about 95% of the workforce of the country.</p> <p>I&#39;m not an economist, so I may not be able to say it precisely, but in the long term I think India needs to develop its own economic growth model. We cannot really copy one model or the other. We might be one country but in reality we are many countries within a country. India is so huge, there is so much diversity, and each geographic area has its own particular skillset.</p> <p>India thus needs a highly decentralised growth model that works with local procurement, local processing, local manufacturing, and local distribution. A few formal sector corporations are not going to give jobs to the millions and millions of youth in our country. If you really want the youth to feel that they have productive, meaningful work that is dignified, you have to look at a decentralised and localised model of growth – what we at SEWA call the 100-miles approach.</p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="tang" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Elizabeth Tang</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_tang.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Elizabeth Tang is the General Secretary of the International Domestic Workers Federation.</p> </div> <p>There are many well known strategies for this: organising across regions, organising across sectors along a single supply chain, worker cooperatives, etc. We had already identified them back in the 1970s, and I still think there are no other ways. We have to believe in them and work toward them.</p> <p>The problem I see is something else. It&#39;s not that these solutions are not solutions. The problem is that we are doing less and less in terms of building international linkages, of building regional or international strategies.</p> <p>Donald Trump and trade unions are now saying many of the same things. They have lots of problems at home, those problems are growing, so they can no longer have large budgets for international activities. There is less time for international solidarity because building their organisation at home is the priority. They are becoming narrower in perspective and more inward looking. Twenty years ago in Asia, there were many regional platforms and networks, and now they have all died.</p> <p>I got my start organising Coca-Cola workers in 1982 because I was connected with the International Union of Food Workers (IUF). At that time the IUF was campaigning for a boycott of Coca-Cola, because one of their factories in Guatemala was on strike and many trade union leaders were being killed in the country. We used that story to mobilise Coca-Cola workers in Hong Kong. We also mobilised workers to go to the South African consulate to protest against Apartheid. We actually collected donations from workers to send to South Africa to support trade unions. Nowadays all such initiatives have disappeared.</p> <p>It&#39;s not just a question of resources. It&#39;s always not enough, they are always scarce. I think our enemies have succeeded in creating fear among us, and instead of confronting that fear we submit to it. One of employers&#39; most common tactics is to threaten to leave when we demand better conditions. But often it&#39;s just a bluff. Some smaller operations can close and open easily, but when we talk about the bigger ones it&#39;s not so easy. I can&#39;t remember how many times Coca-Cola has threatened to leave Hong Kong, but they are still here.</p> <p>So before we conclude that globalisation just hasn&#39;t worked, that that&#39;s the only problem, we need to look at ourselves and how inward-looking we have become.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="tate" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Alison Tate</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_tate.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Alison Tate is Director of Economic and Social Policy at the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC).</p> </div> <p>I think the UN’s sustainable development goals and the Agenda 2030 framework has raised awareness of the interconnectedness between labour rights and labour standards, on the one hand, and the long-term economic and environmental sustainability of companies on the other. </p> <p>From the ITUC’s perspective, our message is very often that we need to change the rules. We&#39;ve done global polling of the general public in 14 countries and around 85% of people surveyed say it&#39;s time to rewrite the rules of the global economy. That&#39;s the kind of crisis that we&#39;re facing. The future of our society feels like it&#39;s being determined by an economic model that takes no consideration of the needs and the aspirations of people.</p> <p>For us an underpinning of fundamental human rights is essential to changing that. That&#39;s not an old idea in a modern world. That&#39;s a really fundamental idea that remains relevant. The United Nations institutions have a human rights mandate. The same is true for the ILO. Decent work is the key pillar of the work of the ILO, and improving access to universal social protection and the formalisation of all forms of work is key to living that mandate.</p> <p>Where we see these institutions not taking that on, we need to push them to come back to the fundamentals and the foundations of what works. Crucially, we need to ensure that pervasive global inequality in terms of women&#39;s access to work and discrimination issues in the workplace are addressed. That means addressing maternity rights and parental leave, as well as ensuring minimum living wages, social protection and collective bargaining is available to all women. It means taking specific and targeted action to make sure that what comes about will change the nature of the global economy. Women are at the front lines of many of these industries where fundamental labour rights are eroded, so tackling discrimination is fundamental. All those global institutions have made commitments to that. They&#39;ve all made very good communiques or proclamations or declarations, but it&#39;s now important that those are realised. </p> </div> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. Our support is not tacit endorsement within. The aim was to highlight new ideas and we hope the result will be a lively and robust dialogue.</p> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Thu, 11 Oct 2018 07:33:01 +0000 openDemocracy 120011 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Future of work round table: bringing business leaders and policy makers on board https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Workers' organisations know where they are trying to get to, but convincing those with power to prioritise rights over profits is no easy task. Our 12-person round table contemplates the challenge.</p> </div> </div> </div> <style> #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 0px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} .breakcontainer {display:flex;wrap:nowrap;clear:both;} .breakedges {flex-grow:1;min-content:100px;margin:auto;} .breakcenter {flex-grow:1;max-width: 300px;font-size:90%;color:#999;margin:0 15px;text-align:center;margin:auto;} .breakline {width:100%;border-top:1px solid #999;} .breakcenter a {color:#999;} </style> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/BTS_Roundtable_Q3_Colour_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Artwork by Carys Boughton. All rights reserved.</p> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <div class="question active">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <p style="color:rgba(255,0,0,0.6);font-size:110%;">What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers? How can workers more effectively participate in shaping the conditions under which they work?</p> <div id="respondents"> <div class="respondentsleft"> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#ancheita">Alejandra Ancheita</a></span><br /><span class="affil">ProDESC</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#bader-blau">Shawna Bader-Blau</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Solidarity Center</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#bhattacharjee">Anannya Bhattacharjee</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Asia Floor Wage Alliance</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#cdebaca">Luis C.deBaca</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#dongfang">Han Dongfang</a></span><br /><span class="affil">China Labour Bulletin</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#gonzalo">Lupe Gonzalo</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Coalition of Immokalee Workers</span></p> </div> <div class="respondentsright"> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#haas_kyritsis">Theresa Haas & Penelope Kyritsis</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Worker-driven Social Responsibility Network</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#kenway">Emily Kenway</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Focus on Labour Exploitation (FLEX)</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#nanavaty">Reema Nanavaty</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Self-Employed Women's Association</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#tang">Elizabeth Tang</a></span><br /><span class="affil">International Domestic Workers Federation</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#tate">Alison Tate</a></span><br /><span class="affil">International Trade Union Confederation</span></p> </div> </div> <!--RESPONDENTS--> <div class="break"></div> <!--CONTENTSTART--> <div id="ancheita" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Alejandra Ancheita</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_ancheita.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Alejandra Ancheita is the founder of the Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Project (ProDESC) in Mexico City.</p> </div> <p>Part of the main purpose of our organisation is to find ways to achieve transnational justice. Our most successful inroad so far has been our RADAR programme. This eight-year-old programme seeks to defend the rights of Mexicans temporarily migrating to the United States under the H2A/H2B visa programme.</p> <p>The group of workers we collaborate with in Sinaloa, Mexico uses this scheme to work in the seafood industry in Luisiana. We saw that these workers were suffering from a pattern of violations that began with recruiters in their home community and ended on the seafood farms in the United States.</p> <p>In response, we developed a strategy to try to protect these workers on both sides of the border. On the Mexican side we filed a criminal complaint against the recruiters for fraud. This was the first time recruiters were detained in Mexico, and the first time the authorities recovered and returned money to workers. </p> <p>They were, however, only part of the problem. These workers were already vulnerable when the recruiters offered them work. Poverty, a lack of opportunities, and violence within their own communities had made them desperate. So desperate that they were willing to pay money just for the promise of being hired.</p> <p>Their vulnerability travelled with them across the border and was exacerbated by the H2A/H2B visa rules, which tie workers to a single employer. Employers can do whatever they want – demand unpaid overtime, provide sub-standard working conditions, or even keep the workers in captivity – and get away with it. If the workers complain, the employer can have them deported.</p> <p>For lawyers in the U.S., one of the main challenges in bringing cases is that both the primary employer and the end buyers have the legal excuse of saying they didn&#39;t know. That allows them to evade responsibility. In response, we began to send letters of notification documenting abuses to the primary employer and to other actors in the supply chain. With that notification nobody can say they didn&#39;t know.</p> <p>So, what we are offering is information about these violations. The different nodes in the supply chain have the opportunity to change what is happening. If they decide to maintain the same recruiter or to maintain the conditions where the violations were happening, these letters of notification can be used to prove that the primary employer and the other actors in the supply chain were aware of the violations. This is when we can really open up litigation.</p> <p>Companies don&#39;t want to lose money. So while a company might be able to hire a lot of lawyers to defend themselves, it&#39;s important to understand that starting litigation with solid proof gives us an opportunity to use social responsibility mechanisms to our advantage. That is the moment when we can argue to investors that products are being produced with human rights violations, and that we can make public all these conditions. That is when you really can have an impact. </p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="bader-blau" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Shawna Bader-Blau</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_bader-blau.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Shawna Bader-Blau is Executive Director of Solidarity Center.</p> </div> <p>There are a couple ways to respond to that. The first one is, most of the fundamental human rights of workers that are abused are abused illegally. We call this things like wage theft. Furthermore, the majority of people who are not paid the wages they are owed are women. This happens in contexts where not being paid the minimum wage is illegal. So, there&#39;s a complete lack of will on the part of governments to enforce existing norms and standards. And, at best, companies turn a blind eye to such violations and feign ignorance.</p> <p>A mass movement of people needs to expose and address this fundamental lawlessness. It&#39;s like women in the #MeToo movement. We&#39;re globally exposing a lawlessness that has been going on forever, and we&#39;re saying, ‘No. You can&#39;t just do that’. It&#39;s true wild west behaviour in many, many countries. Certainly in the informal economy, where there is no will or interest in protecting rights. You can already see this movement forming. Domestic workers, agricultural workers, construction workers, and others are coming together in creative and powerful ways to address the lawlessness that governs workers&#39; lives. </p> <p>On the demand side, it&#39;s important to break silos up. We&#39;ve dedicated a lot of time at the Solidarity Center to building bridges between labour movements and other social and political movements. There are parts of the world, such as much of Latin America, where that has always happened. But in a lot of the rest of the world it&#39;s not common. It&#39;s really important that we bring together the feminists of the #MeToo movement with the labour movements that are representing more and more women. There are 75 million women around the world in unions. These are the most powerful women&#39;s rights organisations on Earth, from an economic standpoint.</p> <p>We also need to build bridges between land rights and indigenous peoples movements and labour rights movements. So many people are expelled from their land by big corporations, and then end up migrating for work, usually in lousy conditions. That&#39;s intolerable. We have to bridge these kind of movements to make common cause. And the common cause is the reassertion of democracy.</p> <p>There&#39;s no such thing as just a consumer or a worker. On some level we&#39;re all citizens. We&#39;re owed and deserve fair and decent treatment, and the dignity of democracy. We have the right to not only come together in our workplaces, but to create governments that represent our interests. And that very question of democracy is on the table right now.</p> <p>We have the huge task of reasserting these fundamental rights as core to democracy and exposing the fact that the concentration of more and more wealth in fewer and fewer hands gives those few not only economic power, but massive political power. That political power is exercised increasingly against the interests of the rest of us. In short, economic inequality is a massive democracy issue.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="bhattacharjee" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Anannya Bhattacharjee</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_bhattacharjee.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Anannya Bhattacharjee is the International Coordinator of Asia Floor Wage Alliance.</p> </div> <p>We need to understand that business is not one monolithic thing. There is big capital and there is small capital. If we approach all businesses as capital, and have the same approach to all of them, then we won&#39;t make the most strategic alliances.</p> <p>Multinationals have huge power over their global production networks. They use this power to force producers to sign contracts that are essentially only beneficial to the multinationals. The margins for the local supplier are squeezed more and more, and this then affects the welfare of workers locally. As worker organisations we need to be aware of these dynamics, and make our demands logical to the fact that there is big capital and small capital. There are some things we can demand of the suppliers at the local level, and there are some things that can only be delivered by the multinationals.</p> <p>Unfortunately I doubt that even business sufficiently understands this. As a labour activist I can imagine allying with small capital to counter big capital, and thereby bring benefits to both small capital and labour. However, I think that business at the local level does not often see labour organisations as an ally. Small capital sees itself only as part of the business world. They haven&#39;t quite understood or internalised the inequalities, and how in some cases unlikely alliances may actually be beneficial. If we were able to understand each other&#39;s perspectives better, and strategise together, then I think we could make an impact. </p> <p>National governments are turning inward. They&#39;re focusing on their national competitiveness in, I would say, a short-sighted way. Governments do not think about their regions collaboratively. For example, as the Asia Floor Wage Alliance, we brought Asian labour into alignment on the issue of a living wage in Asia. We understand that workers in different countries are being divided against each other by making some labour cheaper than others.</p> <p>National governments could do something similar. It would require governments to come together, just one government acting alone would not work. There are some existing regional alliances out there, of course, but they are not as dynamic or cooperative as one would like. They&#39;re split on various levels: politically, historically, etc. We are not seeing enlightened governments at this point, which is extremely unfortunate. Government&#39;s policies are nowhere near understanding the need for regional cooperation towards global capital.</p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="cdebaca" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Luis C.deBaca</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_cdebaca.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Ambassador Luis C.deBaca, of Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center, directed the U.S. Office to Monitor/Combat Trafficking in Persons under President Barack Obama.</p> </div> <p>I certainly don&#39;t want to hope for tragedies, but I think that you have to make tragedies mean something. In the United States it was the combination of Thai workers locked in a factory in El Monte, California and deaf Mexican street peddlers in New York that horrified people enough to allow us to get the Trafficking Victims Protection Act through. For the international community it was how horrified they were that women were being auctioned off in the Balkans. </p> <p>If it wasn’t for the cockle pickers in Morecambe Bay we wouldn&#39;t have a slavery way of dealing with human trafficking in the UK. I would rather go back in time and have 23 live Chinese workers make it back to the sand that day. But not being able to do that, I&#39;m going to make sure that their deaths don&#39;t go in vain and that we spread that slavery theory across the entire Commonwealth.</p> <p>Unfortunately, I think that it does take that sort of tragedy. People don&#39;t seem to care about baseline worker exploitation. In the Clinton administration, we took the most horrible things of El Monte and the deaf Mexican case and we turned it into the worker exploitation task force. That created a bunch of ways in which we could improve labour enforcement apart from criminal enforcement. Unfortunately, those other methods dropped away after George Bush became president and we returned to relying on criminal prosecutions.</p> <p>The bigger point there is that prosecution, while it shouldn’t be the only tool, has a definite role. The success of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW) in driving change in Florida tomato fields comes from being a worker-driven group rather than waiting for the government to bring improvements, but at key times it was the fact of actual enforcement that had a big impact on the growers.</p> <p>The predator being out there in the forest – in this case the government – has a focusing effect. I think CIW has been very good at saying, ‘WSR, as we do it, might make you uncomfortable. But it&#39;s not gonna make you nearly as uncomfortable as having the FBI go through your stuff’. To do that you have to have an FBI that will actually go through their file cabinets. We have that in the United States, but a lot of other countries don&#39;t. Critics of the US Trafficking In Persons Report often accuse us of being fixated on prosecutions. Our response is that we&#39;re actually not fixated on prosecutions. But we know that if there are no prosecutors on this, and there&#39;s no real reason for the companies to worry, they’re not going to worry. </p> <p>To me, the thing that makes it possible to have worker-led social responsibility is the prospect of a boss going to jail. A boss going to jail, or shipping containers sitting in an impound lot, is a very good way to incentivise a company to pick up the phone and call the workers.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="dongfang" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Han Dongfang</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_dongfang.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Han Dongfang is the Executive Director of China Labour Bulletin in Hong Kong.</p> </div> <p>As noted in the previous question, the most effective way for workers to participate in shaping the conditions under which they work is by organising in the workplace and engaging in collective bargaining with their employer. Even in China, one of the worst countries for workers’ rights violations, we have seen numerous examples of workers with a common grievance coming together and taking strategic and well-thought-out collective action to force their employer to the bargaining table. It is not only CSR organisations and the media who can improve workers’ rights, but also workers taking the initiative. Worker organising is obviously a time-consuming process, but the results are solid. The strength gained by the workers also stays with them. It doesn’t vanish as soon as the media spotlight switches to another subject.</p> <p>Isolated collective bargaining experiences cannot be sustained and are difficult to replicate if there is no trade union representation. Our experience in China highlights how important trade union representation is to successfully pushing through worker initiatives, even in a country where worker-led trade unions are still a sensitive topic. Our experience in India shows that workplace collective bargaining is the strongest tie linking trade unions and workers, and is therefore able to create a long term and sustainable solution to the protection of workers’ rights.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="gonzalo" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Lupe Gonzalo</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_gonzalo.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Lupe Gonzalo works with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.</p> </div> <p>With business leaders, it is important to point out that it is getting increasingly difficult for companies to hide abuse because of increasing levels of transparency worldwide. Because of technology. Because of social media. When abuse happens, even in far away places, we find out about it. That&#39;s different than 15 or 20 years ago. It means that consumers can inform themselves about actual conditions on the ground.</p> <p>A good example of how this can work is what we&#39;ve done recently with the fast food company Wendy&#39;s. We spent years working on a public campaign to educate consumers about the conditions in their supply chain in Mexico. We pushed really hard to convey the reality despite what Wendy&#39;s was saying. We combined that with action steps. We were not only telling consumers what was happening, but we gave them ways to help. That combination of educating people and telling them what to do about it really allowed us to make real change.</p> <p>The United States isn&#39;t a good example when it comes to reaching policy makers. Farm workers and domestic workers have been excluded from federal protections since at least the 1930s. At the same time, any politician who knows anything understands that the migrant work force is a fundamental part of the foundation of the economy of this country. Whether it&#39;s in hotels, or restaurants, or agricultural fields, we are a part of this economy.</p> <p>We really have to be talking about how to protect the basic human rights of workers in those jobs. To get there politicians need to recognise that economic contribution, but they also need to see the faces and the families of the workers who are doing these jobs. That means that we as people need to show that to them. We need to show that we exist, and that as immigrants we&#39;re doing our part to move the whole country forward. If we hide ourselves no one will ever see us. We have to be willing to go out in public to tell our stories. I hope that in the future that can lead to change.</p> <p><em>Translated by Marley Moynahan at the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.</em></p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="haas_kyritsis" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Theresa Haas & Penelope Kyritsis</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_haas.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Theresa Haas is Director of Outreach and Education at the Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) Network.</p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_kyritsis.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Penelope Kyritsis is Outreach and Education Coordinator at the Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) Network.</p> </div> <p><strong>Penelope:</strong> I don&#39;t see any reason why WSR can&#39;t be a policy maker&#39;s project. The principles are quite simple. The only barrier I see is finding the right incentive.</p> <p><strong>Theresa:</strong> There&#39;s quite often a number of levers that policy makers have to either provide preferences, or block non-WSR participating entities from being able to engage in business. There&#39;s no reason why policy makers couldn&#39;t require suppliers for public procurement to prioritise or exclusively source from WSR programmes. The same goes for government contractors. Sometimes private developers have to get certain government permits in order to build properties. You could have a system through which policy makers require developers to participate in WSR programmes in order to get the permits. </p> <p>The bigger issue is about incentivising policy makers to want to make those changes. That’s hard, because policy makers are deeply influenced by business. I think that business, in many ways, constrains policy makers from enacting stricter laws and regulations for workers engaged in any kind of production for public purposes. So a big part of the change does need to happen at the level of the businesses and the brands. </p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="kenway" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Emily Kenway</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_kenway.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Emily Kenway is senior advisor on human trafficking and labour exploitation at Focus on Labour Exploitation. Until recently she was private sector adviser to the UK’s office of the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner.</p> </div> <p>For policy makers, one of the things that does work is involving business voices in the lobbying effort. Unlikely coalitions of corporate, trade, and civil society organisations do work. Take the 2015 UK Modern Slavery Act. Section 54 on transparency in supply chains, weak as it is, exists in part because corporate and investor voices pushed for it. Policymakers listen to businesses and you can&#39;t ignore that fact. You have to find a reason why a policy shift would be in the interests of business as well. Part of this is remembering that businesses are made up of people. Who they are can be very important. Take the UK Living Wage accreditation. In cases where campaigners won very large companies over to this wage rate, it was often because they found an internal champion within the company who understands it and wants to do it.</p> <p>The other tactic that should be used more often is targeting public procurement. Like companies, government also has to consider the reputational risk of its business-style activities, i.e. the products and services it buys. Particularly the current UK government which has a prime minister who seems to want to make anti-slavery her moral legacy. Campaigners could leverage that and push for deep action with actual teeth if they could demonstrate that there is child and slave labour in the government&#39;s own supply chains. That&#39;s not impossible to demonstrate.</p> <p>And while transparency is what uncovers that sort of thing, we need to be wary of putting too much faith in it alone. Transparency has become an end in itself, but it is only a means. We need to ask how it is affecting or improving labour rights at the bottom of a supply chain. We shouldn&#39;t applaud companies for mapping the first tier of their supply chains. That&#39;s really not the point. For transparency to be effective, you use it to first bring issues to light. Then you act to structurally alter the possibility for those same issues to arise again.</p> <p>It&#39;s quite clear from companies&#39; modern slavery statements that this is not happening. The vast majority of even the better ones focus on output activities. They&#39;ve trained x number of staff or run an educational workshop for y number of suppliers. But they are not focusing on outcomes. What has actually changed? What means this issue isn&#39;t going to happen again? They&#39;re missing that part of it.</p> <p>I actually think they are missing that part of it – they are stuck at outputs and can’t fathom outcomes. Most of the time when I meet with supermarkets I mention the Fair Food Program, just to see if people have heard of it. They should have, because it is one of the best examples of worker-led labour rights change out there today. But they usually haven&#39;t. They&#39;re missing those links and ideas. There is a lot of work for activists, civil society organisations, and trade unions to do in terms of providing alternative models to them.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="nanavaty" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Reema Nanavaty</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_nanavaty.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Reema Nanavaty is Director of the Self-Employed Women's Association (SEWA).</p> </div> <p>The primary and most effective route is to organise informal sector workers. This gives them a collective strength. Their voice is heard. Their work gets visibility. For that to succeed, one has to work on capacity building for both leadership and management. If I, as an informal worker, know where the product that I&#39;m embroidering goes to, what the finished product is, and what the sale price is, I have a much stronger base from which to work. That&#39;s why our organisation invests a lot in members&#39; education.</p> <p>We also work on setting up real alternatives for informal sector workers, because having alternatives increases their bargaining power. For example, we have set up a company run by garment and textile workers. It&#39;s grown to include over 15,000 artisans and garment workers and provides an alternative to other employers. We have also set up a company of small farmers, which has now managed to create its own rural distribution network and supply chain. </p> <p>For almost a decade we have worked to organise home workers and small farmers in neighbouring countries as well. It&#39;s a long process, and many barriers stand in our way. Our focus is on women to women integration: bringing women producers together with women producers across the borders of different countries. To help with this process we have set up what we call SABAHs – SAARC Business Associations of Home-based Workers. It is through these different SABAHs that we have begun to develop our own, independent national supply chains. We&#39;re now trying to find ways to get these supply chains to interact with each other and to integrate regionally as well. It&#39;s a relatively new project that can only grow at the pace of its members, but it&#39;s gradually moving in a constructive way.</p> <p>We have also experimented with other tools like model contracts, but they haven&#39;t been picked up very much in India. There is no government regulation that mandates supplier firms to enter into formal contracts. Employers thus remain very footloose. Today they work with the processors, or ginners, or spinners of India, but tomorrow they may ship the entire operation to southeast Asia, Bangladesh, or Africa.</p> <p>One reason why such regulation doesn&#39;t exist is because India has yet to ratify the 1996 ILO Home Work Convention. We campaigned for more than 10 years to have that created, but until they ratify the convention we will not see a policy made by the government.</p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="tang" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Elizabeth Tang</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_tang.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Elizabeth Tang is the General Secretary of the International Domestic Workers Federation.</p> </div> <p>This is also our question. I used to organise all types of workers, and now I only organise domestic workers. I see the difference in terms of how to build power.</p> <p>For other types of workers you focus on building your membership, your internal strength, so that you can strike. I once organised local Coca-Cola workers for a wage increase. We had a single target: the Coca-Cola factory and employer. We were able to mobilise workers to go on strike, and we were able to build up an image that everybody could get behind. It was easy.</p> <p>In the case of domestic workers it is much trickier. There isn&#39;t a single employer, there are many. They are ordinary people. Nice people. Also poor people. So if we target our employers, we are also targeting the community. I&#39;m convinced that getting the public at large to understand us is the key to success. It&#39;s harder, because it really involves a change in attitudes and a change in the value system of the population. We need to shift how people look at domestic work. How people look at women. How people look at migrants. We need to shift people&#39;s mindsets so that they begin to understand the value of our contribution.</p> <p>Targeting policy makers is something we have to invest much more in. It&#39;s very hard in the beginning. Activists and trade unionists commonly and mistakenly take for granted that people know what they know. Unfortunately our world is not like this. If people are not in your world they really don&#39;t know your world. People turn their faces away and don&#39;t want to listen. But once you find the opportunity to start talking and people begin to hear you, things start to change.</p> <p>We&#39;ve had many successful experiences on this. Here in Hong Kong we recently had a legislator advocate for revisions to our human trafficking law. It&#39;s outdated and focuses only on preventing sexual exploitation. It has taken us years, but there are now a few parliament members who understand that exploitation of migrant domestic workers is much more common in Hong Kong than of sex workers.</p> <p>For migrant workers, it is important to lobby lawmakers in both the country of origin and the country of destination. Most of our members spend probably 80% of their energy on the country of origin. Lobbying the destination country can seem much harder, yet it is as important. In places like Hong Kong domestic workers are indispensable. That gives them bargaining power. They first have to understand this, and then they have to have local support to act on it.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="tate" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Alison Tate</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_tate.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Alison Tate is Director of Economic and Social Policy at the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC).</p> </div> <p>It&#39;s an interesting question to answer, because this really depends on how you see the power dynamics between these different political and financial institutions. There are the policy makers within a government; inter-governmental groups the like G20; international financial institutions like the World Bank or the International Monetary Fund that both provide access to capital and dispense policy prescriptions; and powerful business leaders at the head of some of the largest financial entities on the planet.</p> <p>It’s important to remember that organised labour is an actor as well. An important way to counteract these other forces is by building workers’ power. It&#39;s really important. That means ensuring labour market institutions that deliver justice. That labour courts are there to ensure good laws and social protection measures. That rights are actually enforced. That labour inspections work. And that the financial system is working to the benefit of workers. Building these up requires not just good policy, but also political will.</p> <p>I think many democratic governments around the world are absconding from their responsibility to intervene and make sure that these systems work. Governments are either withdrawing from that responsibility, or not living up to it. </p> <p>Very few governments are living up to their responsibilities in tackling the kinds of fast-paced developments that we see. When people talk about the future of work and about the fourth industrial revolution there&#39;s a lot of fear because of the uncertainty about how quickly those changes are happening in the world of work. But there is also a lack of trust that governments are not living up to their democratic responsibilities. </p> <p>We are in a moment of the intersection of multiple global crises, of unemployment, underemployment, inequality, of poverty and of climate. Of course people are taking on these challenges in all kinds of creative ways. Not only in the formal economy, but informal workers are also organising into associations and into unions. There are huge numbers of workers who have been excluded from traditional structures, including from trade unions, because their work is informal. Domestic workers have formed unions and global networks. Great examples are in South Africa, Dominican Republic, India. This is also happening in countries like Sweden and Norway and Denmark, where freelance workers are coming together through platform-based organising. They are participating and collectively seeking to access the protections long afforded to formal unions.</p> <p>Many companies also understand that they need to really look at their own practices. Sometimes the route to that realisation is indirect, such as the need to address climate action. Some companies are now working with workers to design employment plans that go along with carbon emission reduction plans. Changes like that provide new opportunities for unions to organise, to negotiate and to bargain collectively around those conditions.</p> </div> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. Our support is not tacit endorsement within. The aim was to highlight new ideas and we hope the result will be a lively and robust dialogue.</p> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Wed, 10 Oct 2018 07:48:37 +0000 openDemocracy 120010 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Future of work round table: do ethical consumerism and investment work? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>'Fair trade'-style programmes exist to reassure individuals that the products they buy or the investments they make are responsibly created. Do they work? And if not, is there a better way?</p> </div> </div> </div> <style> #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 0px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} .breakcontainer {display:flex;wrap:nowrap;clear:both;} .breakedges {flex-grow:1;min-content:100px;margin:auto;} .breakcenter {flex-grow:1;max-width: 300px;font-size:90%;color:#999;margin:0 15px;text-align:center;margin:auto;} .breakline {width:100%;border-top:1px solid #999;} .breakcenter a {color:#999;} </style> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/BTS_Roundtable_Q2_Colour_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Artwork by Carys Boughton. All rights reserved.</p> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <div class="question active">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <p style="color:rgba(255,0,0,0.6);font-size:110%;">Do you believe that existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption have been effective in improving worker conditions and promoting workers’ rights? Do you have examples of new ways forward that could improve upon what is already being done?</p> <div id="respondents"> <div class="respondentsleft"> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#ancheita">Alejandra Ancheita</a></span><br /><span class="affil">ProDESC</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#bader-blau">Shawna Bader-Blau</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Solidarity Center</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#bhattacharjee">Anannya Bhattacharjee</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Asia Floor Wage Alliance</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#cdebaca">Luis C.deBaca</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#dongfang">Han Dongfang</a></span><br /><span class="affil">China Labour Bulletin</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#gonzalo">Lupe Gonzalo</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Coalition of Immokalee Workers</span></p> </div> <div class="respondentsright"> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#haas_kyritsis">Theresa Haas & Penelope Kyritsis</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Worker-driven Social Responsibility Network</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#kenway">Emily Kenway</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Focus on Labour Exploitation (FLEX)</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#nanavaty">Reema Nanavaty</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Self-Employed Women's Association</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#tang">Elizabeth Tang</a></span><br /><span class="affil">International Domestic Workers Federation</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#tate">Alison Tate</a></span><br /><span class="affil">International Trade Union Confederation</span></p> </div> </div> <!--RESPONDENTS--> <div class="break"></div> <!--CONTENTSTART--> <div id="ancheita" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Alejandra Ancheita</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_ancheita.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Alejandra Ancheita is the founder of the Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Project (ProDESC) in Mexico City.</p> </div> <p>In our experience corporate social responsibility programmes can be useful in very specific cases. For example, when you have a factory producing shoes for a transnational corporation under very bad conditions and in a very small town, where most of the population is affected. In a case like that codes of conduct, due diligence, or nam-ing and shaming mechanisms can work when pursued alongside a proper legal strategy. </p> <p>It&#39;s different when we&#39;re talking about an entire industry. At this broader level our experience shows that trying to improve worker conditions through certifications has minimal impact. Perhaps not zero, but minimal. We are now working with berry pickers in Baja, California. These workers work between 14 and 16 hours a day. The owners of the farm do not give them all the training they need. They do not receive all the tools necessary for their work. They are only hired by the day. They are not able to form an independent union or settle a collective bargaining contract. Yet all the products they pick are certified by one organisation or another. </p> <p>What works better is to not only implicate the farm owner but also the companies that are buying, selling, and exporting these products. In order to do that we&#39;re supporting the workers to collectively organise and building a strategy of strategic litigation. We pursue lobbying and advocacy with the Mexican government as well as with the brands. We are creating a new narrative to inform the public about what is happening to these workers.</p> <p>Explaining all the layers of violation that can occur can be very difficult. The structural conditions we face in Mexico usually mean that when one human right is violated others are as well. Take berry pickers on a farm. Their labour rights are likely being violated in the ways we have already talked about, even though the berries themselves are certified. Behind that, however, might lie a further violation: the farm they&#39;re working on might be located on former communal land.</p> <p>You see, after the NAFTA agreement came into force indigenous communities did not receive support from the government to work the land. They owned the land, but not the means. So they sold it. Now many of those same individuals, who once collectively owned the land, pick berries for the new owners under precarious conditions. It&#39;s a chain of exploitation resulting from a failed economic model, one that cannot ensure labour rights or indigenous peoples&#39; rights to territory and natural resources.</p> <p>Those kinds of facts very complicated for consumers to understand, even those with good will. They want to support campaigns and thus try to believe in these mechanisms of social responsibility. But the reality is that companies use social responsibility mechanisms because they are cheap and make corporations appear as the good guys. What is much more expensive for transnational corporations is fulfilling labour standards and fulfilling human rights. </p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="bader-blau" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Shawna Bader-Blau</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_bader-blau.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Shawna Bader-Blau is Executive Director of Solidarity Center.</p> </div> <p>It&#39;s really important that there be a variety of strategies that well-meaning consumers and investors can access and use to try to do good. Those of us in the field, therefore, need to find allies in these structures and these movements.</p> <p>At the same time, a common pitfall of these strategies is that they are not directly tied to the needs of workers. They might be well-meaning but they aren&#39;t devised or co-created with the input of the affected people. That can lead to odd outcomes, such as a product boycott that the workers themselves don&#39;t actually want.</p> <p>A stronger response would be if the people thinking about ethical consumption and its effects on the earth, indigenous people, and workers came together with the people producing food, clothes, and other goods and services. Different social movements crossing boundaries to come together in common cause. That&#39;s the future of how we build power. We can&#39;t do it in silos like we have so far. Neither of our strategies are effective enough, not on the worker end and not on the consumer end. The global economy is just too big. </p> <p>There are great examples of how to converge interests in ways that really lead to positive change on the ground. Take the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh. We point to that a lot because it has global companies coming together with local NGOs, unions, and international civil society at one table to reach a negotiated and binding agreement on how to make workplaces safer. That is the sort of model of cooperation we should be pushing on private equity firms and the big investment companies behind the brands. We should push the idea that ethical investing means investing in brands that are signed onto these kinds of binding international standards.</p> <p>We need to reassert at every level of corporation and government that labour rights are critical to shared prosperity. In many of the ethical consumption and ethical investment initiatives I&#39;ve seen, the core rights of workers are often missing – collective bargaining, freedom of association, and the right to have a say in one’s own working conditions. That&#39;s tragic because, while there are a lot of rights that we need to advocate for when we&#39;re trying to create fairness in the global economy and more positive corporate behaviour, core rights are absolutely key. Yet they&#39;re missing, I&#39;d say, almost 70% to 80% of the time. </p> <p>They&#39;re missing because they are perceived to hit the bottom lines of companies. I hope things like the Bangladesh Accord can be used to undo that assumption. You can&#39;t say that the global brands that signed onto the accord are diminishing, tiny little companies of no importance. They represent the 300 largest global garment brands on Earth. Somehow none of them went bankrupt or dissolved after they signed the accord. We should do a better job of advertising that fact.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="bhattacharjee" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Anannya Bhattacharjee</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_bhattacharjee.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Anannya Bhattacharjee is the International Coordinator of Asia Floor Wage Alliance.</p> </div> <p>We have not seen any of these programmes really change the lives of workers. I&#39;m not saying that all of them are 100% rubbish. There could be a few pilots here and there which serve a few workers in a microcosm, and solve a problem for a period of time. But we have not seen any of these efforts really change the lives of workers.</p> <p>Let&#39;s look at two ways in which workers are suffering, and let&#39;s see how these programmes could impact them. </p> <p>The first is the day-to-day relationship between workers and the factory management. To a large extent those industrial relations – the way managers behave on the shop floor – are determined by the sourcing practices of the multinationals purchasing their products. Those sourcing practices frequently require managers to push workers extremely hard without fairly remunerating them. As a result workers face coercive, retaliatory, and often violent industrial relations. So: industrial relations can only improve if the extremely coercive practices that are needed to extract the work from the workers are removed. None of these ethical investment practises or CSR programmes really focus on what it would take to do that.</p> <p>A second problem workers face is that of extremely low wages, if not wage theft. In many situations, workers are not able to fight for higher wages because the industrial relations I&#39;ve described make sure that they do not exercise their collective power. This is no accident. Low wages and coercive industrial relations are in place so that the cheapest labour can be engaged to provide goods at very low cost. These problems aren&#39;t solved by the sorts of research and investment that go on. They may sound nice, but really at a ground level, they are not making any difference to workers&#39; lives. </p> <p>In my opinion things will only improve when workers&#39; organisations are at the table to discuss, implement, and monitor the solutions. This rarely happens because most corporate activities tend to avoid dealing with workers&#39; organisations. There&#39;s antipathy towards trade unions or any kind of representative organisations. The one exception is that sometimes they may engage at a very high level – a global union at the level of Geneva or Brussels – even though production is on another continent. </p> <p>The point remains: the only time things have a chance of working is when an activity can be conceived, implemented, and monitored by local worker organisations. Of these there are really only a handful of examples. In the garment industry there is the freedom of association protocol in Indonesia, and there&#39;s the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh. These agreements were designed with the participation of labour organisations, they have a process of enforceability, and they bind signatories to certain activities. I would say these are some of the conditions for success, but they&#39;re extremely hard to achieve. Not because they&#39;re difficult to do, but because of the unwillingness of companies to engage in with them.</p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="cdebaca" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Luis C.deBaca</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_cdebaca.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Ambassador Luis C.deBaca, of Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center, directed the U.S. Office to Monitor/Combat Trafficking in Persons under President Barack Obama.</p> </div> <p>For folks coming at this from a trafficking lens, a lot of the multi-stakeholder initiatives (MSI) look like they were either designed to be toothless or they became captive over the years. This group says, ‘Ya’ll don&#39;t have any teeth, and so therefore you&#39;re just helping to greenwash’. Then the established MSI participants turn back around and say, ‘You guys think that it&#39;s always about putting people in jail, you don&#39;t understand how hard this is’.</p> <p>The truth is probably somewhere in the middle. But I think it’s very interesting that, by now, even many of the people who don’t consider themselves as part of the anti-trafficking or anti-slavery movements are pressing for more teeth and more public transparency. That shift has led to the creation of the California Supply Chain Transparency Act, which then morphed into the US procurement standards from former president Barack Obama, which came out around the same time as the UK Modern Slavery Act in 2015. Those were all very much being driven by that kind of rebellious, young, anti-trafficking movement.</p> <p>I helped promote the content of the California bill both nationally and internationally. Part of the reason we went down this route was that we felt, at the time, that MSI and social audits were largely being done by environmentally-focused folks with environmentally-focused approaches. They were forestry and biology majors who were good at measuring chemicals in the water but not necessarily good at talking to workers in their dorms. That scepticism combined with the fact that a lot of audits remained proprietary information for the companies concerned, and with the way employers could use the ILO’s tripartite consensus model to their advantage. They could point to a labour union representative in their MSI, while ignoring the fact that trade unionists were getting killed over where their third- or fourth-tier suppliers were operating. There was that sort of fiction that was happening in the CSR model.</p> <p>This is one of the reasons why so many of us are interested in Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) instead. It puts the worker a little bit further forward into the issue and it doesn&#39;t depend on the largesse of the company. Corporations can no longer claim to be committed to a tripartite, high-low style dialogue with the unions while simultaneously using lobbying and business associations to ensure unions stay powerless. My hope and dream for WSR is that it changes that dynamic.</p> <p>A part of me also likes it because it does not necessarily require the worker&#39;s input to be filtered through official labour union structures. Trade unions in some countries are phenomenal with a lot of extremely brave people, but in some countries they&#39;re very captive. They&#39;re captive either to the government itself or to the companies. The entire focus on WSR puts the first and most important actor first in this, as opposed to corporate social responsibility.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="dongfang" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Han Dongfang</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_dongfang.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Han Dongfang is the Executive Director of China Labour Bulletin in Hong Kong.</p> </div> <p>The corporate social responsibility and employer code of conduct strategy has been a necessary first step. The biggest achievement of these programmes, however, has been to highlight what should be done rather than to bring about real improvements. Brands are busy sending out auditors to the suppliers, auditors are busy travelling between different worlds and writing reports, employers are busy telling their workers what to say and what not to say to the auditors, and civil society organisations and media are busy finding the faults in the audits and accusing the brands of using them for PR exercises. It’s a never ending game of cat and mouse.</p> <p>Workers as a bargaining partner at the site of production are the biggest piece missing from this picture. China Labour Bulletin (CLB) has been arguing for the last 20 years that the corporate social responsibility approach will never become an effective tool for protecting workers’ rights unless it involves the workers producing these goods as a bargaining partner. We believe that workplace collective bargaining will not only result in a better life for workers but also enhance the reputation of the brands, stabilise labour relations, and create stronger local consumption near the factories. In other words, workplace collective bargaining has multiple benefits for all stakeholders.</p> <p>For many years nobody listened to this argument, so in 2005 CLB took the strategic decision of focussing on workplace collective bargaining as a means of protecting and developing the economic interests of Chinese workers. During this process, we were able to demonstrate the effectiveness of worker-led, enterprise-level collective bargaining in solving strike cases. Meanwhile, the process and the results demonstrated that worker organising was not necessarily a threat to the ruling Communist Party of China (CPC). It could instead bolster the legitimacy of the CPC by improving living standards for ordinary Chinese workers. This was one of the major elements that directly led to the CPC’s reform of the official All-China Federation of Trade Unions (ACFTU) in late 2015. It was the first time in history that Chinese workers actually had the opportunity, as members of the official union, to turn that organisation into a genuine trade union that represented workers at the enterprise level.</p> <p>In early 2017, CLB brought our experience of promoting workplace collective bargaining in China to India, where we are working with a garment workers union in Bangalore. After one year of strategic training for worker activists and worker organising on the factory floor, a team of representatives elected by the workers initiated a bargaining process in one of the major garment factories. Although it led to furious retaliation, including physical beatings and dismissals, all the representatives were able to hold on without backing down. This allowed the CSR partners involved enough time to commission an in-depth report on the case, and in the end the management finally engaged in dialogue with the garment workers union. This example shows how collective bargaining and organising on the factory floor, combined with CSR, can actually get the employer to change its behaviour and become a leading role model.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="gonzalo" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Lupe Gonzalo</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_gonzalo.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Lupe Gonzalo works with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.</p> </div> <p>Corporate social responsibility programmes exist to satisfy consumer demand for ethical products. Their primary purpose is to protect the brand by preventing consumers from taking their business somewhere else. They are not meant to and do not succeed in protecting the human rights of workers, or in reducing poverty for workers.</p> <p>The reason that these programmes don&#39;t work is because there is no enforcement. There&#39;s no one actually ensuring that the high standards the companies talk about are reaching workers. For example, there are a lot of coffee products from Central America that are labelled fair trade, but the workers producing them have no idea they&#39;re a part of that programme. It doesn&#39;t actually affect their lives or change anything for them.</p> <p>I think what is necessary is just doing the hard work of directly educating consumers as workers. Consumers see us as human beings. They don&#39;t see us as machines. Our message is that workers and consumers can do something together. Our campaigns open the eyes of people, but it is only through concerted and conscious consumer demand that these types of programmes can actually be enforced. Companies will only invest in them if consumers actually demand high standards and enforceable programmes. </p> <p>The essential elements of the Fair Food Program model can and have been replicated in many contexts.</p> <p>First, workers need to be the authors of the campaigns. It is critically important that workers themselves are establishing the goal posts, as they are the only ones who can really identify what they need.</p> <p>Second, consumers need to be involved. Signing the necessary binding agreements is not something companies want to do, so you have to build power with consumers and have them as allies in this process in order to make companies sign these types of agreements. </p> <p>Third, workers must be educated about their rights, ideally by other workers. People who not only literally speak their language but also who have a deep and personal understanding of the industry by having worked it. This is very powerful. Not only is the information better communicated, but having workers as educators inspires confidence in the programme.</p> <p>Fourth, buyers and suppliers must understand that this is not a losing situation for them. The lead brands are going to gain something, because they now have a product that is actually responding to consumer demand. That will give them more consumers, not less. In turn, suppliers can be confident going forward that they will continue being able to sell their products. </p> <p>Finally, mechanisms have to be in place to consistently monitor and enforce rights in the place of work. When are abuses are found, there needs to be consequences for that behaviour. Workers have to be able to see that the person who committed abuses was fired for doing so. That gives them trust in the programme, and makes it more likely that they will also report abuse. This is the key to making it work. </p> <p><em>Translated by Marley Moynahan at the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.</em></p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="haas_kyritsis" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Theresa Haas & Penelope Kyritsis</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_haas.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Theresa Haas is Director of Outreach and Education at the Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) Network.</p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_kyritsis.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Penelope Kyritsis is Outreach and Education Coordinator at the Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) Network.</p> </div> <p><strong>Penelope:</strong> The prevailing corporate response to addressing labour exploitation in global supply chains over the past 20 years has been a boom in corporate social responsibility schemes, including social auditing and certification schemes. The major flaw of these programmes is that they are typically voluntary and lack enforcement. There are no consequences for failing to comply with standards. That makes standards without enforcement programmes little more than Band-aids, obscuring how downward price pressures create exploitative conditions in the first place. </p> <p><strong>Theresa:</strong> I would also note that ‘multi-stakeholder initiatives’ – e.g. the Forest Stewardship Council or the Rainforest Alliance – are sort of like round tables for civil society, brands, suppliers, and some types of government. Everybody supposedly comes together in dialogue and talks about how to fix the problem.</p> <p>The fundamental flaw in those schemes is that they do not include or represent a fundamental shift in power. There is a significant imbalance of power between workers at the bottom of the supply chain and brands at the top of the supply chain. And unless you have legally binding agreements with mandated enforcement you&#39;re not fundamentally shifting power. </p> <p>WSR is fundamentally about shifting power. It’s about shifting power, resources, and control from the entities at the top to the workers at the bottom in ways that legally obligate companies to prioritise the needs and rights of workers. There is currently a lot of pressure on companies to produce products in ways that are ethical and responsible. It&#39;s something that consumers seem to want and investors seem to want. Fair trade doesn&#39;t do it. Rainforest certification doesn&#39;t do it. Currently WSR is the only way in global supply chains to do that. </p> <p>And the reality is that any company that is not currently implementing a WSR programme in its supply chain is at very significant risk of having deeply embarrassing labour issues in their supply chains exposed. All the way up to slavery and trafficking. Yet companies have obviously made the calculation that they would rather do the thing that is cheaper and easier than the programme that actually protects workers and also protects the brand&#39;s reputation.</p> <p>There is a lot of debate around whether WSR is good for business or not. I think it ultimately is good for business, but I don’t think that really matters. I don&#39;t think any company decides to do WSR because they&#39;ve taken a hard look at what the right thing to do is. They do it because they face massive pressure from consumers, workers, and the public over one or more serious violations of labour rights in their supply chains. They feel that this is what they have to do in order to protect their reputation. I don&#39;t think there&#39;s any brand that has independently looked at WSR and decided that it was an attractive business opportunity.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="kenway" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Emily Kenway</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_kenway.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Emily Kenway is senior advisor on human trafficking and labour exploitation at Focus on Labour Exploitation. Until recently she was private sector adviser to the UK’s office of the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner.</p> </div> <p>My previous work at ShareAction and at the Living Wage Foundation focused on investment and consumer strategies to address corporate responsibility issues. I think both are problematic. They can win marginal gains, but overall the war is still being lost and such strategies may actually distract us from that fact.</p> <p>Responsible investment programmes at big investment houses have analysts who focus on the environmental, social, and governance risks of companies, and then engagement teams who talk to the companies about those things. You can win changes by engaging with those teams; ShareAction has done so plenty of times. However, responsible investment will always clash with the drive for profit and maximisation of share value which is legally and culturally bound into this sector.</p> <p>Take labour exploitation in supply chains. Investment managers may tell their companies that they need to have an ethical supplier code of conduct in place about how suppliers’ should treat workers. What you’re less likely to find is them saying that companies need to change their purchasing practices, because the prices they offer bind suppliers into paying poverty wages and using labour that may have been trafficked. Likewise, you won’t find investors promoting union recognition despite it being key to protecting labour rights. Fundamentally, investors are on the side of capital, not labour, and so investment strategies target the softer and weaker things. They feel nice and sound nice, and they will probably make a small amount of difference. But such strategies will never achieve far reaching, systemic, rights-oriented change.</p> <p>I have less time for ethical consumerism. Obviously, it will only ever be applicable to a small and privileged segment of the economy because it comes with a price premium. It&#39;s also based on certain signals, such as the stamps you see on packaging. That&#39;s how we know that it is better to buy this tea than that tea. But when we look under the hood of those certifications, they don&#39;t necessarily look like they are doing what we would hope.</p> <p>A new report out from the Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute found that labour conditions on tea and cocoa plantations were relatively similar for those in certified supply chains and those which were not. Some of the worst abuses were actually found on plantations producing certified products. No one wants to have a go at these certifications, but we really need to call them out if they&#39;re not working. Their shortcomings make the whole idea of ethical consumerism quite difficult.</p> <p>We also have to ask ourselves about the principles underlying the approach. We are living in a world that places the market at the heart of things, and strategies like ethical consumerism inherently place the responsibility on individuals. That is a neoliberal approach to responsibility. We need to question whether that&#39;s something we want to promote, or whether actually we need legislative and regulatory mechanisms which place responsibility on the companies themselves, making labour rights, environmental impacts and so on a core requirement for their business models.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="nanavaty" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Reema Nanavaty</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_nanavaty.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Reema Nanavaty is Director of the Self-Employed Women's Association (SEWA).</p> </div> <p>I do not think these campaigns are at all effective. Companies use these opportunities to show how they are working with a cotton farmer, or with a poor producer. But in reality I do not believe they want to distribute any part of their profit to those end producers. It&#39;s not that they fail in their efforts. It&#39;s only a question of pass or fail when they attempt. I don&#39;t think there is an attempt at all by the tops of the global supply chains to engage directly with the end producers.</p> <p>Campaigns or certifications like &#39;fair trade&#39; exist to attract customers and increase market share. They are used to convey to the customer that a company believes in fair trade or that a product was produced in fair ways. But what is the guarantee for that? Corporations say that they do audits, but do they ensure that the minimum wage is met? Do they ensure that the farmers who grow the cotton or the spices get the minimum support price? Do they have access to childcare or healthcare services?</p> <p>In my work I have not observed them doing this at all, so it seems that poor and informal sector workers are being commodified for use in sales and marketing. This is so unfortunate.</p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="tang" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Elizabeth Tang</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_tang.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Elizabeth Tang is the General Secretary of the International Domestic Workers Federation.</p> </div> <p>When I was at the Confederation of Trade Unions we had very little involvement with such campaigns. They are more popular in the West, and there they are more successful.</p> <p>One time I participated in a project to monitor a supplier of a major retailer in China. It was a great project. All the stakeholders were cooperative: the retailer, the supplier, our partner at the Ethical Trading Initiative, the British Trade Unions Congress. We succeeded in checking on working conditions, we even set up workers&#39; committees. It went perfectly. We were so successful that the factory owner actually closed down the factory. He opened a new production line in the southwest of China, which was far enough away that nobody was bothered to monitor it.</p> <p>I don&#39;t object to companies trying to do these projects, but they are incredibly challenging. For me, I will focus all my limited power on building workers&#39; power and building my organisation. That is also hard, but I see progress. As a trade union movement leader I always feel that we have never done enough. We need to do more ourselves. We cannot expect our employers to change.</p> <p>More useful in my opinion would be if the groups that support workers&#39; rights – the funders – better understood how crucial it is to invest more in organisation building and movement building. It&#39;s necessary to invest in campaigns as well, obviously, but before that we need the capacity. We are currently very weak. But once we reach the levels of membership we need and have the leaders in place, we will know what to do. Unfortunately, lots of people only want to invest in the last step: fix this problem, change that policy. But they don&#39;t realise that the first half, the work that enables us to have the capacity to take that last step, hasn&#39;t been done yet. Investing only in the last step can consume large amounts of resources, but it will be less likely to succeed.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="tate" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Alison Tate</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_tate.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Alison Tate is Director of Economic and Social Policy at the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC).</p> </div> <p>Ethical investment, ethical consumption, and ethical trade programmes have been going on for decades. They&#39;ve been really important for raising the awareness of consumers, workers, and businesses about the ethics involved in production, trade, and consumption. They&#39;ve played a really important role in promoting the concept of worker&#39;s welfare, if not worker&#39;s rights.</p> <p>The limit to those programmes is that they&#39;re all voluntary initiatives. They’re about standards that are applied in particular companies. For example, in the way in which buyers engage with their suppliers. That has been really important, and continues to be important to ensure an understanding that fairness and decency should be a part of the trading relationship. That it&#39;s not just a financial transaction, but there are social consequences and social responsibilities involved.</p> <p>That said, we will only see real change when companies and investors really take on their responsibilities around ensuring decent work. That means ensuring that, no matter in which country or under which legal system, the company&#39;s profit has been derived while respecting fundamental labour and human rights.</p> <p>For investors, engaging with the companies in which they invest is not just about asking whether forced labour exists in a particular company&#39;s operations or supply chain. It is about asking what is being done about it when it’s found. And if it&#39;s not being found, is the company looking hard enough? Investors need to demand that companies set up rigorous due diligence processes and provide workers with a voice in that process, and a mechanism for reporting grievances and seeking remedy.</p> <p>We’re working with the union trustees of pension funds to help encourage that process. Pension funds are one of the big investors of the world. They represent $30 trillion in the global economy, as owners of workers’ capital, meaning that they are the stewards of the money contributed by workers to pension systems from their pay, as deferred wages.</p> <p>Pension funds decide where those assets are actually invested. Their criteria for doing that is ultimately up to them, but those looking to invest according to ESG standards (environmental, social, and governance standards) must also take into account labour standards. That’s part of the ‘S’, and it’s upon those pension funds to look at the working conditions of the companies in which they’re investing. </p> <p>Pension funds are ideally placed to spearhead a shift towards fronting working conditions as a basis for investing. Their aggregate capital is enormous, and the union representatives on their boards, as both representatives of workers and as caretakers of workers’ capital, have a direct interest that the working conditions and that the rights of workers are respected. There is a lot of potential for more action there. </p> </div> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. Our support is not tacit endorsement within. The aim was to highlight new ideas and we hope the result will be a lively and robust dialogue.</p> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Tue, 09 Oct 2018 08:36:07 +0000 openDemocracy 119984 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Future of work round table: how has the world of work changed? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The world of work has changed. What have been the most momentous shifts, and how have they affected workers? Twelve respondents take stock before looking to the future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <style> #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 0px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} .breakcontainer {display:flex;wrap:nowrap;clear:both;} .breakedges {flex-grow:1;min-content:100px;margin:auto;} .breakcenter {flex-grow:1;max-width: 300px;font-size:90%;color:#999;margin:0 15px;text-align:center;margin:auto;} .breakline {width:100%;border-top:1px solid #999;} .breakcenter a {color:#999;} </style> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/BTS_Roundtable_Q1_Colour_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Artwork by Carys Boughton. All rights reserved.</p> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <div class="question active">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <p style="color:rgba(255,0,0,0.6);font-size:110%;">Global patterns of work and employment are now structured very differently today than in the past, due to factors such as the rise of global supply chains, new financial models, the growth of migrant and informal labor, and technological innovations. What do you regard as the most important changes in the nature of work globally, and what have been their primary impact for workers?</p> <div id="respondents"> <div class="respondentsleft"> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#ancheita">Alejandra Ancheita</a></span><br /><span class="affil">ProDESC</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#bader-blau">Shawna Bader-Blau</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Solidarity Center</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#bhattacharjee">Anannya Bhattacharjee</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Asia Floor Wage Alliance</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#cdebaca">Luis C.deBaca</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#dongfang">Han Dongfang</a></span><br /><span class="affil">China Labour Bulletin</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#gonzalo">Lupe Gonzalo</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Coalition of Immokalee Workers</span></p> </div> <div class="respondentsright"> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#haas_kyritsis">Theresa Haas & Penelope Kyritsis</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Worker-driven Social Responsibility Network</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#kenway">Emily Kenway</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Focus on Labour Exploitation (FLEX)</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#nanavaty">Reema Nanavaty</a></span><br /><span class="affil">Self-Employed Women's Association</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#tang">Elizabeth Tang</a></span><br /><span class="affil">International Domestic Workers Federation</span></p> <p class="rspacing"><span class="participant"><a href="#tate">Alison Tate</a></span><br /><span class="affil">International Trade Union Confederation</span></p> </div> </div> <!--RESPONDENTS--> <div class="break"></div> <!--CONTENTSTART--> <div id="ancheita" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Alejandra Ancheita</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_ancheita.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Alejandra Ancheita is the founder of the Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Project (ProDESC) in Mexico City.</p> </div> <p>The signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in 1994 brought about enormous changes for workers in Mexico. NAFTA was supposed to improve working conditions and labour rights. Instead it established a series of measures that effectively reduced the possibilities for workers to strike or bargain collectively. </p> <p>The rights of rural and indigenous communities to the land and natural resources around them were also affected by NAFTA-related economic policies. People who used to work as farmers found themselves migrating to the nearest cities or north to the United States. So while the introduction of neoliberal policies after NAFTA positively affected corporations, it negatively affected labour. For Mexican workers both precarity and informality have grown over the past 25 years. Mexico is considered an emergent economy, but around 60% of the population is living in poverty. Inequality is an enormous problem in Mexico, and the living conditions of the general population in comparison to the economic elite is very bad.</p> <p>Precarity has become the general rule for workers in Mexico and Latin America more generally. Most workers are not able to collectively organise as an independent union. They are not able to create contracts through collective bargaining. Their instability affects their other rights, and many no longer have access to the right to housing, health, or education for themselves or their families. </p> <p>Violence in the factories has also increased. By violence, I mean that the employer is not paying extra hours and not providing workers with the legally required worked environment. Managers are verbally abusive. Female workers suffer sexual harassment, and so on. In such environments, where it is so difficult for workers to demand respect of their basic labour rights, they also have little success in demanding the right to collectively bargain.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="bader-blau" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Shawna Bader-Blau</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_bader-blau.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Shawna Bader-Blau is Executive Director of Solidarity Center.</p> </div> <p>While much about the nature of work has stayed the same for decades, I would highlight a few changes over the past 50 to 70 years that have had a real impact on working conditions globally. These factors are setting the groundwork for the future of work. </p> <p>I&#39;d start with the creation of the Bretton Woods institutions after the second world war: the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the other sister organisations. Their approach to rebuilding the world&#39;s economy developed in the context of the fight between capitalism and communism and between different forms of democracy and authoritarianism.</p> <p>These institutions emphasised the need to establish global free trade, interconnectedness, and private-sector growth in both norm and practice. From this point onward, you started to see a real push on things like the flexibilisation of labour markets and the loosening of labour laws. The Bretton Woods institutions used loans and rules enforced on poorer countries to weaken labour laws, to limit public budgets and public spending, to institute fees on health and education, and generally to instil a notion of private sector growth in countries. </p> <p>This trajectory has continued with force throughout the past seven decades. We have gotten to a point where in more and more countries it&#39;s hard to do very simple things like form unions or come together as workers to achieve collective bargaining. In many countries the right to strike has been dismantled, and the concept of the right to employment has been eliminated almost everywhere. That has really affected the nature of work. We&#39;ve seen not only increasing crackdowns on unions and union rights, but also growth in short-term, temporary, and flexible forms of employment.</p> <p>The growth of global free trade agreements in recent years have exacerbated this trend. These are really massive investor treaties that enormously privilege the rights of investors over the rights of humans and the rights of workers. Individual rights continue to be constrained at the national level, while investment flows are governed at a global level. It has been very disproportionate growth – investors over humans.</p> <p>Finally, the massive growth of technology, which has had so many amazing benefits for all of us, has also allowed private sector companies to extend their reach in pursuit of the cheapest inputs, labour, and distribution services. Today&#39;s global supply chains contain large quantities of temporary and contract labour. There is virtually no legal accountability for lead firms when it comes to human rights, as they subcontract out the vast majority of the work – and their responsibility. This means workers are not only being driven farther and farther apart from each other, but they are also becoming more distant from the forces of capital impacting their day-to-day lives. These factors together have had a massive negative impact on the world of work.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="bhattacharjee" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Anannya Bhattacharjee</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_bhattacharjee.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Anannya Bhattacharjee is the International Coordinator of Asia Floor Wage Alliance.</p> </div> <p>I would say two things. First, the structure of production itself has changed considerably. A large part of production now takes place through global production networks, which has really changed how responsibility is distributed. Multinationals outsource their work to other regions where labour is cheaper. In doing so they evade the responsibility of actual production, yet still benefit from the cheaper cost of production. The growth of those global production networks has definitely been a key change that has affected workers&#39; lives. </p> <p>Second, we have seen the growing dominance of short-term, extremely insecure employment relationships, where employers actively recruit the most vulnerable parts of the population. We&#39;ve seen large numbers of people moving from rural to urban areas in search of work, because they see the growth of industries there as a source of jobs. However, once they enter those jobs they understand very quickly how torturous the employment is. That is a huge lesson for them. The insecurity of their employment and the extremely exploitative conditions of their employment conspire to make it very difficult for them to voice their grievances or seek justice. </p> <p>On top of that, they find that this employment opportunity – which they thought would alleviate their poverty and which is why they migrated – actually pays very little. They are barely able to manage their expenses and go into increasing amounts of debt. They are surprised by how little it really helps them to economically better themselves. This is how workers experience it.</p> <p>Many workers these days are also women workers. They experience an amazing amount of sexual harassment and compulsion to engage in sexual activities to keep these jobs. So there is another layer of violence that comes through because again, as I said, the point is always to recruit the most vulnerable workers in this type of production. </p> <p>But as bad as it is, it&#39;s usually not as bad as going back. These are situations of relative misery. In urban jobs they&#39;re just barely able to meet their expenses to keep their body and mind together. They are able to feed themselves and their families. Many suffer from severe malnutrition, but feeding themselves badly is still better than hunger or starvation.</p> <p>So it&#39;s really a question of relative misery. They have something, but it is nothing close to decent jobs. In India job creation is really the creation of miserable jobs. What is I think is very disturbing about all this is that it really wouldn&#39;t take much to make these jobs more decent. </p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="cdebaca" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Luis C.deBaca</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_cdebaca.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Ambassador Luis C.deBaca, of Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center, directed the U.S. Office to Monitor/Combat Trafficking in Persons under President Barack Obama.</p> </div> <p>One of the most concerning trends is that developed countries have allowed their labour inspectorates to be weakened over time. They used to have governance and institutions that were sufficient to engage on behalf of workers. Now they are more like those of developing countries in terms of their inability to investigate.</p> <p>Labour departments around the world in the &#39;60s and &#39;70s were actually quite active. Companies worked to undercut them by attacking their budgets and statutory authority. In other words, they attacked inspectors’ ability to force change in the workplace. This dismantling of labour ministries and labour inspectors, along with the dismantlement of the ability to unionise through globalisation, are to me both very important changes.</p> <p>That shift has meant that some of the slack has been picked up by the prosecution function of the state. Police and prosecutors must now deal with forced labour and horrible worker mistreatment, often in cases where it never would have gotten so far if there had been proper administrative enforcement by labour inspectors.</p> <p>In the 1990s, we at US Justice Department&#39;s Involuntary Servitude and Slavery Programme found ourselves pushing Congress to give us a criminal labour violation with the prospect of jail time. What was happening was that labour inspectors were coming to prosecutors and saying these guys keep flaunting the civil penalties. They’re eating the fines as a cost of doing business – we need make this criminal. We had ended up in a situation where prosecution and law enforcement had to come in because the more effective labour response had evaporated. That&#39;s not good. You never want to have criminal law enforcement driving social policy or standards out in the workplace.</p> <p>The consequence of that for workers is that the stakes get a whole lot higher. If the only tool available is criminal law, what gets done to you has to be worse for the government to care. The level of proof necessary also goes way up, and companies are probably going to fight the case much harder. </p> <p>Also, if we’re forced into saying that something is slavery or trafficking in order to go after somebody, it exempts companies from having to create better workplaces by making only the most egregious important. I think there is a huge danger in us setting up entire work-related regulatory schemes around these terms of slavery and trafficking. </p> <p>It would be like trying to plan a response to childhood exposure to violence, and then only dealing with murder. You have to look at all the stages and degrees of severity that come before that. If murder is all you do, then you end up not dealing with the entire thing that gets you to the place of murders. It&#39;s the same thing here. If you&#39;re not dealing with wage theft, if you&#39;re not dealing with hours worked, if you&#39;re not dealing with the ability to act through unions, then don&#39;t be surprised when the most horrendous violations of enslavement and abuse end up happening.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="dongfang" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Han Dongfang</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_dongfang.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Han Dongfang is the Executive Director of China Labour Bulletin in Hong Kong.</p> </div> <p>The globalised and fast-changing supply chain model of production sets workers further and further away from each other even as the goods they produce become ever more closely related within a highly globalised market. Unfortunately, while this process was happening neither national nor international trade unions found a way to effectively respond to this new reality. The extra wealth created by this globalised production model is disproportionately distributed. Far more of it reaches the hands of capital than those of labour, and far more ends up in developed countries than developing countries.</p> <p>As a result, on one hand, the price of the products remains low. Consumers, including working families in the developed world, are able to consume more. On the other hand, the income of the workers producing these goods in faraway countries also remains low.</p> <p>This new reality impacts workers in many ways, but the two most detrimental factors are the difficulty in organising, both locally and internationally, and the loss of local and global bargaining power.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="gonzalo" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Lupe Gonzalo</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_gonzalo.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Lupe Gonzalo works with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.</p> </div> <p>From the perspective of my community and my home country, but also from that of many American workers, corporations have evolved over the past several decades in ways that have greatly increased their power. They have taken advantage of that power to effect political change. Their actions have also forced workers and entire communities to leave where they originally are from in order to seek out work to survive. </p> <p>What workers find out through the migration process is that the places they arrive to have the same types of abuses as the places they came from. They left to seek better jobs and better lives. What they find are incredibly abusive situations, this time exacerbated by the fact that they are now in a new place where they don&#39;t know the laws and where they don&#39;t know their rights. Now it is even easier for people to take advantage of them. That has been the biggest impact that we&#39;ve seen for these communities. </p> <p>In this new context companies take advantage of any crack of vulnerability that they can find in order to profit as much as possible. At the end of the day their one concern is how much money they can make. It&#39;s a deeply problematic and abusive situation where both governments and companies are able to push for certain policies without thinking about the humanity of workers and their families. This is how we&#39;ve ended up with conflicting sets of economic and immigration policies that first pressure workers to migrate and then allow them to be exploited and abused when they arrive. </p> <p><em>Translated by Marley Moynahan at the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.</em></p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="haas_kyritsis" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Theresa Haas & Penelope Kyritsis</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_haas.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Theresa Haas is Director of Outreach and Education at the Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) Network.</p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_kyritsis.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /><p class="inlineaffil">Penelope Kyritsis is Outreach and Education Coordinator at the Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) Network.</p> </div> <p><strong>Penelope:</strong> Among the most striking changes in the nature of work concerns the rise of global supply chains and relatedly, the increase in outsourcing and sub-contracting practices. This re-organisation of production has given multinational corporations the ability to dictate costs along their supply chains. They use their market power to pressure suppliers to cut prices, a practice which allows an ever greater share of the profit to concentrate at the top while margins are further and further squeezed down below. These changes have enabled a consolidation of corporate power of multinational corporations as buyers at the top of supply chains.</p> <p>At the end of the day, those most affected by this price squeeze are the workers at the bottom of supply chains. Supply chain dynamics and buyer practices have made it very difficult for suppliers to maintain successful commercial relationships and comply with labour standards, including minimum wage laws, at the same time.</p> <p><strong>Theresa:</strong> The consolidation of corporate power and the rise of global supply chains have created intense competition between suppliers. The easiest way for suppliers to compete is on the basis of price, and the easiest way for them to lower prices is by squeezing not only direct labour costs but also associated indirect costs. That means, for example, not providing appropriate fire safety equipment or seating in a factory, or paying the legally mandated premium for overtime.</p> <p>Concentrated corporate power combined with intense competition among contractors has also allowed firms to shorten lead times. Buyers at the top of supply chains can pressure suppliers to deliver goods faster, more quickly, and more cheaply. This puts an incredible squeeze on workers financially, physically, and emotionally that really embodies this idea of a race to the bottom. </p> <p><strong>Penelope:</strong> A lot of times when people talk about labour exploitation they talk about it as if it&#39;s an unintended consequence of business practices. However, labour exploitation is an integral part of the design of global supply chains. When the idea is to get goods as cheaply as possible by outsourcing costs it&#39;s inevitably workers who pay the price.</p> <p><strong>Theresa:</strong> I think responsibility lies almost exclusively with the brands at the top of supply chains. They have intentionally restructured their industries in almost deity-type ways. The production of many products bound for the US market used to take place exclusively in the US, often by suppliers wholly owned by the retailers. That system had a number of flaws from a business perspective, one of which was that the retailer and the supplier were one and the same. That put a significant, exclusive amount of responsibility on the retailer for the conditions of the supplier.</p> <p>By outsourcing production, buyers distanced themselves from that responsibility. At the same time they created an intense amount of competition that has driven down prices. Suppliers are really caught in a bind there, but I don&#39;t think brands are at all. Brands have done this intentionally because it is in their best interest to outsource production, deny responsibility, and drive down prices.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="kenway" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Emily Kenway</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_kenway.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Emily Kenway is senior advisor on human trafficking and labour exploitation at Focus on Labour Exploitation. Until recently she was private sector adviser to the UK’s office of the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner.</p> </div> <p>Changes in the way production is organised, rather than changes in the nature of work per se, are what determine the constraints and opportunities around work and the potential for rights in labour. Over 80% of goods and services are traded through supply chains today in an incredibly complex, globalised system of production. Thousands of sub-contractors and suppliers operating below intricate transnational corporate structures now relate to the eventual end product or service.</p> <p>This works really well for capital, essentially because it fragments the power dynamics in production. That, in turn, fragments responsibility and creates a vacuum of accountability in relation to labour rights. The London construction sector is a good place to see this in action. It is common to find workers on a site who do not know what company they&#39;re working for, because the work has been sub-contracted out so many times. So these chains obfuscate who the ultimate employer is. That&#39;s not a term that the corporate sector is that happy with. But if you look at the power dynamics down these chains you can see that the lead companies at the top are, to some extent, shaping the conditions and possibilities for workers’ terms much lower down.</p> <p>Legal frameworks have not caught up with this at all. A worker&#39;s labour rights may fall in between different national jurisdictions, or between different nodes of a supply chain within a country. Millions of workers around the world are bound into this system, but without clarity on how to leverage those chains for their benefit, or where to direct claims and grievances to achieve change.</p> <p>This whole picture of fragmentation and inaccessible accountability is compounded by two further issues. They&#39;re often talked about as if they&#39;ve changed, but the ways they haven&#39;t changed are more important. The first is informal labour. It has always been a significant constituent part of the economies of the Global South. People think of informal labour as somehow anachronistic, and assume that sectors will formalise over time. People often talk about this in relation to domestic labour, as it has particularly high rates of exploitation. Yet that formalisation isn&#39;t happening, and in general the informal sector is actually growing.</p> <p>The other thing is that while migrant labour has grown – that&#39;s a change – the more important issue is that we still haven&#39;t learned to protect them. They remain, largely, excluded from labour rights protections. The UN Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families was finalised in 1990 but so far it has had very low levels of ratification. It hasn&#39;t succeeded.</p> <p>Taken together, these factors have created a situation where responsibility chains are totally obfuscated; where capital has free movement but labour rights have not gone with it; and where you have growing parts of the labour market – informal and migrant labour – that are under-protected. It&#39;s a really disenfranchised, under-protected labour market that benefits capital above all else.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="nanavaty" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Reema Nanavaty</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_nanavaty.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Reema Nanavaty is Director of the Self-Employed Women's Association (SEWA).</p> </div> <p>When people speak about global changes in working conditions the informal sector is completely left out. Workers in the informal sector often work out of their homes, so even though the majority of workforce in India and in the Global South are informally employed their work remains invisible. This means that most policy debates end up only discussing self-employed or informal workers from the point of view of advanced economies.</p> <p>The informal sector is growing. When the Self Employed Women&#39;s Association started in the 1970s in was around 90% of the Indian economy. Now it&#39;s around 95%. Part of the reason for this growth is internal migration. Informal workers migrate to the cities from rural areas and are only able to find precarious and menial kinds of work.</p> <p>For informal workers in India and the rest of the Global South, innovation is an in-built part of their coping strategy. There is no security of work – the informal sector resides outside the purview of government policies – so workers have little choice but to continuously change their work and adjust to newer skills. So, one day I might be an incense stick roller or an Indian cigar roller, then I might have to suddenly move to packaging, and from packaging I might suddenly move to finishing ready-made garments.</p> <p>As innovation as a daily coping strategy for informal sector workers remains unrecognised, many questions crucial to policy remain unasked. Everybody talks about skilled development or life-long learning, but what does life-long learning mean in an informal context? What kinds of skills or schools are required? These questions remain unanswered. </p> <p>That home-based workers are often found in rural areas also affects workers&#39; positions within global supply chains. Does any major company directly work with these informal sector workers? No, they do not. They just cannot afford to. They are scattered, they work out of their homes, their tools are worn out. These workers don&#39;t know where the raw material comes from or where the finished product goes to. Therefore, it is very convenient for brands at the top to just work with the intermediaries. That is why, despite their putting in so many long hours of work, the informal sector workers do not get their fair share of income.</p> </div> <div class="breakcontainer"> <div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div><div class="breakcenter">Want to respond? Use the comment form below,<br />or write to us at <a href="mailto:beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net">beyond.slavery@opendemocracy.net</a>.</div><div class="breakedges"><div class="breakline"></div></div> </div> <div id="tang" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Elizabeth Tang</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_tang.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Elizabeth Tang is the General Secretary of the International Domestic Workers Federation.</p> </div> <p>Most of the changes are actually nothing new. We have been talking about capital moving around, the exploitation of workers in so-called third world countries, migration, and the casualisation of labour since the seventies. What&#39;s new is that advances in technology have intensified them.</p> <p>More women are migrating. Not just so-called professionals or people with high levels of education are chasing better work, but also comparatively uneducated women with little English from rural areas. This happened before but not at this scale. </p> <p>Technology is, I think, driving this shift. Lots of domestic workers are now migrating solely through the information they find on websites, not only with the help of an agency. It&#39;s now easier for them to make the move on their own. Before it was just doing what a man told them to do. They didn&#39;t have anything concrete, many didn&#39;t get so much as a piece of paper from the agent. Now they have access to recruiting websites on their phones. There&#39;s a lot of information there, it&#39;s all written down, so it seems more real and more secure. It&#39;s not, but it creates that impression.</p> <p>The catch is that when they finally get a job there is no protection. The website might have said $10 per day or $200 per month before they started work, but if that doesn&#39;t materialise there is nothing they can do. They aren&#39;t protected by anything. It&#39;s true that many more countries have passed laws regarding domestic workers, but they are not enforced. So what looks concrete, real, and precise actually turns out to be fluid.</p> <p>The other big change is that worker security has either greatly diminished or gone away entirely. Nobody has a life-long guarantee for their job, and pension systems almost look like dinosaurs now. The line between informal workers or casual workers and workers with formal jobs has actually become very very small. In both situations what you have is not secure.</p> <p>Discrimination hasn&#39;t changed too much, but it&#39;s important to note that it remains as alive as ever. The IDWF gets constant feedback on working conditions from its members, and the most common word we hear is discrimination. Once people know you are a domestic worker, they immediately think you are stupid. You are dirty. You are not made for anything better than to clean. They never realise that they depend so much on domestic workers, that their lives would be completely disrupted without them.</p> <p>Lots of domestic workers are also migrants, and as migrants they also face another layer of discrimination. Add that to being a domestic worker, and people really have no respect for them. It is very hard to ask for legal protections when the people around you do not think you deserve them.</p> </div> <div class="break"></div> <div id="tate" class="responsebox"> <p class="inlinename">Alison Tate</p> <div class="biobox"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fow_tate.jpg" width="150" alt="respondent photo" /> <p class="inlineaffil">Alison Tate is Director of Economic and Social Policy at the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC).</p> </div> <p>From a labour perspective the really important changes are the impacts of trade and globalisation on business models, and the creation of global supply chains. These have led to greater exploitation in the modern age. There&#39;s a lot of discussion today about poverty alleviation and bringing people out of the most extreme forms of poverty through wages and access to income. But what we&#39;ve seen in the last 10 years is a model of business that undermines the capacity for job security and income security. This of course leads to a spectrum of exploitations.</p> <p>If you look at the global workforce, it&#39;s about three billion workers. Only 60% of those are in formal work, and the majority of workers around the globe, no matter what level of development, are in insecure work. They don&#39;t know what their next week or their next month looks like in terms of their income. For those 40% of workers in informal work, they don&#39;t have the recognition of an employment relationship with their employer or recognition under law. That level of insecurity is a very stressful and sometimes leads to desperate situations.</p> <p>Many are working in less and less secure conditions, but they might be more concerned to keep their job than to speak up or complain. It is the experience of many workers that joining a union or taking collective action means risking retaliatory action from employers, not being assigned work or shifts, or the risk being sacked. Freedom of association, collective bargaining, social protection are fundamental workers’ rights are recognised in international law. They are for all workers.</p> <p>No job should be without a floor of universal social protection, which includes certain benefits for when a worker is not able to access sufficient income. No worker should be without a minimum living wage, or the capacity to bargain for a fair contract price floor. Yet that&#39;s what we&#39;re seeing more and more in the digitalised and platform economy.</p> </div> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. Our support is not tacit endorsement within. The aim was to highlight new ideas and we hope the result will be a lively and robust dialogue.</p> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Mon, 08 Oct 2018 08:53:31 +0000 openDemocracy 119952 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Future of work round table: joint funders' statement https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Philanthropic foundations are powerful yet largely unseen actors within civil society. We invited the foundations supporting this event to momentarily lift the curtain and explain their strategic thinking in this field.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/Tessellation_Colour_7_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Artwork by Carys Boughton. All rights reserved.</p> <style> #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <div class="question active">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <!--CONTENTS START--> <p>On behalf of the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, the Sage Fund and openDemocracy, welcome and thank you for joining this virtual roundtable. This discussion is being hosted and facilitated by openDemocracy with support from the Ford Foundation.</p> <p>As brief context and background for this discussion, the Ford Foundation initiated a global exploration on quality work in 2015, alongside program staff who are, or are now, colleagues with the Sage Fund and OSF. We released <a href="https://drive.google.com/open?id=1MklmEG5tOK0XbOIkdFucYTqUddVplR7M&authuser=cameron.thibos@opendemocracy.net">a report</a> that provides a synthesis of the insights gathered from the work of partners and grantees, collaborations with external partners, research, and the collective knowledge of the program staff involved in the exploration. All along, we hoped that the insights summarised in this report would spur new ideas, necessary innovations, and dynamic conversations across the field. We also recognise that in order to address the systemic barriers and powerful actors underscored in the report, it is essential that we build solidarity across borders and issues, and to unite an array of actors and institutions to act collectively towards our aims for a more fair, just and inclusive society worldwide. </p> <div class="biobox"><p class="inlineaffil"><strong>About the authors</strong></p><p class="inlineaffil">John Irons is the Director of the Ford Foundation’s Future of Work team, supporting US and global efforts.</p><p class="inlineaffil">Laine Romero-Alston is a Team Manager for the Open Society International Migration Initiative, leading the Fair Work Program in the Americas.</p><p class="inlineaffil">Daria Caliguire is the founding Director of the SAGE Fund, based in the US and supporting global efforts.</p> </div> <p>As such, the Ford Foundation is partnering with openDemocracy to host and facilitate a roundtable to bring together multi-stakeholders from across fields to discuss questions of strategic importance. </p> <p align="center">~</p> <p>In recent decades, several profound shifts in the global economy have gathered momentum, transforming the structures of employment and resulting in rising inequality, including: increased globalisation of capital; a proliferation of complex production supply chains; heightened informality and precariousness of work; weakened regulatory capacity of the state and worker bargaining power; and, increased attacks on civil society broadly, and to trade unions, freedom of association and the right to collectively bargain worldwide.</p> <p>These shifts and the resultant outcomes have led to forced migration as a result of diminished economic security, and have given rise to many powerful corporations operating with impunity in the extraction of labour and resources from workers and communities around the world.</p> <p>At the same time, technological advancements have dramatically reshaped the workplace, digital space and public security, outpacing existing labour laws, social protections and governance of technical infrastructure. All of these trends are exacerbated by long standing legacies of power and discrimination based on gender, race, ability and migration status.</p> <p>While we have each witnessed these seismic changes and repercussions, we were also grappling with the role of philanthropy in responding in a coordinated global manner consistent with the scale and size of these challenges playing out across the world. With that in mind we endeavoured to begin a conversation where we zeroed in on how we could align most effectively given the rapidly changing inputs to a global economy and the aspiration to have them be inclusive.</p> <p>We each entered the conversation from different starting points based on our fields of study and experience while utilising very different approaches: </p> <div style="margin-left:15px;"> <p><em>For the Sage Fund,</em> it means utilising and expanding on the human rights framework to ensure accountability of corporations and other powerful economic actors in the global economy and remedy for workers and affected communities.</p> <p><em>For Open Society Foundations International Migration Program,</em> it means developing strategic interventions that draw from both labour market, worker rights and migrant rights arenas to improve conditions for migrant and low wage workers alike, and shift the broader business models and economic systems implicated.</p> <p><em>For the Ford Foundation,</em> it means shaping solutions that realise decent work and inclusive economies through investing in workers to have voice and influence, by shaping policies and practices that centre workers and their wellbeing.</p> </div> <p>At the same time, we recognise that we are all working to transform the same deeply connected systems, with fundamental linkages and overlap in terms of interests, incentives, power and structures. The issues we are trying to address, and the rights we are trying to protect for communities and workers – whether informal, migrant or dependent contractors – are bound together underscoring the potential for collective interventions and disruptive impact.</p> <p>As we explore how a global strategy to address these trends might take shape, we share as an input <a href="https://drive.google.com/open?id=1MklmEG5tOK0XbOIkdFucYTqUddVplR7M&authuser=cameron.thibos@opendemocracy.net">a recently released report</a> that synthesises our insights gathered from grantees, external partnerships, research, and our own knowledge on the trends and barriers to quality work today as well as the opportunities to address quality work challenges.</p> <p>In this joint effort, we explored the potential of several opportunity areas for promoting a decent work agenda and the promotion of human, migrant and labour rights on a global scale. Though these are not representative of all the frameworks we explored, and some were not fully tested given the timeline and approach of the exploration, these are five opportunity areas that we identified as promising interventions for systems change:</p> <ol> <li><em>Changing company practices and behaviour:</em> To change company behaviours, a combination of push and pull entry points can be useful.<br /><br /></li> <li><em>Influencing investment:</em> Influencing investment can drive quality work, by utilising investment levers to encourage “high road” business practices and behaviours that mitigate risk and lead to more sustainable operations.<br /><br /></li> <li><em>Establishing international or transnational standards and norms:</em> Global labour standards and norms are critical to advance and protect labour rights and protections.<br /><br /></li> <li><em>Strengthening and enforcing labour laws:</em> Governments have primary responsibility for ensuring human rights are realised, including through enforcing standards and regulations, addressing policy failure, holding companies accountable, and protecting and supporting workers both within their borders and across.<br /><br /></li> <li><em>Organise workers to build voice and power:</em> Cross border organising amplifies worker power, whereby actors organise on multiple levels – across geographies, supply chains and migration corridors. Nonetheless, long-term systemic change hinges on empowering workers at the local level to represent their own interests in negotiations.</li> </ol> <p>It is our hope that this dialogue will allow us to lift up promising interventions that have impact as well as offer lessons learned about interventions that aren’t working, and based on this understand how we reckon with and shift strategies amidst evolving circumstances. We are grateful for those who have weighed in so eloquently and purposefully to further this conversation and to put forward ideas and suggestions as we continue to wrestle with the extent of these challenges.</p> <p>We look forward to participating with you in the upcoming days in this virtual discussion, as well as in other fora, to identify specific entry points, promising opportunities, and ways to coordinate and align in addressing key issues. Thank you in advance for your thoughtful contributions.</p> <p>In Solidarity,</p> <p>John Irons, Ford Foundation</p> <p>Laine Romero-Alston, Open Society Foundations </p> <p>Daria Caliguire, Sage Fund</p> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Mon, 08 Oct 2018 07:48:53 +0000 openDemocracy 119954 at https://www.opendemocracy.net ROUND TABLE: the future of work https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Current labour systems are leaving huge numbers of workers in vulnerable and precarious conditions. How can workers and their allies shape a better future for work? Twelve leading experts in the field weigh in.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/Tessellation_Colour_8_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Artwork by Carys Boughton. All rights reserved.</p> <style> #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <div class="question active">Introduction</div> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <!--CONTENTS START--> <p>The Ford Foundation recently conducted an exploration of the changing nature of work globally. Some of the main findings which emerged from this two year project were captured via the publication of a recent report – <a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MklmEG5tOK0XbOIkdFucYTqUddVplR7M/view?usp=sharing">Quality Work Worldwide</a> – which advanced a number of overlapping strategies for improving protections against labour exploitation and vulnerability, and for enabling workers to more effectively participate in shaping their terms of employment. The report also identified a number of foundational challenges which were undermining the quality of work globally: 1) lack of accountability from companies, 2) global governance gaps, 3) limited action from national governments, and 4) insufficient power and voice for workers. </p> <div class="biobox"><p class="inlineaffil"><strong>About the authors</strong></p><p class="inlineaffil">Joel Quirk is Professor in Political Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand.</p><p class="inlineaffil">Cameron Thibos is the managing editor of Beyond Trafficking and Slavery.</p> </div> <p>The round table that starts today expands upon the main findings of this report. While the report provides an important starting point, many additional conversations need to take place in order to advance our understanding of both underlying challenges and potential alternatives. Working together with the <a href="https://www.fordfoundation.org/work/challenging-inequality/future-of-work/">Future of Work</a> team at the Ford Foundation, we have invited 12 leading experts to share their thoughts regarding how and why work has changed, and what types of strategies and approaches need to be introduced or expanded in order to effectively promote quality work globally. Some of the participants in the round table are representatives of organisations who participated in the original project. Others are new voices who expand the conversation further. Their responses are explicitly their own, and the support of the Ford Foundation for this project does not represent tacit endorsement for what is being said.</p> <p>Each of the participants in the round table has provided answers to five key questions regarding the changing nature of work. These questions have been designed to be open ended, since we wanted to give round table participants an opportunity to take the conversation in different directions. We did not want to point towards specific conclusions. The answers given were recorded via individual interviews, which were then transcribed and edited for clarity. Over the course of this week we will publish each of the answers given to individual questions, starting with question one today and ending with the last question on Friday. Once this phase of the round table has concluded, we will circulate a call for additional submissions. We will also be going back to our contributors to get their thoughts on the responses given by other participants. </p> <p>The following remarks help to introduce the core issues at stake in the round table. We begin with a brief overview of some of the ways in which global patterns of work and employment have changed, and what types of effects these changes have had for workers and their allies. We then offer some reflections on the politics of quality work. These reflections are in turn used to help introduce some of the main strategies which have been highlighted by round table participants. </p> <h2>The new world of work</h2> <p>In December 2010, the government of Qatar was awarded the right to host the <a href="https://www.fifa.com/worldcup/qatar2022/index.html">2022 FIFA World Cup</a>. Bringing such a high profile sporting event to the Middle East was undoubtedly a major coup for a small country such as Qatar. However, their position as host has also attracted a great deal of international scrutiny. Persistent concerns about <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/quicktake/world-cup">corruption behind the scenes</a> have been increasingly overshadowed by <a href="https://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/insidestory/2012/06/201261472812737158.html">numerous reports</a> regarding the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/25/revealed-qatars-world-cup-slaves">exploitative and abusive</a> <a href="https://www.freedomunited.org/advocate/qatar-kafala/">treatment of migrant workers</a>, who are <a href="http://www.theworkerscupfilm.com/">building facilities for the event</a>. Campaigns by organisations such as <a href="https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/campaigns/2016/03/qatar-world-cup-of-shame/">Amnesty International</a> and <a href="https://www.hrw.org/news/2017/09/27/qatar-take-urgent-action-protect-construction-workers">Human Rights Watch</a> have identified all kinds of problems, including expensive and deceptive recruitment, atrocious living conditions, segregation, low salaries worn away by delays, deductions, and long hours, exceptional levels of workplace death and inquiry, and threats of violence. The government of Qatar has repeatedly declared that it is <a href="https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/qatariilo-agreement-on-labour-reforms-must-be-backed-by-action-real-improvements-for-migrant-workers-say-rights-groups/?page=1#c164472">taking action to prevent abuses</a>, and <a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/us-qatar-migrant-labour/despite-reforms-qatars-migrant-workers-still-fear-exploitation-idUSKCN1LS007">recently announced</a> that the vast majority of migrant workers <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/sep/06/qatar-law-change-milestone-migrant-workers-world-cup-2022-exit-permits">no longer have to secure an exit permit</a> from their employer to leave the country. While this reform has been <a href="http://www.newindianexpress.com/world/2018/sep/05/qatar-lifts-controversial-exit-visa-system-for-workers-1867622.html">cautiously welcomed</a>, it also speaks to a larger series of issues regarding the role of governments in both creating and sustaining migrant labour systems. </p> <p>Migrant labour in Qatar is designed to be exploitative. Workers migrate from <a href="http://priyadsouza.com/population-of-qatar-by-nationality-in-2017/">many different countries</a>, including Nepal, India, and the Philippines, and their labours are regulated by contracts which give employers huge amounts of discretionary power. These contracts can last up to five years. Workers cannot change jobs without securing permission from their employer, there is <a href="https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/research/2018/09/mercury-mena-abuses-qatar/">very limited scope to effectively resolve grievances</a>, and their work takes place under the shadow of deportation. The government has the power to change how the system is designed, but its interests are closely aligned with employers, rather than workers. <a href="https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/campaigns/2016/03/qatar-world-cup-of-shame/">Amnesty has reported</a> that there are around 1.7 million migrant workers in Qatar – at least 90% of the overall population – but their precarious status as non-citizens effectively leaves them on the outside looking in. As foreigners, they reside in Qatar on a temporary basis, they can rarely speak Arabic (and sometimes also English), and they can be easily and effectively sanctioned for all kinds of reasons. It is easy to diminish or dismiss the interests and experiences of workers, because the system has been designed to make it extraordinarily difficult for workers to collectively organise. Political strategies familiar to workers attempting to improve their pay and conditions – such as strikes, pickets, litigation, unionisation, collective bargaining – are almost entirely absent. </p> <p>This absence is important. While the FIFA World Cup has concentrated attention on stadiums in Qatar, <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/dws/marie-jos-l-tayah/claiming-rights-under-kafala-system">similar migrant labour systems</a> can be found in many other parts of the world. While some <a href="http://www.globalconstructionreview.com/news/unions-hail-landmark-employer-agreement-workers-ri/">employers may treat workers better than others</a>, that is frequently an individual choice. The system itself assigns them a huge amount of discretion in how to behave. In 2017, it was estimated that there were <a href="http://www.arabnews.com/node/1201861/saudi-arabia">11 million migrant workers in Saudi Arabia</a>, with perhaps <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/international/qatar-2022-world-cup-workers-rights-kafala-system-migraints-middle-east-a8182191.html">23 million migrant workers</a> based in the Middle East more generally. Many of these migrant workers can be found in private homes, creating <a href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;ved=2ahUKEwiztp2dterdAhWRW8AKHXFLB6gQFjAAegQICRAC&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fapmigration.ilo.org%2Fresources%2Fdecent-work-for-migrant-domestic-workers-moving-the-agenda-forward%2Fat_download%2Ffile1&amp;usg=AOvVaw3lhwqEwniSyCBPLiQnT9A2">an additional set of challenges</a>. While these estimates are only rough guides, they nonetheless help to illustrate a fundamental point: radical changes in global labour markets have created a huge population of workers who labour under systems designed to severely limit their capacity to mobilise for better pay and conditions. </p> <p>The growth of migrant labour is only one of a number of changes in global patterns of work and employment. Another key example concerns the <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/genevieve-lebaron-neil-howard-cameron-thibos-penelope-kyritsis/confronting-root-causes">growth of global supply chains</a>. The last three decades have seen international corporations engage in a ‘race to the bottom’, with most aspects of production processes and supply chains being relocated to countries in the Global South with lower wages, less regulation, and fewer workplace protections. Global supply chains have been designed by corporate executives to maximise their profits while minimising their political and legal liability.</p> <p>Leading corporations exercise their market power to drive down costs per unit, since their numerous suppliers in the Global South have limited capacity to effectively bargain for better returns or less demanding production cycles. Companies further down the chain are therefore compelled to minimise wages and working conditions. Contracts get subcontracted and then subcontracted again, creating many layers between the corporation and supply chain worker. It can sometimes be very difficult to <a href="https://www.racked.com/2017/2/10/14576282/ivanka-trump-brand-supply-chain-project-just">work out who is producing what for whom</a>. Regulations governing labour relations have struggled to keep up with these new business models. Supply chains spans numerous countries and companies, which once again creates barriers for workers who might want to organise to improve pay and conditions. Most work within supply chains is offered on a ‘take it or leave it’ basis, and the terms on offer invariably favour corporations. </p> <p>Several observations can be drawn from these examples. While not everyone has been affected by recent changes in the same way, there are some general themes which are worth highlighting:</p> <ol> <li>Many governments throughout the globe have reduced their commitments to protecting workers, and have frequently embraced neo-liberal models of de-regulation and non-binding self-regulation, which have shifted the balance of power between workers and employers.<br /><br /> </li> <li>Corporations have leveraged the globalisation of finance, production and migration to create business models that maximise corporate power while minimising corporate accountability. <br /><br /></li> <li>The production of good and services has been globalised to an unprecedented degree, creating all kinds of opportunities for corporations to move – or threaten to move – between countries and/or suppliers in order to further reduce their production costs.&nbsp;<br /><br /> </li> <li>Employers have used various strategies to reduce labour costs and externalise risks, including subcontracting and outsourcing, piecework and penalty pay, zero-hours contracts, forced overtime and wage theft. These often overlap with patterns of race and gender discrimination.<br /><br /> </li> <li>Existing regulations, both domestic and international, have struggled to keep up with ongoing changes, contributing to governance gaps where regulations either apply weakly or not at all. Even in cases where regulations do apply they are not always consistently or effectively enforced. <br /><br /></li> <li>Workers and their allies have been forced to confront challenging questions regarding these recent changes, resulting in ongoing conversations about how to organise, and what to push for. </li> </ol> <p>What should we make of this new world of work? What kinds of strategies and approaches have the best chance of elevating the voices and interests of exploited and precarious workers? To help answer these and other questions, we have turned to some of the world’s leading experts. </p> <h2>Working towards quality work</h2> <p>Labour is frequently divided into two distinct categories: free and unfree. The former is said to involve workers negotiating a deal with an employer regarding their service. If the employer uses direct coercion to compel them to start work, or to continue to work, then their labour is said to become forced, and is therefore regarded as immoral and unfree. This comparison portrays free labour as a desirable condition, and it is often suggested that workers should be thankful to be ‘free’.</p> <p>However, there are many occasions where desperate workers have few if any alternatives, and therefore ‘freely’ consent to highly exploitative conditions. There are currently hundreds of millions of free labourers across the globe who routinely endure terrible and irregular wages, unsafe and unhealthy workspaces and homes, sexual harassment and assault, and bullying and abuse. They may well be formally free to leave, in the sense that they retain the capacity to seek out other forms of work, but their capacity to exercise any kind of individual ‘choice’ nonetheless remains severely constrained by their precarious status and a shortage of viable alternatives. The work involved is not work which would be freely chosen if there were other alternatives on offer. </p> <p>Maintaining a sharp distinction between free and unfree is not always helpful. If we narrowly focus on unfree labour, then everything which ends up falling on the other side of the dividing line gets removed from the equation. We need to focus upon <em>all</em> vulnerable workers, rather than <em>only</em> workers subject to unfree labour. This means incorporating forms of precarious labour which may be nominally ‘free’, yet still have many highly objectionable features. This is part of the rationale behind the framework of quality work, which is defined in the Ford Foundation's report (p. 2) in terms of “opportunities that provide safe working conditions, a fair income, social protection, and freedom of association and expression”.</p> <p>This definition of quality work in turn draws upon the concept of <a href="https://www.ilo.org/global/topics/decent-work/lang--en/index.htm">decent work</a>, which is broadly defined by the International Labour Organisation (ILO) in terms of “work that is productive, delivers a fair income with security and social protection, safeguards basic rights, offers equality of opportunity and treatment, prospects for personal development and the chance for recognition and to have your voice heard”. Behind both definitions is a emphasis upon what work <em>should be</em>, and what types of <a href="file:///localhost/Moving%20Towards%20Decent%20Sex%20Work/%20Sex%20Worker%20Community%20Research%20Decent%20Work%20And%20Exploitation%20In%20Thailand">practical steps and employment conditions</a> would help improve the overall quality of work. This is very different to the minimum threshold associated with free labour, which is frequently understood to mean that ‘the market should decide’, so long as workers are not subject to direct coercion. There are similar differences between accepting a minimum wage and advocating for <a href="https://cleanclothes.org/livingwage">a living wage</a>.</p> <p>Quality work is clearly not a goal which can be advanced using a single strategy or approach. This is one of the main reasons why this round table has been organised, since it is crucial to have a wide range of perspectives and experiences represented when thinking about ways forward. This therefore makes this an excellent time to introduce our contributors to our quality work round table, who all have a number of valuable insights and proposals to share on this topic. </p> <h2>What would it take to reach quality work for all?</h2> <p>Our first contributor, <strong>Alejandra Ancheita</strong>, is the founder of the <a href="http://www.prodesc.org.mx/index.php/en-us/home/aboutus">Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Project</a> (ProDESC) in Mexico City. She observes that, “Precarity has become the general rule for workers in Mexico and Latin America more generally. Most workers are not able to collectively organise as an independent union. They are not able to create contracts through collective bargaining. Their instability affects their other rights, and many no longer have access to the right to housing, health, or education for themselves or their families”. When it comes to thinking about potential solutions, she observes that, “Companies use social responsibility mechanisms because they are cheap and make corporations appear as the good guys”. She therefore discusses a series of alternatives, including an ongoing programme designed to “defend the rights of Mexicans temporarily migrating to the United States” on both sides of the border. She also makes the important point that, “Worker organisation doesn&#39;t necessarily have to go through traditional unions. What is important is that they are organised”.</p> <p>Our second contributor, <strong>Anannya Bhattacharjee</strong>, draws upon her experience in the Indian subcontinent, where she works as the International Coordinator of the <a href="https://asia.floorwage.org/">Asia Floor Wage Alliance.</a> Bhattacharjee observes that, “In India job creation is really the creation of miserable jobs”. At the same time, “It really wouldn&#39;t take much to make these jobs more decent”. She suggests that a good way to start is by recognising that, “Business is not one monolithic thing. There is big capital and there is small capital. If we approach all businesses as capital, and have the same approach to all of them, then we won&#39;t make the most strategic alliances”. Yet at the end of the day, working conditions will only improve “when workers&#39; organisations are at the table to discuss, implement, and monitor the solutions”. However, this rarely happens due to “antipathy towards trade unions or any kind of representative organisations”. </p> <p>We also have an important contribution from <strong>Shawna Bader-Blau</strong>, the executive director of <a href="https://www.solidaritycenter.org/">Solidarity Center</a>, a US-based international worker rights organisation. She observes that things have now got to the point where, “It&#39;s hard to do very simple things like form unions or come together as workers to achieve collective bargaining”. This situation has been further complicated by the growth of free trade agreements, which “enormously privilege the rights of investors over the rights of humans and the rights of workers”. Improving the lives of workers requires action on multiple fronts, including building bridges between labour movements and other social and political movements, exposing the fundamental lawlessness behind wage theft, and effective global regulation based upon human rights frameworks. Much of the focus of her contribution is the model provided by the recent <a href="http://bangladeshaccord.org/">Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh</a>, which is “a negotiated agreement between workers and employers … akin to collective bargaining”.</p> <p>Building upon his decades of experience within the US State Department, <strong>Luis C.deBaca</strong> identifies a number of promising strategies for reducing vulnerability and exploitation. He observes that “developed countries have allowed their labour inspectorates to be weakened over time”. This has important effects: “If you&#39;re not dealing with wage theft, if you&#39;re not dealing with hours worked, if you&#39;re not dealing with the ability to act through unions, then don&#39;t be surprised when the most horrendous violations of enslavement and abuse end up happening”. This has resulted in a situation where criminal justice mechanisms have stepped in to provide partial cover, but this also comes with complications: “if we’re forced into saying that something is slavery or trafficking in order to go after somebody, it exempts companies from having to create better workplaces by making only the most egregious important”. Improving the lives of workers requires action on multiple fronts, including investing in worker-driven social responsibility, which “doesn&#39;t depend on the largesse of the company”. And while prosecution is only one tool amongst many, for C.deBaca one of the things “that makes it possible to have worker-led social responsibility is the prospect of a boss going to jail”. When thinking about future steps, C.deBaca also suggests that, “The fight against unscrupulous employers sometimes gets stopped by the intermural fights and navel gazing of the modern slavery movement, or the anti-trafficking movement, or the labour movement, or whatever we&#39;re wanting to call it these days”. </p> <p>This is followed by some reflections from <strong>Han Dongfang</strong>, the Executive Director of <a href="https://www.clb.org.hk/">China Labour Bulletin</a> in Hong Kong. Dongfang observers that global supply chains set “workers further and further away from each other even as the goods they produce become ever more closely related”. This in turn creates major difficulties when it comes to “organising, both locally and internationally”, and contributes to a “loss of local and global bargaining power”. He therefore maintains that corporate social responsibility “will never become an effective tool for protecting workers’ rights unless it involves the workers producing these goods as a bargaining partner”. The decades of experience of the China Labour Bulletin in helping to develop collective bargaining and organising in both China and, more recently, India provides a valuable model here: “Even in China, one of the worst countries for workers’ rights violations, we have seen numerous examples of workers with a common grievance coming together and taking strategic and well-thought-out collective action to force their employer to the bargaining table”.</p> <p>The round table also greatly benefits from the experience of <strong>Lupe Gonzalo</strong>, from the <a href="http://ciw-online.org/">Coalition of Immokalee Workers</a>. When thinking about potential solutions, Gonzalo observes that “Corporate social responsibility programmes exist to satisfy consumer demand for ethical products. Their primary purpose is to protect the brand by preventing consumers from taking their business somewhere else. They are not meant to and do not succeed in protecting the human rights of workers, or in reducing poverty for workers”. She instead makes the case for an alternative based upon the&nbsp; <a href="http://www.fairfoodprogram.org/">Fair Food Program</a>, whose essential features “can and have been replicated in many contexts”. She also endorses a model provided by a <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/penelope-kyritsis/why-boycott-wendy-s-ask-women-farmworkers">recent campaign</a> targeting the fast food company Wendy&#39;s:&nbsp; “We spent years working on a public campaign to educate consumers about the conditions in their supply chain in Mexico. We pushed really hard to convey the reality despite what Wendy&#39;s was saying. We combined that with action steps. We were not only telling consumers what was happening, but we gave them ways to help”.</p> <p>The value of worker-driven social responsibility (WSR) is mentioned by a number of contributors to the round table. It should come as no surprise that it features in the contribution by <strong>Theresa Haas and Penelope Kyritsis</strong> from the <a href="https://wsr-network.org/">Worker-driven Social Responsibility Network</a>. Reflecting on the power now exercised by leading corporations within supply chains, Kyritsis observes that, “It has become very difficult for suppliers to maintain successful commercial relationships and comply with labour standards, including minimum wage laws, at the same time”. Haas similarly observes that “responsibility lies almost exclusively with the brands at the top of supply chains”. She therefore advances a case for WSR as an effective way of “shifting power, resources, and control from the entities at the top to the workers at the bottom in ways that legally obligate companies to prioritise the needs and rights of workers”. When it comes to thinking about the future of work, Kyritsis makes the further point that, “It’s not technology rendering workers vulnerable to extreme labour exploitation, but the fact that wealth and power are not concentrated in the hands of workers … Computers aren&#39;t the problem”. </p> <p>We also greatly benefit from having a contribution from <strong>Emily Kenway</strong>, from <a href="https://www.labourexploitation.org/">Focus on Labour Exploitation</a>. Building upon her extensive experience both inside and outside government, Kenway observes that global supply chains “fragment responsibility and create a vacuum of accountability in relation to labour rights”, resulting in a situation where workers sometimes “do not know what company they are working for”. Echoing other contributors, Kenway is reluctant to endorse ethical investment models and ethical consumerism, and instead recommends specifically targeting the exposure of governments to abuses within their own supply chains. She also specifically endorses the <a href="http://www.fairfoodprogram.org/">Fair Food Program</a>, as “one of the best examples of worker-led labour rights change out there today”. &nbsp;When summarising the current state of play, she observes that, “We are bargaining for scraps at the moment against a legislative and global economic framework which empowers capital. That has to change but it won’t unless we make the right sorts of targeted, disruptive, systemic interventions”.</p> <p>We also have a second contribution from the Indian subcontinent featuring <strong>Reema Nanavaty</strong>, the Director of the <a href="http://www.sewa.org/">Self-Employed Women&#39;s Association (SEWA)</a>. She observes that the “the majority of the workforce in India and in the Global South are informally employed”, what has meant that “their work remains invisible”. Emphasising a point which comes up time and time again within the round table, Nanavaty argues that, “The primary and most effective route is to organise informal sector workers. This gives them a collective strength. Their voice is heard. Their work gets visibility”. She also points to SEWA’s efforts to provide alternative employment, including the establishment of a company run by garment and textile workers that employs 15,000 people. As part of their ongoing lobby efforts, SEWA is mobilising in support of “a floor living minimum wage for informal sector workers …&nbsp; skills development, social development, and social protection programmes”. In the case of informal workers, “innovation is a crucial part of their coping strategy. They have to keep innovating day in and day out for their own survival”.</p> <p>The round table also features <strong>Elizabeth Tang</strong>, the executive director of the <a href="http://idwfed.org/en">International Domestic Workers Federation</a>. Emphasising the ways in which different problems intersect, Tang observes that, “Lots of domestic workers are also migrants, and as migrants they also face another layer of discrimination … It is very hard to ask for legal protections when the people around you do not think you deserve them”. Given the scale of these challenges, it is essential to specifically prioritise investment “in organisation building and movement building”. She observes that “lots of people only want to invest in the last step: fix this problem, change that policy. But they don&#39;t realise that the first half, the work that enables us to have the capacity to take that last step, hasn&#39;t been done yet. Investing only in the last step can consume large amounts of resources, but it will be less likely to succeed”. &nbsp;When faced with corporate power, it is also crucial not to submit to fear: “One of employers’ most common tactics is to threaten to leave when we demand better conditions. But often it&#39;s just a bluff. Some smaller operations can close and open easily, but when we talk about the bigger ones it&#39;s not so easy. I can&#39;t remember how many times Coca-Cola has threatened to leave Hong Kong, but they are still here”.</p> <p>Our final contribution comes from <strong>Alison Tate</strong>, who builds upon her experience at the <a href="https://www.ituc-csi.org/">International Trade Union Confederation</a>. As part of her contribution, Tate identifies the emergence of a “model of business that undermines the capacity for job security and income security” as one of the main obstacles to promoting workers’ rights. She argues that, “No job should be without a floor of universal social protection, which includes certain benefits for when a worker is not able to access sufficient income. No worker should be without a minimum living wage, or the capacity to bargain for a fair contract price floor. Yet that&#39;s what we&#39;re seeing more and more in the digitalised and platform economy”. Improving the lives of precarious workers therefore requires action on multiple fronts, including building workers power, organising the informal economy in innovative ways, leveraging the power of pension funds, strengthening labour courts, rewriting the rules of the global economy, and campaigning for a convention on the elimination of violence against women and men in the world of work. </p> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. Our support is not tacit endorsement within. The aim was to highlight new ideas and we hope the result will be a lively and robust dialogue.</p><div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Mon, 08 Oct 2018 07:47:42 +0000 openDemocracy 119955 at https://www.opendemocracy.net