BeyondSlavery https://www.opendemocracy.net/taxonomy/term/17588/all cached version 17/01/2019 11:07:59 en End the system of forced rescue and institutionalisation in India https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters/end-system-of-forced-rescue-and-institutionalisation-in-india <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>India’s new Trafficking in Persons Bill, 2018 repeats the mistakes of its predecessor.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/15711735852_d03e8314e8_o.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Tamil Nadu, India. Feng Zhong/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/poorfish/15711735852/in/photolist-7zpUNy-6a6nh3-YCzFLW-sKmq3-DacH2L-rdXMi9-4ttmNi-aLx9Cn-qnjTZ7-b1Xbzv-bgtmWn-6Sw16T-9YPs8W-knqBTw-7RCLQA-qnHiA4-2CT7c-pp1A3i-2zFfE2-7zpUh1-6Y3yj3-2zKGtw-28FZ3zS-EWjvdT-JFgB7H-EhCVXK-r19bTz-RFSd4q-2bQ5kHc-XsEXgp-N51wM-8LkJZ1-pWoKFs-7P6CUk-3VKH2r-8rBeTd-5xVezj-7E8Ka3-CbR9pj-5ozbsj-3gHU5K-uzPsKc-GxnKy9-K6AVrm-u4mac6-GMyReN-GhiQ87-GhiS6q-H4u5q3-uxt1Uh">Flickr. (cc by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p>In the wake of repeated shelter scandals, some anti-traffickers have taken the <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/issue-forced-institutionalisation-adult-women-shelter-roop-sen/">bold step</a> of acknowledging the harms inherent to India’s current anti-trafficking law, the Immoral Trafficking (Prevention) Act, 1986 (ITPA). Those who seek to redress the abuses inherent in this system should be applauded; however, some points need clarifying before designing a more humane response to the problems of sex trafficking in India. Ultimately, the ITPA needs to be repealed and India’s new Trafficking of Persons Bill, 2018 (ToP Bill) should be sent to select committee and redrafted.</p> <p>When framing the problem of sex trafficking in India, anti-traffickers often claim that the majority of those who sell sex in India are <a href="https://www.ted.com/talks/sunitha_krishnan_tedindia">forced</a> or begin when they are <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/issue-forced-institutionalisation-adult-women-shelter-roop-sen/">underage</a>. The best available research, however, provides a different picture. A <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1468426/">survey </a>of over 6500 female sex workers in South India aged 15 and above found that the mean age of entrance into sex work was 21.7 years. The most comprehensive <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.2040-0209.2013.00416.x">data set</a> included 3000 sex workers from across the nation. Of these, 81.59% entered sex work when they were 19 years old or above and 14.53% between 15-18 years. The Pan India Survey found that across all modes and sites of sex work in India, 79.4% of women entered the trade voluntarily, while 7.1% were forced, 2.8% were sold, and 9.2% were cheated.</p> <p>Here it is useful to pause for a note about definitions. The term ‘forced’ should only be used in reference to work rendered through physical force, threats, beatings, blackmail, cheating and similarly direct forms of compulsion. The term ‘forced’ should <em>not</em> be applied to situations in which people enter a mode of work out of financial need. If financial urgency were defined as ‘force’, then the vast majority of the world’s workers would have to be defined as ‘forced labourers’. Very few individuals are either entirely free to make unfettered decisions about their means of earning money or are entirely freed from the need to do so. This is important. An overly broad definition of ‘force’ or ‘coercion’ leaves us unable to distinguish between people trafficked against their will, people who hate their work but do it out of necessity, and people who actually enjoy their work but are not independently wealthy enough to avoid the financial compulsion to work. There is a line here that must be maintained for all workers, including those who sell sex. The term ‘forced’ does not include the pressure of economic need. A worker who would prefer a different kind of work or who would rather not work at all is not the same as a worker who is forced to work. </p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Under India’s present anti-trafficking system, almost eight out of 10 times a woman was rescued against her will in the name of saving her from sex trafficking.</p> <p>With that clarified, the vast majority of women who sell sex in India are <em>not forced</em> to do so. Numerous studies, including <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.2040-0209.2013.00416.x">Sahni and Shankar (2013)</a>, <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10691-012-9211-z">Kotiswaran (2012)</a>, <a href="https://societyandspace.org/2017/05/23/street-corner-secrets-by-svati-p-shah/">Shah (2014)</a>, <a href="https://www.dukeupress.edu/given-to-the-goddess">Ramberg (2014)</a>, <a href="https://www.academia.edu/23878616/The_Stickiness_of_Sex_Work_Pleasure_Habit_and_Intersubstantiality_in_South_India">Walters (2016</a>), and <a href="https://www.sangram.org/news/raided-e-book-4">Pai, Murthy, Seshu &amp; Shukla (2018)</a>, confirm this framing and this finding. The reality of the largely voluntary nature of sex work in India is not acknowledged in the ITPA. The ITPA makes no distinction between women who sell sex by choice and those who do so by force. It treats both groups as legitimate targets for raid and rescue.</p> <p>Many of those who were initially forced into sex work eventually transition and begin to work voluntarily; how a woman first entered sex work tells us nothing about her present circumstances. And even women who are forced to work may nevertheless prefer not to be rescued if that rescue is also forced. To lock up someone who has been trafficked is to traffic her again. One women who had been forcibly rescued told me, “They [the anti-traffickers] are treating us exactly how the traffickers treat us.” <a href="https://www.sangram.org/news/raided-e-book-4">Pai, Murthy, Seshu &amp; Shukla (2018</a>) methodically tracked down 230 of the 244 total people who had been rescued under the ITPA across four locations between 2005 and 2017. A massive 79% of them “stated that at the time of the raid they were voluntarily in sex work and wanted not to be ‘rescued’”.</p> <p>Pause a moment to consider this shocking finding. This means that under India’s present anti-trafficking system, almost eight out of 10 times a woman was rescued against her will in the name of saving her from sex trafficking. Only two out of 10 times was that rescue welcome. That is an appallingly high rate of failure and a staggering amount of unnecessary harm. It is clear that, as it is being presently implemented, the ITPA causes much more damage than it fixes. Tens of thousands of families and individuals have been injured by this piece of legislation in the decades that it has been enforced across the nation.</p> <h2>The immense damage of forced rescue</h2> <p>Adult women should not be institutionalised against their will. They should have a choice in the kinds of support services they receive after rescue. Forced institutionalisation leaves inmates angry and rebellious, regardless of whether they wish to remain in sex work or not. Staff who deal with these angry inmates may resort to physical, emotional and psychological abuse in order to subdue them. </p> <p>Vibhuti Ramachandran and I <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters-vibhuti-ramachandran/recipe-for-injustice-india-s-new-trafficking-bil">have written previously in openDemocracy</a> about the harrowing experience of incarceration in India’s anti-trafficking shelters. Some key points from this earlier article include: </p> <div style="margin-left:25px;"> <p>• Some shelters do not provide the inmates adequate nutrition, sanitation, or even anti-retroviral and diabetic medications. Shelter staff treat them as&nbsp;<a href="http://sunithakrishnan.blogspot.com/2014/">dangerous</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/hyderabad/25-women-rescued-in-trafficking-cases-escape/articleshow/19657168.cms">belligerent</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters-neil-howard/interview-forced-rescue-and-humanitarian-trafficking">adversaries</a>&nbsp;or as&nbsp;<a href="http://www.epw.in/journal/2016/44-45/who-would-live-cage.html">shamefully immoral</a>&nbsp;(<a href="https://www.epw.in/author/barnali-das">Das 2016</a>; <a href="http://sunithakrishnan.blogspot.com/2014/">Krishnan 2014</a>; Times of India 2013).</p> <p>• Inmates cannot support, care for, or readily communicate with their family members. Protective custody also severely limits women’s capacity to earn (<a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/vibhuti-ramachandran/rescued-but-not-released-%E2%80%98protective-custody%E2%80%99-of-sex-workers-in-i">Ramachandran 2015</a>). The rehabilitation programmes offered with the help of NGOs miscalculate the <a href="https://www.academia.edu/37104978/Humanitarian_Trafficking_Violence_of_Rescue_and_Mis_calculation_of_Rehabilitation">socio-economic realities</a> of women’s lives (<a href="https://www.academia.edu/37104978/Humanitarian_Trafficking_Violence_of_Rescue_and_Mis_calculation_of_Rehabilitation">Walters 2016</a>). Many rescued women in Mumbai said they could not afford to learn new skills; their priority was rather to earn (Ramachandran 2015).</p> <p>• Rescued women experience inordinate bureaucratic delays to their release and are offered scant legal counsel to hasten the process. As their stay in shelter homes lengthens from the prescribed four weeks into several months, many inmates fall into depression; some of them attempt to <a href="https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/hyderabad/25-women-rescued-in-trafficking-cases-escape/articleshow/19657168.cms">escape</a>, to <a href="http://sunithakrishnan.blogspot.com/2014/">riot</a>, or even to end their lives by <a href="https://www.deccanchronicle.com/nation/crime/150418/hyderabad-rescued-uzbek-woman-ends-life-in-shelter-home.html">suicide</a> (Walters 2016).</p> </div> <p>Clearly not all rescues are forced. Ramachandran (2017)&nbsp;<a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/vibhuti-ramachandran/critical-reflections-on-raid-and-rescue-operations-in-new-delhi">found</a> that in New Delhi some anti-traffickers do attempt to differentiate between adult women who wish to leave brothels and those who do not. It is, however, very difficult to make this crucial distinction during the rush of a rescue operation. The ITPA does not even require this effort. The damage created by this omission is immense. A study by the National Human Rights Commission has detailed violent, insensitive, and inappropriate police behaviour during raids, and critiqued the focus on removing women from brothels while their earnings, possessions, and even their children are left behind (<a href="http://nlrd.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/ReportonTrafficking.pdf">Sen and Nair 2004</a> (Vol. II): 403-404).</p> <h2>Whether the ITPA or the new Trafficking in Persons Bill, women remain under lock and key</h2> <p>Given the state of the present shelter system in India, anti-traffickers’ support for the Trafficking of Persons Bill, 2018 (ToP Bill) is surprising. Some have claimed that the ToP Bill recognises women’s autonomy and point to Section 17(4) as proof. This section, they suggest, will allow those picked up under forcible rescue to reject rehabilitation. But a close look at the wording of Section 17(4), reveals that its language appears far less friendly to those rescued than its supporters suggest. It reads:</p> <blockquote> <p>(4) Where the Magistrate is satisfied, after making an inquiry as to the age of the victim and it is found that the victim is not a child, the Magistrate may, make an order that the victim be placed, for such reasonable period, in a Rehabilitation Home: </p><br /> <p>Provided that, if the victim or any person rescued is not a child and he voluntarily makes an application supported by an affidavit for his release and if the Magistrate is of the opinion that such application has not been made voluntarily, the Magistrate may reject such application after recording his reasons in writing.</p> </blockquote> <p>Under the current ITPA it is functionally impossible for a person inside a protection home to approach an appellate court for release without the full cooperation of the NGO. The wording of the ToP Bill creates a small, theoretical opening for that to now happen. Yet in the scenario under the new bill, why would it be any more feasible for a shelter inmate to apply for release to the magistrate without the full cooperation of the NGO, especially since it would require an official affidavit? Shelter inmates could not produce such a document from inside a shelter without the support of the NGO itself. And how supportive is an NGO likely to be of inmates seeking release if the organisation’s budget is linked either directly or indirectly to the number of inmates kept inside its protection home (as is the case for the majority of anti-trafficking NGOs)? Immediately losing inmates would equate to losing funding, and most NGOs are not likely to hasten that outcome. Would the courts take up the onus of educating inmates about the required affidavits? Would the courts help them to draft these documents if the NGO does not? The ToP Bill is silent on this important issue.</p> <p>Ignore for a minute that this is the same anti-trafficking system that has been famously <a href="http://file/C:/Users/014905395/Desktop/Articles%20and%20Book%20Chapters/oday.in/india/story/rapes-beatings-situation-of-terror-tiss-report-documents-bihar-shelter-horror-1312956-2018-08-13">abusive</a> to date. Let us suppose for the sake of argument that the NGO or the court would facilitate an inmate’s application for release under the ToP Bill. Even granting this point and assuming that an application could be made, note that the emphasis of Section 17(4) in the ToP Bill is not actually the creation of a well-defined mechanism for releasing those who have been incorrectly rescued. It does <em>not</em> underscore the autonomy of those rescued. Rather, its emphasis is on questioning the voluntary nature of a release application and on rejecting it. Nowhere does it state under what circumstances an application for release should be granted. Nowhere does it state that an application might even <em>be</em> granted. Given the present abuses of the anti-trafficking system, it is unwise to believe that this single, negatively worded section will overhaul an entire system of forced institutionalisation, especially given that the language of the rest of the ToP Bill indicates otherwise.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">While the law must serve the minority of people do not work voluntarily, their needs should never be used as an excuse to cause severe harms to the majority in the trade.</p> <h2>Detained for a “short term”, but for how long? </h2> <p>Perhaps the most important omission here is that Sec 17(4) does not state how quickly a magistrate must consider and respond to an application of release. The ToP Bill restricts the period of shelter stay to a “short term”. But what constitutes a short term? Under the present ITPA, rescued victims should be produced in court within 28 days. According to evidence from shelters in Hyderabad, Mumbai, and New Delhi this process takes a minimum of two to three months in the best of cases, despite the legal mandate of 28 days. If the same problem persists under the new ToP Bill (and why should it be different?), then a “short term” stay in a shelter will likely also take a magistrate a minimum of two to three months to process.</p> <p>Imagine that you were a voluntary sex worker living at home with your family. That family is dependent on your daily earnings, as is the case for the majority of women who sell sex in India. Imagine that you were suddenly taken in a forced rescue operation by police and locked in a shelter. Imagine that, despite wishing to be released, you suddenly faced two to three months of a “short term” stay in a shelter without means to earn money, pay your bills, or feed or care for your family. What would happen if you had small children at home? Or an ageing parent who depended on you?</p> <p>Imagine not only the harm that being locked up would do to your financial situation, but also to your reputation. How could you explain your two to three month absence to your family? What if they had not been aware of how you earned your living previously? What damage would it do to your most important relationships to be forcibly locked in an anti-trafficking shelter and outed as a sex worker? Even if it were for only 28 days, that itself would be a very long time to lose one’s freedom. How could society not expect you not to become angry? To rebel, to attempt escape or suicide, or to riot in response? This is what routinely happens under the ITPA at present. It would not change under the new ToP Bill, as forced rescue and detention would persist. Why champion such an inhumane proposal? </p> <h2>Beyond forced rescue</h2> <p>Some anti-traffickers’ solution for this intractable problem is that shelters should be open rather than closed. But presuming that the majority of the women arriving at the institution were forcibly rescued, how many of them could realistically be expected to stay when given the choice? Very few. Why fund a system of forced rescue that treats those targeted to degradation, intimidation, the loss of property and even violence (Sen and Nair 2004 (Vol. II): 403-404) only to see those same people then turn and walk away from the shelters where they are delivered? </p> <p>Why not abandon forced rescue altogether as some anti-trafficking <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/vibhuti-ramachandran/critical-reflections-on-raid-and-rescue-operations-in-new-delhi">NGOs in Delhi</a> have done? Why justify the immense harms sustained by almost 80% of those forcibly rescued by pointing to the less than 20% of those who welcome it? Two wrongs cannot make a right. Why not instead develop a more accurate and efficient means of identifying those who want help exiting commercial sex? The ITPA makes no such provisions, and it should be repealed. The ToP Bill also relies on forced rescue and detention. It does not envision a system of open shelters. Its language presumes a system of closed shelters and court mandated release, and this system has already shown to be <a href="https://indianexpress.com/article/india/sexual-abuse-at-6-homes-physical-violence-at-14-report-to-bihar-govt-5281192/">highly abusive</a>. This is a primary reason that the ToP Bill should not be passed in its present form.</p> <p>Instead of institutionalisation, a model of community-based rehabilitation would overhaul of the present abusive system. A path toward open shelters and community-based rehabilitation must be pursued at all costs. The law must service the dire needs of the minority of people in the sex trade who do not work voluntarily. At the same time, their needs should never be used as an excuse to cause severe harms to the majority in the trade who do not wish to be rescued or institutionalised.</p> <p>Prabha Kotiswaran, an expert on Indian anti-trafficking law at King’s College London, has laid out many of severe drawbacks of the ToP Bill, 2018 in an extensive <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/prabha-kotiswaran/criminal-law-as-sledgehammer-paternalist-politics-of-india-s-2018-tr">review</a>. Some of the objections she and other scholars have laid out in addition to those above include:</p> <div style="margin-left:25px;"> <p>• Under the ToP, it is not the purported victim but rather an anti-trafficking police officer or unit that will decide whether rescue is necessary. Forced rescue is always unethical. It should never be legal. </p> <p>• The bill specifies that the inter-state repatriation of victims be completed within three months and inter-country repatriation within six months (Sec 26 (4)). This would be shorter than at present, and a welcome change. However, the present bill includes no timelines for the release of local inmates, who are the majority and do not require repatriation. The culture of bureaucratic delays would thus not be corrected and would likely continue the present system of rescued people languishing in shelters for months even if they are technically eligible for release.</p> <p>• The bill would expand the present system of forced rescue and incarceration from just women and girls who sell sex to other groups like bonded labourers and people in begging. The numbers of people picked up in forced rescues and then institutionalised would thus be set to rise exponentially.</p> <p>• The bill spells out a system of punishment in which those accused must prove themselves innocent rather than vice versa and punishments are not commensurate with the severity of crimes (for example, inducing victims to beg receives more jail time than trafficking them for sex).</p> </div> <p>Unfortunately, these are only a few of the extensive problems with the new ToP Bill. It is a poorly written piece of legislation containing a tangle of unresolved knots. At present, it would balloon an already highly abusive shelter system while addressing only a few of the system’s existing problems. The ToP Bill should be referred to select committee and redrafted. </p> <p>More than the ToP, the inhumane consequences of the ITPA must acknowledged and this legislation must be repealed. Instead, the progressive Bonded Labour and Juvenile Justice acts should be more fully enforced and methodically expanded to create a comprehensive solution to human trafficking in India that expands labour and migration rights while enforcing employer and supply-chain accountability. Such an approach would situate solutions within community-based services and thereby prioritise the autonomy of survivors of trafficking themselves.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters/scandals-in-indias-raid-and-rescue-shelters-is-awful-distracting-from">Scandals in sex worker rescue shelters: is ‘awful’ distracting from ‘lawful’? </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/vibhuti-ramachandran/critical-reflections-on-raid-and-rescue-operations-in-new-delhi">Critical reflections on raid and rescue operations in New Delhi</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters/beyond-raid-and-rescue-time-to-acknowledge-damage-being-done">Beyond ‘raid and rescue’: time to acknowledge the damage being done</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters-vibhuti-ramachandran/recipe-for-injustice-india-s-new-trafficking-bil">A recipe for injustice: India’s new trafficking bill expands a troubled rescue, rehabilitation, and repatriation framework</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/prabha-kotiswaran/criminal-law-as-sledgehammer-paternalist-politics-of-india-s-2018-tr">The criminal law as sledgehammer: the paternalist politics of India’s 2018 Trafficking Bill</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/prabha-kotiswaran/neoabolitionism-s-last-laugh-india-must-rethink-trafficking">Neoabolitionism’s last laugh: India must rethink trafficking</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/prabha-kotiswaran/empty-gestures-critique-of-india-s-new-trafficking-bill">Empty gestures: a critique of India’s new trafficking bill</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Kimberly Walters Tue, 08 Jan 2019 08:00:00 +0000 Kimberly Walters 121182 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Carta abierta: un enfoque más apropiado sobre el trabajo infantil https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/carta-abierta-un-enfoque-m-s-apropiado-sobre-el-trabajo-infantil <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A medida que la ONU considera su posición sobre el trabajo infantil, 59 personas expertas exponen los argumentos en contra de una edad mínima universal. La explotación no puede evitarse con prohibiciones generales sino con enfoques más matizados. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/open-letter-better-approach-to-child-work">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none caption-xlarge'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/8763356206_37ec457480_z_0.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/8763356206_37ec457480_z_0.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="300" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload caption-xlarge imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>Dang Ke Duc for the ILO/Flickr. (CC 2.0 by-nc-nd)</span></span></span></p> <h2>Prólogo</h2> <p>El equipo de <em>Beyond Trafficking and Slavery</em> (Más allá de la trata y la esclavitud) se complace en publicar la siguiente carta como parte de nuestra secuencia «Estudios de caso y críticas». El documento, respaldado por más de 50 personas destacadas de la academia, profesionales de los derechos humanos y defensoras del trabajo infantil y juvenil, hace un llamado al Comité de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Convención de los Derechos del Niño para evitar vincular el «Comentario General sobre los derechos de los adolescentes» propuesto con el Convenio de la OIT sobre la edad mínima (No. 138) o las normas de edad mínima establecidas en ese convenio.</p> <p>En cambio, las personas que suscriben piden al Comité de la ONU sobre la Convención en los Derechos del Niño que haga referencia a la Convención de la OIT sobre las peores formas de trabajo infantil (No. 182). El apoyo al Convenio 182 en esta instancia específica está sujeto a que las voces de las niñas y niños que serán afectados sean escuchadas y se actúe en consecuencia; que sus derechos sean respetados; y que sus mejores intereses —decididos en conjunto con las niñas y niños— sean priorizados en todos los casos. La carta, además, rechaza la aplicación general del Convenio No. 182 de la OIT y, en su lugar, sugiere que su aplicación se guíe por una cuidadosa consideración de las circunstancias sociales, culturales y económicas en las que viven y trabajan niñas y niños.</p> <p>Por largo tiempo, estos mensajes han sido destacados por un abrumador número de personas de la academia, profesionales de los derechos de las niñas y niños y grupos organizados de niñas y niños trabajadores. Todas estas personas han expresado su preocupación por los impactos perjudiciales que las convenciones internacionales dominantes sobre los derechos de la infancia pueden producir sobre el trabajo infantil. Siempre se ha condenado de forma especial, sin embargo, el Convenio No. 138 de la OIT, como lo demuestran muchos de los artículos publicados en nuestra serie sobre <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyond-slavery-themes/generations">«Infancia y juventud»</a>. Los temas tratados incluyen los enfoques «abolicionistas» y de «edad mínima», ambos altamente problemáticos y derivados de las ficciones sobre la existencia de un tipo de niñez único y universal. Encarnan una comprensión del curso de la vida que delinea el trabajo de niñas y niños a partir de sus determinantes sociales, políticas y de otra índole estructural, así como el papel del trabajo en sus vidas y las de sus familias. Los grupos de niñas y niños trabajadores en Bolivia, Perú, Paraguay, Burkina Faso, India y otros lugares dejaron claro que su participación en una variedad de trabajos (incluidos muchos de los prohibidos por las leyes) es a menudo parte integral de sus intentos de acceder a la educación, medios de subsistencia y planes de desarrollo, así como parte de su participación socio-económica y ciudadana en el sentido más amplio. Se espera que el Comité de la ONU sobre la Convención de los Derechos del Niño adopte las propuestas esbozadas en esta carta, dando paso a un enfoque relativamente más informado que tenga en consideración el lugar de niñas y niños en el mercado laboral.</p> <hr /> <p>20 de enero de 2016</p> <p><strong>Para: Miembros del Comité de la ONU sobre la Convención de los derechos del niño</strong></p> <p>Estimados miembros del Comité:</p> <p>Como grupo de personas profesionales e investigadoras estrechamente involucradas con los derechos de las niñas y niños y los programas de protección de la infancia, tenemos un interés particular en el trabajo infantil. Recientemente, nos enteramos de que se está preparando una Observación general sobre los derechos de las y los adolescentes, y esto puede afectar los derechos de las niñas y niños que trabajan, en relación con el artículo 32 de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño. Vemos esto como una oportunidad para mejorar la protección de la infancia y adolescencia trabajadora. En particular, instamos encarecidamente al Comité a vincular su recomendación sobre adolescentes al Convenio 182 de la OIT y referirse a la importancia de proteger a niñas y niños trabajadores de la explotación y el daño, en vez de mirar los Estándares de edad mínima establecidos en el Convenio 138 de la OIT. La referencia a OIT 182 debería respetar toda la gama de derechos de la niña y el niño, incluidos sus derechos de protección, su derecho a la educación, y sus derechos participativos —entre los que destacamos su derecho a la información, a participar en las decisiones que los afectan y a organizarse—. Cualquier aplicación de la OIT 182 debería tener en cuenta, en la práctica, los contextos locales en los que trabajan niñas y niños para asegurar que se contemplen sus intereses. Si el Comité desea convocar un debate técnico sobre las cuestiones planteadas aquí en relación con el trabajo infantil, nos complacería colaborar en ese empeño.</p> <p>A través de nuestro trabajo de campo e investigación con niñas y niños, familias y comunidades, hemos llegado a reconocer que ellos pueden trabajar —y, en efecto, trabajan— para mantenerse a sí mismos y a sus familias. Este trabajo de niñas, niños y adolescentes se lleva a cabo en una variedad de contextos culturales y escenarios que, en muchos casos, les permiten adquirir habilidades técnicas, empresariales y de vida que les ayudan a convertirse en personas adultas productivas dentro de sus sociedades. Sin embargo, el trabajo que realizan niñas, niños, y adolescentes, puede tener efectos positivos y negativos. Pueden trabajar en situaciones dignas que no son perjudiciales ni explotadoras y que contribuyen a la materialización de sus derechos. También existen casos en los que trabajan en entornos inseguros y no saludables, con salarios bajo o sin ellos y sin poder continuar su educación ni ver materializados otros derechos.</p> <p>Estamos de acuerdo en que en todas las situaciones, incluso cuando los niños y las niñas trabajan, deben estar protegidas de cualquier daño y explotación, pero tenemos reservas sobre el uso del Convenio 138 de la OIT (Convenio sobre la edad mínima) para lograr ese objetivo. La protección contra toda forma de explotación se establece en el artículo 32 de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño (párr. i) y la protección contra toda forma de daño se especifica en el Convenio 182 de la OIT. Aunque se debe tener cuidado para garantizar que el trabajo infantil sea seguro, apropiado, que contribuya a la educación de niñas y niños y los dignifique, las políticas que se enfocan en prohibir el trabajo infantil, en especial a través limitaciones de edad, generalmente no son lo mejor para ellos y pueden tener impactos negativos:</p> <p>• Cuando las normas de edad mínima se incorporan a la legislación, <em>las niñas y niños más pequeños que ya no pueden trabajar de forma legal</em> pueden ser empujados a formas de trabajo ilegales, invisibles o más dañinas, dejándolos sin un sistema de protección. También pueden ser excluidos del aprendizaje crítico, las oportunidades de desarrollo y las actividades de desarrollo comunitario.</p> <p>• Cuando el objetivo principal de la legislación es la edad mínima para trabajar, <em>las niñas, niños y adolescentes mayores que pueden trabajar legalmente</em> pueden estar expuestos a condiciones de explotación o trabajo dañino, ya que la legislación no se centra en prevenir la explotación y el daño. Creemos firmemente que los estándares mínimos de edad no son la forma adecuada de proteger a niñas y niños que trabajan.</p> <p><strong>Cualquier intervención llevada a cabo para proteger y apoyar a niñas y niños que trabajan debe enfocarse en prevenir la explotación y el daño respetando sus derechos humanos, incluido el de participar en las decisiones que los afectan.</strong></p> <p>Un número creciente de personas de la academia y profesionales en el campo del trabajo infantil adoptan posturas muy críticas frente a la política de una edad mínima universal para el empleo, en especial como figura en el Convenio 138 (1973) de la OIT. Esto sorprende a quienes suponen que la política protege a las niñas y niños del abuso y fomenta su educación.</p> <p>Exponemos aquí en pocas palabras el argumento en contra de una edad mínima universal. Se basa en un gran cuerpo de investigación empírica multidisciplinaria sobre cómo el trabajo afecta al bienestar y al desarrollo de las niñas y niños.<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/open-letter-better-approach-to-child-work#fn1">1</a> La evidencia contra una política universal de edad mínima es mucho más persuasiva que la evidencia a favor de esta, por lo que muchas personas especialistas abogan por abandonarla por completo. En su lugar, proponen favorecer políticas como el Convenio 182 de la OIT, que se dirige específicamente al trabajo que resulta dañino para niñas y niños.</p> <h2>Algunos de los desafíos involucrados en la discusión del trabajo infantil</h2> <p>Las personas que debaten sobre el «trabajo de niñas y niños» o el «trabajo infantil» con frecuencia no reconocen que tienen en mente diferentes fenómenos. Este es un problema que obstaculiza la formulación de políticas racionales:</p> <p>• Algunas personas conciben el «trabajo» como el trabajo industrial estereotipado: actividades remuneradas de tiempo completo. Gran parte de la literatura anterior e institucional sobre el trabajo infantil se centra en este tipo de trabajo.</p> <p>• Otras lo consideran como un concepto más amplio, que incluye las tareas de tiempo parcial en las granjas y empresas familiares y en el hogar, tales como ir a buscar agua o leña y ocuparse de otras niñas o niños.</p> <p>Siguiendo las tendencias actuales de las ciencias sociales, <strong>definimos el «trabajo infantil» de forma amplia, para incluir todas las actividades que ayudan a las niñas y niños a mantenerse a sí mismos y/o a los demás</strong> (parientes usualmente, pero no siempre). Según esta definición, la gran mayoría del trabajo infantil está en algún contexto o conexión familiar, a tiempo parcial y no remunerado.</p> <p>Con el tiempo, las políticas de edad mínima han pasado del concepto más restringido al más amplio.</p> <h2>Las actitudes hacia el trabajo infantil se ven afectadas por los valores</h2> <p>Las personas encaran los debates sobre el trabajo infantil con diversos valores e ideologías. Por ejemplo:</p> <p>• Algunas consideran que el trabajo es, en esencia, inapropiado para la infancia, que esta debería estar libre de responsabilidad y dedicada al aprendizaje y el ocio. Los buenos padres no involucran a niñas y niños pequeños en el trabajo.</p> <p>• Otros consideran que el trabajo es bueno para las niñas y niños, que proporciona en algunos casos acceso a ingresos, así como capacitación en disciplina y responsabilidad. Todas las niñas y niños deberían ayudar desde una edad temprana como una práctica efectiva de crianza.</p> <p>• Para muchas personas, la conveniencia del trabajo es situacional. El trabajo es aceptable para niñas y niños cuando es seguro y no los priva indebidamente de la escuela y el tiempo libre.</p> <p>Dichos valores se relacionan con las diferencias culturales, de clase y de otro tipo, así como con las preferencias individuales. El desafío es cómo lidiar con esas diferencias en las políticas. En cuestiones de trabajo infantil, esto ha sido especialmente difícil cuando los valores se vuelven rígidos en ideologías de un tipo u otro.</p> <p><strong>Se necesita equilibrio, y la experiencia sugiere que esto se logra mejor al conjugar valores con investigaciones empíricas que vinculen rigurosamente las políticas con las consecuencias en el bienestar de las niñas y niños.</strong></p> <h2>La política de la edad mínima general para trabajar</h2> <p>Quienes defienden estándares de edad mínima universales (en oposición a los específicos) lo justifican con uno o más de tres presuposiciones clave sobre qué es bueno para las niñas y niños, y lo toman como un hecho:</p> <ol> <li>El trabajo es un impedimento para el desarrollo de los niños y niñas, al menos antes de la adolescencia. O, las niñas y niños que trabajan tienen más probabilidades de ser pobres en la edad adulta: una «transmisión intergeneracional de la pobreza».</li> <li>Incluso si el trabajo es generalmente aceptable para la mayoría de las niñas y niños, trabajar los pone en riesgo de abuso. La mejor manera de evitar tales abusos es prohibir que trabajen, y los beneficios de evitar el abuso compensan los efectos negativos de no trabajar.</li> <li>Prohibir el trabajo a niñas y niños en edad escolar es útil para mantenerlos en la escuela y promover la importancia primordial de la educación.</li> </ol> <p><strong>La experiencia evaluada y la investigación de las ciencias sociales en una amplia gama de disciplinas sugieren firmemente que ninguna de estas suposiciones es válida como una generalización universal</strong>.<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/open-letter-better-approach-to-child-work#fn2">2</a></p> <h2>Supuesto 1 - «El trabajo es un impedimento para el desarrollo de los niños y niñas»</h2> <p>Aunque no hay evidencia científica de que las responsabilidades laborales sean intrínsecamente malas para las niñas y niños (más allá de la cuestión del abuso), existe evidencia considerable de que cuando realizan un trabajo adecuado a su edad y en un ambiente de apoyo, esto puede cumplir un importante papel en el desarrollo de su vida presente y en la preparación para la edad adulta. La política de edad mínima ignora este conjunto sustancial de evidencia:</p> <p>• La participación en el trabajo del hogar y económico a menudo es una poderosa fuerza de socialización que brinda a las niñas y niños resiliencia y recursos, a través de la participación plena en sus familias y comunidades.</p> <p>• A través del trabajo, niñas y niños pueden aprender habilidades técnicas y sociales que mejoran su confianza y bienestar en el presente y sus oportunidades de vida en el futuro.</p> <p>• Cuando niñas y niños superan desafíos a través de su trabajo, y particularmente cuando encuentran que otras personas pueden depender de ellos, el logro puede ser una fuente importante de autoestima y resiliencia, lo que es particularmente importante para las niñas y niños en situaciones de riesgo.</p> <p>•El trabajo tiene beneficios económicos que son importantes, no solo para la nutrición y los gastos escolares de familias pobres, sino también en el futuro. Investigaciones recientes sugieren que, una vez que se controlan adecuadamente la pobreza y otras condiciones influyentes, el trabajo temprano en un modo y cantidad adecuados puede asociarse con <em>un mayor</em>, que no menor, éxito en la edad adulta. Los factores situacionales dominan.</p> <p><strong>Dichos beneficios se han documentado para niñas y niños incluso por debajo de la edad mínima establecida para «trabajos ligeros». Cuando el trabajo a menudo constituye una oportunidad para el bienestar y el desarrollo de niñas y niños, la interrupción del trabajo infantil conlleva un costo considerable. Este costo debe evaluarse cuando se considera cualquier protección que pueda ofrecerse impidiendo que trabajen. El trabajo no se puede dividir con precisión en categorías mutuamente excluyentes como trabajo dañino o benigno.</strong></p> <h2>Supuesto 2: «Prohibir el trabajo protege a las niñas y niños del abuso y de la explotación»</h2> <p>La mayor parte de la evidencia no sugiere que el simple hecho de trabajar ponga a las niñas y niños en riesgo de abuso (aunque en ciertas situaciones lo haga). Tampoco apoya la afirmación de que una política universal que prohíba el trabajo infantil reduzca el abuso laboral (aunque prohibiciones cuidadosamente dirigidas contra ciertos tipos de trabajo dañino pueden ayudar a proteger a niñas y niños). Además, existen razones específicas por las cuales el Convenio de la OIT sobre la edad mínima (138) como instrumento legal no es necesario ni adecuado para proteger a las niñas y niños:</p> <p>•El trabajo perjudicial, peligroso y de explotación ahora está prohibido por la Convención de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos del Niño y por el Convenio 182 de la OIT. En consecuencia, mantener un requisito de edad mínima solo es efectivo a la hora de prohibir el trabajo en empleos que&nbsp;<em>no son</em>&nbsp;perjudiciales, peligrosos o en condiciones de explotación. ¿Por qué prohibir a las niñas y niños tener un trabajo adecuado?</p> <p>• El Convenio sobre la edad mínima no protege a las y niños de la explotación en «empresas familiares y de pequeña escala que producen para consumo local y no emplean regularmente trabajadoras o trabajadores contratados», puesto que están exentos de los términos de la Convención (artículo 5.3). La investigación ha demostrado que en tales empresas a veces hay más explotación que en aquellos empleos asalariados que están prohibidos.</p> <p>• La Convención sobre la edad mínima no ofrece ninguna protección alternativa a quienes por situaciones de fuerza mayor necesitan ingresos para ganarse la vida, y muy a menudo para la educación. De hecho, al hacer que el empleo formal sea ilegal, la Convención hace que el trabajo infantil (incluido el trabajo doméstico) sea clandestino y hace que las situaciones de trabajo de explotación se den con mayor frecuencia y sean considerablemente más difíciles de controlar.</p> <p>• La Convención sobre la edad mínima trata los efectos más que las causas, ignorando la gran desigualdad en la cual la explotación de niñas y niños no puede separarse de la explotación de las familias y de las comunidades.</p> <p><strong>Por lo tanto, la evidencia sugiere que una edad mínima general para el empleo en realidad no protege a las niñas y niños del abuso laboral, pero puede privarlos de los beneficios del trabajo. De esa manera, hace más daño que otra cosa. Además, al centrarse en el criterio injustificado de la edad, esta política desvía la atención, la energía y los recursos del abuso verdaderamente grave de las niñas y niños en el lugar de trabajo, el cual requiere de una intervención urgente.</strong></p> <h2>Supuesto 3 - «El trabajo y la escuela son incompatibles»</h2> <p>El peso de la evidencia no respalda la idea de que prohibir que niñas y niños trabajen los mantenga en la escuela o promueva su educación.</p> <p>• Muchas personas jóvenes combinan con éxito el trabajo y la escuela, y en aquellas situaciones en las que la pobreza no exige de jornadas laborales más largas, es más probable que disminuyan el tiempo libre que el trabajo escolar.</p> <p>• El acceso y la calidad de la escuela son los factores determinantes más fuertes de la asistencia escolar y el rendimiento. Atender a estas cuestiones funciona de manera más efectiva a la hora de mantener a las niñas y niños en la escuela que prohibir el trabajo.</p> <p>• Aumentar los ingresos de los hogares (por ejemplo, a través de transferencias monetarias condicionadas) en entornos de pobreza, puede aumentar la asistencia escolar y reducir la cantidad de tiempo que las niñas y niños dedican al trabajo, sin obligarlos necesariamente a que lo abandonen por completo.</p> <p>• El hecho de mantener sin trabajo a las niñas y niños puede hacer que la escolaridad sea más difícil y, en algunos casos, incluso imposible para aquellas familias que necesitan ingresos para cubrir los gastos escolares.</p> <p>• Las niñas y niños que no asisten a la escuela o encuentran la asistencia humillante debido a defectos serios en el sistema escolar necesitan una actividad constructiva alternativa. El trabajo a menudo es la mejor opción.</p> <p><strong>No se ha demostrado que la política de prohibir el trabajo infantil sea necesaria o efectiva para mejorar la asistencia y el rendimiento escolar, y tal política puede impedir que las niñas y niños adquieran los beneficios educativos del trabajo.</strong></p> <h2>Trabajo infantil y el mercado de trabajo</h2> <p>Otra suposición detrás del impulso para eliminar el trabajo infantil busca favorecer a las niñas y niños solo de forma indirecta, a través de beneficios que son principalmente para las personas adultas. Sostiene que la eliminación de la participación de las niñas y niños en el trabajo protege el empleo y los salarios de las personas adultas, elevando el ingreso familiar de modo que las niñas y niños no tengan que trabajar. Si bien hay evidencias de que las niñas y niños pueden competir en los mercados de trabajo asalariado con las personas adultas, también las hay de que la participación económica de la infancia puede mantener la viabilidad de muchos tipos de empresas domésticas (como granjas y pequeños negocios) y así crear empleo e ingresos para las personas adultas.</p> <p><strong>El efecto del trabajo infantil en los ingresos de las personas adultas varía con el trabajo y la situación. También es importante reconocer que niñas y niños también tienen derecho a un ingreso sin el apoyo adecuado de personas adultas.</strong></p> <h2>Derechos e intereses de las niñas y niños</h2> <p>Aunque la Convención sobre la edad mínima se escribió antes de que el discurso sobre los derechos de las niñas y niños adquiriera prominencia, a menudo se supone que es un documento sobre los derechos de la infancia.</p> <p>Esta suposición es falaz.</p> <p>La política universal de reducción de la edad mínima para niñas y niños garantiza ciertos derechos humanos que se otorgan a todo el mundo. Según las leyes internacionales de los derechos humanos, los derechos extendidos a todo el mundo, como el derecho al trabajo, pueden reducirse en la infancia por su propia protección. Sin embargo, para que esta excepción sea válida, debe demostrarse que es necesaria —es decir, que no se puede lograr por medios que no restrinjan sus derechos— y efectiva —que, en la práctica, protege a la infancia—. Ninguna de estas condiciones se cumple con la política universal de edad mínima. De hecho, las niñas y niños pueden estar protegidos por medidas contra el trabajo perjudicial que no les prohíban trabajar, y no pudimos encontrar evidencia que sugiera que una prohibición universal en realidad protege a la infancia. Sin embargo hemos hallado una serie de casos en los que claramente funcionó en detrimento de sus derechos.</p> <p><strong>Con respecto a la política internacional sobre el trabajo infantil, sería más lógico y beneficioso para niñas y niños trasladar los esfuerzos para implementar una política universal de edad mínima a la aplicación urgente de políticas para proteger a niñas y niños frente a empleos y condiciones de trabajo que según pruebas empíricas son efectivamente perjudiciales para ellos, tal y como como lo exigen la Convención de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos del Niño y el Convenio 182 de la OIT.</strong></p> <p>Por lo tanto, recomendamos que cualquier Comentario General desarrollado en relación con el artículo 32 de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño haga referencia al Convenio 182 de la OIT (con los requisitos mencionados anteriormente) y a la importancia de proteger a las niñas y niños trabajadores de la explotación y el daño, y <strong>no</strong> a las Normas de edad mínima establecidas en el Convenio 138 de la OIT.</p> <p>Si tiene alguna pregunta o precisa de más aclaraciones, comuníquese con Richard Carothers (richardcarothers@rogers.com), quien coordinará una respuesta colectiva con todas las personas signatarias.</p> <p>Gracias por su consideración acerca de este importante asunto.</p> <p>Atentamente.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chus-lvarez/traduciendo-beyond-trafficking-and-slavery-la-historia-detr-s-del-hecho">Traduciendo Beyond Trafficking and Slavery: la historia detrás del hecho</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHUSA ÁLVAREZ</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kamala-kempadoo/revisitando-la-carga-del-hombre-blanco">Revisitando la «carga del hombre blanco»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KAMALA KEMPADOO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gallagher/trata-de-personas-de-la-indignaci-n-la-acci-n">Trata de personas: de la indignación a la acción</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/lucha-contra-la-trata-de-personas-encubrimiento-de-los-programas-de-luc">Lucha contra la trata de personas: encubrimiento de los programas de lucha contra la inmigración</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK AND ANDRÉ BROOME</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DAVID A. FEINGOLD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi">«Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LOURDES ALBÁN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en">Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/bridget-anderson/entender-el-contexto-interpersonal-y-estructural-del-trabajo-del-hoga">Entender el contexto interpersonal y estructural del trabajo del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BRIDGET ANDERSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ilana-berger/aliados-o-coconspiradores-qu-necesita-el-movimiento-de-trabajadoras-del-h">Aliados o coconspiradores: ¿qué necesita el movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ILANA BERGER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sameera-hafiz/m-s-all-de-la-supervivencia-lecciones-aprendidas-de-las-trabajadoras-del">Más allá de la supervivencia: lecciones aprendidas de las trabajadoras del hogar en la organización de campañas contra la trata de personas y la explotación laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SAMEERA HAFIZ</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ai-jen-poo/salir-de-las-sombras-el-personal-del-hogar-habla-en-los-estados-unidos">Salir de las sombras: el personal del hogar habla en los Estados Unidos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AI-JEN POO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/william-myers/prohibir-el-trabajo-infantil-es-una-mala-idea">Prohibir el trabajo infantil es una mala idea</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WILLIAM MYERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-bourdillon/trabajo-infantil-lo-bueno-y-lo-malo">Trabajo infantil: lo bueno y lo malo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL BOURDILLON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/sobre-la-nueva-ley-de-trabajo-infantil-de-bolivia">Sobre la nueva ley de trabajo infantil de Bolivia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jessica-taft/apoyo-las-ni-as-y-ni-os-trabajadores-como-agentes-sociales-pol-ticos-y-ec">Apoyo a las niñas y niños trabajadores como agentes sociales, políticos y económicos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JESSICA TAFT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jo-boyden-gina-crivello/trabajo-infantil-escolaridad-y-movilidad">Trabajo infantil, escolaridad y movilidad</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JO BOYDEN, GINA CRIVELLO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/roy-huijsmans/trata-infantil-la-peor-forma-de-trabajo-infantil-o-el-peor-abordaje-la-m">Trata infantil: ¿la «peor forma» de trabajo infantil o el peor abordaje a la migración juvenil?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROY HUIJSMANS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/edward-van-daalen/salvar-ni-as-y-ni-os-con-canciones-y-refrigerios">Salvar a niñas y niños con canciones y refrigerios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EDWARD VAN DAALEN</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery BTS en Español Thu, 13 Dec 2018 11:31:02 +0000 openDemocracy 120940 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Apoyo a las niñas y niños trabajadores como agentes sociales, políticos y económicos https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jessica-taft/apoyo-las-ni-as-y-ni-os-trabajadores-como-agentes-sociales-pol-ticos-y-ec <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>El movimiento peruano del trabajo infantil ofrece un modelo visionario para las comunidades colaboradoras, solidarias e igualitarias en las que las y los menores se consideran plenos participantes de la vida económica, social, y política. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/jessica-taft/supporting-working-children-as-social-political-and-economic-agents">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none caption-xlarge'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/8446761495_134a8a0bd9_z.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/8446761495_134a8a0bd9_z.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="307" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload caption-xlarge imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>Alex Proimos/Flickr. (CC 2.0 by-nc)</span></span></span></p> <p>En junio de 2012 me senté en un círculo con 25 niñas, niños y adolescentes para escucharles presentar análisis críticos detallados sobre la ley peruana de la infancia y la adolescencia (<em>Código de los Niños y Adolescentes</em>, en adelante denominado simplemente <em>«código»</em>). Pequeños grupos de niñas y niños habían pasado las últimas horas comparando la ley actual con una serie de cambios propuestos, con el objetivo de identificar posibles cambios positivos y enumerar sus preocupaciones sobre las leyes antiguas y las nuevas. La mayoría eran niñas y niños trabajadores involucrados en organizaciones de niñas, niños y adolescentes trabajadores. Se habían reunido para realizar un taller e iniciar una campaña de incidencia para proponer sus propios cambios al <em>código</em>.</p> <p>Durante el taller, debatieron las posibles implicaciones de los cambios políticos, así como los supuestos sobre la infancia integrados tanto en la versión original de la ley como en la nueva. La política antigua, a pesar de tener sus inconvenientes, se basaba principalmente en la idea de que las niñas y los niños son personas con derechos. Sin embargo, la nueva propuesta parecía regresar a una visión más anticuada de la infancia principalmente como un objeto pasivo de protección o corrección.</p> <p>Las niñas y niños se percataron de que los cambios propuestos añadían referencias frecuentes que limitaban su autonomía como «bajo la supervisión de las madres y los padres» o «con el permiso de sus madres y sus padres». Hablaron de cómo las autoridades no les habían consultado de forma directa, como principales personas interesadas en la elaboración de una ley que trata sobre niñas y niños. En su opinión, las autoridades no les consultaron porque consideran que «un grupo de personas adultas expertas saben lo que hay que hacer con la ley» y que «no podemos tomar decisiones. Las personas adultas están más capacitadas para decidir sobre la infancia». Criticaron el hecho de que los artículos de ambas leyes, tanto la antigua como la nueva, criminalizaban el trabajo infantil. Concluyeron diciendo que las personas adultas que diseñaron el proyecto del nuevo <em>código</em> no veían a las niñas y a los niños de la misma manera en que se veían a sí mismas: como ciudadanas y ciudadanos competentes y con el derecho a participar activamente en la vida política, social y económica.</p> <h2>El movimiento nacional de niñas y niños trabajadores</h2> <p>Las niñas y los niños que planificaron y realizaron este taller fueron líderes nacionales y locales del movimiento peruano de la infancia trabajadora, un movimiento con casi 40 años de historia organizando a niñas y niños trabajadores en una lucha colectiva por sus derechos, su dignidad y su bienestar. El movimiento está compuesto por pequeños grupos ubicados en escuelas, iglesias y barrios del país. Actualmente es una red nacional de organizaciones, formada por casi 10.000 niñas, niños y adolescentes trabajadores de edades comprendidas entre 8 y 17 años, y que está apoyada por varios cientos de personas adultas.</p> <p>&nbsp;El objetivo del movimiento de las niñas y los niños que trabajan es descriminalizar y desestigmatizar el trabajo infantil, así como cuestionar directamente el enfoque de «erradicación del trabajo infantil» de la Organización Internacional del Trabajo. Apuestan por un enfoque político más matizado que les proteja de la explotación y de condiciones de trabajo perjudiciales, pero que permita y valore el trabajo infantil, siempre que este se realice en condiciones dignas y seguras que no interfieran con su aprendizaje y desarrollo. Las contribuciones del movimiento a este debate político son absolutamente esenciales y merecen ser consideradas seriamente. Además, ofrece al mundo un modelo profundamente visionario y muy importante no solo para la colaboración no jerárquica entre distintas generaciones, sino también para la creación de comunidades en las que se respete y valore plenamente a las niñas y los niños. Y a través de la práctica de las relaciones igualitarias y solidarias entre distintas generaciones, el movimiento también mejora notablemente las vidas diarias y el bienestar de las niñas y los niños que trabajan.</p> <h2>Un desafío para la división menores–personas adultas</h2> <p>Quienes participan del movimiento peruano de niñas y niños trabajadores tienen una concepción propia sobre la infancia que hace hincapié en las capacidades de las niñas y los niños y en su igualdad básica con respecto a las personas adultas. Defienden que las niñas y los niños deberían ser considerados participantes legítimos y valiosos en todos los aspectos de la vida comunitaria: económica, social, cultural y política. Esto no quiere decir que ignoren los aspectos más vulnerables de la infancia, ni que eximan a las personas adultas de toda la responsabilidad que tienen sobre el bienestar de las niñas y los niños. En lugar de eso, ven a las niñas y los niños como sujetos sociales con derechos inalienables, conocimientos propios y aportaciones que hacer en sus comunidades, en base a su experiencia como menores. El movimiento destaca las capacidades de las niñas y los niños para adquirir nuevas habilidades, incluyendo las de la autoorganización, incidencia y activismo; y la necesidad de que las personas adultas y menores trabajen conjuntamente en condiciones de igualdad para que ambos grupos puedan compartir su experiencia y aprender el uno del otro. A través del movimiento, los niños y niñas se convierten en facilitadoras, coordinadoras y participantes capacitadas en un debate democrático vivo.</p> <p>Para colaborar de forma significativa y compartir verdaderamente el poder de toma de decisiones, tanto las niñas y los niños como las personas adultas del movimiento han de cuestionar sus propias ideas preconcebidas e interiorizadas sobre la infancia y la edad adulta. Deben cuestionar que las personas adultas saben más, que las niñas y los niños no entienden muy bien los problemas y que las personas adultas deben estar «a cargo». En forma constante, surge la oportunidad de debatir sobre las ideas relacionadas con la infancia, y las niñas, los niños y las personas adultas del movimiento, quienes tienen mucha experiencia reflejando los distintos paradigmas de la infancia. Una vez, una participante adulta me explicó que «para que las personas adultas traten a las niñas y los niños de manera diferente deben primero verles de manera diferente». Y me gustaría añadir que también las niñas y niños deben verse a sí mismos de manera diferente.</p> <p>Además de promover nuevas formas de ver la infancia, el movimiento de las niñas y los niños trabajadores ha construido una cultura propia de organización basada en la colaboración, el cuidado y el respeto hacia las niñas y los niños. La relación entre las personas adultas del movimiento —a las que se conoce como <em>colaboradoras</em>— y las organizaciones de niñas, niños y adolescentes trabajadores son profundamente personales y emocionales. También son políticas en la medida en que son comprendidas de manera explícita por todas las personas como una práctica de interacción más igualitaria.</p> <p>Las personas adultas recuerdan a los niños y niñas que han de llamarles por su nombre de pila. Hablan abierta y honestamente con ellas sobre las opciones disponibles y les animan a tomar sus propias decisiones, intentando siempre mantenerse un poco al margen, escuchándolas y dejándolas que lleven la iniciativa en el movimiento. En este contexto, las niñas y niños trabajadores se sienten respetados, se ven a sí mismos con más conocimiento, con más poder y más competentes, y confían más en sus propias voces. Esta cultura de colaboración promueve el desarrollo individual de las niñas y niños como sujetos sociales, políticos y económicos que defienden sus derechos como menores y como trabajadores.</p> <p>La cultura intergeneracional de carácter colaborativo del movimiento y el profundo respeto por la capacidad, la dignidad y los derechos de las niñas y niños trabajadores crean una importante estructura de apoyo para ellos como individuos. Los resultados de mi investigación indican que las niñas y niños que participan en el movimiento son personas expresivas, directas y están orgullosas de su identidad como trabajadoras, se sienten cómodas hablando en público y están dispuestas a compartir sus pensamientos e ideas con las personas adultas. Están dispuestas a decir lo que creen y a cuestionar las injusticias cuando las ven. Saben que cuentan con un grupo de personas que les apoyarán si se encuentran con problemas o sus derechos se ven vulnerados.</p> <p>A largo plazo, la experiencia anecdótica de las personas adultas <em>colaboradoras</em> con varios años de participación en el movimiento nos dice que quienes han ocupado cargos de liderazgo (sobre todo a nivel nacional) han logrado mucho éxito como trabajadoras sociales, abogadas, profesoras y otras profesiones; y han experimentado un ascenso social importante mientras continuaban con su compromiso de ayudar a otras personas a través de su trabajo. Muchas de estas personas continúan implicadas en el movimiento o ahora colaboran con otras organizaciones de la clase trabajadora.</p> <p>El movimiento peruano de niñas y niños trabajadores proporciona un importante servicio a la infancia trabajadora al apoyar su desarrollo como personas empoderadas y miembros comprometidos de sus comunidades. El movimiento también ha defendido de forma clara y convincente la importancia de escuchar a las niñas y niños trabajadores e incluir sus voces en los debates políticos sobre el trabajo infantil. Pero, en mi opinión, este movimiento tiene más que ofrecer aún a quienes estamos interesadas en los derechos de la infancia y en la capacidad de decisión política de las niñas y niños, pues resulta un potente modelo para crear formas de colaboración e interacción profundas, significativas e igualitarias entre generaciones.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi">«Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LOURDES ALBÁN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en">Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/bridget-anderson/entender-el-contexto-interpersonal-y-estructural-del-trabajo-del-hoga">Entender el contexto interpersonal y estructural del trabajo del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BRIDGET ANDERSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ilana-berger/aliados-o-coconspiradores-qu-necesita-el-movimiento-de-trabajadoras-del-h">Aliados o coconspiradores: ¿qué necesita el movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ILANA BERGER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sameera-hafiz/m-s-all-de-la-supervivencia-lecciones-aprendidas-de-las-trabajadoras-del">Más allá de la supervivencia: lecciones aprendidas de las trabajadoras del hogar en la organización de campañas contra la trata de personas y la explotación laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SAMEERA HAFIZ</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ai-jen-poo/salir-de-las-sombras-el-personal-del-hogar-habla-en-los-estados-unidos">Salir de las sombras: el personal del hogar habla en los Estados Unidos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AI-JEN POO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/william-myers/prohibir-el-trabajo-infantil-es-una-mala-idea">Prohibir el trabajo infantil es una mala idea</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WILLIAM MYERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-bourdillon/trabajo-infantil-lo-bueno-y-lo-malo">Trabajo infantil: lo bueno y lo malo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL BOURDILLON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Jessica Taft BTS en Español Thu, 13 Dec 2018 11:28:51 +0000 Jessica Taft 120936 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Salvar a niñas y niños con canciones y refrigerios https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/edward-van-daalen/salvar-ni-as-y-ni-os-con-canciones-y-refrigerios <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Si la conversación en el «Debate de Alto Nivel sobre el trabajo infantil» de la OIT hubiera estado a la altura de su nombre, el mundo podría haber comenzado a avanzar en esta cuestión tan importante. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/ilc/edward-van-daalen/saving-children-with-songs-and-light-refreshments">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/14205343508_8f71d5b0c5_k_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Meeting of the IPEC International Steering Committee for the World Day Against Child Labour. 103rd Session of the International Labour Conference. Geneva, 10th of June 2014. Pouteau/Crozet/Albouy/Flickr. (CC 2.0 by-nc-nd)</p> <p>El 8 de junio, durante la Conferencia Internacional del Trabajo (CIT) del 2016, asistí al <a href="http://www.ilo.org/ipec/Campaignandadvocacy/wdacl/2016/lang--en/index.htm">Debate de Alto Nivel sobre el trabajo infantil</a> , que marcó el Día mundial contra el trabajo infantil, que se celebra cada año el 12 de junio. El tema de este año era: «¡Eliminar el trabajo infantil en las cadenas de producción es cosa de todo el mundo!» Por desgracia, todo sigue como siempre.</p> <p>Como es habitual durante un evento sobre los derechos de niñas y niños, hubo lugar para el entretenimiento; solo que esta vez, duró unos 30 minutos de los 90 totales asignados al evento. Tal y como prometía el folleto que promocionaba la mesa redonda, las personas delegadas de la OIT fueron invitadas a un refrigerio y una actuación musical del <a href="http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/french/2016/06/akissi-delta-engagee-contre-le-travail-des-enfants/#.V17LZbt95D8">Choeur pour l&#39;Abolition du Travail des Enfants</a>, un grupo de artistas de Costa de Marfil que sensibiliza al público marfileño sobre el trabajo infantil. El estribillo de su canción «Mon enfant» termina con «mi niña, eres mejor que todo el sucio oro que te aplasta y te hace sangrar». De ahí en adelante estaba claro que estábamos hablando de las «peores formas».</p> <p>Como es habitual el Director General de la OIT, Guy Ryder, abrió el debate. Su declaración se hizo eco de uno de los subobjetivos establecidos por el <a href="http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/economic-growth/">8º Objetivo de Desarrollo Sostenible</a>: asegurar la prohibición y eliminación de todas las formas de trabajo infantil para el año 2025. Para lograr el objetivo —argumentó— se requiere de una buena combinación de políticas (educación gratuita y de calidad, buenas leyes y protección social), puestos de trabajo para madres y padres, así como garantizar el derecho de todas las personas trabajadoras a organizarse; siempre y cuando éstas no sean niñas y niños, por supuesto.</p> <p>Durante el evento del año pasado, Ryder hizo hincapié en que el lugar en el que se celebraba el debate (La Sala XX del Palais des Nations de la ONU) suele ser utilizado por el Consejo de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, y que esto era simbólico por la importancia que tiene la erradicación del trabajo infantil como cuestión de Derechos Humanos. Este año hubo incluso más simbolismo, puesto que Ryder abandonó el debate media hora después, justo en mitad del mismo. Tal vez porque un tema más importante y relativo a los Derechos Humanos necesitaba su atención o quizá porque el debate de este año carecía de un orador de peso como el del año pasado —Kailash Satyarthi, Premio Nobel de la Paz del 2014— que le obligara a quedarse hasta el final. Quién sabe.</p> <p>El resto de <a href="http://www.ilo.org/ipec/Events/WCMS_487951/lang--en/index.htm">ponentes</a> solo dispusieron de unos pocos minutos para presentarse y hacer sus declaraciones de apertura. Algunas personas se las arreglaron para llevar su superficialidad a otro nivel a pesar de que el formato del debate no les favorecía. Antes de anunciar que Canadá ratificaría el Convenio 138 de la OIT (1973) sobre la edad mínima, la Ministra de Trabajo canadiense, MaryAnn Mihychuck, hizo una broma al Director General cuando éste le encendió el micrófono, broma que, según el moderador, merecía un aplauso. Más tarde, Andrews Addoquaye Tagoe, en representación de un sindicato de trabajadoras y trabajadores de Ghana y de la <a href="http://www.globalmarch.org/">Marcha Global contra el Trabajo Infantil</a>, hizo que las personas presentes gritaran a la vez «¡fuera!» después de que él dijera «trabajo infantil». Aparte de eso, fue básicamente lo mismo de siempre. La frase «el tiempo de las excusas se ha acabado» fue muy repetida, pero los sindicatos señalaron directamente a los empleadores, que a su vez culparon a los gobiernos.</p> <p>Como siempre, se pidió a las niñas y niños del lugar que representaran artísticamente algo sobre el trabajo infantil. En ese momento, estudiantes de la Escuela internacional de Ginebra (convenientemente situado, literalmente, al otro lado de la calle del edificio de la OIT) hicieron un vídeo, varios carteles y este poema que se les entregó a las personas delegadas.</p> <p><em>Una niña (o Un niño).</em></p> <p><em>Tengo derechos, tengo obligaciones.</em></p> <p><em>Tengo educación, tengo trabajo.</em></p> <p><em>Voy a la escuela, voy al trabajo.</em></p> <p><em>Podrían expulsarme, podrían despedirme.</em></p> <p><em>Agarro un lápiz, agarro un martillo.</em></p> <p><em>Recibo flores, planto flores.</em></p> <p><em>Compro ropa, fabrico ropa.</em></p> <p><em>Llevo diamantes, extraigo diamantes.</em></p> <p><em>Tengo amigas, tengo compañeras.</em></p> <p><em>Juego con hermanos, trabajo con mis hermanos.</em></p> <p><em>Como chocolate, cultivo chocolate.</em></p> <p><em>Tengo un profesor, tengo un jefe.</em></p> <p><em>Escribo, coso.</em></p> <p><em>Llevo zapatos, fabrico zapatos.</em></p> <p><em>Recibo una pensión, obtengo un salario.</em></p> <p><em>Trabajo para obtener buenas notas, trabajo para mantener.</em></p> <p><em>Soy una niña, soy una niña</em></p> <p><em>(o Soy un niño, soy un niño).</em></p> <p>Es el tipo de discurso que esperas de jóvenes estudiantes que han aprendido sobre el trabajo infantil únicamente a través de folletos, vídeos y canciones; es comprensible. Sin embargo, uno esperaría que la OIT junto con su Programa Internacional para la Erradicación del Trabajo Infantil (IPEC, en sus siglas en inglés) fuera más allá de estos estereotipos para abordar la multitud de complejas cuestiones que subyacen a un término tan controvertido como es «trabajo infantil». Por desgracia, parece que este es justamente el tipo de lenguaje que la organización está deseosa por adoptar en sus <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/neil-howard/what-s-wrong-with-world-day-against-child-labour">principales campañas contra el trabajo infantil, que a menudo dificultan la vida a aquellas niñas y niños que trabajan y tratan de construirse una vida digna.</a></p> <p>Para terminar, como de costumbre, se hizo un gran anuncio. El año pasado, <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/karl-hanson-edward-van-daalen/can-campaigns-to-stop-child-labour-be-stopped">Kailash Satyarthi lanzó la campaña de la OIT «50 for Freedom»</a>, para conseguir que 50 países ratificasen el Protocolo de 2014 relativo al Convenio sobre el trabajo forzoso de 1930 (hasta la fecha lo han hecho seis países). En 2016, el ministro de Trabajo de Argentina, Jorge Triaca, confirmó que su país acogerá la 5ª Conferencia Mundial sobre el Trabajo Infantil en octubre de 2017. Esperemos que quienes la organicen se tomen este tema más en serio y le dediquen el tipo de debates sustanciales e integradores que tan desesperadamente necesita.</p> <p><em>El trabajo de campo para este informe se realizó en el marco del proyecto de investigación «Living rights in translation. An interdisciplinary approach of working children&#39;s rights», financiado por el Comité Especializado en Investigación Interdisciplinaria de la Fundación Nacional Suiza para la Ciencia (SNSF) (Proyecto n.º CR11I1</em>156831).<em></em></p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Edward van Daalen BTS en Español Thu, 13 Dec 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Edward van Daalen 120939 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Sobre la nueva ley de trabajo infantil de Bolivia https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/sobre-la-nueva-ley-de-trabajo-infantil-de-bolivia <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Evo Morales ha sido criticado por la reducción en Bolivia de la edad laboral a los 10 años. Pero cuando el trabajo infantil es un hecho, es mejor para las niñas y niños que sea formalizado y regulado. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/neil-howard/on-bolivia%E2%80%99s-new-child-labour-law">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/550948.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/550948.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="306" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>Shoeshine boy at work during the carnival in Oruro, Bolivia. Linn Bergbrant/Demotix. All Rights Reserved.</span></span></span></p> <p>En 2014, Evo Morales ganó las <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolivian_general_election,_2014">elecciones generales de Bolivia</a> de manera abrumadora.&nbsp;Aunque fue una catástrofe para las personas de derecha que defienden el libre mercado, su victoria fue celebrada como un triunfo de la igualdad y la justicia sociales por progresistas de izquierda. Sin embargo, tanto la izquierda como la derecha están de acuerdo en un hecho: condenan de forma inequívoca la ley de trabajo infantil de Morales.</p> <p>El «Código de la infancia y la adolescencia» tira por la borda décadas de legislación sobre el trabajo infantil. En todo el mundo, y según la Convención sobre la edad mínima de la Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT), las niñas y los niños pueden comenzar a trabajar a los 14 años en tareas ligeras. En Bolivia, esa edad se acaba de reducir a los 10 años, siempre y cuando las niñas y los niños sean trabajadores autónomos y vayan a la escuela. Pueden firmar contratos de trabajo —pueden ser contratadas o contratados por otra persona— a los 12 años, siempre y cuando tengan el permiso de sus padres y continúen con su educación. La ley también contiene estipulaciones firmes en cuanto a la protección de las niñas y niños trabajadores, y sanciones severas para las personas empleadoras que no las respeten.</p> <p>Las críticas han sido atronadoras. El ala política conservadora en Latinoamérica la ha calificado de <a href="https://nacla.org/blog/2014/2/17/bolivia%E2%80%99s-child-workers-challenge-new-rights-code">deshonrosa</a>; UNICEF y la OIT han liderado un <a href="http://www.trust.org/item/20140724064729-bx215">llamamiento</a> internacional en su contra; Human Rights Watch ha sido mordaz, la persona responsable de las labores de defensa de los derechos de la infancia afirmó que las nuevas medidas son «contraproducentes» y que pueden «perpetuar la pobreza». Adrian McQuade, ex director de Anti-Slavery International, <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2014/jul/25/bolivia-child-labour-law-exploitation-slavery">escribió </a>en <em>The Guardian</em> que «es una vergüenza para todo el mundo» y que representa «el abandono del derecho de las niñas y los niños a preservar su infancia».&nbsp;</p> <p>Estas críticas no sorprenden a nadie, pero se equivocan en muchos aspectos. Hay varias razones por las que la ley representa un paso muy progresista en la dirección adecuada:</p> <p>La primera es que constituye un claro rechazo al enfoque «abolicionista» del trabajo infantil dominante, en favor de una estrategia reguladora más matizada y, en última instancia, efectiva. El enfoque abolicionista pretende sacar inmediata e incondicionalmente a las niñas y niños de lo que la OIT llama las ocupaciones más «peligrosas» e, igualmente, cesar de inmediato cualquier trabajo realizado por menores de 14 años. Sin embargo, el problema con esto es que hay multitud de ejemplos a lo largo de la historia que demuestran que este procedimiento ha empeorado <a href="http://www.dissentmagazine.org/online_articles/more-of-the-same-in-the-fight-against-child-labor">en forma considerable <em>la vida de las niñas y los niños</em></a>. Esto es debido a que, con demasiada frecuencia, el proceder es apolítico. Personas ajenas a la realidad y cargadas de buenas intenciones llegan y prometen rescatar a las pobres niñas y niños de la explotación, pero prometen hacerlo sin cambiar las condiciones político-económicas que permiten —y crean— esa situación, sino simplemente sacándoles del terreno laboral. El resultado de estos intentos es que esas niñas y niños se ven enseguida envueltos de nuevo en las mismas penurias que les llevaron a buscar trabajo en un principio. Esto generalmente les empuja hacia sectores de economías sumergidas donde acaban enfrentándose a condiciones aún peores.</p> <p>Lo que la nueva ley de trabajo infantil de Bolivia trata de conseguir es precisamente ofrecer una alternativa a este dogma quijotesco, apoyándose en la premisa de que los niños y niñas trabajan porque son pobres y, hasta que no dejen de serlo, estarán más protegidas si este tipo de trabajos salen de la clandestinidad. Esto comporta la legalización y la regulación, junto con que las autoridades garanticen que las niñas y niños trabajadores reciban la misma protección y los mismos salarios que las plantillas adultas.</p> <p>La misma lógica pragmática se encuentra en las campañas que buscan la legalización del <a href="http://books.google.com.au/books/about/Trafficking_and_prostitution_reconsidere.html?id=FSHaAAAAMAAJ">trabajo sexual</a>. Como con la prostitución legalizada, <a href="http://rutgerspress.rutgers.edu/acatalog/Rights_and_Wrongs_of_Childrens_Work.html">la evidencia de otros contextos en los que se ha llevado a cabo una práctica más reguladora del trabajo infantil</a> sugiere que ésta es, de largo, la mejor manera de apoyar los intereses de las niñas y niños hasta que exista suficiente voluntad política para que se efectúe una <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jul/08/bolivia-legal-working-age-10">redistribución</a> masiva de los recursos y acabar así con la pobreza. Así pues, es posible que esta ley beneficie a las niñas y niños que trabajan en Bolivia, y como precedente que es, tiene la posibilidad de beneficiar a los del todo el mundo. </p> <p>Esta Ley además ofrece un ejemplo tangible y real de una alternativa efectiva a la hegemonía del pensamiento abolicionista. Ningún otro país ha rechazado de manera tan categórica la inflexibilidad abolicionista, ni ha aprobado una ley que saque a la luz tan rotundamente la hipocresía de esta moralidad. Condenar el trabajo infantil e ilegalizarlo, mientras no se hace nada para acabar con las estructuras que provocan esa situación significa, al fin y al cabo, no hacer nada por ayudar a estas niñas y niños. Esto solo sirve para aplacar el sentimiento de culpa de quienes al ver a una niña o un niño trabajando reconocen sus privilegios de forma manifiesta e incómoda. La postura abolicionista es el peor tipo de sensibilidad liberal y la ley de trabajo infantil de Bolivia lo saca a relucir. Esta ley, además, se convierte en un faro para otras alternativas.</p> <p>La tercera razón por la que esta ley es un gran avance es que reconoce la capacidad de las niñas y niños para opinar y decidir qué es lo que les conviene. Al contrario de lo que se podría pensar, las niñas y niños trabajadores han <a href="http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/11/18/child_workers_of_bolivia_unite">apoyado fervientemente</a> esta nueva ley. El sindicato pionero <a href="http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/11/18/child_workers_of_bolivia_unite">Unión de niñas, niños y adolescentes trabajadores de Bolivia</a> (UNATSBO), que representa a decenas de miles de menores de todo el país, alega que la regulación y la protección laboral son más útiles para las personas pobres y jóvenes que las prohibiciones masivas. Históricamente, quienes buscan ayudar a las niñas y niños lo hacen sin consultarles y sin tener en cuenta sus opiniones en el asunto. Aparte de ser una contradicción moralmente cuestionable, hablar <em>en nombre de</em> los niños, niñas y adolescentes mientras se les ignora, ha sido del todo inefectivo. El reconocimiento que Bolivia ha hecho a su derecho a ser escuchadas es muy importante.</p> <p>Es muy probable que la sociedad boliviana siga el ejemplo de su gobierno de ofrecer un mayor respeto a sus trabajadores y trabajadoras más jóvenes. Entidades importantes dedicadas a la investigación demuestran que las percepciones del estatus de una persona son fundamentales para determinar cómo tratamos a esa persona. Precisamente, ésta es la razón por la que muchas democracias liberales prohíben la incitación al odio. Al declarar que la juventud no solo es capaz de trabajar y organizarse, sino que también puede realizar contribuciones valiosas y necesarias para sus familias y para la sociedad, Evo Morales está exigiendo que la sociedad boliviana haga lo mismo: respetar a estas y estos jóvenes como personas que son y tratarlos como tal.</p> <p>Ni apruebo la explotación infantil ni considero que el trabajo infantil suponga siempre un problema, pero quiero que quienes están leyendo esto reconozcan que vivimos en un mundo injusto y desigual, y que regular el trabajo infantil es más beneficioso para las niñas y niños trabajadores que aplicar la contraproducente tirita abolicionista. En vez de condenar la medida de Morales como si fuese retrógrada, quienes abogan por el abolicionismo y sus aliados harían mucho mejor si uniesen sus fuerzas en contra de las desigualdades económicas que provocan el trabajo infantil.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi">«Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LOURDES ALBÁN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en">Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/bridget-anderson/entender-el-contexto-interpersonal-y-estructural-del-trabajo-del-hoga">Entender el contexto interpersonal y estructural del trabajo del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BRIDGET ANDERSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ilana-berger/aliados-o-coconspiradores-qu-necesita-el-movimiento-de-trabajadoras-del-h">Aliados o coconspiradores: ¿qué necesita el movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ILANA BERGER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sameera-hafiz/m-s-all-de-la-supervivencia-lecciones-aprendidas-de-las-trabajadoras-del">Más allá de la supervivencia: lecciones aprendidas de las trabajadoras del hogar en la organización de campañas contra la trata de personas y la explotación laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SAMEERA HAFIZ</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ai-jen-poo/salir-de-las-sombras-el-personal-del-hogar-habla-en-los-estados-unidos">Salir de las sombras: el personal del hogar habla en los Estados Unidos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AI-JEN POO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/william-myers/prohibir-el-trabajo-infantil-es-una-mala-idea">Prohibir el trabajo infantil es una mala idea</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WILLIAM MYERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-bourdillon/trabajo-infantil-lo-bueno-y-lo-malo">Trabajo infantil: lo bueno y lo malo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL BOURDILLON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Neil Howard BTS en Español Thu, 13 Dec 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Neil Howard 120935 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Scandals in sex worker rescue shelters: is ‘awful’ distracting from ‘lawful’? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters/scandals-in-indias-raid-and-rescue-shelters-is-awful-distracting-from <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>How should we channel concern over the growing number of anti-trafficking scandals?</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/15790674367_2e1b0bf857_o.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Kolkata. Animesh Hazra/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/animeshhazra/15790674367/in/photolist-q4nkmk-paK2H6-24t2VLa-24LTL5-qp7fNw-jRNoSZ-aGYyBx-dUSZmQ-9nqFsB-7RPZbS-qUoLqu-LysA9-hMohhy-reQtn9-iyZvcZ-4tJkCt-pUHKkM-dPvMqo-4tYFWV-SnNti2-pt3vYr-4nFuZk-5JpixM-aC4EwW-nSr2pw-bkJdaF-6pmv9F-3mA5Fn-Sn3ya6-2yNm4p-9CNKen-bGczac-daWv3W-8m3Bov-29HtsHA-bh3fEX-gLhjtn-gDHQMb-bCaLuv-nPaymw-3ACBS-nWKFML-86pfZq-ezjeBN-pCJcTX-7LrEXQ-4vRcGU-cjXDYh-6mZMh9-4upTzw">Flickr. (cc by-nc)</a></p> <p>In Muzaffarpur, India, <a href="https://www.indiatoday.in/india/story/rapes-beatings-situation-of-terror-tiss-report-documents-bihar-shelter-horror-1312956-2018-08-13">news</a> erupted last May that the head of a government-backed shelter for victims of trafficking relied on the repeated help of his staff and silence of his neighbours while raping more than 30 inmates. A <a href="https://features.propublica.org/liberia/unprotected-more-than-me-katie-meyler-liberia-sexual-exploitation/">similar report</a> appeared in October about the transnational NGO, More than Me, for child survivors of commercial sexual exploitation in Monrovia, Liberia. In late November, yet <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/nov/23/prison-better-women-cry-foul-over-celebrated-indian-charity?fbclid=IwAR1MjpyOWuPHIOXThC39KMtCz8CWPnP6EaUjasn2CdFGratGJ3_WUv8lqGM">another report</a> broke, this time highlighting beatings and coerced labour within the prominent anti-trafficking NGO Prajwala, in Hyderabad, India. A survivor died by <a href="https://www.deccanchronicle.com/nation/crime/150418/hyderabad-rescued-uzbek-woman-ends-life-in-shelter-home.html">suicide</a> in the same shelter in April. Such awful scandals within the anti-trafficking movement are <a href="https://www.newsweek.com/2014/05/30/somaly-mam-holy-saint-and-sinner-sex-trafficking-251642.html">not new</a>, but 2018 has been particularly plagued by repeat shocks.</p> <p>Rights activists worry that such scandals may act as little more than lightning rods. When lightning strikes, the rod channels dangerous energy away from the building and safely into the ground where it dissipates. Similarly, when such news reports are dismissed as unfortunate but unusual ‘bad apples’, the attention they command may serve to channel energies away from the reforming the system as a whole – the awful distracting from the lawful.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Imagine being plucked from of your life, locked in a shelter, and waiting in limbo for 60 to 90 days to hear whether the court deems you in need of rehabilitation</p> <h2>The forced, fully legal confinement of sex workers in India </h2> <p>In India, for example, news reports abound about the number of arrests in Muzaffarpur and the ongoing court proceedings against those allegedly involved. While such attention is warranted, we hear almost nothing about the fact that forced rescue is both legal and pervasive in India under the Immoral Trafficking (Prevention) Act, 1986 (ITPA). The ITPA does not distinguish between victims of sex trafficking and adult women who choose to sell sex. By its authority, both groups are merged into one and made the <a href="https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2126796">lawful targets</a> of anti-trafficking teams. </p> <p>More to the point, the ITPA does not require that targets of anti-trafficking efforts consent to be rescued. Whether or not they wish it, once the police identify them, both victims of trafficking and voluntary sex workers have no choice but to be <a href="https://www.sangram.org/news/raided-e-book-4">locked up in protection homes</a> while courts sort out their cases. This process ought to last less than a month, but typically takes <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/vibhuti-ramachandran/rescued-but-not-released-%E2%80%98protective-custody%E2%80%99-of-sex-workers-in-i">two to three months</a> at minimum. Imagine being plucked from of your life, locked in a shelter, and waiting in limbo for 60 to 90 days to hear whether the court deems you in need of rehabilitation or whether your family can take you home from the shelter. For some inmates, this process can take three years or more. The Prajwala rescuee that took her own life earlier this year had been <a href="http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/hyderabad/2018/apr/16/she-used-to-smile-at-us-but-could-never-communicate-1802089.html">incarcerated</a> for more than four months while waiting to be repatriated to Uzbekistan. </p> <p>Women in India who welcome rescue from trafficking adjust more easily to life within closed protection homes. However, many (and <a href="https://www.sangram.org/news/raided-e-book-4">arguably most</a>) women picked up in anti-trafficking raids completely reject forced rescue. Those who are held against their will in ‘protection homes’ – lawfully under the ITPA –resort to <a href="https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/hyderabad/25-women-rescued-in-trafficking-cases-escape/articleshow/19657168.cms">escaping</a>, <a href="http://sunithakrishnan.blogspot.com/2014/">rioting</a>, and <a href="https://www.epw.in/journal/2016/44-45/humanitarian-trafficking.html">self-harm</a> in an attempt to regain or at least assert their own agency. Such women point out that being forcibly detained in Indian protection homes is itself a kind of trafficking when it serves to garner funding from governmental agencies and charitable donors. They claim that such humanitarian trafficking is worse than being held in jail. In jail, they say, they could communicate more readily with their loves ones, and they would be spared requests to manufacture items sold as ‘freedom products’. </p> <p>It’s perhaps not surprising that the staff members in Indian shelters tasked with overseeing such frightened, angry, and depressed women on a day-to-day basis resort to ignoring them, busying them with manufacturing work, or using <a href="https://www.epw.in/journal/2016/44-45/who-would-live-cage.html">shame</a>, verbal and even physical <a href="https://www.epw.in/journal/2016/44-45/humanitarian-trafficking.html">abuse</a> to try to subdue them while they await court release orders. As we know from the Stanford Prison and Milgram experiments, institutional and situational expectations can lead otherwise good people to inflict harm on those under their control. While abusing inmates at trafficking shelters is nowhere lawful, it is rendered almost inevitable in shelters established to implement a law that wantonly disregards the desires and intentions of survivors. </p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Adult women should decide what’s best for themselves, and the notion that anti-trafficking NGOs must “reverse mindsets” is ethically untenable.</p> <h2>The new Indian trafficking bill: a chance missed?</h2> <p>Such paternalism pervades not just the ITPA, but the attitudes of many of those overseeing anti-trafficking efforts. The notion that anti-traffickers know better than survivors themselves compounds the harms that survivors face in the long aftermath of rescue. The paternalism undergirding these harms is well illustrated by the response on social media of a Prajwala board member to the recent report that the shelter’s inmates were angry with their treatment. She <a href="https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=792738874391480&amp;id=100009661242757">wrote</a>:</p> <p>Of course there are disgruntled elements in these shelters. Where a woman had money, alcohol, drugs at her disposal, she has now been asked to wear a uniform, is taught a skill and is asked to follow a strict routine, while her salary (in comparison to what she used to get as a sex worker, a mere pittance) is put directly into her bank account. It takes time for a reversal of mindset amongst these women.</p> <p>That a board member of an anti-trafficking NGO finds no difficulty in forcing her notion of what a woman ought to be doing with her life onto shelter inmates, and that she is comfortable requiring women to earn far less than they once did without regard to economic realities, speaks volumes of a system designed to alienate and antagonise the very people it ostensibly aids. Adult women should decide for themselves what is best for them, and the notion that anti-trafficking NGOs must “reverse mindsets” is ethically untenable.</p> <p>A new bill in India, the Trafficking of Persons Bill 2018, could take the opportunity to rectify the ITPA’s long-standing problems. Instead, the present version of the new bill not only <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/prabha-kotiswaran/empty-gestures-critique-of-india-s-new-trafficking-bill">fails to address the ITPA’s problems</a>, but it seeks to <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters-vibhuti-ramachandran/recipe-for-injustice-india-s-new-trafficking-bil">expand the system</a> of forced rescue and rehabilitation to a much larger swath of workers. <a href="https://amnesty.org.in/news-update/anti-trafficking-bill-overbroad-and-disproportionate-should-be-referred-to-psc/">Amnesty International</a> and the <a href="https://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=23392&amp;LangID=E">UNHROHC</a> have raised human rights objections to the bill. Yet it has already passed in India’s lower house. If it succeeds in the upper house, it is poised to swell a system replete with lawful, comparatively low grade, but no less pervasive harms to the very populations that anti-trafficking networks seek to protect and empower.</p> <h2>Harming while trying to help: a world-wide problem</h2> <p>India is by no means alone in its systemic yet lawful abuses through anti-trafficking operations. Runa Lazzarino <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/runa-lazzarino/freeloaders-blackmailers-and-lost-souls-rescued-sex-trafficking-survivo">argues</a> that aftercare providers in anti-trafficking programmes as far apart as Nepal, Vietnam, and Brazil employed similar registers of distrust, disdain and disregard toward the survivors they were tasked with helping. Toni Eby <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/using-intersectional-approach-to-raid-and-rescue">notes</a> that those who wished to be rescued in the U.S. were sometimes ignored because they did not match the presumed profiles of victims. Nicolas Lainez <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/nicolas-lainez/modern-vietnamese-slaves-in-uk-are-raid-and-rescue-operations-appropria">shows</a> that many of those targeted by anti-traffickers in the United Kingdom preferred to continue working and experienced rescue as more harmful than continuing to work as they were.</p> <p>Anti-trafficking scandals are symptomatic of much more pervasive problems in our approach to righting the wrongs of human trafficking and forced labour. Such scandals should be taken as evidence that the solution itself needs to be entirely re-imagined. While some scholars have highlighted the problematic outcomes of a&nbsp;<a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/garrett-nagaishi/from-utah-to-%E2%80%98darkest-corners-of-world%E2%80%99-militarisation-of-raid-and-re">militarised approach</a>&nbsp;to anti-trafficking operations, others have pointed out that <a href="https://www.endslaverynow.org/blog/articles/sex-trafficking-and-the-carceral-state">carceral solutions</a> to severe exploitation can only ever provide partial answers. Neil Howard argues that till date the anti-trafficking movement has yet to address any of the <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/neil-howard/slavery-and-trafficking-beyond-hollow-call">real roots</a> of severe exploitation. Instead of the forced detainment of victims, we require a broad-based and vigorous transnational labour and migration rights movement if we hope to make real progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/vibhuti-ramachandran/critical-reflections-on-raid-and-rescue-operations-in-new-delhi">Critical reflections on raid and rescue operations in New Delhi</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters/beyond-raid-and-rescue-time-to-acknowledge-damage-being-done">Beyond ‘raid and rescue’: time to acknowledge the damage being done</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/using-intersectional-approach-to-raid-and-rescue">Using an intersectional approach to raid and rescue</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/garrett-nagaishi/from-utah-to-%E2%80%98darkest-corners-of-world%E2%80%99-militarisation-of-raid-and-re">From Utah to the ‘darkest corners of the world’: the militarisation of raid and rescue</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters-vibhuti-ramachandran/recipe-for-injustice-india-s-new-trafficking-bil">A recipe for injustice: India’s new trafficking bill expands a troubled rescue, rehabilitation, and repatriation framework</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters-neil-howard/interview-forced-rescue-and-humanitarian-trafficking">Interview: forced rescue and humanitarian trafficking</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/kimberly-waters/rescued-from-rights-misogyny-of-anti-trafficking">Rescued from rights: the misogyny of anti-trafficking</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/elena-shih/antitrafficking-rehabilitation-complex-commodity-activism-and-slavefree-goo">The anti-trafficking rehabilitation complex: commodity activism and slave-free goods</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/prabha-kotiswaran/criminal-law-as-sledgehammer-paternalist-politics-of-india-s-2018-tr">The criminal law as sledgehammer: the paternalist politics of India’s 2018 Trafficking Bill</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/prabha-kotiswaran/neoabolitionism-s-last-laugh-india-must-rethink-trafficking">Neoabolitionism’s last laugh: India must rethink trafficking</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Kimberly Walters Wed, 12 Dec 2018 10:45:14 +0000 Kimberly Walters 120955 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Organising for a better future for work https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/becky-wright-simon-sapper/organising-for-better-future-for-work <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Unions must reach outside their comfort zones and develop an inclusive collective voice so that workers can organise effectively in a hostile political environment.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/5561373619_07df89fe82_b.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">March for the Alternative, London, 2011. CGP Grey/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/cgpgrey/5561373619/in/photolist-9truC4-9tLxTZ-9tNXHC-5btJbs-hfC196-YxHbmj-i3EGE9-i3FhAK-5buhgh-4A4m8o-9tryP4-4A5vG1-oYAmF3-21inHSo-4A5w5s-285QUEk-2b9PMC1-91SGMG-21zfhhd-27TjhES-KWTJw1-BD46X-91WeRF-914iyY-9tub3X-9tPwX1-9uNsXG-9tPe6j-9trsjr-S6N2nY-91WdSv-SrRxMb-911dWP-8SpvyE-7Y3yqF-9twr5i-9tuwvQ-8SrmHC-9tPgt3-9tLmuX-7XYWjn-8Sog1z-9tLh3i-9tSSih-9tPUKr-8SBPu6-8SKPhH-9tvEH8-9tP5Ku-bDokPd">Flickr. (cc by)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.unions21.org.uk/">Unions21</a> is delighted to participate in this discussion regarding the future of work. Having had the opportunity to read through earlier contributions, we were especially pleased with the emphasis on governments absconding from key responsibilities, as highlighted by Alison Tate and others. We also further endorse <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board#bader-blau">Shawna Bader-Blau</a>’s emphasis on the need to approach people as both workers and citizens simultaneously. These and other contributions feed into the bottom line for our own contribution in this piece, which starts with the premise that governments <em>should</em> act to establish a framework for social responsibility that embraces concepts of fair work, but they cannot be <em>relied</em> upon to do so. And since governments cannot be relied upon to act independently, our goal should be to organise as both workers and citizens in support of a better future for work. </p> <p>This starting point is shared with a number of earlier contributors, such as Han Dongfang, Lupe Gonzalo, Reema Nanavaty and Elizabeth Tang. We see no incentive strong enough to guarantee that policy-makers do the ‘right’ thing. </p> <p>Recent experiences in the United Kingdom have underscored the challenges which need to be overcome in order to organise effectively in defence of precarious workers and migrants. As other contributions to the roundtable have illustrated, including Emily Kenway, Alejandra Ancheita, and Luis C.deBaca, there have been some promising signs of progress in some cases and locations. It is worth emphasising, however, that these examples have frequently proved to be difficult to reproduce or scale up elsewhere. In the United Kingdom, these challenges can be primarily traced to a hostile political environment, along with the strategic choices of key stakeholders.</p> <h2>The fall (and rise?) of unions</h2> <p>Trade unions have been on the decline in the UK ever since former prime minister Margaret Thatcher confronted them head-on in the 1980s. At the beginning of that decade, trade unions had nearly 13 million members. Their lists have since fallen to 6.23 million, a drop in density from 52% of all UK employees to 23%. Collective bargaining coverage, meanwhile, has fallen from 36% of employees at the turn of the millennium to 26% today.</p> <p>Trade union membership in the public sector continues to surpass –&nbsp;by a wide margin – that found in the private sector. This discrepancy hasn’t changed even though the former has shrunk dramatically over the past decades while the latter has become engorged. To cap it all, union members are increasingly aged. Density amongst the youngest cohort is only around 5%. Yet the labour market is the tightest it has ever been.</p> <p>You would imagine that, with swathes of the UK economy now unorganised, unions would coordinate their approach and systematically pool resources to meet these political and economic challenges. For various reasons, forging common front has not been a priority. Instead, significant resources have been directed towards union mergers, legal challenges (e.g. <a href="http://shura.shu.ac.uk/713/1/fulltext.pdf">McSherry and Lodge v BT</a> or <a href="http://www.gmb.org.uk/gmb-victory-uber-workers-rights-upheld">Farrer v Uber</a>), and creating more sophisticated relationships between unions and employers in specific high-density sectors.</p> <p>In cases where a collective worker voice has been established, the prospects of employers acting responsibly have increased. However, these cases are now rare in the UK’s highly atomised economy. In an environment where over 95% of all UK companies now employ less than 10 people, how can collective voice be encouraged, nurtured, and maintained?</p> <h2>Organising outside traditional sectors</h2> <p>This is where we are noticing a new model of collective action emerge, with a number of unions reaching out in innovative ways. The <a href="https://iwgb.org.uk/">Independent Workers Union of Great Britain</a> and <a href="https://www.uvwunion.org.uk/">United Voices of the World</a> (UVA), for example, have undertaken actions amongst gig economy workers in major urban centres that have been loud, joyfully assertive, and widely reported. Unite has established a <a href="https://unitetheunion.org/why-join/member-offers-and-benefits/member-offers/community-membership-benefits/">community-based section</a>, the GMB is making strides among the <a href="http://www.gmb.org.uk/campaigns/uber/overview">bogusly self-employed</a>; Community has reached out to the <a href="https://community-tu.org/community-indycube-pledge-give-power-self-employed/">genuinely self-employed</a>; Equity has had success in the <a href="https://www.equity.org.uk/getting-involved/campaigns/professionally-made-professionally-paid/">fringe areas of performing arts</a>; and the Pharmacists’ Defence Association Union in <a href="https://www.the-pda.org/pdau-boots-update/">supplanting a “fake union” within Boots plc</a>. And many more.</p> <p>What sets these sorts of actions and efforts apart from more traditional activity is the arguably oldest of organising premises – you need to go to where people are rather than where you want them to be. All of the above examples illustrate this in a different ­– and new – way.</p> <p>For the IWGB and UVW it is a question of style and structure. Their members are working in precarious circumstances designed to disempower workers. The unions rely on streamlined decision-making oriented towards demonstrable actions to physically challenge this notion of disempowerment. This has three particular effects: 1) it gets noticed, and therefore has extended reach; 2) it disconcerts employers, a necessary step on the road to engagement; and 3) it builds self-confidence amongst the workers. IWGB and UVW are operating in conventionally hard-to-recruit areas, yet these are the areas in which there has been noticeable employment growth (though now in slight decline) over the last six years. </p> <p>Unite’s community section seeks to organise those not necessarily in any sort of work. Part of this attempt to apply organising techniques to the community as opposed to workplaces is to extend the reach of trade unionism and (obviously) Unite in particular. The range of services provided includes cv and application letter writing, debt counselling, interview training, welfare, payment utilities and tax advice. This is not dissimilar to services that may be available through other community support groups – but in this case they come through the organisational and political prism of the union.</p> <p>The GMB is active in some of the same areas as the IWGB, such as Uber, and has taken a particular interest in those who are bogusly designated as self-employed. This is a subset of the gig economy sector, and the union has developed an exceptional track record in litigation to secure a reclassification so that these workers are legally recognised as such. (Readers will know that in the UK currently, there are three categories of working people – the self-employed, the employed and workers. Workers have a legal platform of rights and protections but to a lesser degree than employees).</p> <p>IWGB and GMB represent two different organisational models in the same industrial space – the former would highlight agility and speed, whereas the ability to deploy significant resources flexibly is a deciding positive actor for the latter. But there is scope for both to continue to increase their memberships.</p> <p>Community, meanwhile, have sought to engage with the growing numbers of genuinely self-employed by, in 2017, partnering with Indycube – a resource organisation for the self-employed – to create <a href="https://www.indycube.community/?option=com_content&amp;view=article&amp;id=28&amp;Itemid=248">“the first Union for freelance and independent workers in the UK”</a>. </p> <p>Equity, a union for performers, focuses on marginal workers in their sector, while pitching to employers the added value of a stable employment relationship with active involvement and a degree of underwriting by an independent union. The weakness of employers’ organisation in the UK is a major impediment to sector level bargaining, but in this instance, the union has facilitated a more co-ordinated approach by employers to realise benefits for their members.</p> <p>Finally, the Pharmacists Defence Association Union (PADU) used complex UK recognition laws to displace an incumbent but non-independent rival. Such a move was unprecedented, and PADU needed to work hard to secure the necessary turn-out in crucial legally-binding ballots on the issue.</p> <p>The PADU campaign, like all the examples cited here, are demonstrations of effective engagement with target groups of people. In each instance success has been predicated on having the means and the desire to truly understand what the concerns of that target group are. It’s member-centred trade unionism, if you will, reaching out into areas that have been resistant to or overlooked by more traditional trade unions. Taken together, they illustrate a renewed appetite for success in the UK labour movement.</p> <p>As for our own group, Unions21, we have established our <a href="http://www.unions21.org.uk/worksforus/about">Commission on Collective Voice</a> – a cross party, multi-disciplinary group to solicit, collect, evaluate, and advocate ways in which Collective Voice can work in the early 21st century. We are data gathering at present, with a publication date for our report of late spring 2019. You can contact us at <a href="mailto:worksforus@unions21.org.uk">worksforus@unions21.org.uk</a>. We’d love to hear from you.</p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/global-alliance-against-traffic-in-women/organising-beyond-silos-confronting-common-ch">Organising beyond silos: confronting common challenges amongst migrants and workers</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BORISLAV GERASIMOV</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/luca-stevenson/decriminalisation-and-labour-rights-how-sex-workers-are-organising-for-">Decriminalisation and labour rights: how sex workers are organising for legal reforms and socio-economic justice</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LUCA STEVENSON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Simon Sapper Becky Wright Wed, 12 Dec 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Becky Wright and Simon Sapper 120953 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Trata infantil: ¿la «peor forma» de trabajo infantil o el peor abordaje a la migración juvenil? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/roy-huijsmans/trata-infantil-la-peor-forma-de-trabajo-infantil-o-el-peor-abordaje-la-m <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>El término «trata infantil» se suele emplear como sinónimo de la migración laboral infantil. Este marco perjudica a una gran cantidad de migrantes menores de edad que cambian de lugar por diferentes motivos; por ello, es necesaria una nueva visión. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/roy-huijsmans/child-trafficking-%E2%80%98worst-form%E2%80%99-of-child-labour-or-worst-approach-to-youn">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none caption-xlarge'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/8762269701_4a97ce6680_z.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/8762269701_4a97ce6680_z.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="306" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload caption-xlarge imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>ILO/Flickr. Creative Commons.</span></span></span></p> <p>En la mayor parte del discurso público, «trata de personas», cuando se refiere a gente joven, se ha convertido en sinónimo de «las peores formas de trabajo infantil». Desde el punto de vista de la migración, prácticamente no hay lugar para discutir el fenómeno de las personas menores de edad que trabajan lejos de sus hogares. Es necesario cuestionar estas certezas. Simon Baker y yo, sobre la base de nuestra investigación y la de nuestras colegas, sostenemos que es erróneo considerar la participación de menores en la migración como un problema exclusivo de trata de personas. Esto homogeneiza de manera equivocada la amplia diversidad de la migración de personas jóvenes que podría describirse como trata infantil, de acuerdo con la definición del Protocolo de Palermo firmado en el año 2000. Reconocer esta diversidad de experiencias nos permite ver por qué la fórmula estándar de «rescate, repatriación y reintegración» es bastante problemática. También deja claro cómo las tendencias dominantes en el discurso de la trata infantil pueden derivar en intervenciones que impactan de manera negativa en las vidas de las niñas y niños que necesitan o desean migrar para trabajar.</p> <p>Analíticamente, la trata infantil constituye uno de los peores enfoques sobre la migración infantil, por tres razones principales. En primer lugar, desconecta la participación de la juventud en la migración de otras cuestiones más amplias con las que está íntimamente vinculada como son la migración en general y el cambio social. En segundo lugar, sugiere que las personas migrantes menores de 18 años son intrínsecamente vulnerables, sin preguntarse cómo se produce la explotación en la migración. Por ejemplo, dicha explotación puede ocurrir debido a que esas personas menores de 18 años son, en general, excluidas de los canales más seguros de migración y de las formas documentadas del trabajo migrante. En tercer lugar, la perspectiva centrada en las víctimas que produce el discurso dominante de la trata de personas no deja mucho espacio para imaginar y estudiar a la gente joven como participantes y agentes activos de sus propias migraciones.</p> <p>Estas cuestiones analíticas no son solo problemas académicos. Estudiar la trata de personas en relación con la migración y el cambio social demuestra que prohibir que la gente joven migre como estrategia para «luchar contra la trata» no es nada más que una ilusión. Además, reducir las razones por las que la juventud migra a temas como la pobreza absoluta o la falta de empleo total es una simplificación excesiva. A diferencia de lo que sugiere el discurso de la trata de personas, la juventud que migra no es de ninguna manera un objeto pasivo en la migración. Negocian de manera muy activa el proceso migratorio y apuntan a disminuir los posibles riesgos y la explotación. Con frecuencia son las personas jóvenes que migran las que ponen fin a las formas inaceptables del trabajo migrante y no las intervenciones contra la trata.</p> <p>La adopción por parte de la OIT del <a href="http://www.ilo.org/dyn/normlex/en/f?p=NORMLEXPUB:12100:0::NO::P12100_ILO_CODE:C182">Convenio sobre las peores formas del trabajo infantil</a> en 1999 (convenio 182) marcó un cambio importante en la respuesta general al trabajo infantil. En vez de un enfoque general, exigía uno diferenciado, y priorizaba que se actuara en contra de las formas más intolerables del trabajo infantil. Este convenio es extraordinario porque redefinió el problema del trabajo infantil. Mientras que el <a href="http://www.ilo.org/dyn/normlex/en/f?p=NORMLEXPUB:12100:0::NO::P12100_ILO_CODE:C138">Convenio de la OIT sobre la edad mínima</a> de 1973 definió el problema desde el punto de vista de la participación infantil laboral bajo una determinada edad, el Convenio 182 reorientó el enfoque hacia los daños producidos por el trabajo.</p> <p>Sin embargo, la comunidad en contra de la trata todavía tiene que aceptar estas ideas progresistas para abordar la problemática del trabajo infantil. La trata infantil está incluida en el convenio como una de las peores formas del trabajo infantil (artículo 3a). Un niño o niña se define como cualquier persona menor de 18 años, y los esfuerzos actuales en contra de la trata en esta área todavía buscan disuadir o sacar a la juventud de los escenarios de la migración. El problema de la trata de personas en relación con las personas menores de edad se mezcla así con el hecho de trabajar lejos de sus hogares y, al mismo tiempo, no ser técnicamente una persona adulta, en vez de definirse desde la perspectiva de las formas específicas de la explotación que podrían producirse. Creemos que esta visión no concuerda con la idea general del Convenio 182, el cual propone un enfoque diferenciado que prioriza lo intolerable y se centra en el daño.</p> <p>Exigimos que se reflexione sobre la trata de personas en relación con la niñez como un problema migratorio. Esto no quiere decir que neguemos que la juventud que migra sufra de varias formas y grados de explotación. No pretendemos ignorar esta realidad. En cambio, creemos que adoptar un punto de vista centrado en la migración permite una perspectiva más fundamentada y matizada que la lograda hasta ahora por el discurso de la trata de personas. Esto creará el espacio político necesario para pensar de manera diferente sobre las intervenciones respecto a la explotación de menores en la migración; por ejemplo, centrando estas intervenciones en hacer que la migración de menores en busca de trabajo sea más segura en vez de intentar prohibirla.</p> <p><em>Este artículo, titulado &quot;<a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-7660.2012.01786.x/abstract">Trata infantil: ¿la «peor forma&quot; del trabajo infantil o el peor enfoque sobre la migración juvenil?</a>», está basado en otro mucho más extenso escrito junto con Simon Baker que se publicó en 2012, en Development and Change.</em></p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Roy Huijsmans BTS en Español Wed, 12 Dec 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Roy Huijsmans 120938 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Trabajo infantil: lo bueno y lo malo https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-bourdillon/trabajo-infantil-lo-bueno-y-lo-malo <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Muchas niñas y niños mejoran sus vidas actuales y futuras a través del trabajo. En vez de prohibir su empleo, los programas para proteger a la infancia trabajadora deberían llevarse a cabo en función de sus intereses. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/michael-bourdillon/working-children-rights-and-wrongs">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none caption-xlarge'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/8763387202_c1e2465751_z.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/8763387202_c1e2465751_z.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="307" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload caption-xlarge imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>Vietnam. Tran Quoc Dung for the ILO/Flickr. Creative Commons.</span></span></span></p> <p>El trabajo infantil puede significar explotación, muchas horas de trabajo, malas condiciones laborales y pocas oportunidades de progresar. Sin embargo, la mayor parte del trabajo hecho por menores (incluso algún trabajo clasificado como «explotación infantil») no es dañino y puede contribuir a su desarrollo.</p> <p>Las niñas y los niños imitan instintivamente las actividades de quienes les rodean, incluso el trabajo remunerado o no que se realiza en la familia y en la comunidad. De esta manera, adquieren experiencia y confianza en sí mismos, aprenden el comportamiento y los valores culturales, y establecen su posición como parte de sus familias y comunidades, con responsabilidades y derechos.</p> <p>Crecer requiere ampliar las relaciones más allá de las que se tienen en casa. El trabajo a menudo brinda una gama más amplia de posibilidades que la escuela. Con frecuencia, las personas jóvenes citan las atracciones sociales como una razón para buscar trabajos temporales o de media jornada. En el trabajo, aprenden a comprometerse en las relaciones con quienes les contratan y con la clientela, y a compartir la responsabilidad. Incluso el trabajo en la calle puede ser educativo. La experiencia laboral en la niñez y adolescencia puede contribuir a tener un ingreso y un empleo posterior, sobre todo cuando se trata de un oficio o una profesión. Aprender en el trabajo brinda beneficios que las instituciones de formación profesional, con frecuencia, no ofrecen y que pueden mitigar el desempleo juvenil. Por todo esto, el empleo de menores no necesariamente perpetúa la pobreza u obstaculiza la educación.</p> <p>En algunas ocasiones, las personas jóvenes han comentado que el trabajo, no así la escuela, les da un sentido de responsabilidad. En África, los valores clave de cooperación y responsabilidad social reciben poca atención en las escuelas, donde el único criterio de éxito suele ser el logro académico. Para quienes tienen poca aptitud para la escuela, el sentido de logro debe venir de otras actividades fuera de la clase; para algunas personas viene del deporte, para muchas, del trabajo. Así, el empleo puede ofrecer un objetivo y una esperanza a las niñas y niños desfavorecidos, y también puede aliviar tensiones en la casa o escuela.</p> <p>En comunidades pobres, el trabajo puede pagar por la alimentación necesaria para el desarrollo físico y cognitivo de niñas y niños. Varios estudios han demostrado que las niñas y niños trabajadores están mejor alimentados y más saludables que quienes no trabajan. Incuso si no se necesita como sustento, el trabajo puede contribuir a una mejor calidad de vida, gastos escolares y viajes fuera de sus comunidades (a estos últimos se los califica erróneamente como trata de personas)</p> <p>El trabajo de las niñas y niños ayuda a lidiar con las crisis económicas, como cuando la persona que provee para la familia enferma o cuando hay una mala cosecha. El orgullo de niñas y niños por su trabajo puede mitigar traumas resultantes de estas crisis y contribuir a la resiliencia. Trabajar en agricultura y en otras empresas familiares puede contribuir a superar la pobreza y ser una señal de éxito económico.</p> <p>Pocos de estos beneficios son específicos de la edad. Por lo tanto, la prohibición de trabajo a cualquier edad puede privar a las niñas y niños de oportunidades para mejorar sus vidas en el presente y de experiencias de aprendizaje para el futuro. Cuanto mayor es el rango de trabajos prohibidos, más son las oportunidades que se pierden.</p> <p>&nbsp;Las niñas y niños que trabajan, a menudo prefieren empleos que les ofrezcan esperanza para el futuro, incluso cuando conlleven riesgos. Estas niñas y niños comparan los beneficios con respecto a los costos. Quienes intervienen en representación de los menores necesitan hacer lo mismo. Los costos y beneficios varían con el contexto, en especial la accesibilidad y la calidad de la educación, las aptitudes de determinadas niñas o niños, las situaciones de ciertas familias y los mercados laborales locales. Las evaluaciones específicas de cada contexto son difíciles y se realizan a nivel local más que a través de patrones universales. A causa de esto, las políticas para proteger a las niñas y niños de la explotación y el trabajo nocivo buscan criterios más simples, como una edad mínima de inserción en el mundo laboral. Muchas intervenciones aseguran tratar sobre la protección a niñas y niños del trabajo nocivo; pero, en la práctica, se centran en la edad para el empleo. Estos estándares de edad mínima se han convertido en una cuestión de fe generalizada, a pesar de la falta de evidencia de que la edad y el empleo se correlacionan con el trabajo nocivo.</p> <p>Existen muchas aristas en esta discrepancia entre la intención de proteger a las niñas y niños del trabajo nocivo y el criterio práctico de intervención en la edad de empleo. En comunidades pobres, la intervención basada en patrones de edad mínima se enfoca a menudo en el empleo en el sector formal (particularmente en industrias de exportación), en el que usualmente se encuentran los mejores trabajos; esta intervención ignora ampliamente el trabajo informal o no remunerado, que pueden conllevar más explotación. Además, dichas intervenciones no se preocupan por las condiciones laborales de las niñas y niños mayores. Las niñas y niños despedidos del trabajo a causa de su edad raramente terminan en una situación mejor como resultado —aunque aquellos cuya situación se mejora en otros aspectos, a menudo terminan haciendo menos trabajo—. Bajo el argumento de que no deberían estar trabajando, a veces se niega el apoyo a niñas y niños más pequeños y vulnerables que necesitan o quieren trabajar, y sus contribuciones se rebajan a la categoría de «ayuda» que no se remunera por miedo al estigma del trabajo infantil. En comunidades rurales, las niñas y niños participan en todo tipo de trabajos para sus familias, pero se les prohíbe emprender tareas benignas en plantaciones familiares orientadas a la exportación, perdiendo así el aprendizaje que dichas tareas podrían brindarles.</p> <p>A diferencia de los programas para la abolición del «trabajo infantil», los programas de protección podrían tener en cuenta sus necesidades y los beneficios de su trabajo. Muchas personas empleadoras se muestran preocupadas por sus empleadas y empleados jóvenes y están dispuestas a mejorar las condiciones de trabajo para ofrecer un empleo seguro, digno y que permita la escolarización. Ha habido muchos programas escolares exitosos y flexibles que se adaptan a las niñas y niños que trabajan. Un programa en Egipto apoyaba en la búsqueda de un trabajo más seguro y digno con el objetivo de apartar a las niñas y niños del trabajo nocivo y tuvo cierto éxito para aquellos mayores de 15 años (algunas empresas que temían por la respuesta de sus mercados europeos rehusaron contratar a niñas y niños más pequeños, por lo que algunos de ellos permanecieron en trabajos nocivos).</p> <p>En América Latina, Asia y África, los trabajadores y las trabajadoras jóvenes han recibido apoyo en la formación de sus propias organizaciones para defender sus intereses. Además de la protección de pares, estas organizaciones han brindado beneficios en materia de desarrollo. Sus actividades son sensibles a las necesidades de trabajadoras y trabajadores jóvenes. El <a href="http://maejt.org/page%20anglais/indexanglais.htm">Movimiento africano de niñez y juventud trabajadora</a>, por ejemplo, trata de ayudar a trabajadoras y trabajadores jóvenes migrantes a alcanzar sus objetivos en vez de insistirles en que vuelvan a sus casas rurales. El movimiento de niñas y niños trabajadores en Bolivia convenció al gobierno de que <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/neil-howard/on-bolivia%E2%80%99s-new-child-labour-law">corrigiera</a> el código de menores para cumplir con las necesidades de las niñas y niños pobres, en lugar de impedirles que ganasen dinero.</p> <p>Esto apunta a una forma constructiva de proteger a niñas y niños del trabajo nocivo: en lugar de <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/william-myers/prohibiting-children-to-work-is-bad-idea">sostener la mala idea de impedir que trabajen</a>, se les apoya para garantizar que se beneficien del trabajo que hacen.</p> <p><em>Para un debate más completo, véase <a href="http://rutgerspress.rutgers.edu/product/Rights-and-Wrongs-of-Childrens-Work,109.aspx">Lo bueno y lo malo del trabajo infantil (Rights and Wrongs of Children’s Work)</a>.</em></p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Michael Bourdillon BTS en Español Wed, 12 Dec 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Michael Bourdillon 120934 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Trabajo infantil, escolaridad y movilidad https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jo-boyden-gina-crivello/trabajo-infantil-escolaridad-y-movilidad <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Tradicionalmente se considera que el trabajo infantil y la educación son excluyentes entre sí; sin embargo, muchas niñas y niños trabajan y emigran para asistir a clases. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/jo-boyden-gina-crivello/child-work-schooling-and-mobility">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none caption-xlarge'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/1128199289_ac75ce1d33_z.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/1128199289_ac75ce1d33_z.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="307" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload caption-xlarge imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>School children walk to school in Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa. Trevor Samson for the World Bank/Flickr. Creative Commons.</span></span></span></p> <p>A finales del siglo veinte, Sharon Stephens caracterizó al mundo moderno en sus escritos sobre la niñez y «las políticas de la cultura» en términos de «flujos transnacionales de productos y personas; un gran número de refugiadas y refugiados, emigrantes, apátridas; proyectos de estado para redefinir los límites amenazados de las culturas nacionales [...]».&nbsp; Las niñas y niños son normalmente considerados sujetos pasivos e involuntarios de estas fuerzas globales de transformación, en vez de ser considerados participantes activos que experimentan, cuestionan y reformulan el mundo a su alrededor. Los niños y las niñas que emigran solas atraen una atención particular a nivel internacional como víctimas cuyos derechos han sido violados, y así, se desencadena un despliegue de políticas de protección y respuestas programáticas. Sin embargo, las desigualdades políticas, sociales y económicas extremas que normalmente respaldan esta tendencia permanecen en gran medida ignoradas.</p> <p>Las ideas predominantes sobre la migración infantil independiente reflejan los esfuerzos globales recientes para restablecer los límites de lo que significa la niñez, los cuales gobiernan y definen cada vez más el uso del tiempo y el espacio de las niñas y niños. Así mismo, aumenta la atención que se presta a la vulnerabilidad de las niñas y niños, sus necesidades de aprendizaje y su dependencia de personas adultas, y los vínculos emocionales formados en el contexto de estructuras familiares nucleares estables se consideran centrales a su desarrollo y bienestar. En este paradigma en expansión de la niñez, las personas jóvenes son representadas como aprendices en vez de asalariadas. Las iniciativas globales tales como <a href="http://www.campaignforeducation.org/en/about-us/about-education-for-all">la campaña Education for All</a> y la ampliación de la escolaridad formal asociada han cumplido su parte, ya que niñas y niños en todo el mundo deben asistir a clases a tiempo completo hasta ser adolescentes. A su vez, la migración infantil para trabajar es considerada una amenaza a la escolaridad y es un signo de desintegración de la familia o maltrato, y comúnmente se confunde con la trata. Como resultado, se resta importancia a las experiencias diarias de las niñas y niños migrantes, centrándose en menores en la calle o víctimas de trata, menores en el trabajo sexual, o niñas y niños refugiados, sin considerar la falta de opciones viables para la juventud.</p> <p>Al fin y al cabo, las ideas sobre qué es una niñez adecuada están inundadas de contradicciones. Las niñas y los niños que crecen en sociedades cambiantes se encuentran equilibrando múltiples expectativas —muchas veces incoherentes—respecto a cómo y dónde deberían invertir su tiempo. Por eso, a pesar de que la migración infantil laboral es ampliamente rechazada a nivel mundial, abandonar el hogar para tener un ingreso es lo que posibilita a muchas niñas y niños escolarizarse y ahorrar para útiles escolares, uniformes y demás. A pesar de la profunda mirada a la migración laboral, las niñas y niños que se mudan para poder acceder a mejores escuelas o de mayor estatus han escapado al escrutinio social, e incluso son aclamados en algunos distritos. El incremento reciente de la migración infantil escolar responde a un drástico aumento de las aspiraciones educativas en todo el mundo. Entre las élites sociales, facilita el acceso a una educación selecta; en los estratos más pobres, está impulsada por la escasez de servicios locales. Cada vez más, la escolaridad se ve como un medio para transformarse en sujetos adinerados y de importancia social; una vía de escape de la pobreza rural y de las ocupaciones rutinarias como la agricultura; una forma de liberar a la gente joven de las adversidades padecidas por la generación parental. A pesar que de no existe garantía de una restitución económica, muchas familias realizan grandes sacrificios financieros para cubrir los costos de oportunidad —directos e indirectos— de la migración escolar, por ejemplo, vendiendo sus tierras o animales.</p> <p>De este modo, la migración infantil independiente, en vez de ser perjudicial, puede ayudar a madurar a las niñas y niños, quienes emigran bajo diferentes circunstancias sociales y materiales y con diversos resultados tanto para ellos como para sus familias. Al valorar los costos y beneficios de la niñez migrante, debemos considerar sus propias motivaciones y razonamientos. La juventud explica frecuentemente cuánto aprecia las oportunidades que tuvieron al migrar. Les permitió observar un mundo más extenso, hacer nuevas amistades y acceder a recursos como las bibliotecas e internet. Además, muchos de los niños y niñas migrantes sin padres no están solas, sino acompañadas por parientes de confianza o compañeras y compañeros. Entre la población viviendo en pobreza, las niñas y niños normalmente crecen como colaboradores en la economía hogareña. Las decisiones respecto a sus trabajos, escolaridad y migración responden a consideraciones tanto colectivas como individuales. El traslado de niñas y niños desde hogares con pocos recursos hacia otros en mejores circunstancias puede mitigar las adversidades familiares, a cambio de ayudar en el hogar anfitrión. Permite a niñas y niños acceder a aprendizajes y oportunidades afectivas no disponibles en el hogar natal. De esta manera, la migración infantil laboral puede fortalecer los vínculos dentro de los grupos familiares extendidos en lugar de crear déficits sociales por la ausencia física.</p> <p>Esto no significa que no existan riesgos en la migración infantil independiente para trabajar o estudiar. Ser joven y estar separada de la red familiar puede aumentar la vulnerabilidad en muchos contextos. Ann Whitehead e Iman Hashim <a href="http://www.childmigration.net/dfid_whitehead_hashim_05">sostienen</a> que: «muchos de los efectos positivos y negativos no surgen de la migración en sí, sino que dependen de las razones que motivaron el movimiento, las circunstancias que se encuentran en los lugares a los que se trasladan y, por supuesto, la distancia y duración de la estadía». Esto apunta a la importancia de evaluar las situaciones que las niñas y niños abandonan y sus posiciones dentro de las estructuras de desigualdad, así como las circunstancias a las que acceden a través de la migración.</p> <p><em>Este artículo ha sido reimpreso de <a href="http://compasanthology.co.uk/">Migration: The COMPAS Anthology</a>, Bridget Anderson y Michael Keith (editores), Centro de Migración, Política y Sociedad, Universidad de Oxford (2014).</em></p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Gina Crivello Jo Boyden BTS en Español Tue, 11 Dec 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Jo Boyden and Gina Crivello 120937 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Prohibir el trabajo infantil es una mala idea https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/william-myers/prohibir-el-trabajo-infantil-es-una-mala-idea <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>El trabajo infantil no tiene por qué implicar explotación, y su prohibición se basa más en las concepciones que se tiene sobre la infancia en Occidente que en investigaciones. Las leyes deberían evitar la explotación infantil y no el trabajo de las niñas y niños. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/william-myers/prohibiting-children-to-work-is-bad-idea">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none caption-xlarge'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/8763370040_2a5fc7c1e7_z.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/8763370040_2a5fc7c1e7_z.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="329" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload caption-xlarge imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>A child works at a brick kiln. Phan Hien for the ILO/Flickr. Creative Commons.</span></span></span></p> <p>El primer convenio internacional moderno que trata específicamente el asunto de la protección infantil parece ser el Convenio sobre la edad mínima (industria) de la Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT), 1919 (núm. 5). Con este convenio se estableció a nivel internacional un estándar sobre el trabajo infantil que había sido principalmente europeo: una edad mínima legal por debajo de la cual se prohibía emplear a niñas y niños en la industria. Existía una creencia muy extendida entre numerosas personas europeas con formación que consistía en pensar que la infancia debía ser privilegiada en cualquier lugar; y que las niñas y niños debían dedicarse a jugar y a ir a la escuela, libres de las preocupaciones y responsabilidades de las personas adultas. Se pensaba que el trabajo serio dañaba a las niñas y niños al robarles su inocencia, una idea que pervive en la actualidad.</p> <p>Con el tiempo, la idea de que se debía proteger del trabajo a las niñas y niños se fue aplicando cada vez más a sociedades no occidentales que aún no se habían industrializado. En muchas de esas sociedades se pensaba que se debía preparar a las niñas y niños para la edad adulta, en lugar de protegerles de ella, y se consideraba que la familia y los vínculos sociales de las niñas y niños incluían tanto obligaciones como privilegios. Ciñéndose al etnocentrismo de los países del Norte, la OIT fue extendiendo gradualmente el alcance de las prohibiciones del trabajo infantil hasta que, en 1973, se aprobó el Convenio sobre la edad mínima (núm. 138). Con él se buscaba «la abolición efectiva del trabajo infantil», y por este convenio se obligaba a los países miembros de la OIT a legislar límites de edad «por debajo de los cuales ninguna persona debía ser admitida en un empleo o trabajo en ninguna ocupación».</p> <p>Mientras que el objetivo original de 1919 era mantener a las niñas y niños fuera de lugares de trabajo poco deseables para los mismos, como minas y fábricas, el propósito ampliado de 1973 consistía en alejarles del trabajo de una forma más amplia. En aquella época, economistas y responsables políticos creían (y aún continúan creyéndolo) que las familias que ponen a trabajar sus hijas e hijos lo hacen por motivos económicos. Con esta concepción básica, basada más en la teoría microeconómica que en datos reales, se da por hecho que las familias cuya riqueza se encuentra por debajo de un nivel determinado valoran más un ingreso adicional que la educación de sus hijas e hijos. Según esta lógica, para salvaguardar el acceso de las niñas y niños a la escuela, es necesario prohibir el trabajo infantil.</p> <p>Esta forma de pensar, junto con la idea de que la imposición de una edad mínima legal para trabajar mantendría a las niñas y niños en la escuela, representa 140 años de sabiduría convencional ahora fosilizada en una doctrina. Las conjeturas sobre el conflicto trabajo-educación y sobre la necesidad de crear políticas de edad mínima legal para mantener a las niñas y niños en la escuela no se han probado nunca con las investigaciones adecuadas. Como tampoco se ha analizado el efecto que tiene la política de la edad mínima en las niñas y niños. Todo el proyecto se basaba en una lógica que no era más que la manera de pensar de un grupo de personas convencidas de algo que realmente no estaba demostrado.</p> <p>No fue hasta la década de 1980 que las personas implicadas en ciencia social y en la defensa de la infancia, entre otras, comenzaron a demostrar las realidades del trabajo infantil. Sus conclusiones, basadas en gran parte en entrevistas con niñas y niños, no concordaban ni con las declaraciones oficiales sobre el trabajo infantil, ni con las justificaciones para la creación de normativas sobre la edad mínima. Hemos aprendido que las decisiones respecto al lugar del trabajo en las vidas de las niñas y niños no responden solo a factores económicos, sino a muchas otras cosas. La iniciativa, o al menos la decisión final, suele estar en las propias manos de estas niñas y niños. Además, tanto las familias como las niñas y niños valoran muchísimo la educación y, por lo general, se organizan para que la misma sea compatible con las responsabilidades laborales de sus hijas e hijos.</p> <p>A mediados de los años 90 ya existía una clara discrepancia entre las políticas internacionales de trabajo infantil perseguidas por la OIT y sus organizaciones aliadas y el conocimiento empírico sobre cómo el trabajo infantil, y las intervenciones sobre éste, afectan al bienestar y al desarrollo de niñas y niños. En base a las pruebas, no hay razón para considerar que el trabajo sea inapropiado incluso para niñas y niños muy pequeños, siempre que se adapte a su edad, a sus capacidades y a sus necesidades de desarrollo. En la mayor parte del mundo, se espera que las niñas y niños ayuden en tareas de sustento y mantenimiento de la familia, y éstas se consideran una parte normal de su crecimiento. Su trabajo se suele enfocar como una actividad educativa y de desarrollo que les prepara para la vida adulta. En muchas culturas, niñas y niños criados sin responsabilidades laborales se considerarían desfavorecidos y sus padres y madres, descuidados. No está demostrado que los sistemas de crianza que alejan a las niñas y niños del trabajo sean mejores en modo alguno que aquellos en que estos asumen responsabilidades laborales.</p> <p>Además, el trabajo y la educación no tienen por qué ser incompatibles; la mayoría de las niñas y niños en edad escolar que trabajan también van a la escuela. Así pues, no se pueden justificar las políticas universales que imponen una edad mínima como un medio para defender el acceso de las niñas y niños a la educación. Si desglosamos correctamente los datos para poder tener en cuenta el nivel económico y otras variables sociales y económicas importantes, llegamos a la conclusión de que apenas existe evidencia de que el trabajo reduzca la asistencia a la escuela. De hecho, en muchos casos el trabajo es un buen apoyo para la educación ya que, por ejemplo, permite obtener dinero para pagar tasas, además de ser educativo en sí mismo. Las ventajas de la educación están muy reconocidas y valoradas, y la demanda de buenas escuelas es mucho mayor que la oferta. Cada vez es menos habitual el abandono escolar para poder trabajar a jornada completa, excepto en casos de pobreza extrema. Los datos indican que el abandono escolar suele estar más relacionado con el mal funcionamiento de la escuela que con la competencia entre educación y trabajo. Por motivos similares, raramente la prohibición del trabajo consigue fomentar la asistencia a la escuela. Sin embargo, si se mejoran las escuelas y se hacen más accesibles y atractivas, aumentará la asistencia y el rendimiento estudiantil.</p> <p>Hay datos que indican que las políticas más efectivas para proteger a niñas y niños que trabajan son las que tienen el objetivo de mantenerles alejados de un trabajo muy peligroso. El Convenio sobre las peores formas de trabajo infantil (núm. 182) de la OIT adopta este enfoque. En este convenio, que se adoptó en 1999, se especifica qué tipos de trabajo y qué condiciones laborales son demasiado peligrosas, degradantes o explotadoras para la infancia. Numerosas personas dedicadas a la investigación o a la defensa de la infancia proponen ahora que la OIT retire el Convenio sobre la edad mínima (núm. 138) y lo reemplace por este nuevo convenio como normativa internacional. Aunque prohibir trabajar a las niñas y niños estrictamente en base a su edad es una mala idea, sí es necesario garantizar que el trabajo que realicen sea seguro y apropiado para su edad. Las políticas y proyectos para hacerlo deben basarse en evidencia empírica más que en las convicciones del grupo.</p> <p><em>Este ensayo resume los hallazgos y argumentos políticos presentados de forma más detallada en Michael Bourdillon, William Myers y Ben White (2009) ‘<a href="http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/01443330910947480">Re-assessing minimum-age standards for children’s work</a>’, en International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy; y Michael Bourdillon, Deborah Levison, William Myers y Ben White (2010) <a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0813548896/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1634&amp;creative=6738&amp;creativeASIN=0813548896&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=opendemocra0e-21">Rights and Wrongs of Children’s Work</a> de Rutgers University Press. Estos asuntos son complejos y requieren explicaciones más extensas que las que son posibles en el formato actual. Les remitimos a las publicaciones señaladas para que puedan acceder a una información y a un debate más completos.</em></p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi">«Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LOURDES ALBÁN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en">Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/bridget-anderson/entender-el-contexto-interpersonal-y-estructural-del-trabajo-del-hoga">Entender el contexto interpersonal y estructural del trabajo del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BRIDGET ANDERSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ilana-berger/aliados-o-coconspiradores-qu-necesita-el-movimiento-de-trabajadoras-del-h">Aliados o coconspiradores: ¿qué necesita el movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ILANA BERGER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sameera-hafiz/m-s-all-de-la-supervivencia-lecciones-aprendidas-de-las-trabajadoras-del">Más allá de la supervivencia: lecciones aprendidas de las trabajadoras del hogar en la organización de campañas contra la trata de personas y la explotación laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SAMEERA HAFIZ</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ai-jen-poo/salir-de-las-sombras-el-personal-del-hogar-habla-en-los-estados-unidos">Salir de las sombras: el personal del hogar habla en los Estados Unidos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AI-JEN POO</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta William Myers BTS en Español Tue, 11 Dec 2018 08:00:00 +0000 William Myers 120933 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Corporate social responsibility helps hide workers’ rights abuse until brands can quietly exit https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/judy-gearhart/voluntary-confidential-corporate-social-responsibility-helps-hide-worker <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Corporations rarely volunteer to do the right thing, yet responses to labour exploitation continue to rely upon corporate goodwill to protect worker rights. A different future requires a different approach.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/22690218454_468a7a8f30_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Sugar cane production in the Philippines. Brian Evans/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/beegee49/22690218454/in/photolist-Az4ir1-7UR3UM-6ZnudV-6Zntz2-242WgzL-dk6AEN-dk7qFP-644D1w-dk7cDD-dk6Y4c-25qdNar-25Gfwz7-dk74as-WAyU33-JE5UB9-dk5Cmm-dk6Fhq-dk6yAd-bjp5WK-242WhyQ-dk6NR6-dk72HU-a65wkq-26MCKnr-dk6LUE-6ZrFvN-g5CBQ-6ZrtGU-dk7m9x-6ZrDDW-dk6EFe-6Zrxeo-dk6ozo-bjpLRB-dk7gfb-dk79ok-dk5zSE-dk5mMW-bjqENi-dk6Cr7-dk6jfd-JE5VBA-bjqBmP-9TXJ7C-bjqudg-bjqxpR-SgVt1G-dk6GLK-dk5GDX-bjpuaK">Flickr. (cc by-sa)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>Corporations have been selling ‘ethical’ products and services to consumers for over three decades. Many of these efforts have been organised under the banner of corporate social responsibility (CSR), with proponents advocating this as a means to secure workers’ rights. Despite their well-documented limitations and brands acknowledging the need for improvements, most CSR initiatives continue to resist the structural changes needed. They instead prefer to tinker around the edges of a failed model. </p> <p>Most CSR programmes are designed to fail. This starts with their top-down approach. As a general rule they rely on credentialed outsiders, who have little to no ties to workers and their communities. Global brands and retailers tend to bargain-hunt with the auditing industry as much as they do with their suppliers. Auditors seeking to win contracts are largely assessed in terms of their capacity to work <em>quickly</em>. They usually have a set number of days on site and whatever they come back with becomes their findings. This approach has cost lives. Factories like Ali Enterprises, Tazreen Fashions, and Rana Plaza had all been monitored or certified by an international code of conduct initiative before they suffered accidents that left over 1500 workers dead within a year.&nbsp; </p> <p>CSR initiatives are based on the premise that global corporations are good actors, and that all will be well if their ethos is implemented throughout their supply chain. Yet if brands really are good actors, we would expect greater supply chain transparency – on both supplier locations and compliance – and public commitments to increase orders from good suppliers over time. Yet most audits are confidential and voluntary. They come with no meaningful role for workers and their organisations, and virtually no repercussions for the brands when workers’ rights are abused or their safety is put at risk. This enables brands to silence findings and walk away if the code of conduct auditors find problems too difficult to fix.</p> <p>Socially responsible investors can help change this approach by asking the companies they invest in for more meaningful information about their supply chain due diligence process, especially its effectiveness at identifying and remediating labour rights abuses. These are key components of the “know and show” benchmarks in the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, now influencing the proliferation of national laws requiring companies to conduct due diligence in their supply chains.</p> <p>Socially responsible investors can support these laws by asking companies to demonstrate their impact on workers’ ability to exercise their rights. The best way for companies to demonstrate such impact is by showing their support for initiatives that put workers front and centre. Worker-driven approaches, such as the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh or the Coalition of Immokalee Workers’ Fair Food Program, have a demonstrated track record of delivering results for both workers and brands.</p> <p>Albert Einstein is said to have defined insanity as doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. This famous definition accurately captures the current state of play as far as most CSR programmes are concerned. The same models get tried and tried again, yielding disappointing results, yet advocates of CSR continue to declare that the next time will be different. The only way that things will be different ‘next time’ is if there is a sustained investment in actually doing things differently. Doing more of the same would be insane. </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/global-alliance-against-traffic-in-women/organising-beyond-silos-confronting-common-ch">Organising beyond silos: confronting common challenges amongst migrants and workers</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BORISLAV GERASIMOV</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/luca-stevenson/decriminalisation-and-labour-rights-how-sex-workers-are-organising-for-">Decriminalisation and labour rights: how sex workers are organising for legal reforms and socio-economic justice</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LUCA STEVENSON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Judy Gearhart Tue, 11 Dec 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Judy Gearhart 120932 at https://www.opendemocracy.net After nearly 20 years of the Palermo Protocols, how do you assess their impact? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/luis-cdebaca/after-nearly-20-years-of-palermo-protocols-how-do-you-assess-their-impact <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span style="color: #434343; font-weight: 700;">On 8 October 2018 we published the&nbsp;</span><a style="font-weight: 700;" href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a><span style="color: #434343; font-weight: 700;">, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This is a followup question to those initial responses.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I think that they're working, in part because they have been an extremely disruptive force. Without this brash, young, and active challenge from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and the protocols themselves, I suspect the IOM, the ILO and other international entities would've continued to chug along with the forced forms of exploitation subsumed into other parts of their mission.&nbsp;</p><p>Previous mechanisms just didn’t work. Whether we’re talking about the 1956 Anti-Slavery Convention, the 1957 Forced Labour Convention, or even the 1999 Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, none of these were focused on victims in the communities in the way that the three-P paradigm – prevention, prosecution, protection – of the Palermo Protocols is.</p><p>Likewise, look at how older British or US paradigms dealt with the sex industry. These laws basically exempted sex workers from ever being classified as being enslaved, even if they had suffered coercion. Instead, they subjected them to a legal regime based on international commerce and movement that considered sex workers unwanted commodities, as opposed to people whose rights may have been violated. That might be the most important part of the Palermo Protocol: it says that it doesn't matter if a person in prostitution chose to do that work, were forced into it, or had crossed a border or migrated. Rather, it focuses on whether they were held in compelled service at any time, regardless of initial consent or foreknowledge, and no matter whether they are in their hometown or thousands of miles away. Conceptually, these changes ended up expanding protection to a lot of people who had been exempted from earlier human rights concepts.&nbsp;</p><p>Even though prosecution numbers have not skyrocketed under Palermo, the discourse and the level of activity has changed substantially as a result. Without Palermo you wouldn't be seeing joint projects between the big institutions in Geneva. You wouldn't be seeing countries going out and setting up task forces. You wouldn't be seeing pro-worker legislation being considered in pro-business places like Australia.</p><p>The fact that Palermo Protocols align pretty closely with the U.S. reporting mechanism has certainly helped to increase uptake. This is an annual audit of what countries are doing to combat trafficking, and when they align themselves against the 11 minimum standards under the US Trafficking Victims Protection Act they also carry out their obligations under Palermo. That feels very different than, ‘Oh, well, if we ever see such and such in any of our brothels, then we will do something.’&nbsp; Each year, the Americans are going to not just assess, but publish the results, which forces a more proactive approach.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>Eighteen years in and we are approaching global adoption of Palermo. But we’re not yet approaching global compliance.&nbsp; The next stage of implementation of that protocol has to now focus on actual results. Countries should no longer be getting credit for ratification or for putting new laws in place – now they have to go out and use them. That means meaningful prosecutions with both criminal punishment of the bosses and restitution for the victims. It means prevention efforts that incentivise a real role for workers in setting and enforcing standards and carry consequences for those who do not address abuse in their supply chains. And it means real victim protection, including social services, family unification, protection from deportation, and true reintegration into communities and workplaces.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up#followup_cdebaca_2">Back to my place in the round table</a></strong></p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/global-alliance-against-traffic-in-women/organising-beyond-silos-confronting-common-ch">Organising beyond silos: confronting common challenges amongst migrants and workers</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GLOBAL ALLIANCE AGAINST TRAFFIC IN WOMEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/luca-stevenson/decriminalisation-and-labour-rights-how-sex-workers-are-organising-for-">Decriminalisation and labour rights: how sex workers are organising for legal reforms and socio-economic justice</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LUCA STEVENSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/nithya-natarajan-katherine-brickell-laurie-parsons/is-race-to-bottom-over-reflecting-o">Is the race to the bottom over? Reflecting on ‘surplus’ populations in Cambodia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NITHYA NATARAJAN, KATHERINE BRICKELL, and LAURIE PARSONS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/caroline-robinson/tied-visas-and-quick-fixes-uk-s-post-brexit-labour-market">Tied visas and quick fixes: the UK’s post-Brexit labour market</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CAROLINE ROBINSON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Luis C.deBaca Wed, 28 Nov 2018 22:55:12 +0000 Luis C.deBaca 120744 at https://www.opendemocracy.net What are the building blocks of an effective transnational alliance? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/shawna-bader-blau/what-are-building-blocks-of-effective-transnational-alliance <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span style="font-weight: 700;">On 8 October 2018 we published the&nbsp;</span><a style="font-weight: 700;" href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a><span style="font-weight: 700;">, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This is a followup question to those initial responses.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Solidarity Center doesn’t have a unique template, and there are many good models across different social movements of successful and lasting transnational solidarity. We have, however, learned a thing or two over two decades as an organisation.</p> <p>First, transnational solidarity means to be grounded in the idea that we are all equal. Fundamental is that we all have equal rights to dignity, to cultural freedom and sovereignty, and to decent lives as we define them. Equally fundamental is recognising that the forces preventing people from achieving equality and justice are global and affect all of us. The world has not treated us all as equals. The world has treated people very differently based on historic discrimination. People in the Global South have been occupied and exploited by the Global North, and within the Global North we have massive gender discrimination and racial disenfranchisement, among other things. Both points need to be recognised at the same time to have transnational solidarity. You build trust by grappling with all that at once. </p> <p>Second, relationships are not built on one-off visits. They&#39;re built on trust and commitment to each other. You must put in the effort to communicate regularly, to listen. Really listening to counterparts in other countries, who exist within a different social movement context, is not a well-enough developed skill. But you can&#39;t be a good ally if you don&#39;t develop empathy and love, and that comes, in part, through really listening.</p> <p>Third, it&#39;s critical to develop joint analyses of power and visions for change. That comes through spending time together and putting all your cards on the table. This is who we are, this is what we&#39;re about, this is who we want to be in the world, this is what we need, this is what we can contribute. You then listen to the other folks, develop a joint analysis, and then situate your relationship and joint work within that. That&#39;s really critical and often missing. When you don&#39;t take the time to do that, you might build a friendship but your work will be less powerful if it is based in assumptions rather than in a joint analysis and theory of change.</p> <p>Finally, developing of a true understanding that we are all in it together. We need to think about mutual interests and reciprocal actions, so that we practise solidarity by treating each other&#39;s campaigns and priorities with a high level of seriousness. In short, we need to really show up for each other.</p> <p><strong><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work#followup_sc_3">Back to my place in the round table</a></strong></p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/global-alliance-against-traffic-in-women/organising-beyond-silos-confronting-common-ch">Organising beyond silos: confronting common challenges amongst migrants and workers</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GLOBAL ALLIANCE AGAINST TRAFFIC IN WOMEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/luca-stevenson/decriminalisation-and-labour-rights-how-sex-workers-are-organising-for-">Decriminalisation and labour rights: how sex workers are organising for legal reforms and socio-economic justice</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LUCA STEVENSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/nithya-natarajan-katherine-brickell-laurie-parsons/is-race-to-bottom-over-reflecting-o">Is the race to the bottom over? Reflecting on ‘surplus’ populations in Cambodia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NITHYA NATARAJAN, KATHERINE BRICKELL, and LAURIE PARSONS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/caroline-robinson/tied-visas-and-quick-fixes-uk-s-post-brexit-labour-market">Tied visas and quick fixes: the UK’s post-Brexit labour market</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CAROLINE ROBINSON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Shawna Bader-Blau Tue, 27 Nov 2018 16:55:38 +0000 Shawna Bader-Blau 120728 at https://www.opendemocracy.net How can funders support the growth of transnational solidarity? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/shawna-bader-blau/how-can-funders-support-growth-of-transnational-solidarity <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span style="font-weight: 700;">On 8 October 2018 we published the&nbsp;</span><a style="font-weight: 700;" href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a><span style="font-weight: 700;">, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This is a followup question to those initial responses.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Transnational solidarity should be supported as a good and as a value in and of itself. Businesses and authoritarian states are doing their own versions of transnational joint work, and they've got bottomless resources to play with. They’ll be doing that no matter what we do, often with negative impacts for the rest of us. We need to show that embedded relationships among people around the world are actually more important than the global connections of global capital, or the global collaborations of the autocratic political elite. </p> <p>Donors correctly frame their role as that of ‘partner’. They should be partners because they're filled with smart people who have their own important visions. But that partnership needs to reflect the principles I’ve mentioned elsewhere: tolerance for ambiguity, the ability to be a deep listener, patient and invested in the long term. This is really important because remaining distant from movements and passing out money is a very limiting way to help. There are many more ways funders could use their power to support these movements. At the same time, it's also really important that they're not controlling or second guessing social movements with that positional power.</p> <p>Measuring success needs to be thought about differently when we're talking about developing transnational solidarity. Metrics need to be serious, but they also need to be long-term. The building blocks of solidarity –&nbsp;patience, commitment, deep listening, developing a joint analysis – require time as much as they require money. It takes technology for people to communicate across borders, and frequently air travel as well. It takes interpretation and translation. You can't expect the English speakers of the world alone to develop a powerful transnational social movement. People have got to be able to speak in the medium in which they live and work, and sometimes that means funding many rounds of interpretation so everybody can speak with the most confidence and strength. </p> <p>If funders want to support transnational solidarity movement building, they need to think about supporting core operating budgets rather than always trying to underwrite specific activities. That’s important because if you're building a movement of workers around the world you're not going to be able to predict all the specific interventions in advance that will be needed over the course of however many months or years a grant is operating. </p> <p>Further, if a donor wants to support an organisation's goal of developing its relationships across borders and building transnationally, then it needs to invest in its relationship with that organisation as well. Core support is really the best way to do that. Not only does it pay for staff and internal development work, but it signals belief in the organisation and its mission. It says, ‘We've talked about it, we get each other. I believe in your vision and I see your plan - we're partners. I'm your funding partner, here's the core support’. And then you stay in touch. The donor becomes part of the movement and supporting it, but not inadvertently trying to manage it or run it by micromanaging its individual, specific activities. You're not telling it what to do, and you're not holding it to a promise of a specific intervention that was made a year ago when circumstances were completed different.</p> <p><strong><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement#followup_sc_2">Back to my place in the round table</a></strong></p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/global-alliance-against-traffic-in-women/organising-beyond-silos-confronting-common-ch">Organising beyond silos: confronting common challenges amongst migrants and workers</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GLOBAL ALLIANCE AGAINST TRAFFIC IN WOMEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/luca-stevenson/decriminalisation-and-labour-rights-how-sex-workers-are-organising-for-">Decriminalisation and labour rights: how sex workers are organising for legal reforms and socio-economic justice</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LUCA STEVENSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/nithya-natarajan-katherine-brickell-laurie-parsons/is-race-to-bottom-over-reflecting-o">Is the race to the bottom over? Reflecting on ‘surplus’ populations in Cambodia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NITHYA NATARAJAN, KATHERINE BRICKELL, and LAURIE PARSONS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/caroline-robinson/tied-visas-and-quick-fixes-uk-s-post-brexit-labour-market">Tied visas and quick fixes: the UK’s post-Brexit labour market</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CAROLINE ROBINSON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Shawna Bader-Blau Tue, 27 Nov 2018 16:51:11 +0000 Shawna Bader-Blau 120727 at https://www.opendemocracy.net How can funders support the creation, implementation, and spread of worker-driven social responsibility? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/lupe-gonzalo-marley-moynahan/how-can-funders-support-creation-implementation-and-sprea <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This is a followup question to those initial responses. </strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><strong>Lupe:</strong> The reality is that all of the pieces of the worker-driven social responsibility (WSR) model are critically important, and they all have to be well resourced in order to function. Whether it&#39;s travelling, or getting materials to workers, or printing thousands of hand-outs, or sending out an education team, or so on. They’re all necessary, but we see a real imbalance in where we get funding. Sometimes we fall really short in less popular areas, like workplace monitoring. That creates a bigger problem than one might think, because we all have to stop our regular work in order to frantically fundraise for that one area. So being holistic in a funding approach is crucial. For WSR, corporate campaigns and consumer action is really important. Monitoring is important. And the workers are important. All three things are critically important. You can&#39;t do WSR without all three.</p> <p><strong>Marley:</strong> There’s a metaphor that I use a lot with our funding community, which is about gardens. It does not work to plant seeds and walk away. A garden is a year-round endeavour, and you need to support it at every stage of growth. The Fair Food Programme (FPP) has become a very mature version of the WSR model and it is bearing fruit. We now need to harvest that fruit and replant it. That means cultivating, nurturing, replicating, and growing successful programmes like the Milk With Dignity Programme in Vermont. If funding drains away, flagship programmes like the FFP will wither instead of reaching their potential as pioneering forces, and no longer be able to serve as guides for newer programmes. </p> <p>I’d also like to say something about funding metrics, and what it means to fund success. Funders really want to feel like they&#39;re a part of systemic change. Unfortunately, that can be misinterpreted when an organisation is measured by the loftiness of its goals rather than by its actual accomplishments on the ground. Organisations like ours are frequently pressured into positions of over-promising. ‘Within five years we will take WSR to every industry in the US’ – that sort of thing. It should be about what we are doing to create change that is both systemic and measurable, and what sort of clear and concrete plan we have for the future. </p> <p>Furthermore, if we’re talking about systemic change in work, then we should also be talking about worker-driven metrics of impact. This goes far beyond an organisation’s mission, or how much infrastructure they have. Has there been measurable change in the lives of workers? Of how many? And how deep does that change go? Those are the metrics that I think funders need to focus on. </p> <p><strong><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement#followup_ciw_2">Back to my place in the round table</a></strong></p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/global-alliance-against-traffic-in-women/organising-beyond-silos-confronting-common-ch">Organising beyond silos: confronting common challenges amongst migrants and workers</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GLOBAL ALLIANCE AGAINST TRAFFIC IN WOMEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/luca-stevenson/decriminalisation-and-labour-rights-how-sex-workers-are-organising-for-">Decriminalisation and labour rights: how sex workers are organising for legal reforms and socio-economic justice</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LUCA STEVENSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/nithya-natarajan-katherine-brickell-laurie-parsons/is-race-to-bottom-over-reflecting-o">Is the race to the bottom over? Reflecting on ‘surplus’ populations in Cambodia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NITHYA NATARAJAN, KATHERINE BRICKELL, and LAURIE PARSONS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/caroline-robinson/tied-visas-and-quick-fixes-uk-s-post-brexit-labour-market">Tied visas and quick fixes: the UK’s post-Brexit labour market</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CAROLINE ROBINSON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Marley Moynahan Lupe Gonzalo Tue, 27 Nov 2018 14:17:33 +0000 Lupe Gonzalo and Marley Moynahan 120721 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Tied visas and quick fixes: the UK’s post-Brexit labour market https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/caroline-robinson/tied-visas-and-quick-fixes-uk-s-post-brexit-labour-market <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The British government wants to import migrant labourers using a scheme that will leave workers vulnerable to forced and precarious labour. Is this their idea of leadership against ‘modern slavery’?</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/PA-30894336.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">The radish harvest in Norfolk. Dan Law/PA Archive/PA Images. All rights reserved.</p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>In 2016 the UK voted to leave the European Union. At the time many British businesses raised serious concerns about the likely impact of a leave vote upon the labour market. At the heart of their concerns was a fear of labour shortages resulting from the end of free movement within the EU. Some experts from government, civil society and <a href="https://www.cipd.co.uk/Images/facing-the-future_2017-tackling-post-Brexit-labour-and-skills-shortages_tcm18-24417.pdf">industry</a> have called for a renewed focus on improving wages and conditions in order to entice British workers into jobs that were previously only palatable to EU nationals. </p> <p>This would be in line with the UK’s stated ambition of <a href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/07/30/we-will-lead-the-way-in-defeating-modern-slavery/">leading the world</a> in the fight against ‘modern slavery’. If employers must treat workers better as a result of Brexit, then surely this helps to advance the cause? Yet rather than welcoming this new world of work, the government has instead introduced a <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/seasonal-workers-pilot-request-for-information/seasonal-workers-pilot-request-for-information">temporary migrant worker scheme</a> that will greatly increase the risk of ‘modern slavery’ in Britain. </p> <h2>Migrants for the fields</h2> <p>In September, following sustained business lobbying to address worker shortages, the government introduced a a new ‘<a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/seasonal-workers-pilot-request-for-information/seasonal-workers-pilot-request-for-information">seasonal workers pilot’</a>. The pilot will bring non-EU workers to the UK agricultural sector by tying their work visas to two ‘pilot operators’. For those of us working to end labour exploitation in the UK, this is a backwards step that will create a new worker underclass. </p> <p>The new pilot to bring non-EU nationals to fill agricultural labour shortages responds directly to industry concerns. Indeed, Michael Gove, the environment secretary, justified the new scheme when it was first announced <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-pilot-scheme-to-bring-2500-seasonal-workers-to-uk-farms">by saying</a>, “We have listened to the powerful arguments from farmers about the need for seasonal labour to keep the horticulture industry productive and profitable.”</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Without effective safeguards, this new scheme will be a gift for those who wish to exploit workers.</p> <p>No mention was made of any concerns from workers, and crucial issues regarding the design of this new scheme are yet to be determined. We do not yet know whether workers will be allowed to change employer, to bring family members and other dependents with them, or to live outside employer-provided accommodation. Instead, the government has said that the <a href="http://www.gla.gov.uk/">Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority</a> (GLAA) – one of the four key UK labour inspectorates – will oversee wages and living standards for workers in the scheme. Despite the government saying they are working with the GLAA <a href="https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2018-09-06/171412/">to get the scheme right</a>, crucial elements of the GLAA’s role in propping up worker protections in the scheme have also yet to be determined. </p> <h2>A scheme or a scam?</h2> <p>Without effective safeguards, this new scheme will be a gift for those who wish to exploit workers. Two examples show why. First, the limited six months stay under the scheme means it is unlikely that workers will have time to form migrant community or trade union ties. Because of this, pro-active inspections of labour sites are essential to reach these isolated workers. As yet no extra resources for proactive labour inspection to police the scheme have been announced. Second, there is a high in-built risk of debt bondage inherent in the scheme, with overseas labour providers likely to charge large fees to workers. It is essential that the GLAA licenses labour providers in sending countries to reduce this risk. Whilst the GLAA currently licenses labour providers within the EU, an extension of their remit to the rest of the world is a very different, and far more complex, proposition.</p> <p>As the UK enters into new trading partnerships and brings new workers to our shores, it is vital that we put in place and fund systems to prevent exploitation. Our labour inspectorates need essential resources to do their job – a little over <a href="https://www.labourexploitation.org/publications/risky-business-tackling-exploitation-uk-labour-market">double current levels</a> if we’re even to reach the International Labour Organisation’s recommended one inspector per 10,000 workers. The tried and tested GLAA licensing system will have to be expanded to high-risk labour sectors that are likely to see an increase in migrant workers in years to come. The care and construction sectors, for example, are unlikely to survive without workers from outside the UK. </p> <p>For the new seasonal worker pilot, the Agricultural Wages Boards that previously set standards in England and Wales should be reinstated. Furthermore, a real effort must be made to ensure workers drive the conversation about their pay, conditions, and treatment in this high-risk scheme. Finally, even if these steps are taken, exploitation will not only continue to exist but also remain largely hidden unless the UK establishes channels for individual workers to report abuses. The UK desperately needs a 24-hour complaints line for workers that can offer resolution to problems raised. </p> <p>This post-Brexit vision for the UK labour market looks like a recipe for abuse and exploitation. However, there is still time to ensure a better future for work. We have a chance to reimagine the labour market and labour standards, and to reverse recent attacks on <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/tackling-employment-law-red-tape--2">regulations</a> and worker protections. For a country with aspirations to lead the world in the fight against exploitation, we can surely do better than schemes that are designed to appease business interests at the expense of workers.</p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/global-alliance-against-traffic-in-women/organising-beyond-silos-confronting-common-ch">Organising beyond silos: confronting common challenges amongst migrants and workers</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BORISLAV GERASIMOV</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/luca-stevenson/decriminalisation-and-labour-rights-how-sex-workers-are-organising-for-">Decriminalisation and labour rights: how sex workers are organising for legal reforms and socio-economic justice</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LUCA STEVENSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/nithya-natarajan-katherine-brickell-laurie-parsons/is-race-to-bottom-over-reflecting-o">Is the race to the bottom over? Reflecting on ‘surplus’ populations in Cambodia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NITHYA NATARAJAN, KATHERINE BRICKELL, and LAURIE PARSONS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/caroline-robinson/tied-visas-and-quick-fixes-uk-s-post-brexit-labour-market">Tied visas and quick fixes: the UK’s post-Brexit labour market</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CAROLINE ROBINSON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Caroline Robinson Thu, 22 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Caroline Robinson 120618 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Is the race to the bottom over? Reflecting on ‘surplus’ populations in Cambodia https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/nithya-natarajan-katherine-brickell-laurie-parsons/is-race-to-bottom-over-reflecting-o <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Everybody speaks about a ‘race to the bottom’ in the world of work. For brick workers enduring debt-bondage in Cambodia the race might already be over.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/cambodiakiln.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Inside the brick kiln. Thomas Cristofoletti, Ruom. ©2018 Royal Holloway, University of London. All rights reserved.</p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>Tanya Murray Li, a professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto, describes the millions of unemployed or under-employed people across Asia as “<a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00717.x">surplus populations</a>”. She writes, “For the 700 million Asians who live on less than a dollar a day, tiny incomes are ample testament to the fact that no one has a market incentive to pay the costs of keeping them alive from day to day, or from one generation to the next.” </p> <p>This idea of a surplus population puts a whole new spin on the notion of a ‘race to the bottom’ in terms of the trajectory of work. It forces us to rethink the very premise of the metaphor, and also to question how such populations can become lucrative for capital in other ways. </p> <p>Standard Marxist political economy has long held that a key power differential between companies and their labourers is that there are far more workers than there are jobs. This creates a ‘reserve army of labour’ and thus downward pressure on labour prices – a phenomenon that capital is keen to perpetuate. Yet Li argues that the vast numbers of low-paid labourers are no longer required to further increase profits, even in reserve. Labour competition is already so high and prices are already so low that millions of lives have become simply surplus to the needs of industrial and services sector-led growth.</p> <h2>Profitable only through debt</h2> <p>Our recent research report ‘<a href="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/596df9f8d1758e3b451e0fb2/t/5bc4d7cdc83025e41e7b10a0/1539627177544/Blood+bricks+high+res+v2.pdf">Blood Bricks</a>’ offers a stark glimpse into one case of surplus lives in Cambodia. The research documents how bricks destined for ascending skyscrapers in Phnom Penh are moulded and fired by debt-bonded families. These families were once smallholder farmers in rural areas. The impacts of climate change and medical expenses pushed them into unsustainable debts, often with one of the many unregulated microfinance institutions in the country.</p> <p>To deal with their rising indebtedness, they approached brick kiln owners located near Phnom Penh, who agreed to pay off the creditors if whole families moved onto the kilns and worked off the consolidated debt. Cambodian smallholder farmers-turned brick workers therefore entered the non-farm economy by being “<a href="http://www.chronicpoverty.org/uploads/publication_files/WP81_Hickey_duToit.pdf">adversely incorporated</a>” into broader circuits of capital accumulation. They did this by borrowing from the high-interest microfinance sector that is increasingly characterised by <a href="http://norberthaering.de/en/32-english/news/952-bateman-cambodia?&amp;format=pdf">foreign investment and financialisation</a>. </p> <p>As such, despite being surplus to the requirements of the economy as labourers, smallholder farmers became lucrative in another way; as bearers of debt. The value of their agricultural produce, or their contribution as labourers, is surpassed by their borrowing. This renders everything they own, and even their future wages, collateral to the finance market. This is what happens when the everyday costs of living are no longer provided by the state for pauperised farmers. Debt becomes the only recourse, and credit institutions gain a new – if highly risky – customer base. Ananya Roy, a professor of urban planning, social welfare and geography at UCLA Luskin, has termed this “<a href="https://www.routledge.com/Poverty-Capital-Microfinance-and-the-Making-of-Development-1st-Edition/Roy/p/book/9780415876735">poverty capitalism</a>”. </p> <p>When jobs are scant and low-paid, rural smallholders are in a particularly adverse position when it comes to the labour market. The risk of defaulting falls on individual farmers, who are therefore forced into extreme exploitation on brick kilns to stave off creditors. Wider <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14442213.2014.894116">research</a> from Cambodia also documents the appropriation of land by creditors as a result of loan defaults. </p> <h2>The race has already been lost</h2> <p>The ‘race to the bottom’ metaphor in this context thus appears inadequate. Rather than representing an ongoing struggle, the ‘bottom’ is already here for millions across Asia, and in other parts of the world as well. </p> <p>Advocating for strong labour rights alone won’t make a difference to these surplus populations. Rather, it is the very nature of the economy that needs reform. An economic model which renders their work surplus, and thus allows their adverse incorporation into the economy as bearers of debt and then as indebted labourers, is the issue. It is also the state’s lack of social provisioning. The absence of state welfare or support for the poorest in Cambodia forces them to rely on debt for their day-to-day expenditure. </p> <p>Therefore in thinking through what “<a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work">business, politics or organising</a>” can do in response to declining labour standards, we need to step back and ask a more fundamental question. What happens when the lives of millions are surplus to the requirements of growth? </p> <p>As well as struggling for “decent, stable, and well-paid work”, as <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">Alf Gunvald Nilson</a> argues in this series, we need to explore how economies and the state value people’s lives – particularly those that are surplus to the requirements of growth. This means focusing on social welfare and protection afforded to the poorest, and resisting new ways to adversely incorporate them into capitalism as an alternative to this, for example through financialisation and indebtedness.</p> <p>The phenomenon of surplus populations is worsening as more and more people leave rural life and find poor prospects of work in the non-farm sector. We therefore need an agenda that addresses poverty outside of work as well as within it.</p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/global-alliance-against-traffic-in-women/organising-beyond-silos-confronting-common-ch">Organising beyond silos: confronting common challenges amongst migrants and workers</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BORISLAV GERASIMOV</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/luca-stevenson/decriminalisation-and-labour-rights-how-sex-workers-are-organising-for-">Decriminalisation and labour rights: how sex workers are organising for legal reforms and socio-economic justice</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LUCA STEVENSON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Laurie Parsons Katherine Brickell Nithya Natarajan Wed, 21 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Nithya Natarajan, Katherine Brickell and Laurie Parsons 120622 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Decriminalisation and labour rights: how sex workers are organising for legal reforms and socio-economic justice https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/luca-stevenson/decriminalisation-and-labour-rights-how-sex-workers-are-organising-for- <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The decriminalisation of sex work must be made central to the future of work, but that should only ever be a beginning rather than an end.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/PA-38700796.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Demonstration in Paris on 22 September 2018 in memory of Vanessa Campos. Apaydin Alain/ABACA/ABACA/PA Images. All rights reserved.</p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>Political and public debates regarding sex work have intensified and crystalised into two apparently irreconcilable positions. On the one hand, we have calls for the recognition of sex work as work, with the primary goal being the end to criminalisation and legal oppression. On the other, we have the view that prostitution should be regarded as intrinsic violence against women. From this perspective criminalisation – and especially the criminalisation of clients – is an important part of larger efforts to disrupt, decrease, and ultimately abolish prostitution. This debate has important ramifications for efforts to grapple with the future of work, as opposition to the basic notion of sex work as work like any other continues to undercut efforts to improve rights and protections for sex workers. </p> <p>The abolitionist model of criminalising clients has recently gained considerable ground across Europe. France, Norway, Sweden, Ireland and Northern Ireland have all criminalised the purchase of sex. Israel and other countries are debating similar laws, and Spain officially announced a ‘feminist abolitionist’ government. Despite this negative trend, sex workers continue to self-organise and formulate collective demands against their precariousness and exploitative working conditions. </p> <p>By way of further illustration, I’d like to share three current examples from different European countries that demonstrate both the breadth of sex workers’ organising and the obstacles they face. </p> <h2>Snapshots of oppression, snapshots of solidarity – Autumn 2018</h2> <p>In September, Spanish media reported that a new sex worker union, Organización de Trabajadoras Sexuales (OTRAS), had been created and officially registered by the Department of Labour. In response, the Spanish government announced its decision to disband it. Pedro Sanchez, the Spanish president, confusingly justified this annulment on Twitter by saying prostitution is illegal in Spain. It’s not, and despite the political pressure OTRAS followed through with the launch of their union and continued their project of to self-organisation. </p> <p>In the United Kingdom, a grassroots campaign led by sex workers and allies from diverse sex worker-led organisations coordinated the launch of the DecrimNow campaign at the fringe Labour Party Conference in Liverpool. British and migrant sex workers – both street-based and indoors – denounced the impact of criminalisation, austerity and poverty on their living and working conditions and called for the Labour Party to support them as precarious and informal workers.</p> <p>In France, sex workers recently mourned the murder of Vanessa Campos, a migrant transgender sex worker from Peru who had worked in France for two years. Vanessa was killed in August 2018 by a group of men as they attempted to rob her client. For several months prior to that attack, Vanessa and her colleagues had tried to report these aggressors to the police who ignored them. The apathy and silence of the political class was denounced by sex workers and trans organisations such as STRASS and ACCEPTESS-T through demonstrations, vigils and articles. Sex workers and allies had previously warned of the dangerous implications of the 2016 French law criminalising the purchase of sex, which has increased the vulnerability and precarity of sex workers and forced them to work in more dangerous areas.</p> <p>Her murder sparked a wave of global protests from Amsterdam to Bogotá. In each city, sex workers and their allies stood in solidarity with sex workers in France whilst also linking Vanessa’ s murder to local struggles against racism, transphobia, police harassment and violence against sex workers. </p> <h2>Demands for a better future</h2> <p>Taken together, these three examples provide visible and concrete examples of the ongoing self-organisation of sex workers as workers and their united and unequivocal demands for decriminalisation, labour and human rights. Sex workers are also calling for: justice for all in their community; documentation and the right to work for all migrant workers; an end to transphobia and greater access to education and other forms of economic activity for trans people; reform of the welfare state; and an end to austerity. While the call for decriminalisation captures the headlines, it should be clear that there is much more going on here.</p> <p>The European network for sex workers’ rights, ICRSE, supports and amplifies the voices of sex workers in Europe. It also develops resources analysing exploitation in the sex industry and violations of sex workers’ rights. Over the next two years, thanks to the support of the Oak Foundation, ICRSE will coordinate a project aiming at supporting migrant sex workers to tackle exploitation and trafficking in the sex industry in partnership with several of our member groups. The project is a response to the continued criminalisation of migration and sex work, and to the negative effects of increasingly repressive ‘security measures’ on migrant sex workers. Sex workers aren’t unique in this struggle. Precarious workers everywhere face similar types of challenges, and the voices and experiences of sex workers can contribute greatly to larger campaigns for greater rights and protections for all workers and migrants. Greater solidarity between migrant and labour organisations and the sex workers’ movement is the future. </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/global-alliance-against-traffic-in-women/organising-beyond-silos-confronting-common-ch">Organising beyond silos: confronting common challenges amongst migrants and workers</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BORISLAV GERASIMOV</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Luca Stevenson Tue, 20 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Luca Stevenson 120619 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Salir de las sombras: el personal del hogar habla en los Estados Unidos https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ai-jen-poo/salir-de-las-sombras-el-personal-del-hogar-habla-en-los-estados-unidos <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>El personal del hogar de los Estados Unidos, hace tiempo excluido de la mayoría de las leyes de protección laboral, puede mostrar a una fuerza laboral cada vez más flexibilizada cómo sobrevivir en la nueva economía. <strong><em><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/dws/ai-jen-poo/out-from-shadows-domestic-workers-speak-in-united-states">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/6804492384_3727cbf199_o-bw.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Carlos Lowry/Flickr. Creative Commons.</p> <p>Nuestros hogares son nuestros santuarios. Allí regresamos para comer y descansar tras un día de trabajo. Allí es donde nos sentimos más a salvo. Pero para muchas personas, nuestro hogar es un lugar con riesgos.</p> <p>Para el personal del hogar – niñeras, personal de limpieza, cuidadoras y cuidadores, quienes realizan el trabajo para que todos los otros trabajos sean posibles –, nuestro hogar es su lugar de trabajo. Detrás de las puertas cerradas de los hogares de nuestro vecindario es donde esta fuerza laboral invisible (en su mayoría compuesta por mujeres migrantes) pasa su día alimentando a nuestras hijas e hijos, limpiando nuestras cocinas y cuidando a nuestras personas mayores o personas amadas con alguna discapacidad. Hay 100 millones de personas que trabajan como personal del hogar, ocultas del mundo exterior, excluidas de muchas legislaciones laborales que protegen a otros rubros de personal laboral, y vulnerables en las sombras de la economía.</p> <p>Si escuchan al personal del hogar, oirán historias que evocan todo tipo de emociones, desde humorísticas hasta humillantes y angustiosas. Personas obligadas a dormir en el sótano junto a un tanque de aguas residuales desbordado. Personas sin ningún recurso a quienes se les retiene el pago total. Personas a las que se les pide pasear a un perro y a una niña por el vecindario en un cochecito doble. El dolor de tener que dejar que otra persona cuide a tu propia hija o tu propio hijo. También hay muchas historias positivas, historias de independencia y de relaciones que crecen hasta volverse más fuertes que las de sangre. Pero en el contexto de este campo laboral tan íntimo, cada historia incluye vulnerabilidad, y casi todo el personal del hogar tiene alguna historia de abuso.</p> <p>La cruel ironía es que el personal del hogar realiza uno de los trabajos más importantes de nuestra economía. A medida que las personas de la generación del «baby boom» envejecen y disfrutan de una mayor esperanza de vida, con la idea de envejecer en sus hogares en vez de asilos y otras instituciones, crece la necesidad de contar con personal del hogar para el cuidado de personas mayores. Además, hay más mujeres dentro de la mano de obra, lo que significa que la capacidad para el cuidado del hogar es menor y, por ende, surge una necesidad de servicios y ayuda en el hogar sin precedentes. Entre el desplazamiento del trabajo en los sectores actuales de la economía por la automatización y la inteligencia artificial, y el incremento de la necesidad de la atención y servicios del hogar, se anticipa que en 2030 el trabajo de cuidado de personas será la ocupación más numerosa de la economía.</p> <p>Algo tiene que pasar.</p> <h2>Un desarrollo a paso firme</h2> <p>La exclusión del personal del hogar de las leyes básicas de protección laboral en los Estados Unidos, incluyendo el derecho a organizarse, negociar de manera colectiva y formar sindicatos, se arraiga en el legado de la esclavitud. En la década de 1930, cuando se debatían las políticas laborales fundamentales en el Congreso de los Estados Unidos, miembros de los estados sureños se negaban a firmarlas si el personal del hogar y agrícola (en su mayoría personas afroamericanas en esa época) era incluido en las nuevas leyes de protección. Para tranquilizar a estos miembros, la Ley Nacional de Relaciones Laborales (1935) y otras leyes laborales fundamentales se aprobaron especificando esas exclusiones.</p> <p>Con este trasfondo legal e histórico, hace 20 años empecé a reunirme con personal del hogar de la ciudad de Nueva York como parte de una iniciativa para conectar a mujeres asiáticas inmigrantes con trabajos mal remunerados. Fue imposible ignorar al ejército silencioso de mujeres de color, principalmente migrantes, paseando en cochecitos a niñas y niños de raza diferente por las calles de Manhattan.</p> <p>A pesar de la necesidad, fue un desafío hacer que un pequeño grupo de mujeres se acercase. La mayoría de quienes conocí era la fuente principal de ingresos de sus familias y vivían bajo una presión económica extrema para llegar a fin de mes. Superar la idea de asistir a una reunión que podría poner en riesgo sus trabajos no les resultó fácil. La presión en las mujeres migrantes se veía agravada por el temor a ser deportadas y separadas de sus familias y comunidades. Pero insistimos, y finalmente nos abrimos camino para crear espacios seguros en los que las mujeres pudieran reunirse, conectar y gestar un sentimiento de comunidad y pertenencia.</p> <p>Las trabajadoras que vinieron se dieron fuerza y poder entre sí. Se corrió la voz entre otras ciudades donde también comenzaban a organizarse. Reunión tras reunión, en mayor o menor escala, las organizaciones del personal del hogar empezaron a esparcirse de manera local. En el 2007, todo estaba listo para romper el aislamiento de las reuniones locales y conectarnos a nivel nacional; llevamos a cabo nuestra primera reunión nacional y formamos oficialmente la Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras Domésticas («NDWA», por sus siglas en inglés).</p> <p>Diez años después, somos una alianza de 64 organizaciones locales de personal del hogar en 36 ciudades y 17 estados de todo el país. Entre nuestros miembros hay niñeras, personal de limpieza, cuidadoras y cuidadores de personas mayores o con discapacidades cuyo entorno laboral es un hogar. Las trabajadoras y los trabajadores pueden unirse a través de una organización afiliada local o de forma particular desde cualquier parte del país, pagar las cuotas y tener acceso a capacitaciones, beneficios y otros recursos.</p> <p>Nuestro recién descubierto sentimiento de poder se volvió tangible a medida que presentábamos demandas y organizábamos encuentros en contra de personas empleadoras abusivas. Las demandas nos permitieron comprender las limitaciones de la ley, ya que el personal del hogar había estado sometido a numerosas exclusiones en la legislación laboral. Quedó claro que necesitaríamos organizarnos para cambiar las leyes y promulgar nuevas políticas.</p> <p>Introdujimos entonces la Carta de Derechos del Personal Doméstico: una legislación estatal que establece las protecciones básicas para la mano de obra, por ejemplo cuestiones contra la discriminación o el derecho a tener un día de descanso por semana y vacaciones pagadas. Nuestro primer gran logro llegó en 2010 cuando, tras siete años de campaña, el gobernador del estado de Nueva York convirtió el proyecto en ley. Desde entonces, otros seis estados aprobaron leyes para proteger los derechos del personal del hogar, y el Ministerio de Trabajo federal cambió sus normas para incluir a dos millones de personas que trabajan como personal de atención del hogar, previamente excluidas de las protecciones federales de salario mínimo y de horas extras.</p> <p>Además, el trabajo pionero con trabajadoras del hogar que han sobrevivido a situaciones de trata de personas con fines laborales, empezó a modificar la conversación sobre la trata incluyendo el espectro de vulnerabilidades que enfrentan las mujeres con trabajos de bajos salarios. Se recuperaron millones de dólares de salarios impagados y miles de personas que trabajan como personal del hogar se han unido a las campañas desarrollando toda una nueva generación de líderes para los movimientos de cambio social.</p> <h2>El futuro del trabajo</h2> <p>Aunque nuestra década de trabajo se enfocó en mejorar las condiciones laborales del personal del hogar, su importancia en el resto de la mano de obra no debe subestimarse. En los primeros años de organización, las condiciones y vulnerabilidades que el personal del hogar enfrentaba parecían marginales comparadas con el resto de la mano de obra. Hoy, estos problemas afectan a un grupo mucho mayor de personas. La falta de seguridad laboral, la falta de caminos hacia el desarrollo profesional y la falta de acceso a redes de protección sociales son problemas que enfrentan las trabajadoras y los trabajadores de muchos sectores. De hecho, a medida que una mayor parte de la fuerza laboral se vuelve temporal, de medio tiempo o autónoma, el «trabajo no tradicional» se torna más habitual. </p> <p>A medida que la economía de los Estados Unidos se ajusta frente al incremento de la «economía de los pequeños encargos», y las empresas y las personas trabajadoras tratan de descubrir cómo aprovechar los beneficios y evitar los peligros de este tipo de trabajos signados por avances tecnológicos, solo es necesario mirar al personal del hogar para darnos cuenta de cómo se desarrollará. Las trabajadoras del hogar somos las primeras trabajadoras de la economía de los pequeños encargos: hemos experimentado su dinámica, luchado frente a sus desafíos y, más importante aún, hemos encontrado algunas soluciones para sobrevivir como una fuerza laboral vulnerable.</p> <p>Todo el mundo podría beneficiarse, por ejemplo, de una nueva declaración de derechos para las personas trabajadoras del siglo XXI. Además del personal del hogar, existen millones de trabajadoras y trabajadores en ambientes no tradicionales a quienes se les niega el acceso a beneficios. Todas las fuerzas laborales podrían beneficiarse de un sistema de formación reinventado que una la creciente brecha entre trabajadoras y trabajadores con ingresos altos y bajos. Y, si logramos averiguar cómo darle voz y voto real a esta fuerza laboral desagregada, con una organización sostenible y ampliable de trabajadoras y trabajadores del siglo XXI, podríamos crear un contexto en el que las personas trabajadoras puedan ocupar un lugar en la discusión y ayudar a forjar el futuro de la economía global de una vez por todas.</p> <h2>Una alianza del siglo XXI</h2> <p>En la Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras Domésticas estamos desarrollando soluciones enfocadas al futuro.</p> <p>Estamos construyendo una asociación nacional de personas voluntarias en la que cualquier trabajadora del hogar puede unirse y obtener acceso a capacitación y beneficios. Estamos desarrollando nuevos programas de formación y desarrollo profesional para la fuerza laboral y haciendo accesible la capacitación en diferentes idiomas, y desde los teléfonos celulares. Hemos desarrollado un <a href="http://www.goodworkcode.org/">Código de Buenos Empleos</a>, un marco de referencia para que los trabajos sean buenos dentro de la economía virtual, que ayude a las empresas a diseñar sus negocios teniendo en cuenta el bienestar de su personal. Y estamos desarrollando un programa portátil de beneficios que brinde a contratistas independientes y a trabajadoras del sector informal los medios necesarios para recaudar contribuciones sociales y utilizarlas para recibir los beneficios que deseen.</p> <p>Como fuerza laboral mayoritariamente femenina, el modo en que desarrollamos las soluciones es crítico. Debemos asegurarnos de que la fuerza laboral indocumentada y migrante esté totalmente incluida en nuestras soluciones y estrategias. Cuando queramos organizar la fuerza laboral, debemos tener en cuenta cómo los legados de la esclavitud y del colonialismo moldean la fuerza laboral presente. Por suerte, este es precisamente el modo en que nuestro movimiento ha evolucionado. Trabajando en la intersección de muchas identidades y experiencias, tenemos el desafío de crear modelos organizativos en los que todas las personas tengan voto y dignidad, donde todas las personas tengan una sensación de pertenencia.</p> <p>El movimiento mundial de personal del hogar surge en el momento preciso, no solo para traer dignidad y respeto a las personas que se dedican a esto, sino para moldear el futuro del trabajo a nivel mundial, para que sea un mundo de oportunidades y seguridad económica real para todas las familias. El personal del hogar se ubica en el centro de muchos cambios en la economía global y también debe estar en el centro de las soluciones. Nosotras creemos que la investigación, la organización y las soluciones que emergen del movimiento mundial de personal del hogar son claves para muchas de las cuestiones críticas a las que debemos responder para lograr dignidad y oportunidades en el futuro.</p> <p>Así que la próxima vez que vea a una trabajadora entrar silenciosamente en una casa con sus artículos de limpiezas o a una niñera tranquilizando a una niña que llora y que no es de ella o a una cuidadora llevando lentamente a una persona anciana en silla de ruedas hacia el sol, tome nota.</p> <p>Es probable que pasen desapercibidas, pero su importancia para todas nosotras y nosotros no se puede subestimar. Sus luchas son las luchas del futuro laboral. Sus soluciones son las soluciones del futuro laboral. No solo nos están salvando de las condiciones laborales del trabajo del hogar del pasado y del presente, sino que también podrían salvarnos de un futuro laboral que no aprende de los errores del pasado.</p> <p>Y así es como construimos un futuro laboral con dignidad y respeto hacia todas las trabajadoras y todos los trabajadores, un futuro laboral del que nos enorgullezcamos. </p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi">«Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LOURDES ALBÁN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en">Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/bridget-anderson/entender-el-contexto-interpersonal-y-estructural-del-trabajo-del-hoga">Entender el contexto interpersonal y estructural del trabajo del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BRIDGET ANDERSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ilana-berger/aliados-o-coconspiradores-qu-necesita-el-movimiento-de-trabajadoras-del-h">Aliados o coconspiradores: ¿qué necesita el movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ILANA BERGER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sameera-hafiz/m-s-all-de-la-supervivencia-lecciones-aprendidas-de-las-trabajadoras-del">Más allá de la supervivencia: lecciones aprendidas de las trabajadoras del hogar en la organización de campañas contra la trata de personas y la explotación laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SAMEERA HAFIZ</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Ai-jen Poo BTS en Español Mon, 19 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Ai-jen Poo 120214 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Organising beyond silos: confronting common challenges amongst migrants and workers https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/global-alliance-against-traffic-in-women/organising-beyond-silos-confronting-common-ch <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Only a coordinated challenge can make work better for all. We are all in this together.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/14635612963_ac87be4852_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Carlos LV/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/fotos_de_carlos/14635612963/in/photolist-oiikQx-vZBqb-2aeeUGi-8Djbqc-8Ff3dn-6QAP3-5wHsGf-c8Qhuh-5hSQ55-tsimC-974qeL-aAMVX-p41q-4nCixM-7F8E1g-HxAXk-fLCXSH-g5Ev7H-ncrvi5-US34A1-Qu42WL-s8ErCA-Wbuzrm-dNTzna-272Za8S-KBzHNr-kc2sps-Sy9Sw7-DTZymv-d91FhC-MjrYND-49eeGq-Aayrto-6HqTeW-6z2wWj-23V1UQG-gYkhY-UuR1RC-72Xjpv-8Acaav-6FYShs-4qKEnL-W1wdr5-8xH3Sw-8r5zbr-566Q1P-58ryBT-5UiWxN-4Merhf-3zQrvT">Flickr. (cc by-nc)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>We thank the BTS editors for convening this roundtable and this call for contributions. It may come as a surprise to some to see a contribution from an anti-trafficking organisation. Yet for us at GAATW, trafficking has always been an issue of labour and labour migration. Our efforts to challenge exploitation and trafficking must therefore be grounded in a deep understanding of the world of work. This means taking stock of how and why work has changed globally, identifying the specificities of each sector, and finding ways to enable workers to organise and build alliances. </p> <p>It has long been clear that trafficking, exploitation, and labour rights violations occur in sectors where women, often migrants or of lower socio-economic status, work. These sectors include domestic work, the sex industry, the garment industry, and agriculture. Each of these comes with particular conditions that enable abuse and exploitation. Domestic work takes place in private homes. Sex work is criminalised and highly stigmatised in most countries. Agriculture and the garment sector are rarely monitored effectively.</p> <p>We also know that the experiences of women who have been trafficked or exploited in these sectors tend to be very similar. They endure long working hours, unfair wage deductions, physical, psychological, verbal or sexual abuse, control on their movement, confiscation of documents, and so on. The strategies that can reduce exploitation in these sectors are very similar too: stronger and better enforced labour regulations; oversight and accountability of employers; firewalls between labour inspections and immigration; and the ability of workers to organise and bargain collectively. </p> <p>Despite these common experiences and challenges, there remains a tendency towards fragmentation – or siloing – of the efforts of different groups that support women working in these sectors. Many anti-trafficking organisations view trafficking from a criminal justice perspective, and some continue to employ a harmful “raid-rescue-rehabilitation” model despite <a href="http://gaatw.org/resources/publications/908-collateral-damage-the-impact-of-anti-trafficking-measures-on-human-rights-around-the-world">extensive evidence</a> that it does not work. Migrant rights groups typically exclude citizens. Local workers’ groups typically exclude migrants. Trade unions tend to be male-dominated. Many do not allow migrants to join or lead them, and usually exclude informal workers. All of these groups can and have been hostile to sex workers. And domestic worker organisations and sex worker organisations don’t often talk to each other, despite the fact that many women move between domestic work and sex work or engage in both at the same time. </p> <h2>Towards a united front</h2> <p>To address this fragmentation, GAATW organised a <a href="http://gaatw.org/events-and-news/68-gaatw-news/945-knowledge-sharing-forum-on-women-work-and-migration">Knowledge Sharing Forum on Women, Work and Migration</a> in April 2018. The participants included more than 60 representatives from trade unions, academia and NGOs, and their expertise spanned anti-trafficking, migrant rights, women’s rights, sex worker rights, and domestic worker rights. The primary aim of the forum was to share strategies for protecting women’s rights and reducing the risks of exploitation and trafficking, and to forge new alliances between these diverse groups. </p> <p>Our discussions centred on decent work, migration, and gender-based violence in the workplace. They brought to light how a woman’s access to opportunities and knowledge and her ability to negotiate depend on her geographical location and social standing in the patriarchal structure. Given this realisation, we also focused upon the importance of cross-sectoral movement building for all women workers. On the final day, participants came up with a joint <a href="http://gaatw.org/events-and-news/68-gaatw-news/949-statement-on-violence-and-harassment-in-the-world-of-work">statement on violence and harassment in the world of work</a>. This was released ahead of the 107th Session of the International Labour Conference in Geneva, where delegates met to deliberate on an international instrument to address violence and harassment in the world of work. </p> <p>We hope to make these forums an annual event and to hold them in different parts of the world. Now more than ever there is an urgent need for social justice movements to come together. There is a need to build and strengthen movements across issues and across sectoral and geographical borders. Civil society organisations focusing on different issues need to come out of their silos and share their work. In doing so, they will gain a deeper understanding of each other’s concerns, challenges, and successes, and find out where their meeting points are.</p> <p>Some of this cross-movement building is already happening. If GAATW had not talked to migrants and sex workers, we would not have understood how anti-trafficking laws are now being used to justify border controls and other repressive policies. If our members had not engaged with trade unions such as the Self-employed Women’s Association, the Asia Floor Wage Alliance, or the International Domestic Workers Federation, they would have missed out on many lessons for how to unionise informal workers at grassroots level.</p> <p>Quite naturally, all these different groups have different priorities, different strategies, and different opinions. But our goals are same. We all want to see a world free of exploitation, where people can move freely and are not criminalised or discriminated against because of their migrant status. We want to see a world where everyone can realise their rights. Above all, we want a world that is safe, secure, and peaceful for all. </p> <p>As this Future of Work round table has shown, the state of the world of work requires a coordinated challenge. We need to find new ways to organise ourselves and legitimise diverse forms of worker mobilisation. Anti-trafficking NGOs, women’s rights, migrant rights, domestic worker organisations, sex worker organisations, and trade unions need each other at this moment. No single group has the answer. No single group on their own can effect the change that is needed.&nbsp; </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women Thu, 15 Nov 2018 10:36:17 +0000 Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women 120580 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Más allá de la supervivencia: lecciones aprendidas de las trabajadoras del hogar en la organización de campañas contra la trata de personas y la explotación laboral https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sameera-hafiz/m-s-all-de-la-supervivencia-lecciones-aprendidas-de-las-trabajadoras-del <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Las campañas contra la trata de personas pueden ayudar a inclinar la balanza hacia la justicia, pero solo serán exitosas si se basan en las vivencias de las personas supervivientes y se enfocan en soluciones sistémicas. <strong><em><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sameera-hafiz/beyond-survival-lessons-from-domestic-worker-organising-campaigns-agains">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/PA-21845760.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Migrant domestic workers hold posters demanding the same basic labour rights as those of the Lebanese workers during a march in Beirut, Lebanon, in 2014. Hussein Malla/AP/Press Association. All rights reserved.</p> <p>Muchas campañas convencionales contra la trata han logrado efectos favorables: han planteado el problema de la trata de personas a escala mundial y han ayudado a incentivar la acción nacional e internacional para la protección de las víctimas. No obstante, tienen también limitaciones graves; lo que significa que, algunas veces, sus aportes generales pueden ser poco positivos.</p> <p>Principalmente, se ven limitadas por una tendencia generalizada a organizarse exclusivamente en torno al problema de la trata de personas, lo que a menudo debilita la relación entre la trata de personas y otras formas de opresión y marginación. Muchas de las campañas incorporan la idea de la trata como un problema excepcional que requiere soluciones excepcionales, en vez de una opresión sistemática que requiere soluciones sistemáticas para todas las personas trabajadoras. Además, demasiadas campañas contra la trata utilizan relatos de vulnerabilidad y victimismo para ilustrar el alcance del problema, pero no logran colaborar de manera significativa con las personas supervivientes en la creación y manejo del discurso.</p> <p>Las campañas de concienciación tienen potencial, pero este todavía está por verse. El aprendizaje de los errores pasados y de las lecciones de las trabajadoras del hogar organizadas permitirían a las campañas contra la trata inclinar la balanza hacia la justicia y hacer frente al desafío de garantizar un trabajo digno para todas las personas.</p> <h2>La trata de personas no es un problema aislado</h2> <p>La Alianza nacional de trabajadoras del hogar (NDWA, por sus siglas en inglés) considera la trata de personas como el caso extremo de un patrón constante de explotación laboral que afecta a muchas personas trabajadoras en condiciones de vulnerabilidad. Tal explotación comienza con salarios bajos, ausencia de vacaciones pagadas, horarios imprevisibles y falta de acceso a programas de seguridad social. Puede luego continuar con robo de salarios, acoso sexual, discriminación, abuso verbal y horas extraordinarias involuntarias. También sabemos —por las vivencias de las trabajadoras del hogar, quienes en muchos casos enfrentan altos índices de trata de personas en los Estados Unidos y en el extranjero— que las políticas inhumanas de inmigración, la injusticia racial, la desigualdad entre géneros, la desigualdad económica y otras barreras sistémicas juegan un papel central en el aumento de la vulnerabilidad ante los abusos en este patrón constante de explotación laboral. Las campañas contra la trata de personas deben prestar la debida atención a todas las formas de opresión y de desigualdad.</p> <p>A través de numerosas estrategias, las campañas de la NDWA (aún aquellas que no se enfocan específicamente en la trata de personas) han luchado por romper este patrón constante de explotación y vulnerabilidad. Por ejemplo, siete estados de los EE.UU. han promulgado leyes de derechos del personal del hogar. Estas campañas legislativas son complejas y requieren de mucho esfuerzo, y son las que básicamente han creado nuevos derechos y protecciones laborales para el personal del hogar, aportando reconocimiento y dignidad a la mano de obra. Estas leyes han reforzado las normas mínimas para el personal del hogar, tales como el derecho a un salario mínimo y la regulación de las horas extraordinarias. Además, la fuerza de estas campañas se basa en el liderazgo de las trabajadoras del hogar quienes están dispuestas a incorporar sus historias personales a la acción política.&nbsp;</p> <h2>Discurso desarrollado y manejado por las personas supervivientes</h2> <p>En 2013, la NDWA lanzó <a href="https://www.domesticworkers.org/beyondsurvival">Más allá de la supervivencia</a>, la primera campaña nacional de organización de trabajadoras del hogar que sobreviven a la trata de personas. La campaña surgió de las lecciones aprendidas de los años de experiencia de las trabajadoras del hogar organizadas, durante los cuales las mujeres inmigrantes y de color afectadas directamente estuvieron al frente del movimiento a nivel local y nacional. Así que desde un comienzo, <em>Más allá de la supervivencia</em> ha estado arraigada en las voces y el liderazgo de las personas supervivientes comprometidas con el activismo político. Su liderazgo genera conciencia acerca de la trata de personas sin incorporar historias de victimización, puesto que las personas supervivientes manejan por sí mismas el discurso y la agenda.</p> <p>Tal espíritu está presente en todos los esfuerzos de <em>Más allá de la supervivencia</em>. En un encuentro reciente, las participantes en la campaña – muchas de las cuales son supervivientes de trata – realizaron un ejercicio de análisis de las noticias y titulares actuales sobre la trata de personas. Muchas notaron el discurso sensacionalista predominante de los medios que retratan las experiencias traumáticas de las víctimas, negando su voz y marginalizándolas, sin ningún control ni consentimiento para la divulgación de sus experiencias personales.</p> <p>Las personas participantes en <em>Más allá de la supervivencia</em> se sintieron molestas ante titulares tales como los de <em><a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2016/07/18/chinese-nanny-beaten-starved-treated-like-a-dog-in-wealthy-minn-suburb-authorities-say/?utm_term=.9f327e183922">The Washington Post,</a></em> «Niñera china golpeada, privada de alimentos, “tratada como un perro” en un suburbio adinerado de Minnesota». Estas historias no solo horrorizaban sino que a menudo se interrumpían sin aclararse completamente, y concluían con el victimismo y no con la supervivencia, la cual es pieza clave en las historias de nuestras miembros. Como coordinadora de esta campaña, una de las experiencias más extraordinarias de mi vida ha sido presenciar a las personas supervivientes en su interacción con las y los responsables políticos, al compartir estrategias de sensibilización para identificar a personas objeto de trata o ampliar el círculo cuando una nueva persona superviviente se vincula a la campaña y comparte su historia por primera vez. </p> <h2>Soluciones sistémicas para todas las personas trabajadoras</h2> <p>En el contexto político actual de los EE.UU., las campañas promovidas por las voces de las personas supervivientes de la trata deben desempeñar un papel central en la formación del discurso sobre los derechos humanos. La era Trump promete un incremento sustancial del control de la inmigración, un aumento de la discriminación y la violencia basada en el odio, la vigilancia policial incontrolada de las comunidades de color y la supremacía de los intereses empresariales que debilitará aún más la protección de las personas trabajadoras. Las supervivientes son verdaderas expertas en la sensibilización de otras trabajadoras del hogar, y en identificar quienes puedan ser víctimas de trata. Garantizarán desde primera línea que las trabajadoras del hogar recién identificadas como víctimas de trata puedan dar un paso al frente e iniciar la dura tarea de convertirse en supervivientes. Innovarán y experimentarán para definir la mejor forma de lograrlo de cara a la creciente hostilidad de los sistemas diseñados para ayudar a las víctimas. Invertir en este liderazgo y valorar la experiencia de la vivencia es hoy más importante que nunca.</p> <p>Aún en este momento político divisor, sigue existiendo un consenso generalizado sobre la trata como una violación a los derechos humanos; y un compromiso, por lo menos de carácter retórico, sobre la necesidad de ponerle fin. Las personas supervivientes de la trata están en condiciones no sólo de sensibilizar sobre la trata de personas sino de formular un argumento convincente sobre la necesidad de continuar con los esfuerzos para enfrentar las desigualdades sistémicas. Mediante la creación estratégica y visionaria de campañas de sensibilización pública, las personas supervivientes pueden llevar el mensaje de que las políticas migratorias inhumanas, el exceso de vigilancia policial y la carencia de condiciones laborales decentes promueven un clima que posibilita la trata de personas. De este modo, pueden mejorar las condiciones no solo para las personas que sobreviven a la trata, sino en general para todas las personas trabajadoras migrantes con salarios bajos.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi">«Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LOURDES ALBÁN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en">Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/bridget-anderson/entender-el-contexto-interpersonal-y-estructural-del-trabajo-del-hoga">Entender el contexto interpersonal y estructural del trabajo del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BRIDGET ANDERSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ilana-berger/aliados-o-coconspiradores-qu-necesita-el-movimiento-de-trabajadoras-del-h">Aliados o coconspiradores: ¿qué necesita el movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ILANA BERGER</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Sameera Hafiz BTS en Español Thu, 15 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Sameera Hafiz 120213 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Aliados o coconspiradores: ¿qué necesita el movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ilana-berger/aliados-o-coconspiradores-qu-necesita-el-movimiento-de-trabajadoras-del-h <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Mejorar las condiciones de trabajo en las relaciones laborales individuales no es suficiente. Hacen falta cambios sistémicos en la industria de cuidados. <strong><em><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/ilana-berger/allies-or-co-conspirators-what-does-domestic-workers-movement-need">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/4Z1B2643.jpg" alt="" width="100%" /><span class="image-caption" style="font-size: 10px; font-style: italic;">Photo by Jennifer N. Fish.</span></p><p>¿Son «aliadas y aliados» lo que necesita realmente el movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar? Alicia Garza, cofundadora del movimiento Black Lives Matter y directora de proyectos especiales para la Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras del Hogar («NDWA», por sus siglas en inglés) prefiere utilizar el término «coconspiradores».</p> <p>«La coconspiración se refiere sobretodo a lo que hacemos, no a lo que decimos», <a href="https://www.movetoendviolence.org/blog/ally-co-conspirator-means-act-insolidarity/">explica Garza</a>. «Se trata de superar la culpa y la vergüenza, y de reconocer que nosotras no creamos nada de esto. Por lo que sí aceptamos responsabilidad es por el poder que poseemos para transformar nuestras condiciones».</p> <p>Garza nos pide que reconozcamos una dinámica de poder y busquemos corregirla, en vez de inquietarnos y culparnos. Al emplear trabajadoras del hogar, participamos de un sistema que es fundamentalmente injusto; por tanto, debemos tomar posesión de él y trabajar para cambiarlo.&nbsp;</p> <p>Para que las personas empleadoras se conviertan en coconspiradoras, deben empezar a reconocer múltiples verdades. Primero, que la industria del trabajo del hogar en los Estados Unidos está conectada directamente con un legado de esclavitud, y que la supremacía blanca y el patriarcado están profundamente arraigados en su estructura.&nbsp;</p> <p>Segundo, que sin trabajadoras del hogar, muchas personas no podríamos vivir la vida que vivimos. Necesitamos de ellas, ya sea para el cuidado infantil que nos ayuda a balancear nuestro trabajo y nuestras necesidades familiares, o bien para el cuidado que permitirá a nuestros padres envejecer con dignidad. Parte del trabajo que hacemos en Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Network («HIH», por sus siglas en inglés) es ofrecer ayuda a las empleadoras y empleadores para que colaboren en mejorar las condiciones de las trabajadoras en esta industria y, en el mejor de los casos, para convertirse en coconspiradores y transformarla.</p> <p>HIH es una red nacional de empleadoras y empleadores de trabajadoras del hogar para realizar tareas de limpieza, atención y cuidados, que saben que las condiciones laborales respetuosas y dignas benefician tanto a quienes emplean como a quienes son empleadas. En conjunto con organizaciones locales de trabajadoras del hogar y nuestros principales socias, National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA) y Caring Across Generations (CAG), promovemos una visión común de cómo deberían ser el cuidado y apoyo en los hogares para las personas tanto trabajadoras como empleadoras, y de cómo debería ser una sociedad que cuida de su población. Para alcanzar esto, ofrecemos ayuda a las personas empleadoras para mejorar sus prácticas de contratación y para que colaboren con sus trabajadoras en la creación de políticas y directrices culturales que las dignifiquen y respeten tanto a ellas como a todas nuestras comunidades.&nbsp;</p> <p>Nuestro «ingrediente especial» es nuestra interdependencia fundamental. Esto es especialmente relevante frente a la narrativa dominante de una individualidad tóxica que desciende desde los más altos niveles gubernamentales.</p> <p>En una industria donde las cosas suceden —en su sentido más literal— detrás de puertas cerradas, la aprobación de leyes no es suficiente para mejorar las condiciones laborales de las trabajadoras del hogar. La aprobación de la declaración de derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar en siete estados fue una victoria histórica para cientos de miles de personas; sin embargo, su implementación sigue siendo un reto puesto que en esta industria existen condiciones laborales diarias que no han sufrido cambios sustanciales. La materialización de condiciones dignas y justas en los lugares de trabajo depende del conocimiento que tengan las trabajadoras de sus derechos y las personas contratantes de sus obligaciones. La información pública respecto a leyes relevantes ha sido insuficiente y en este punto recae fuertemente sobre los hombros de las organizaciones comunitarias de base. En la mayoría de los casos, las trabajadoras del hogar permanecen aisladas y quienes las contratan siguen siendo quienes fijan los términos del contrato.</p> <p>Por esta razón, HIH inició una campaña pública de información para apoyar la implementación de la Declaración de derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar: My Home is Someone’s Workplace –MHSW (Mi casa es el lugar de trabajo de otra persona). Sus objetivos son: (1) garantizar la implementación de los estándares legales mínimos existentes y ampliados en la Declaración de Derechos, y (2) promover «estándares comunitarios» que establezcan directrices más allá de aquellas legales, y que representen la visión de nuestro movimiento sobre las mejores prácticas laborales en el trabajo del hogar.&nbsp;</p> <p>MHSW es una campaña intensiva y de alto impacto dirigida a las comunidades para aprovechar el ímpetu generado por las victorias de la declaración de derechos en todo el país.&nbsp;Así, esperamos desarrollar un modelo replicable para aprovechar la visibilidad de estas iniciativas legislativas, las cuales enfocan la atención en lugares de trabajo que han estado desatendidos por mucho tiempo. </p> <p>Por medio de esta campaña, se motiva a las personas empleadoras para reconocer que sus hogares son realmente lugares de trabajo y se les incentiva a dejar de referirse a las trabajadoras del hogar como «parte de la familia» (un cambio de paradigma que ofrece un punto de partida muy necesario para la implementación de mejores estándares). Para tener éxito en esta lucha de una industria del trabajo del hogar más justa, HIH debe ir más allá e involucrar al mayor número de personas empleadoras posible. </p> <p>La mayor limitación para nuestro trabajo en MHSW ha sido no poder cambiar la estructura de poder: esta se basa en que las personas empleadoras hagan lo correcto de forma individual, pero no democratiza la distribución de poder en la industria entre quienes contratan y quienes son contratadas. Además, puede limitar a las personas empleadoras que no pueden pagar más y aquellas que tienen dificultades para pagar los servicios que ya reciben. A pesar del mito de que quienes contratan trabajadoras del hogar son personas blancas y ricas, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/lucero-herrera-saba-waheed/dispelling-myths-why-domestic-employer-worker-solidarity-is">las empleadoras y empleadores son un grupo mucho más diverso de lo que pensamos</a>, y los trabajos de cuidado bien pagados son una opción que pocas personas pueden permitirse.</p> <p>Por tanto, aunque cada persona empleadora estuviera perfectamente informada y deseara implementar salarios y condiciones de trabajo justas para sus trabajadoras del hogar, esto no sería posible debido al problema sistémico reinante, sobre cómo se valoran y pagan estos servicios. Las personas empleadoras no deberían soportar la carga que resulta de la ausencia de una infraestructura integral de cuidado para apoyar a las familias, pero tampoco deberían hacerlo las trabajadoras del hogar. Por lo tanto, además de nuestro trabajo informativo, HIH está involucrada en campañas para transformar la industria del cuidado de manera que todos los cuidados a lo largo de la vida sean razonables y accesibles para quienes los necesiten. Los esfuerzos para expandir la asequibilidad son cruciales para conseguir triunfos importantes a nivel legislativo, incluyendo la declaración de derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar.</p> <p>Por consiguiente, HIH organiza a las personas empleadoras para ampliar el acceso y la asequibilidad de los cuidados, con especial atención al apoyo y los cuidados a largo plazo para las personas mayores y con discapacidad en California y Nueva York. Todo esto mientras se construyen los cimientos para campañas de mayor duración por la transformación de este sector en uno que provea de apoyo universal a las necesidades de las familias. Al igual que sucede con la reforma del sistema de salud —y tantas otras problemáticas—, la primera victoria en políticas estatales expande las posibilidades disponibles.&nbsp;</p> <p>Tras las elecciones del 2016, líderes y personal de HIH comenzaron a pensar en cómo las personas empleadoras de trabajadoras del hogar, quienes en su mayoría son mujeres de color y migrantes, podrían ayudar a personas migrantes y otras poblaciones que han sido blancos de esta administración. Creamos y divulgamos los<a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1iM696_2aZGSwV-UpmSgBC_uQgFpY4Vu1T1lg-sXgyR8/edit"> Consejos para personas empleadoras luego de las elecciones</a>, que fueron compartidos y vistos por miles de personas. También lanzamos nuestra campaña Sanctuary Homes en conjunto con NDWA (#SanctuaryHomes) tras haber conversado con nuestras empleadoras y empleadores miembro, así como con personas asociadas y aliadas que representan a las principales comunidades, incluyendo National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA), Cosecha, Mijente, Make the Road NY, y The California Domestic Workers Coalition.</p> <p>La participación en una industria que está tan conectada con la esclavitud y la supremacía blanca es complicada. Sin embargo, creemos que quienes contratan pueden aliarse o coconspirar con las trabajadoras del hogar, cambiar sus prácticas de empleo particulares y organizarse con las trabajadoras para transformar la industria y nuestra sociedad. En nuestro trabajo, continuamos moldeando valores centrales como la interdependencia y accesibilidad y pretendemos cambiar la cultura del movimiento y nuestras comunidades hacia estos valores en común.&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Para efectos de este artículo, utilizamos el término «personas empleadoras» en forma general. En esta categoría incluimos personas que contratan trabajadoras del hogar, aunque estas sean pagadas a través de agencias, el programa Medicaid u otros fondos públicos, de manera que la clientela puede no estar pagando directamente a las trabajadoras.</em></p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi">«Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LOURDES ALBÁN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en">Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/bridget-anderson/entender-el-contexto-interpersonal-y-estructural-del-trabajo-del-hoga">Entender el contexto interpersonal y estructural del trabajo del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BRIDGET ANDERSON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Ilana Berger BTS en Español Wed, 14 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Ilana Berger 120212 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Philanthropy can have blind spots and red lines. We must resist the temptation to sidestep difficult issues when it comes to workers’ rights.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/8763225240_45a9aa466d_k%20%281%29.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Wood factory in Viet Nam. Aaron Santos for ILO/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/iloasiapacific/8763225240/in/photolist-jwqh5i-UT5N3X-eYwS5Y-UFxXKg-TDzbZc-raks3M-dg44wY-dyZiRW-emoyXL-dbRh3Y-mXrJTa-e5zMst-dMJ67e-jwFfkY-NUC2b2-emhF2i-jwzFSk-n9TDCB-dwGqKL-jyQ49Q-dMSY9E-UNJDsQ-qe3k5Z-dkFawY-dkF5Hc-emnPym-cBtGRu-eLEpj8-cBtCgm-dM1axD-nsRUBf-dM1kxg-oQrDFC-mgxogB-hJVQX9-eZxoRU-bwXuNV-dM78dE-dkF7b8-eDG33A-dbPV5R-uSyvhp-dcqpbY-mgEi6H-dMz4eo-drFc6d-ft35aC-dM5xN3-drRB2w-dyYMjJ">Flickr. (cc by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>As a funder working at the intersection of human trafficking and workers rights, I greatly value the landscape analysis and call for collaboration found the new report <a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MklmEG5tOK0XbOIkdFucYTqUddVplR7M/view?usp=sharing">‘Quality Work Worldwide’</a>, recently released by the Ford Foundation and SAGE Fund. As another funder recently reflected, it is especially helpful as a directional map which identifies specific sites for improving the quality of work globally. Equally importantly, it also includes an analysis of specific barriers which can be anticipated, such as investors’ short horizon on profits and lack of global governance, when it comes to changing the direction of our global economy. </p> <p>While both funders and NGOs can benefit greatly from this map, there are still some uncharted areas. &nbsp;In this piece, I identify two additional themes that merit further consideration: </p> <h2>Recognise sex work in the analysis</h2> <p>When we talk about informal work, we too often leave out the sex industry. Like many within society, funders can turn away from sex workers. Because of criminalisation and stigma, even labour rights funders often forget about this large sector, or gravitate towards more palatable causes. </p> <p>Sex workers have been in conditions of precarity long before recent shifts in the economy made headlines. Operating in a hostile environment and without any of the benefits attached to legal employment, sex workers have nevertheless found ways to better their conditions. They’ve done this through collectivisation, unionisation, law reform, self-regulation, peer protection, sharing resources, and early and constant innovation in their use of the internet. Many sex workers embrace the hustle and creativity that is possible in informal work, but also face exploitation and violence that comes from being so marginalised.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Foundations themselves only have money to give away because of corporate profits.</p> <p>As the report states, “informality itself is not a challenge; rather, the lack of rights and protections for these workers – and the stigma surrounding informality – is impeding quality work for billions of workers around the world.” &nbsp;Many of the strategies offered in the report for informal workers, from facilitating peer exchange to tailoring responses to specific sectors, would be valuable for sex workers. Promising work by sex workers to protect their rights should be brought to scale. Including these workers would push the boundaries of our analysis, help us think about who else we are leaving out because of our moral judgments, our undervaluing of feminised labour, or our inability to see all the ways that labour and capital circulate. </p> <p>&nbsp;We should not leave sex workers off the map when it comes to any exploration of the risks and opportunities in the future of work. </p> <h2>Challenging ourselves to challenge corporate power</h2> <p>The power of corporations permeates every aspect of our lives, our economy, and our democracy. The legal buffers separating corporations at the top from workers in their supply chains mean they can turn a blind eye to forced labour and other violations, even while benefitting from this race to the bottom. This report explicitly names the power of corporations, along with the need to build worker power to challenge it through leading models such as worker-driven social responsibility (WSR).</p> <p>But corporate power reaches far beyond the workers whom they employ. Foundations themselves only have money to give away because of corporate profits, and their endowments (usually 95% of their assets) are invested in the world’s capital markets. Corporate foundations are even more tied to the interests of corporations. As Anand Giridharadas argues in his recent book Winner Takes All, philanthropic foundations may talk about “systemic change,” but most philanthropists benefit too much from the system as it stands to really want to change it. &nbsp;</p> <p>A funder strategy to promote workers’ power must acknowledge this tension. This report from the Ford Foundation and SAGE Fund will have even more impact if it compels funders to explore how philanthropy’s relationship with corporations could be used for good. More foundations could be screening for workers’ rights offenders in their investment portfolios, or using their position as shareholders to hold corporations to account. &nbsp;Foundations must also be challenged to move outside our comfort zone: to fund more campaigns that directly challenge corporations and public policy change that puts limits on corporate power. &nbsp;</p> <p>Supporting the kind of transformation that will give everyone access to quality work will require funders to eliminate blinds spots such as sex work, and to confront corporate power, and our own relationship to it. </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work">Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AMOL MEHRA</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Sienna Baskin Tue, 13 Nov 2018 11:09:08 +0000 Sienna Baskin 120556 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Funding the future of work means addressing gaps in the present of work https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/amol-mehra/funding-future-of-work-means-addressing-gaps-in-present-of-work <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Investing in frontline communities builds resilience and increases opportunities for non-exploitative work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/8550275501_11ed58a07c_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Rug-making in Mongolia. Byamba-ochir Byambasuren for ILO/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/iloasiapacific/8550275501/in/photolist-e2yp28-p5jzHH-TAEEfd-drFwmo-drFcrP-nbh6P3-RGgNck-UT6xWZ-e2yp54-jwtc1L-qqZ2sG-dM4eGu-nrwkiA-emoGUE-dM6VFU-U7rJD9-emosuC-cAoiWN-emoyAU-TDymZ4-gJowe7-UFxXWi-jwCFfm-NPUUB6-gJgGGp-dksj9D-dbPJE3-dkF9Ga-drCwfD-dg4Bbp-dbPiQ3-hJVRDu-dMMquT-cAoiTC-dg4GvH-UNJMy9-fTEke3-hJVNb7-emhVvx-V9v4df-cGUjwU-eatEAQ-dM4ixb-gxB6xR-VHLdKY-2cAae28-jYrExA-dMSHSy-jwta75-dMPFx1">Flickr. (cc by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>Our economic globalisation has raised hundreds of millions out of abject poverty. It has also left far too many with far too little. The global labour market teems with workers seeking employment to lift their lives beyond subsistence, yet the contexts in which they search for work make them highly vulnerable to exploitation and abuse. The predatory and pernicious side of economic globalisation thrives on an endless supply of fragmented, marginalised and invisible labour. No sector is immune to this reality because it is a hallmark of our market system. It’s a design feature of the global economy, but it need not be.</p> <p>The statement by the Ford Foundation, Open Society Foundation and Sage Fund properly underscores the challenges presented by our current economic paradigm and draws attention to the various levers that drive and reinforce inequalities. Helpfully, the statement also articulates “opportunity areas” that are primed to address the design feature mentioned above.</p> <p>The Freedom Fund supports work across these opportunity areas. Working towards our mission to end modern slavery, we have a front-row seat to the emergence of powerful solutions for ensuring fairness, equity, and justice for all workers. </p> <p>In Thailand, we work in the seafood sector where labour abuses, including forced and bonded labour, are rife. Migrant workers in the seafood sector scour the seas on fishing vessels for weeks at a time, catching the seafood served in restaurants and sold by retailers across the world. These workers have no bargaining power, no formal recognition and very little social protection. </p> <p>In Ethiopia, we focus on a population of women and girls who, seeking economic opportunity, migrate to the Middle East for domestic work. In transit and on arrival, these women are at high risk of being abused and falling into situations of slavery. Most emigration takes place within an unsafe, irregular system that leaves emigrants vulnerable to physical abuse and sexual violence. </p> <p>In southern India, we work with frontline communities to address labour exploitation in parts of the garment industry. Across the region, tens of thousands of girls and young women have been recruited into fraudulent employment schemes in some of the industry’s cotton spinning mills. These workers are buried so deep in apparel supply chains that global retailers trying to address abuses across their operations claim they have little influence against these instances of exploitation. </p> <p>Across all these contexts, we see how the opportunity areas in the joint funders statement are present. Supporting work along these lines can drive real and meaningful reform.</p> <p>First, we see the drivers that lead to abuse. These include the decentralised nature of economic production; the lack of meaningful economic opportunities in communities around the world; weak education about rights; low commitment and resources from governments to enforce protections; and targeted and destructive efforts to undermine worker organising and power.</p> <p>Next, we see how frontline communities themselves are best placed to address these challenges. It is therefore crucial to invest in the frontlines, including workers and civil society, and to develop solutions with them to tackle the drivers of abuse. This could be by investing in efforts to build worker power, and by supporting workers to organise, claim their rights, and challenge the systems that lead to abuse as we are doing in Thailand. This could also mean investing in community-based economic models, or supporting prevention programmes and alternative livelihoods to build resilience among vulnerable groups as we’re doing in Ethiopia. Finally this could include supporting civil society to advocate and engage with factory owners, global retailers and local officials to drive reforms as we’re doing in southern India. </p> <p>As we embark on this fourth industrial revolution, we must take note of the challenges of work – and their effects on vulnerable workers specifically – in the present. Exploitation thrives across sectors and regions, and our efforts as funders aren’t adding up to enough. We need more action, faster and at scale, to ensure that the future of work is less bleak than the present. The key to success is understanding the contexts and consequences of current economic models, and directing resources to frontline efforts that confront the drivers of exploitation. Only then can we possibly ensure that the future of work is a hopeful one.</p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SINE PLAMBECH, DY PLAMBECK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work">From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">AVA CARADONNA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo">Three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES SINCLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MIKE DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/sienna-baskin/expanding-map-how-funders-can-ensure-quality-work-for-all">Expanding the map: how funders can ensure quality work for all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIENNA BASKIN</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Amol Mehra Tue, 13 Nov 2018 11:01:48 +0000 Amol Mehra 120554 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Entender el contexto interpersonal y estructural del trabajo del hogar https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/bridget-anderson/entender-el-contexto-interpersonal-y-estructural-del-trabajo-del-hoga <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>La relación entre las trabajadoras del hogar y quienes las emplean puede ser difícil; pero no tiene por qué serlo. <strong><em><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/bridget-anderson/understanding-interpersonal-and-structural-context-of-domestic-work">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/16099754179_6d3caf1989_o.jpg" alt="" width="100%" /><span class="image-caption">Freaktography/Flickr.&nbsp;<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">(CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)</a></span></p><p>Mi interés en el trabajo del hogar surgió cuando dejé la universidad y comencé a ser lo que ahora se llama una trabajadora del hogar interna para una familia adinerada en el oeste de Londres. Por ese entonces, era «la chica de arriba». A cambio del departamento independiente en el piso de arriba, limpiaba y lavaba la ropa durante cuatro horas de lunes a viernes y hacía el té cuando la hija menor llegaba a casa. Pulía la plata y planchaba las sábanas. Después de las fiestas limpiaba el vómito de las personas que luego se convertirían en ministras y ministros del Partido Laborista.</p> <p>Mi empleadora me explicó que alquilaba el departamento a cambio de estos servicios, en vez de ofrecer un salario, porque pensaba que eso sería explotación y ella no quería explotar a nadie. Cuando comencé a trabajar me pareció justo, pero nuestra relación se fue deteriorando. Ella y su esposo estaban en medio de un divorcio. A veces ella se desahogaba conmigo y me contaba todo, para después llamarme la atención al día siguiente por no haber doblado las sábanas correctamente. Cumplía las funciones de confidente y de sirvienta alternativamente según su estado de ánimo.</p> <p>En esa misma época comencé a trabajar con trabajadoras del hogar indocumentadas. No pretendo comparar mi situación con la de ellas: eran mujeres que podían estar escapando de situaciones de vida o muerte, ser golpeadas por poner un suéter en la lavadora o por comer un pedazo de pan, tener prohibido contactar a sus seres queridos, sin tener un salario, sin tener un espacio para dormir, etc.</p> <p>Las empleadoras, quienes con frecuencia les gritaban u obligaban en forma deliberada a realizar tareas humillantes, perpetuaban la mayor parte de la violencia física no sexual. «El esposo, él es muy bueno, pero la mujer es una fiera» me confesó una vez una mujer. La representación de los esposos como los buenos y los reproches hacía las esposas por abusar de sus trabajadoras me dejaba intranquila, al igual que las críticas de algunas trabajadoras del hogar hacia sus empleadoras: «Si yo fuera tan rica como ella, sería ama de casa y no dejaría a mi hijo o hija al cuidado de una extraña».</p> <p>«¿Por qué el patriarcado ha quedado libre de culpa?» Reflexionaba sobre ello incluso cuando yo también prefería al esposo de la familia para la que trabajaba que a la esposa. Sin embargo, tenía claro que las personas que nos empleaban nunca podrían ser nuestras aliadas.</p> <p>Ahora veo que el tema es más complicado. Primero, porque no siempre es fácil distinguir quién es la persona que nos emplea. En muchos hogares heteronormativos, la mujer puede administrar el trabajo del hogar, pero es el hombre quien firma el contrato. Cuando se trata de un trabajo de cuidado, la persona que utiliza el servicio es a veces la empleadora o el empleador y a veces un familiar, y cada persona tiene relaciones e interacciones distintas con la trabajadora. En ocasiones, una agencia emplea formalmente a una trabajadora del hogar, y puede también mediar entre la trabajadora y la persona usuaria del servicio. Asimismo, trabajadoras y empleadoras no son categorías exclusivas o binarias: muchas trabajadoras del hogar inmigrantes utilizan los servicios de trabajadoras del hogar en sus países de origen. Quién contrata, por qué, en qué etapa de la vida, y con qué implicaciones sociales, todo esto varía cultural e históricamente, al igual que la relación de poder entre trabajadora y empleadora.</p> <p>Además, es importante reconocer que incluso en los países ricos, no todos las personas empleadoras son de clase media. Cuando estaba investigando la expansión de la Unión Europea de 2004, realizamos una serie de entrevistas con «au pairs». Recuerdo a una mujer que había trabajado como «au pair» para una familia por más de seis años. Su empleadora era una madre soltera que tenía dos hijos y tenía un trabajo por turnos en un hospital donde le pagaban poco. No tenía familia cerca y su vida habría sido insostenible si no hubiera tenido acceso al apoyo de una persona que viviera en su casa y la ayudara a cambio de un sueldo inferior al salario mínimo. La «au pair» explicó que no se había ido porque le preocupaba qué sería de la familia si ella se iba.</p> <p>El problema de la explotación en el trabajo del hogar no es solo el resultado de personas empleadoras moralmente censurables. Se trata de la dependencia del capitalismo patriarcal en el trabajo reproductivo gratis o de bajo costo, el deterioro de las redes de seguridad social y la feminización de las políticas de austeridad. En este ejemplo, la «au pair» y su empleadora podrían haber sido aliadas en la lucha por mejorar los salarios y las condiciones laborales de trabajadoras y trabajadores en el sector salud, y para mejorar la provisión estatal de guarderías como requisitos necesarios para asegurar que las trabajadoras del hogar no sean explotadas. El truco es comenzar con los derechos de las trabjadoras del hogar, en vez de decir que se garantizarán sus derechos tan pronto como se resuelva todo lo demás.</p> <p>No se puede negar que en los hogares particulares existen conflictos de intereses entre las empleadoras y las trabajadoras del hogar. Estos no se limitan a cuestiones de pago, horario y condiciones de trabajo, sino que también se relacionan con las emociones. La empleadora puede sentirse insegura por el cariño de sus hijas e hijos hacia su niñera o tener ansiedad sobre el estado de envejecimiento de sus padres, sentirse culpable por no estar en casa, frustrada porque la casa no se ha limpiado de la manera que lo habría hecho ella, y preocupada por las atenciones de su esposo. La trabajadora también puede sentirse celosa de las relaciones personales, sentir resentimiento al encontrarse alejada de sus seres queridos mientras está cuidando de otros, o sentirse enfadada por la desigualdad global que hace que ella preste servicios para personas con un estilo de vida inalcanzable para ella. Pero también pueden haber sentimientos positivos en ambos lados y un entendimiento que surge de la convivencia diaria, aunque se debe destacar que esto no necesariamente se refleja en el pago o en las condiciones laborales.</p> <p>He hablado con empleadoras para varios proyectos de investigación, y la mayoría no querían verse como explotadoras que se aprovechaban de una mujer en una situación más vulnerable. Para reconciliar este punto, con frecuencia se apoyan en la noción de «empleo como un favor»: la trabajadora necesita un trabajo y la empleadora beneficia a la trabajadora al proporcionarle un empleo. Entonces la empleadora interpretará la capacidad de su empleada de comprar medicamentos, pagar la escuela de sus hijas e hijos o dejar a un esposo alcohólico como resultado del salario que ha ganado como trabajadora del hogar. En consecuencia, expresan que no solo no perpetúan la desigualdad, sino que también son partícipes de la vida privada de sus trabajadoras y que estas confían en ellas como si fueran algo más que una empleadora.</p> <p>¿Qué tipo de alianza se busca de parte de las empleadoras —a diferencia de otras partes interesadas— en la promoción de los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar? En todo el mundo, las personas empleadoras tienden a ser reacias a reconocer el derecho de las trabajadoras de afiliarse a un sindicato. Pueden dar a las trabajadoras la flexibilidad para asistir a reuniones y eventos políticos; brindarles apoyo para la legalización y la regularización; estar dispuestas a firmar documentos de patrocinio, a pagar impuestos y seguridad social; y tener capacidad de reflexión y discusión. He conocido a trabajadoras del hogar que dicen que ellas sí tienen esta clase de empleadoras o empleadores. Educar y motivarlos para que contribuyan de estas formas y para que entiendan la relación entre lo que sucede en el hogar y las desigualdades estructurales constituye un pequeño paso hacia la eliminación de las desigualdades nacionales, económicas y de género que caracterizan tanto la demanda como la oferta del trabajo del hogar en el mercado.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi">«Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LOURDES ALBÁN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en">Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Bridget Anderson BTS en Español Tue, 13 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Bridget Anderson 120211 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>If philanthropic foundations want to positively affect the lives of workers, then they should use their money to hold the powerful to account and to help workers be heard.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/37446145875_b42f29e792_b.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Overview shot of the 2017 Salzburg Global Seminar 'Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy'. Salzburg Global Seminar/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/salzburgglobal/37446145875/in/photolist-Z3ZhyK-85Gv4R-qq1oA1-bWmD5u-bULE7a-YMLZVW-hbx8uc-XKFBYb-9y5Dsn-YLdtJh-9pnkpB-XKFztG-9pqrc3-W9coMq-Z3Zf5B-2aNpLwZ-9pnpkg-9pqpbq-9iVGax-e6iBzj-7Q41D9-jCvvmb-6GRZ35-k7kDgn-6GLHUX-hbvWHh-5GpZNt-e6cYDg-9pppXv-hfjjsN-bzDrxx-zhGzy-9Fy2Fb-YMM16f-5HLmt9-8ebPRk-6TyeUF-dAoRnd-dYmQn3-4pwt1h-9pqn6U-yt2vf-xSr8Bj-6s921h-6GS6EL-6dPHPq-yNsvqG-8ccmVP-6V72hz-zhGR5">Flickr. (cc by-nc-nd)</a> </p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>Three funders – the Ford Foundation, the Sage Fund, and Open Society Foundations – <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement">recently wrote about their strategic priorities when funding interventions</a> in the world of work. The Ford Foundation was the most detailed, identifying their five areas for strategic interventions as follows:</p> <style> ol li {margin-bottom:12px;} </style> <ol> <li>Changing company practices and behaviour;&nbsp;</li> <li>Influencing investment;&nbsp;</li> <li>Establishing international standards and norms;&nbsp;</li> <li>Strengthening and enforcing labour laws;&nbsp;</li> <li>Organising workers to build voice and power.</li> </ol> <p>My assessment is that the conventional human rights framework – the third strategy on this list – requires reinforcing. Despite all of the talk of new and different approaches, there remains considerable value to actually holding governments accountable for existing standards which they&nbsp; have agreed to uphold, yet frequently fail to do so. The final strategy – organising workers – also deserves special emphasis and needs further funding to amplify and transmit workers’ voices.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Despite all of the talk of new and different approaches, there remains considerable value to actually holding governments accountable for existing standards.</p> <h2>We still need more accountability!</h2> <p>Reinforcing the human rights framework means holding governments to account for: </p> <ol> <li>Their failure to implement the positive measures required to protect certain human rights. There is much more to this than criminalising human trafficking, forced labour, and other workplace abuses; </li> <li>The measures they <em>have implemented</em> that effectively prevent certain categories of workers from exercising their rights, such as migrant workers and domestic workers.&nbsp; </li> </ol> <p>Like all strategies, this approach needs some fine-tuning. It should avoid supporting initiatives at the United Nations that go around in circles or do not result in binding agreements. Instead, it should explicitly identify what all governments must do in order to stop gross exploitation and discrimination. Some judgments by regional human rights courts are already doing this.</p> <p>Furthermore, as labour inspectors around the world are routinely under-resourced, this is a sector that requires monitoring, as well as technical innovation. Monitoring both the resources provided to labour inspectors (and other enforcement agencies operating in the world of work) and the way they perform is crucial, but they can only begin to function properly with adequate funding. We shouldn’t assume that only rich businesses or philanthropists can take on the job of enforcing laws against extreme exploitation and labour abuse. </p> <p>Interventions are already underway on all five strategic areas. There is a danger that the first four of the five result too easily in ‘top down’ approaches and ‘one size fits all’ solutions, when the world’s cultural diversity requires more heterogeneous solutions. This diversity tends to be glossed over, especially when global capital as a whole is held responsible for most ills. Priority should be given to ‘horizontal’ rather than ‘vertical’ approaches, whereas today it’s too often the other way around.</p> <p>We have learned from experience that ‘one size fits all’ solutions tend to be deformed once they are implemented at local level. A small business supplying a global brand might, for example, satisfy the brand’s requirement of “no child labour” by discriminating against young workers (banning anyone under 18 from its workplace). Similarly, we hear of migrants who spend fortunes to move from one part of the world to another, only to be sent home again in the name of ‘saving’ them from the clutches of traffickers or other criminals. Such stories demonstrate how some programmes or policies do tremendous damage to the individuals involved. Yet it remains surprisingly difficult to secure funding to document these negative effects. There needs to be an open acknowledgment when interventions do not work, yet funders and civil society organisations tend to close ranks in ways which make it hard to change course when mistakes have been made. </p> <h2>Workers need a greater voice!</h2> <p>The fifth strategy listed by the Ford Foundation – amplifying the voice and influence of young and old workers, migrant workers, and returnee migrants – is vital. Conventionally this was done by promoting freedom of association and collective bargaining, and trusting that trade unions would transmit the workers’ voices. However, experience has shown that this is not enough: many workers go unrepresented and the trade union structures at the international level are sometimes part of the top-down problem.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">It is relatively easy to be accurate about the abusive experiences reported by workers. It is more dangerous when intermediaries impose their own bias on the proposed remedies.</p> <p>Paying attention to “workers’ voice” implies an openness to alternatives outside of conventional trade unions. Such methods include, for example, consulting workers confidentially (i.e. without their employers or supervisors being aware of the consultations) and summarising their messages in different ways for different audiences. This should prevent packaging their words only for people who have influence (i.e. vertical communication), and help make relevant messages available to other workers (the horizontal audience). Improving access to accurate information empowers workers. We saw this in the way farmers in parts of Africa were empowered when they first obtained mobile telephones. Once they were able to check on prices in different markets, they were able to reduce their dependence on the buyers who came to their farms. &nbsp;</p> <p>Transmitting workers’ voice raises numerous ethical issues, especially if support for alternatives has the side effect of undermining the influence of unions. Is it possible for either workers’ leaders or non-workers (such as activists and researchers) to interpret workers’ voice correctly and honestly? It is relatively easy to be accurate about the abusive experiences reported by workers. It is more dangerous when intermediaries impose their own bias on the proposed remedies. Further finance is needed to develop innovative methods to transmit and amplify workers’ voices, focusing on methods that do not leave workers or migrants dependent on yet another broker who manipulates the message. The popular refrain of ‘giving voice to the voiceless’ misses the point entirely. People who are exploited are not voiceless, so we need to be cautious when we claim to speak on their behalf. </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/tom-hunt/new-podcast-future-of-trade-unions">NEW PODCASTS: The future of trade unions – masterclass series</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/igor-bosc/round-about-solutions-to-forced-labour-don-t-work">Why roundabout solutions to forced labour don’t work</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/michael-dottridge/eight-reasons-why-we-shouldn-t-use-term-modern-slavery">Eight reasons why we shouldn’t use the term ‘modern slavery’</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/mike-dottridge-neil-howard/how-not-to-achieve-sustainable-development-goal">How not to achieve a sustainable development goal</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Mike Dottridge Mon, 12 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Mike Dottridge 120462 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Volver al futuro: el trabajo de las mujeres y la economía de los pequeños encargos https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/abigail-hunt/volver-al-futuro-el-trabajo-de-las-mujeres-y-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-en <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Aprender de la historia del trabajo de las mujeres puede ayudarnos a superar la discriminación y mejorar las condiciones laborales en la economía de los pequeños encargos. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/abigail-hunt/back-to-future-women-s-work-and-gig-economy">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/32847731616_351931eb4c_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">An Ethiopian domestic worker in Beirut, Lebanon. Joe Saade for UN Women/Flickr. (CC 2.0 by-nc-nd)</p> <p>«El futuro del trabajo» es <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/issue/magazine/2017/02/24/magazine-index-20170226">noticia</a> y el debate capta interés en los círculos políticos. Y con razón: una falta persistente de trabajo digno a nivel global está afectando en forma negativa los ingresos y, por consiguiente, los estándares de vida. Encarar esto es un desafío cada vez más crítico para la clase política alrededor del mundo, a la luz del latente cambio demográfico y la aceptación del aumento del desempleo como algo habitual.</p> <p>En la <a href="http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_protect/---protrav/---travail/documents/publication/wcms_443267.pdf">economía de los pequeños encargos</a>, en la cual las compañías teconológicas desarrollan plataformas a través de las cuales se puede contratar a personas para realizar tareas definidas, el debate suele centrarse en las maneras en las que la «Uberización» está diseñada para cambiar profundamente las formas tradicionales de organizar el consumo y el empleo. Pero no deberíamos permitir que el resplandor de la nueva tecnología nos ciegue: la economía de los pequeños encargos es, a la larga, un vino viejo en botella nueva.</p> <p>Un evento de la <a href="http://www.ethicaltrade.org/events/future-work-what-does-it-hold-workers-rights">Iniciativa de Comercio Ético</a> —naturalmente, acerca del futuro del trabajo— constituyó un espacio importante para la reflexión. Apoyándose en décadas de investigación, el profesor <a href="http://www2.le.ac.uk/colleges/ssah/research/cswef/staff/professor-peter-nolan">Peter Nolan</a> sentó las bases para argumentar que la «futurología» (o el negocio de predecir tendencias y resultados en el mundo laboral) suele estar disociado del análisis de las tendencias del mercado laboral histórico y de un estudio empírico de lo que ocurre en el presente.</p> <p>Asimismo, en nuestra investigación en el <a href="https://www.odi.org/">Instituto de Desarrollo de Ultramar</a> (ODI por sus siglas en inglés) sobre las experiencias de las mujeres en la economía de pequeños encargos, descubrimos que en muchos aspectos esta economía reproduce los desafíos de género existentes en el mundo laboral, aunque en nuevas formas facilitadas por la tecnología. A continuación, ofrecemos un par de ejemplos.</p> <h2>Los perfiles en las plataformas perpetúan la discriminación</h2> <p>El diseño de la plataforma suele perpetuar la discriminación existente contra las trabajadoras y los trabajadores. Nuestra <a href="https://www.odi.org/publications/10658-good-gig-rise-demand-domestic-work">investigación</a> inspeccionó plataformas de trabajo del hogar —como cocinar, limpiar y a veces de cuidado personal— en India, Kenia, México y Sudáfrica. El trabajo del hogar ya es uno de los sectores más inseguros y explotadores a nivel global, en el que la fuerza laboral está formada de manera desproporcionada por mujeres de grupos marginalizados o minoritarios.</p> <p>Descubrimos que, como en muchos modelos de la economía de los pequeños encargos, las plataformas de trabajo del hogar permiten a la clientela acceder a <a href="https://domestly.com/cleaners/cape-town/city-bowl/">los perfiles</a> de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores y que estas muestran sus imágenes y otra información demográfica. Esto significa que los hogares que contratan personal del hogar pueden realizar su selección en base a características diferentes de sus capacidades para la tarea, como la edad, el género, la raza o su origen étnico.</p> <p>Además, los sistemas de evaluación que se utilizan en los hogares para calificar la calidad de la tarea completada suelen estar integrados a los perfiles de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores. Aun así, <a href="https://lawreview.uchicago.edu/page/social-costs-uber">estos sistemas pueden exponer a las personas trabajadoras a la discriminación</a> ya que las evaluaciones son muy subjetivas y probablemente estén influenciadas por las parcialidades de la persona que evalúa y sus actitudes discriminatorias. Los efectos de esto en las personas trabajadoras que suelen tener dificultades son reales porque las críticas negativas afectan las decisiones de otros hogares para contratar a esa persona o no. En resumen, una crítica que no sea elogiosa puede desfavorecer seriamente a las oportunidades económicas de las personas trabajadoras en el mercado de las plataformas abarrotadas, donde el suministro de personal suele sobrepasar la demanda de sus servicios.</p> <h2>Trabajo digital a destajo desde casa </h2> <p>El «crowdwork» (subcontratación masiva en proyectos colaborativos) digital también comporta desafíos. Contempla plataformas en línea que conectan globalmente a las personas trabajadoras con tareas como etiquetar imágenes, desarrollar bases de datos o transcribir documentos. Estas son completadas y entregadas por internet a compradores —frecuentemente anónimos— dentro de un sistema de remuneración sobre la base del número de tareas completadas. En muchos aspectos, este trabajo es muy parecido al trabajo a destajo desde casa que se extendió a lo largo de los países en desarrollo varias décadas atrás, cuando la producción en el exterior y las cadenas de producción globales se afianzaron. El trabajo del hogar suele ser trabajo de mujeres, y <a href="http://www.wiego.org/sites/wiego.org/files/publications/files/IEMS-Sector-Full-Report-Street-Vendors.pdf">recientemente fue valorado en </a>&nbsp;un porcentaje estimado del 32% del empleo total de las mujeres en India.</p> <p>Al igual que el trabajo del hogar tradicional, los datos precisos de «crowdwork» son difíciles de conseguir. Los estudios sugieren que entre el <a href="http://www.feps-europe.eu/assets/778d57d9-4e48-45f0-b8f8-189da359dc2b/crowd-working-survey-netherlands-finalpdf.pdf">46</a>% y el<a href="http://www.uni-europa.org/2016/02/16/crowdworking-survey-reveails-the-true-size-of-the-uks-gig-economy/">54</a>% de las trabajadoras y trabajadores colaborativos de los países desarrollados son mujeres. Este porcentaje suele ser menor en los países en desarrollo debido a <a href="http://webfoundation.org/2016/10/digging-into-data-on-the-gender-digital-divide/">las diferencias de género significativas en</a> la actividad digital. Sin embargo, lo más importante es que mientras <a href="http://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/employment-and-growth/independent-work-choice-necessity-and-the-gig-economy">los datos disponibles</a> sugieren casi una igualdad de género en la participación, los hombres tienen más posibilidades de participar por voluntad propia.</p> <p><a href="https://www.odi.org/comment/10498-international-calls-innovation-support-women-refugees-who-want-work">Nuestra investigación actual</a> sobre la economía de los pequeños encargos en Jordania sugiere que es probable que la participación de las mujeres en esta nueva variedad de trabajo desde casa aumente rápidamente. Se percibe como particularmente adecuado para las mujeres, debido a las normas socioculturales que restringen la movilidad y el compromiso con trabajos remunerados fuera del hogar, y su flexibilidad también permite a las mujeres continuar con el cuidado no remunerado del hogar. Aun así, <a href="http://www.wiego.org/informal-economy/occupational-groups/home-based-workers">la historia de las trabajadoras del hogar</a> a nivel global nos dice que aunque el trabajo colaborativo pueda proporcionar una oportunidad para que las mujeres aumenten su participación en el mercado laboral, puede que este trabajo ni sea digno ni fortalecedor.</p> <p>Las condiciones laborales pueden ser extremadamente malas, las ganancias del trabajo a destajo suelen ser bajas y las desiguales debido al valor fluctuante de la cadena de demanda, y la invisibilidad y el aislamiento de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores complica la organización y las negociaciones.&nbsp;<a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1024258916687250">La evidencia emergente</a> sobre el trabajo colaborativo no contradice esta experiencia. Superar las barreras de la participación femenina en el mercado laboral y administrar el trabajo remunerado y no remunerado no debería significar el desplazamiento de las mujeres a un trabajo remunerado precario y aislado.</p> <p>La economía de pequeños encargos también presenta nuevos ángulos en desafíos antiguos. En particular, la organización de trabajo colaborativo supone un desafío para regular la mejora de las condiciones laborales en las cadenas de valor digitales facilitadas por el trabajo colaborativo. Las plataformas son conocidas por evitar la regulación laboral al usar modelos de «contratistas independientes», la naturaleza transnacional del trabajo colaborativo hace que sea difícil identificar la jurisdicción nacional responsable, y las leyes de trabajo nacionales rara vez se aplican a las trabajadoras y los trabajadores. Esto, sumado a los desafíos históricos afrontados por las trabajadoras y los trabajadores del hogar en la organización y su invisibilidad (no ajena) a los encargados, sugiere que se necesitan medidas urgentes si se pretende que las trabajadoras y los trabajadores colaborativos progresen.</p> <h2>Cómo triunfar en la economía de los pequeños encargos </h2> <p>Como las plataformas de la economía de pequeños encargos se vuelven cada vez más prominentes, se necesita prestar suma atención a las políticas para garantizar que los derechos laborales ganados con esfuerzo no retrocedan, y que las oportunidades de esta economía beneficien a todas y todos – y no solo a las compañías y a quienes consumen en las plataformas servicios baratos con solo oprimir un botón.</p> <p>Como se argumentó en esta serie, garantizar que <a href="http://speri.dept.shef.ac.uk/2017/04/18/its-time-to-regulate-the-gig-economy/">las regulaciones laborales</a> sean adecuadas para su propósito en la era de la economía de los pequeños encargos es crítico. Pero la tecnología de las plataformas también es prometedora para superar los desafíos y mejorar las condiciones laborales, si aprendemos de la historia. Las compañías de las plataformas podrían incorporar igualdad y justicia en las plataformas al omitir la información demográfica y sólo incluir la experiencia laboral y otra información relacionada al trabajo en las páginas de perfiles. Este sería un buen comienzo para abordar la discriminación arraigada.</p> <p>La falta de estadísticas sobre las trabajadoras y los trabajadores del hogar ha contribuido a su invisibilidad frente a quienes diseñan y aprueban las políticas. Las plataformas podrían cambiar esto ya que son una gran fuente de datos. Contienen información detallada de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores y de sus actividades, y por lo tanto podrían ofrecer una gran oportunidad para entender y mejorar las condiciones laborales si esa información estuviera disponible. Además, las trabajadoras y los trabajadores del hogar que entrevistamos apreciaron, por primera vez, la posibilidad de poder monitorear las horas trabajadas y sus ganancias a través de la plataforma. Desarrollar otros aspectos orientados a las personas trabajadoras como los <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2016/04/26/all-mobile-phones-in-india-to-have-panic-buttons-to-improve-wome/">botones de emergencia</a> puede aumentar su seguridad de forma inmediata.</p> <p>La tecnología digital también proporciona nuevas maneras para que las trabajadoras y los trabajadores se comuniquen y se organicen para mejorar las condiciones. Los sindicatos como la <a href="http://www.sewa.org/index.asp">Asociación de Trabajadoras Autónomas (SEWA)</a> de India han organizado a personas trabajadoras marginalizadas cuando los sindicatos tradicionales les han fallado. Ayudarles a adaptarse a la economía de los pequeños encargos es crítico, en particular porque sus partidarias y partidarios principales se encuentren trabajando cada vez más a través de estas plataformas.</p> <p>Finalmente, las &nbsp;personas trabajadoras se están integrando cada vez más en las <a href="http://platformcoop.net/">cooperativas de plataformas</a> que se adueñan de y controlan la tecnología como <a href="https://www.upandgo.coop/">Up &amp; Go</a>, una plataforma de servicios de limpieza del hogar en la ciudad de Nueva York. Si la economía de los pequeños encargos actual controlada por compañías le falla a las personas trabajadoras, por qué no brindar un modelo de trabajo bien establecido y actualizado en un mundo cada vez más digital.</p> <p>Si se puede aprender algo del pasado no hay ninguna razón por la cual las mujeres no puedan beneficiarse de la llegada de la tecnología digital que conecta a las trabajadoras y los trabajadores a oportunidades económicas. Como muestra nuestra investigación, existen pasos positivos que las personas trabajadoras, las plataformas, los sindicatos, las asociaciones de mujeres y la clase política pueden dar. Si podemos adoptar medidas, y rápido, entonces podremos garantizar que las mujeres puedan gozar de un trabajo de buena calidad en la economía de los pequeños encargos.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Abigail Hunt BTS en Español Mon, 12 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Abigail Hunt 120210 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Change incentives, change the outcomes: three ideas to stop the global race to the bottom https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/james-sinclair/change-incentives-change-outcomes-three-ideas-to-stop-global-race-to-bo <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Companies have little reason to prioritise workers’ rights over profit. It’s up to us to change that.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/3467605421_1c09647ce4_b.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Ranjit Bhaskar for Al Jazeera English/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/aljazeeraenglish/3467605421/in/photolist-6hqohn-fomiSx-8Cr6Cr-fomGee-fomT6x-22nh4RN-6nJCtC-7y6n8-fmw21Y-bHpHZx-jEcFMe-29xG6V-f7Y6iq-oc7eTH-f7GEHD-f7Hjjk-bdhaJF-dwAXpx-buuVmE-f7H5ik-63GpYj-f7WULN-f7XQfy-fmgRpz-jpXKnz-qi8oVC-bqw8Am-f7WTk9-fDfJ6v-buuWfo-poqJ87-aHEc7p-eKqBkZ-XkoJvZ-bs58aM-izaKV-nT92hX-oV87TZ-dwGqYo-p9RsaS-9hxxyE-nwDE8Z-o8LKT6-ofis8H-fomwQB-prsRQh-6huxSj-oaQ5VD-ffhzX5-2cpffYk">Flickr. (cc by-sa)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>When I co-founded the fair labour company FSI Worldwide in 2006, my colleagues and I thought that we were in the vanguard of an ethical business revolution. The illegal and unethical practices of recruiters were well known by then, and we sensed that the tide was turning on the issue of workers’ rights in global supply chains. It seemed there was a growing willingness and ability on the part of governments, businesses, and consumers to properly invest in better protections for vulnerable workers. </p> <p>We were wrong. </p> <p>Global corporate demand for our services, which seek to provide migrant workers to employers willing to offer safe and protected employment, remains a tiny fraction of the overall market. Only a handful of multinational companies have been prepared to elevate ethical practice over rhetoric and invest in the services provided by companies like ours.</p> <p>While we applaud the companies that have invested, it is troubling that 12 years after our founding we are still offering plaudits to businesses simply for acting within the bounds of legal and ethical compliance. Yet this remains the case, in large part because those of us working for greater corporate responsibility and accountability have little in the way of leverage. We are effectively reduced to appealing to the better angels of corporate nature. While some companies engage, too many others conclude that the financial costs of cleaning up their supply chains outweigh any potential benefits in tackling the abuse of workers. </p> <p>There are no easy or quick fixes to this problem. Progress will only come when we have fully appreciated the scale of the challenge and identified effective levers for change. There have been many thoughtful and helpful responses to this round table so far, most of which I agree with wholeheartedly. The problems we face are multi-dimensional and require several layers of intervention. In my view three potential levers of change stand out.</p> <style> ol li {margin-bottom:12px;} </style> <ol> <li><strong>Concerted political action:</strong> Three decades of neo-liberal deregulation have resulted in a transnational race to the bottom on consumer price. Worker welfare and environmental protections have been sacrificed in the cause of higher shareholder returns. Frameworks like the <a href="https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/2">United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights</a> have attempted to arrest this fall, but national politicians generally remain either unable to meaningfully restrain corporate activity or choose not to do so. This needs to change, but no one country can do it in isolation. We need to see serious, multilateral engagement between governments in the Global North and the Global South to produce and robustly enforce common standards of protection for workers and the environment. </li> <li><strong>Smarter laws, better enforced:</strong> There has been some progress – notably in the United States, the United Kingdom, and France – on transnational corporate accountability legislation. However, these laws have little power to enforce standards, and the transparency provisions in the UK Modern Slavery Act 2015 are especially light-touch. We need to see more ‘failure to prevent’ provisions that penalise inaction and shift the evidential burden onto companies. There is precedent for this in Section 7 of the <a href="https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/23/contents">UK Bribery Act 2010</a>, which states that a company is automatically liable for any bribery discovered in their operation, unless they can prove that they had in place reasonable measures to prevent such bribery. This could be applied to cases of modern slavery and doing so would compel companies to take much greater responsibility for the protection of workers in their operations.</li> <li><strong>Nudging better behaviour:</strong> The procurement practices of very large buyers can reshape how suppliers are treated and how they, in turn, recruit and manage their workers. Since governments are frequently very large buyers, they have the capacity, currently under-utilised, to shift markets in ways that prioritise ‘best value’ outcomes that incorporate human rights concerns over lowest cost bids. One way this could work is via a points system: demonstrably ethical companies are rewarded with better payment terms and procurement selection priority when it comes to government contracts. Companies who consistently fail to demonstrate proper compliance would be downgraded or blacklisted from government contracts. A standardised system would need to be created and effective monitoring imposed, but these procedural challenges can be overcome with sufficient, if currently lacking, political will.</li> </ol> <p>Ultimately, we should not be facilitating competition on worker welfare. We need global minimum standards that are robustly enforced to create a level commercial playing field. This would allow ethically minded entrepreneurs to compete and would decrease the advantages currently accruing to companies engaged in a race to the bottom. This is a long way from the current system of deregulation, global corporate impunity, and fig-leaf attempts at reform. Yet it is possible if we are willing to disrupt entrenched, privileged, and powerful vested interests. </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fow/mike-dottridge/reflections-on-role-of-philanthropy-in-world-of-work">Reflections on the role of philanthropy in the world of work</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty">The future of work and the future of poverty</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/ilc/benjamin-selwyn/promoting-decent-work-in-supply-chains-interview-with-benjamin-selwyn">Promoting decent work in supply chains? An interview with Benjamin Selwyn</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/ilc/sharan-burrow/global-supply-chains-what-does-labour-want">Global supply chains: what does labour want?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery James Sinclair Fri, 09 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 James Sinclair 120463 at https://www.opendemocracy.net «Unos pasos hacia adelante pero hay todavía un largo camino por recorrer»: viejos conflictos, nuevos movimientos https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/lourdes-alb-n/unos-pasos-hacia-adelante-pero-hay-todav-un-largo-camino-por-recorrer-vi <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Un enfoque crítico del trabajo del hogar basado en nuestras experiencias vividas. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/dws/lourdes-alb-n/few-steps-forward-still-long-way-to-go-old-issues-new-movements">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img width="100%" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/9686358644_75690ebe36_o.jpg" /><span class="image-caption">Members of the Asociacion de Trabajadoras Remuneradas del Hogar outside Ecuador's national assembly. IDWF/Flickr. (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)</span></p><p>La situación de las trabajadoras del hogar remuneradas en Ecuador ha sido, y sigue siendo, un tema crítico. A pesar saber que nuestros derechos como seres humanos y personas trabajadoras son violados diariamente, muchas de nosotras elegimos soportar condiciones de abuso, explotación y discriminación por la necesidad económica y la responsabilidad de cuidar de nuestras familias.</p> <p>Además del cuidado de los hogares de las familias que nos emplean, muchas somos cabeza de familia de nuestros hogares, lo cual implica una gran cantidad de responsabilidades adicionales. Cada mes, tenemos que pagar el alquiler y otros costes de la vivienda social (es decir, si tenemos la suerte de obtener vivienda asistida por el gobierno). Además de estos gastos, debemos contabilizar los costos de salud, alimentos y vestimenta, así como gastos básicos de electricidad, agua, teléfono, internet —con el avance de la tecnología, el internet se ha vuelto indispensable para la educación de nuestras hijas y nuestros hijos— y el costo del transporte diario para nuestras familias y para nosotras mismas. Para cubrir estos gastos, necesitamos una fuente de ingresos, y sin educación o capacitación profesional nuestra única opción es encontrar trabajo en hogares, lo que no garantiza condiciones adecuadas, ni un tratamiento y pago justos.</p> <p>Muchas de nosotras migramos desde áreas rurales a las grandes ciudades desde una edad muy temprana en busca de oportunidades laborales, con la intención de lograr estabilidad económica para nuestras familias y para nosotras mismas. Debemos educar a nuestras hijas e hijos, ya que no queremos que estén sujetos a las mismas condiciones de trabajo, humillación y abuso tanto psicológicos como físicos, incluido el abuso sexual por parte de quienes nos emplean o sus hijos. Queremos que nuestras hijas e hijos estén cualificados, tengan una profesión, mejores oportunidades laborales y una mejor calidad de vida.</p> <p>El trabajo del hogar comporta una multitud de responsabilidades: estamos a cargo de cocinar alimentos, tareas domésticas generales y cuidar de las mascotas y familiares de quienes nos emplean. No es la naturaleza del trabajo del hogar lo que es terrible, sino las condiciones y circunstancias que enfrentamos en él: la falta de suministros adecuados para realizar nuestras tareas, la exposición a los riesgos y las enfermedades profesionales que pueden resultar de este tipo de trabajo. Quienes nos emplean deben entender que somos personas como ellas, con derechos y responsabilidades, y que también tenemos familias que nos necesitan y nos esperan. Deben empezar a tratar nuestro trabajo con la dignidad e importancia que merece, y reconocer que también contribuimos a la economía del país. Después de todo, es nuestro trabajo lo que les permite salir, trabajar y mejorar su propia condición económica.</p> <h2>Trabajo del hogar bajo relaciones de poder</h2> <p>Las mujeres realizan la mayor parte del trabajo del hogar, lo cual no sorprende dado que históricamente se ha considerado que sus funciones son en gran parte reproductivas. Han sido perpetuamente subestimadas por un sistema y una cultura patriarcales, en las cuales los hombres son vistos como los únicos agentes sociales, económicos, culturales y políticamente productivos en sus hogares. Esto provoca con frecuencia que las mujeres, ya sean niñas o jóvenes adultas, se sienten inferiores y dependientes de los hombres, con independencia de la importancia de la contribución económica que hagan a sus familias. Esto es especialmente cierto para las mujeres de bajos ingresos, que son más vulnerables a la explotación, la discriminación y las violaciones de los derechos humanos.</p> <p>También se espera que las trabajadoras del hogar muestren gratitud por su trabajo en hogares de élite, en lugar de abogar por mejorar sus condiciones laborales. La «<em>patrona»</em> es la señora de la casa, es decir, la que tiene poder, dinero y respeto. Ella decide cuánto y cuándo le pagará a la «<em>criada</em>» o «<em>sirvienta</em>», que no puede protestar por miedo a ser echada a la calle. El hecho es que esta fórmula de poder en gran parte no se cuestiona, y contribuye a que el trabajo del hogar sea infravalorado e invisibilizado.</p> <p>Además, este desequilibrio de poder facilita el camino hacia la discriminación, el racismo, la desigualdad —con respecto a la clase, la etnia y el género—, el acoso sexual y el abuso; no solo en el hogar, sino también a nivel sistémico. Estas relaciones de poder desiguales, que a menudo generan violencia de género y discriminación de mujer a mujer, han sido reproducidas y normalizadas por nuestra sociedad. Como tal, han transcurrido décadas sin ningún intento serio de crear y respetar leyes para proteger a las mujeres en este sector.</p> <h2>Organizándonos como un camino para reclamar nuestros derechos</h2> <p>Históricamente en Ecuador, los derechos de las trabajadoras domésticas no han sido reconocidos. Hemos tenido que soportar largas jornadas de trabajo, inestabilidad laboral, falta de acceso a la seguridad social, no tener contratos ni días de vacaciones ni acceso a los beneficios que otras personas trabajadoras reciben del gobierno y de la sociedad.</p> <p>Ha habido muchos casos de empleadoras y empleadores que violan nuestros derechos humanos y laborales. Actualmente, a muchas de nosotras no se nos paga el salario mínimo legal y no tenemos contratos de trabajo en los cuales confiar para nuestra protección. Muchas de nuestras empleadoras y empleadores exigen que trabajemos a través de contratos de servicio informal, los cuales les exime de su responsabilidad de proporcionarnos bonos del 13º mes, vacaciones pagas y seguro de salud.</p> <p>Estos temas y la precariedad general del trabajo del hogar inspiraron en 1997 a un grupo de <em>compañeras</em> a reunirse en la ciudad de Guayaquil, Ecuador, para crear la Asociación de Trabajadoras Remuneradas del Hogar (ATRH), una asociación que lucha por la defensa del trabajo, el género y los derechos humanos de las trabajadoras del hogar con miembros de Guayas, Manabí, Los Ríos, Pichincha, y Esmeraldas, entre otras provincias.</p> <p>A través de diferentes medios de comunicación, las personas miembros y fundadoras de la ATRH han podido informarse sobre los derechos laborales y la seguridad social, entre otros temas de interés, y han educado a sus pares. También pudieron utilizar este conocimiento para proporcionar orientación gratuita a las miembros que sufrieron diversas violaciones de los derechos humanos.</p> <p>Otras ONG como FOS Solidaridad Socialista, Centro de Solidaridad Sindical de Finlandia SASK y Care International nos han proporcionado asesoría y apoyo económico, lo que ha desempeñado un papel crucial en el desarrollo y funcionamiento de nuestras actividades. En la actualidad, la organización está luchando por mantenerse económicamente ya que su única fuente de financiamiento es limitada y proviene de SASK.</p> <p>Hemos tenido reuniones con el Ministerio de Relaciones Laborales de Ecuador, el Instituto Ecuatoriano de Seguridad Social y otros departamentos para abogar por los derechos de las trabajadoras de nuestro sector. El 20 de junio de 2016, después de una larga lucha de 18 años, se estableció el Sindicato Único Nacional de Trabajadoras Remuneradas del Hogar (SINUTRHE) con el objetivo de garantizar el cumplimiento de los derechos de las trabajadoras en el sector del trabajo del hogar.</p> <p>Además, en 2013, Ecuador ratificó el Convenio sobre las trabajadoras y los trabajadores del hogar de la OIT (C 189) con el apoyo unánime de la Asamblea Nacional. Nosotras, las mujeres de ATHR, también somos parte de la Central Única de Trabajadores (CUT). Estos hitos indican que el gobierno de Ecuador y sus diferentes ministerios, así como varias ONG importantes, están dispuestas a apoyar la lucha por los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar.</p> <h2>Progreso, paso a paso</h2> <p>En 2008, el marco jurídico legal para las trabajadoras del hogar cambió de manera positiva bajo el mandato del presidente Rafael Correa y la nueva constitución escrita de la República del Ecuador. El gobierno elevó y reglamentó los salarios de nuestra clase trabajadora, de un salario injusto a uno básico, unificando el salario de todas las trabajadoras y trabajadores. No existen normas específicas para el sector del cuidado del hogar, ya que las trabajadoras del sector se rigen por el Código del Trabajo y, por lo tanto, se supone que tienen los mismos derechos que el resto.</p> <p>De 2008 a 2017, el salario mínimo aumentó de 180 a 375 dólares estadounidenses por mes. De acuerdo con el código, lo mínimo que podemos hacer es un salario básico unificado para un día completo de trabajo, además de horas extras después de ocho horas de trabajo, independientemente de si la trabajadora es interna. De manera adicional, ahora tenemos derecho a afiliarnos al Instituto Ecuatoriano de Seguridad Social, bonificaciones, fondos de reserva, vacaciones pagadas, derechos de salud y otros beneficios establecidos por la ley.</p> <p>Las trabajadoras del hogar también están protegidas por los artículos 243 y 244 del Código Penal Orgánico Integral en Ecuador, que penaliza a quienes al emplearlas no las afilien al Instituto Ecuatoriano de Seguridad Social o no cumplan con las inspecciones de trabajo a nivel nacional. Las trabajadoras del hogar también pueden tener contratos permanentes a tiempo parcial, y así tener acceso a los mismos derechos y beneficios que las trabajadoras a tiempo completo.&nbsp;</p> <p>El avance continuo de los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar depende en gran medida de un esfuerzo conjunto entre las personas asociadas y las trabajadoras de nuestra asociación, el SINUTRHE, el gobierno y la sociedad en general, para garantizar que se cumplan las leyes y se respeten nuestros derechos laborales y humanos.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba">La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ROSE MAHI</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Lourdes Albán BTS en Español Thu, 08 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Lourdes Albán 120209 at https://www.opendemocracy.net From brothels to independence: the neoliberalisation of (sex) work https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/ava-caradonna/from-brothels-to-independence-neoliberalisation-of-sex-work <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Sex workers in the UK are by now just another part of the online, freelance, customer-reviewed digital economy. Their story of how they got there exposes a dangerous shift.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/43661673852_dce214ea7b_o_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Sex workers demonstrate in London in July 2018 against a possible prohibition of online advertising for sex work. juno mac/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/166033858@N08/43661673852/in/photolist-9SFECN-H2DgGv-avdgZ5-aDycRR-aDycRH-4vdnxD-aDycRT-aYodsg-eLptJB-T2fsqi-RJHAkw-8KSFid-SXCD31-SqwS4-SMu3aC-5tkWTc-GmbpgL-ZXFvNq-Z4wU5Z-GqDrPr-6DLTVA-28v7E3m-9q8uJr-C2dBA-6DGJXP-8FkN4F-dNDTBt-aDycRP-dNKuKy-7VjGYW-dNKuSW-35ay3E-aYLS7z-dNDUk2-RJHAsW-Ak8sQ-dNDSYR-28dz5ZX-28v7E1C-dNDUs6-Lgq9Gg-LgrvRD-sRj9r-YD5yEG-28dz68T-x7MQNb-28dz6CF-28v7E5q-29weuud-aDy9it">Flickr. (cc by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>For decades, the British sex industry has straddled both informal and illegal work. This is because while the buying and selling of sex is technically legal in the UK, everything that produces the exchange of sex for money – advertising, employing support staff, renting premises, working collectively – is criminalised. As a result, our workplaces in ‘flats’ (small scale brothels), saunas, and hostess clubs have never been stable or safe places.</p> <p>There has never been any job or income security in the sex industry. You only make money if it is busy, and the ‘house’ takes a percentage of your earnings – sometimes as high as 65-70%. However, up until recently, the way the system usually worked was that the flat manager would cover overheads. Buildings come with rent, utilities, and maintenance costs. Venues also need interior decorating, furniture, bedding, towels, equipment, and cleaning, and in our corner of the service industry also condoms and lube. Bosses would produce and place ads in newspapers and cards in red telephone boxes. They would provide security and often a receptionist, who would screen clients either on the phone or at the door. Similar arrangements existed for escort agencies, although in their case workers were often required to sort out somewhere to receive ‘in-calls’. </p> <p>While we were never paid for the hours spent waiting for clients, and while we had to cover the cost of our own work clothes and grooming, sex workers were not expected to invest time, money, and skills into our work when we were not on the job. Our only investment in marketing was the construction of a work persona. This persona existed in clearly demarcated ways. It appeared when we came into direct contact with clients – either in the room, when actively earning money, or when introducing ourselves to potential clients – and disappeared just as quickly. This meant that sex work was clearly defined as a labour practice within time and space. A job with its uniforms and costumes, tools and office politics. A performed role, which you could stop performing when not actively working. In the past five to ten years, this has changed completely.</p> <h2>The rise of the ‘entrepreneurial’ sex worker</h2> <p>In the last decade, working in flats and saunas has become increasingly risky and difficult. This is in part due to increased immigration raids, neighbourhood gentrification, and the closure of many premises by police with the help of abolitionist feminists. It is also partly a consequence of the broader incorporation of informal service work into the online, freelance, customer-reviewed ‘gig’ economy.</p> <p>Today an increasing number of sex workers in Britain – although certainly not all – are ‘independent’. They are ostensibly self-employed, freelance entrepreneurs. It is a shift that has affected every aspect of sex workers’ lives. Unlike ‘flat’ managers, individual sex workers can rarely secure and afford to rent long term work premises. Instead they hire hotels or rooms by the hour and go to clients’ hotels and homes. And with expensive print advertising out of the question, sex workers must now drum up clients online. They maintain profiles on platforms such as AdultWork, promote themselves on social networks, and many even have their own websites. </p> <p>The work of digital self-promotion is never-ending. Online marketplace websites require constantly updated picture galleries; a ‘personal’ story; details of services available; an active blog; reviews of clients; accepting clients’ reviews of you; and often a web-cam presence. Platforms like AdultWork penalise you or delete your profile if your response time isn’t quick enough, or if your phrasing isn’t to their liking.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">As an ‘independent’ sex worker, you are not exploited by a single employer within a capitalist framework, but by the nebulous yet crushing demands of an entire market.</p> <p>If you have your own website, you also need to spend money on web hosting and web design, or, if you have the skills, spend hours doing it yourself. You need to pay for photographers, outfits, and work tools. You need to spend hours on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram. You need to communicate with clients via phone, Whatsapp, Skype and email. You need to have and engage with a work phone, which you are expected to check constantly. All this before you make one penny.</p> <p>To understand how sex work has changed requires thinking through how both our labour conditions and the political economy of the industry has been transformed. We are no longer forced to hand over hefty house fees to a boss, but our overheads are now much higher. The economic risk of investment has been shifted onto the worker. At the same time, we are now required to invest nearly infinite amounts of unpaid labour into our ‘businesses’. Working hours now stretch into every waking moment and working spaces become everywhere and nowhere.</p> <h2>The isolation of ‘independence’</h2> <p>The term ‘independent’ brings to mind freedom and agency, but the very opposite is often the case. As an ‘independent’ sex worker, you are not exploited by a single employer within a capitalist framework, but by the nebulous yet crushing demands of an entire market. Independent workers are constantly on display while being dangerously isolated. They work alone in spaces hired by the hour, with no cleaners, drivers, or security, and with no check-in/check-out practices. Many new workers don’t even know the ‘buddy’ safety system, and lots of workers don’t have friends who can do this for them due to stigma, immigration, parenting or employability concerns.</p> <p>You can no longer go to work in an anonymous destination. Your activities are all registered online. They are connected to your IP address, and in many cases, to your email and social media accounts. Many workers report clients mysteriously appearing on their private social media profiles. In order to access adult websites, you need to provide your full identity details and passport. In most cases, your face and body are also plastered all over the internet. In neoliberal speak you can ‘choose’ to not show your face in these images, but the price will be lost work. That means only workers who can afford to pick and choose can take this protective measure.</p> <p>When many of us started working – in brothels, flats, peep shows, escort agencies or outdoors – we had the benefit of other workers showing us the ropes. We received recommendations or warnings about workplaces along with other imparted knowledge. How to take and store the money; how to define and protect boundaries; how to give a good service while minimising strain and risk; how to guard against dangerous clients; how to recognise burnout symptoms; how to get out of hairy situations. This shared community knowledge encompassed not just toys, tools, and anatomy, but how to handle the job psychologically and physically.</p> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/42805443385_3d62b720fd_o_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Sex workers demonstrate in London in July 2018 against a possible prohibition of online advertising for sex work. juno mac/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/166033858@N08/42805443385/in/photolist-9SFECN-H2DgGv-avdgZ5-aDycRR-aDycRH-4vdnxD-aDycRT-aYodsg-eLptJB-T2fsqi-RJHAkw-8KSFid-SXCD31-SqwS4-SMu3aC-5tkWTc-GmbpgL-ZXFvNq-Z4wU5Z-GqDrPr-6DLTVA-28v7E3m-9q8uJr-C2dBA-6DGJXP-8FkN4F-dNDTBt-aDycRP-dNKuKy-7VjGYW-dNKuSW-35ay3E-aYLS7z-dNDUk2-RJHAsW-Ak8sQ-dNDSYR-28dz5ZX-28v7E1C-dNDUs6-Lgq9Gg-LgrvRD-sRj9r-YD5yEG-28dz68T-x7MQNb-28dz6CF-28v7E5q-29weuud-aDy9it">Flickr. (cc by-nc-nd)</a></p> <h2>Safety in numbers</h2> <p>Working in flats and brothels, sex workers could also share health concerns. We showed each other symptoms we are worried about, and shared information about treatment, prevention, and the best clinics. The long-established sex workers’ knowledge and vigilance regarding our health has been alarmingly diluted over the past five years.</p> <p>Rarely do public discussions of sex work actually reach into the practicalities of the work. However, it is crucial that we do so. Oral sex without a condom is quickly becoming normalised, often with very little extra charged for this service. The perils of STDs are either poorly understood or viewed as an unavoidable hazard by many new ‘independent’ workers.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">The alarming decline in safety and the reduction of prices is directly related to workers’ isolation.</p> <p>Vaginal sex without a condom used to be almost non-existent. It was something workers would do in secret, charging a hefty sum for the risk. It is now becoming common. Anal sex, hitherto a very specialised and high price service in the case of cis women sex workers, has also become a much more widespread and cheaper practice. The alarming decline in safety and the reduction of prices is directly related to workers’ isolation. New workers no longer come into contact with more experienced workers, and they are deprived of the knowledge, support, and pressure of their peers.</p> <p>This is not to say that everything used to be roses. Of course some flat managers used to put indirect pressure on workers to provide oral without a condom. They behaved like any other bad contractor or manager who wanted workers to comply with unsafe conditions in order to keep the client happy and increase their cut. However, in our experience this was relatively rare and never compulsory. Moreover, such flats quickly acquired bad reputations as workplaces to be avoided. The pressure on ‘independent’ workers is much more subtle and oppressive. If oral sex without a condom becomes a common service, you feel that you have no one but yourself to blame if you can’t make ends meet when not offering it.</p> <h2>At risk for less and less</h2> <p>Platforms such as AdultWork are major contributors to the decline in workers’ safer sex standards. Their ‘check list’ of services is particularly damaging. This list contains a long list of practices, many of them unsafe. It indicates to new workers – and, crucially, clients – that risky practices are no longer seen as exceptional. And while a sex worker can certainly ‘choose’ to opt out of them, doing so now seems oddly limiting – to quote many clients, ‘conservative’.</p> <p>Who profits from this new arrangement? Many clients are taking more health risks now, but they are also getting much more for their money. Workers also face increased risks yet earn less for their labour. Prices have dropped dramatically over the past few years. This is partly due to stiffer competition, austerity, and a lack of industry standards due to the vanishing of flats. However, there is another, perhaps more important reason: the illusion that we are making more money thanks to the elimination of the middle-person.</p> <p>As ‘independents’, we are no longer obliged to give the lion’s share of our hourly rate to mediators and managers. The sum we charge the client is all ours. As a result, we feel we can afford to charge less in order to get more clients. However, the sums don’t add up. ‘Independent’ workers, in fact, invest a lot of money and labour in getting and maintaining clients. The long hours of unpaid marketing and admin work, and the stress caused by constantly being at the client’s beck and call, aren’t neither visible nor financially accounted for.</p> <p>Sitting in a flat waiting for clients was also unpaid labour. But at least when we worked in this system we knew when we were working. We were able to calculate our real hourly wage by dividing our take by the actual time we were <em>at work</em>. We could see if we were earning enough at a specific workplace, and if we weren’t we could try somewhere else. So, as is often the case with neoliberal notion of freedom and choice, the consumer pays less, and the worker puts in more invisibilised, unwaged labour. And this time there’s no recourse, since, allegedly, we are all our own bosses.</p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels">The Sexelance: red lights on wheels</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sam-okyere-essi-thesslund/false-promise-of-nordic-model-of-sex-work">The false promise of the Nordic model of sex work</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/global-network-of-sex-work-projects/why-decriminalise-sex-work">Why decriminalise sex work?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fraser-crichton/decriminalising-sex-work-in-new-zealand-its-history-and-impact">Decriminalising sex work in New Zealand: its history and impact</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/nicola-mai-calogero-giametta-h-l-ne-le-bail/impact-of-swedish-model-in-france-chronicl">The impact of the &#039;Swedish model&#039; in France: chronicle of a disaster foretold</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sws/georgina-orellano/creative-protests-of-sex-workers-in-argentina">The creative protests of sex workers in Argentina</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sws/we-don-t-do-sex-work-because-we-are-poor-we-do-sex-work-to-end-our-poverty">We don’t do sex work because we are poor, we do sex work to end our poverty</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Ava Caradonna Sex workers speak: who listens? Wed, 07 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Ava Caradonna 120476 at https://www.opendemocracy.net La autoorganización marca la diferencia: la resistencia creativa de las trabajadoras del hogar https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/rose-mahi/la-autoorganizaci-n-marca-la-diferencia-la-resistencia-creativa-de-las-traba <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Las redes informales de autoayuda y cuidados mutuos en el Líbano han dado lugar a una alianza liderada por trabajadoras para luchar por los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/dws/rose-mahi/difference-self-organising-makes-creative-resistance-of-domestic-workers">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img width="100%" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/WhatsApp%20Image%202017-05-03%20at%20%202.39.11%20PM%20%281%29.jpeg" /><span class="image-caption">Photo provided by author.</span></p><p>Hay muchas circunstancias implicadas en la explotación de las trabajadoras del hogar migrantes (THM) en el Líbano. La mayoría de las veces las THM somos mujeres, y algunas no sabemos leer ni escribir. A veces, este analfabetismo alimenta la explotación existente que ya está integrada mediante el sexismo, el clasismo y el racismo. Estos factores están presentes en nuestros lugares de procedencia, y la migración nos hace aún más vulnerables a ellos.</p> <p>Nuestros empleadores creen que las personas migran porque no tienen nada que hacer, no están capacitadas o no tienen oportunidades en sus países de origen y que, por tanto, estamos en deuda con ellos por salvarnos. El círculo vicioso de la explotación empieza en los lugares de procedencia de las THM, donde existen agencias que captan a las trabajadoras del hogar y facilitan su migración a cambio de una comisión. Hablando claro, los «tratantes» se aprovechan de las trabajadoras del hogar y las venden a familias hostiles que continúan con esta práctica de explotación. Por ejemplo, las familias para las que trabajamos pueden quedarse con nuestro dinero, porque nos menosprecian o porque piensan que no tenemos ninguna factura que pagar de manera urgente ya que vivimos en su casa.</p> <p>Siempre habrá gente que se beneficie de la explotación de los demás. Esto quiere decir que siempre habrá quien se oponga al cambio de las leyes relacionadas con los derechos de las THM, porque hay gente que se enriquece a costa de ellas. Al final, siempre son las trabajadoras del hogar las que pagan, tanto material como metafóricamente. Aunque la discriminación legal puede terminar con la adopción de las leyes adecuadas, la discriminación personal no terminará de manera repentina; los estereotipos que existen en las mentes de las personas no pueden borrarse de forma fácil. Sin embargo, las leyes tienen el poder de influir en las personas (independientemente de sus prejuicios) y cambiar sus comportamientos hacia las THM por miedo a recibir un castigo.</p> <h2>Esperanza y activismo</h2> <p>Aun así, creemos que llegará el día en que todo cambiará, la jaula se abrirá y el pájaro podrá volver a volar en libertad. Nos organizamos en colectivos, sindicatos y alianzas para poder luchar por nuestros derechos y así estar preparadas para ese momento, en el que obtengamos nuestra tan ansiada libertad. Hay un proverbio que dice que «una mano no puede aplaudir sola». Si yo estuviera&nbsp; sola exigiendo mis derechos con respecto a mi sueldo, mis vacaciones y mi seguro, se me consideraría una excepción y nadie se tomaría en serio mis demandas. Pero si cada vez somos más las THM que unimos fuerzas y empezamos a alzar la voz exigiendo nuestros derechos, puede que nos escuche una persona, y después otra, y después otra, hasta que nuestro movimiento logre un efecto de bola de nieve. ¿Y quién sabe? Un día: ¡pum! Las autoridades decidirían que están cansadas de oírnos y que tienen que respetar nuestros derechos.</p> <p>He sido activista desde que era una niña. Cuando estaba en primaria, era una marimacho y siempre defendía a las demás. Cuando estaban acosando a mis amigas, me buscaban y mis puños iban en busca de los chicos responsables de tales acosos. Crecí así. Cuando llegué al Líbano, no podía aceptar las atrocidades que se cometían contra las THM. Aunque no puedo decir que la primera familia con la que estuve fuera la peor, sin duda no era perfecta. Miraba a mí alrededor y pensaba que no era posible que la gente viviera en esas condiciones. Así que empecé mi activismo en la casa de mi empleadora.</p> <p>Empecé siendo sincera con ella, pero ella no valoró mi honestidad. Me gritaba y nos peleábamos, pero eso no evitó que yo expresara mis ideas y mis necesidades. Un día me preguntó qué era lo que yo esperaba de ella, y cuando se lo expliqué, me dijo que no había nada que ella pudiera hacer para cambiar la situación. Aunque entendí las limitaciones a las que se enfrentaba, le pedí que al menos usara su influencia para hablar con otras mujeres empleadoras que eran amigas suyas. Por ejemplo, faltaba poco para mi cumpleaños y le pedí que convenciera a sus amigas de que dieran el día libre a sus trabajadoras del hogar para que me visitaran en su casa y pudiéramos celebrar mi cumpleaños. Así, poco a poco, mis hermanas y yo empezamos a formar una comunidad de líderes de THM.</p> <h2>Resistencia creativa</h2> <p>Con el tiempo, desarrollamos formas sutiles de resistencia. Había una THM de Sri Lanka que vivía en el edificio frente al mío, y otra de Etiopía que vivía en la planta de abajo. Nos podíamos ver desde nuestros respectivos balcones, pero no podíamos hablar debido a la distancia. Empezamos a comunicarnos a través de gestos para no atraer la atención no deseada de nuestras empleadoras. Podíamos entendernos entre nosotras sin haber acordado previamente el significado de los gestos que utilizábamos.</p> <p>Yo vivía en la quinta planta de mi edificio y usábamos una cuerda para mandar comida a la chica que vivía en la segunda, a la que su empleadora estaba matando de hambre. Ponía la comida en una bolsa de plástico, la ataba a la cuerda y la deslizaba lentamente hacia abajo por la pared externa del edificio. Cuando llegaba la comida, hacía ruido con las sartenes de la cocina para que ella supiera que había llegado. Luego, cuando había terminado de comer, me enviaba el recipiente de vuelta a mi planta usando la misma cuerda.</p> <p>De esta forma se las arreglaba para comer sin que nadie se diera cuenta. A veces también usábamos el ascensor: yo llamaba al ascensor, ponía el envase dentro y ella lo recibía en la segunda planta. Se lo comía rápido, sin que nadie se diera cuenta: ojos que no ven, corazón que no siente. Después me devolvía el envase el mismo día en que se lo había enviado. Siempre hay una manera. Aunque no nos pudiéramos comunicar verbalmente, nos las arreglamos para desarrollar estas técnicas de cuidados mutuos. Pudimos alcanzar esta manera orgánica de comunicar nuestras necesidades porque nuestras experiencias de vida eran similares: yo vivía lo mismo que ella y viceversa. Ella no tenía que explicarme su situación con palabras: sus gestos bastaban para hacerme saber si tenía problemas, si la habían dejado sin comer el día anterior o si todavía no había desayunado.</p> <h2>Resistencia organizada</h2> <p>Hemos desarrollado técnicas para remediar las condiciones que aumentan la explotación de las THM en el Líbano. Ofrecemos clases de inglés, francés y árabe, y también cursos para que la gente aprenda a utilizar ordenadores y a tocar la guitarra, tanto para hombres como para mujeres, ya sean personas jóvenes o ancianas. Nuestros contratos laborales están escritos en árabe en vez de en francés o inglés, pero si sabes cuáles son tus derechos y están escritos en alguna parte, puedes respaldar tus afirmaciones cuando exiges tus derechos, independientemente de que sepas leer árabe o no.</p> <p>De no ser así, estás obligada a creer y aceptar todo lo que te diga tu empleador, ya que ellos saben leer mejor que tú. También empezamos a dar cursos sobre los derechos de las THM y difundir este conocimiento a través de redes de personas a las que podíamos llegar. Es muy difícil desarrollar técnicas para combatir aquellos tipos de discriminación que son invisibles o están codificados. Intentamos ofrecer apoyo para estos casos, pero, hasta ahora, solo hemos podido ofrecer apoyo moral operando a través de redes de cuidados mutuos. El trabajo en Internet y el «boca a boca» se incluyen entre nuestras formas de publicidad. Establecemos relaciones de confianza con las comunidades y nuestras trabajadoras les hablan a sus amigas y círculos sobre nosotras para que se unan, o les cuentan casos que pueden requerir ayuda e intervención en el futuro. Es como una burbuja que va creciendo y expandiéndose con el tiempo, y eso requiere confianza en las líderes que están en el núcleo de la alianza.</p> <p>En mayo del 2016 nos empezamos a organizar como alianza: la Alianza de trabajadoras inmigrantes y del hogar en Líbano. Aunque nuestras oficinas centrales están en Beirut, nuestras socias trabajan en diferentes regiones del Líbano. Somos un grupo de mujeres que comparten una sola voz, porque todas tenemos problemas similares y ya estamos hartas de cómo son las cosas. Confiamos las unas en las otras y estamos listas para el largo camino que debemos recorrer. En esta etapa somos una organización de pequeño tamaño y no tenemos acceso a ningún fondo, pero eso no evita que seamos muy activas en el desarrollo de estrategias y en la planificación. &nbsp;</p> <p>El trabajo de nuestra alianza es diferente al trabajo de las distintas organizaciones que hemos visto en el Líbano, y esto se debe principalmente a una razón: nosotras somos trabajadoras del hogar. Muchas organizaciones que trabajan por nuestra causa están formadas por personas que nunca han estado sometidas a lo que nosotras hemos experimentado en nuestras propias carnes, huesos y sangre. Nuestra alianza refleja quiénes somos y las experiencias que hemos compartido. Es nuestro pan y nuestra vida con sangre, sudor y lágrimas.</p> <blockquote> <p><em>El «nosotras» de esta historia se refiere a la voz común de los y las personas miembro de la alianza y sus camaradas que también son trabajadoras del hogar; el «yo» se refiere a la voz personal y a la historia de Rose Mahi.</em></p> </blockquote> <h2>Sobre la Alianza de trabajadoras inmigrantes y del hogar en el Líbano</h2> <p>Nosotras —las trabajadoras del hogar inmigrantes en el Líbano— nos hemos unido y organizado como una alianza en pos de nuestra causa. Compartimos una voz. Somos trabajadoras del hogar migrantes activistas que luchamos por defender nuestros derechos. Luchamos contra la opresión y la explotación en todos los aspectos por ser mujer y trabajadora del hogar. Nos consideramos una sola a pesar de nuestras diferentes nacionalidades porque compartimos las mismas luchas y dificultades, tanto en el trabajo como en los espacios públicos. Creemos firmemente que trabajar colectivamente fortalece la unidad y solidaridad de todas las trabajadoras, lo que contribuye al empoderamiento de las mujeres. Por ahora, la alianza es autofinanciada.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea">¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANDREA LONDOŃO</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Rose Mahi BTS en Español Wed, 07 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Rose Mahi 120208 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The Sexelance: red lights on wheels https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sine-plambech-dy-plambeck/sexelance-red-lights-on-wheels <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A converted ambulance, the Sexelance is a mobile sex clinic offering harm reduction to the street sex workers of Copenhagen.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/sexelancen_640.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">The Sexelance. Malene Anthony Nielsen/Scanpix. Used with permission.</p> <p>When you open the doors to the Sexelance, you step into a sterile looking room. There’s lube in containers attached to the walls and condoms in boxes. There’s a blue folding chair – usually used for blowjobs – mirrors, and a little red light on the back door that illuminates the interior when the doors are closed. Though thoroughly transformed, it’s obvious that this first ever Danish sex clinic on wheels was once an ambulance riding through the streets of Copenhagen to aid the sick.</p> <p>Today, the Sexelance serves as an alternative to the harsh realities facing street sex workers. In the car, they can sell their services under safer, more hygienic, and more dignified conditions than those on the streets. It’s an easy sell for to sex workers, but their clients rarely find it as appealing. Many do not want to come with them into the car, and then the sex workers must choose: lose the customer or follow them out into the night. </p> <p class="mag-quote-right">The moral discussion over prostitution keeps many good ideas for protecting sex workers from getting off the ground.</p> <p>The sterility of the experience is off-putting. It’s not as if the sex workers want it that way. They’d prefer for the Sexelance to be more cozy and ‘sexy’, but laws make that easier said than done. One of the reasons behind the clinical looking interior is that the Sexelance runs the risk of being accused by police, critics, and the judicial system of encouraging prostitution. That’s illegal in Denmark, even though prostitution itself is not. It’s a distinction rooted in the moral discussion over prostitution that keeps many good ideas for protecting sex workers from really getting off the ground. </p> <p>“Don’t come knocking if the car is rocking” is a phrase often used by the volunteers of the car. But the motivation behind the car is no joke, and the last thing it is trying to do is to encourage prostitution. It’s instead trying make the sex already being sold safer by giving it a secure place to take place. During the many years I have researched migrants and sex workers in the streets of Vesterbro, Copenhagen – an area known for its red-light district – the hotels there have shut their doors to the sex workers and their clients. Places where sex workers used to take their clients have been shut down because they were accused of aiding prostitution.</p> <p>For the sex workers who aren’t working in a licensed brothel, this means they have little choice but to do their job in the customer’s cars, in dark alleyways, and between dumpsters in back yards. It goes without saying that working alone at night with often inebriated customers is dangerous. In comparison, not a single violent incident has been reported to have taken place in the Sexelance. &nbsp;</p> <h2>No research says that safety for sex workers creates more sex workers </h2> <p>The Sexelance delivers an immediate and hands-on solution to a real problem: the lack of safety for street sex workers who, for many different reasons, do not have other ways of making money to support themselves and their families. </p> <p>The Sexelance is not a brothel. It is serious harm reduction on four wheels. Harm reduction means reducing the harms that marginalised people face, and many humanitarian organisations work with harm reduction in areas such as sex work, drug use, and migration. </p> <p>Harm reduction as a tactic has come under increasing critique in recent times. Rather than viewed as a neutral and apolitical act, it has been recast as a way of abetting or encouraging something viewed by many as undesirable. In this case, the act of making sex work safe is re-cast as a method of encouraging prostitution. Similar dynamics are at work when the NGO Doctors Without Borders pulls people out of the water in the Mediterranean and then is accused of encouraging migration. The logic seems to be that the threat of grievous personal harm – being raped behind a dumpster or drowning in the blue waters of the Mediterranean – is the only force capable of keeping these practices in check. Provide a cushion and everybody will soon be doing it.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Is the possibility of a small potential rise morally worse than insisting that those already suffering continue to do so?</p> <p>But people don’t sell sex for safety reasons and people don’t migrate across oceans to be rescued. No research shows that more safety for sex workers creates substantially more sex workers, just as no research shows that more lifeboats create substantially more migrants. The vast majority of people sell sex or migrate because of unemployment, war, and poverty. In relation to these factors, a bit more safety might save lives but it certainly won’t tip the balance.</p> <p>There is a chance that effective harm reduction strategies result in marginally more people entering sex work. People who have worked with harm reduction for years do not reject this possibility. But even if it would be possible to measure a small rise in overall numbers, exclusively due to safety measures, we are still left with a moral philosophic question: is the possibility of a small potential rise morally worse than insisting that those already suffering continue to do so?</p> <p>The Danish philosopher K. E. Løgstrup said that we each have an ethical obligation to help the person standing in front of us in the situation they are in, regardless of the political context. That is the core principle of harm reduction. It does not, in any way, suggest that we cannot also work on sustainable and long-term political solutions for marginalised groups of people. </p> <p>The Sexelance has taken a stand. In the future, the interior in the car will be cozier and ‘sexier’ so more sex workers and their clients will want to frequent it. This change will put the service at risk, but as long as it remains in operation it will create more safety for more people. As Line Haferbier, chairman of the coalition behind the Sexelance, says: </p> <p>“Our goal is that no sex worker have to work in unsafe conditions and risk assault when they are working. Sex workers are experts in their own life and it is upon requests from them that we are now changing the interior of The Sexelance.” &nbsp;</p> <p><strong>A previous version of this article was published in Danish in <a href="https://politiken.dk/debat/klummer/art6619186/Sexelancen-er-gadens-svar-p%C3%A5-pragmatisk-n%C3%B8dhj%C3%A6lp">Politiken</a>. </strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sine-plambech/my-body-is-my-piece-of-land">My body is my piece of land</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sine-plambech/drowning-mothers">Drowning mothers</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sine-plambech/becky-is-dead">Becky is dead</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/anne-gathumbi/helping-sex-workers-help-themselves">Helping sex workers help themselves</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sws/ava-caradonna-x-talk-project/we-speak-but-you-don-t-listen-migrant-sex-worker-organisi">We speak but you don’t listen: migrant sex worker organising at the border</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sws/we-don-t-do-sex-work-because-we-are-poor-we-do-sex-work-to-end-our-poverty">We don’t do sex work because we are poor, we do sex work to end our poverty</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sws/georgina-orellano/creative-protests-of-sex-workers-in-argentina">The creative protests of sex workers in Argentina</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sws/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/power-of-putas-brazilian-prostitutes-movement-in-time">The power of putas: the Brazilian prostitutes’ movement in times of political reaction</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/fraser-crichton/decriminalising-sex-work-in-new-zealand-its-history-and-impact">Decriminalising sex work in New Zealand: its history and impact</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Dy Plambeck Sine Plambech Tue, 06 Nov 2018 08:00:00 +0000 Sine Plambech and Dy Plambeck 120466 at https://www.opendemocracy.net ¿Cómo hacemos de los derechos laborales una realidad? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/c-mo-hacemos-de-los-derechos-laborales-una-rea <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>En los últimos años, las trabajadoras del hogar de Colombia han conquistado muchas mejoras. Ahora apuntan más alto. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/dws/mar-roa-ana-teresa-v-lez-andrea-londo-o/how-do-we-make-labour-rights-real">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/Asamblea%20UTRASD%202014.JPG" width="100%" /><span class="image-caption" style="font-size: 10px; font-style: italic;">Photo provided by authors.</span></p> <p>Hoy en día en Colombia, la gente y el gobierno están hablando por fin de los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar. Resulta extraño que esto solo suceda ahora, dado que es un tema tan fundamental. Históricamente, se ha relegado a estas mujeres a los márgenes menos visibles de la sociedad, y sus trabajos han sido subestimados de forma sistemática, a pesar de su enorme contribución a la sociedad. Estas mujeres – porque hablar de trabajadores del hogar masculinos es nombrar la excepción, lo cual en sí representa un problema – han sido objeto de todas las formas posibles de discriminación: horarios laborales extensos<sup><a id="ffn1" href="#fn1" class="footnote">1</a></sup>, salarios muy por debajo del salario mínimo<sup><a id="ffn2" href="#fn2" class="footnote">2</a></sup> y falta de protecciones sociales, sin mencionar los casos de abuso sexual y laboral. A pesar de que los últimos siete años han estado marcados por una serie de pasos hacia la mejora de las condiciones de vida y trabajo de las trabajadoras del hogar, es necesario trabajar mucho para frenar siglos de discriminación.</p> <p>Nuestro camino en esta lucha comenzó hace ocho años, después de acordar con otras personas y organizaciones preocupadas por este tema que la única manera de avanzar era a través de acciones colectivas y trabajo de equipo: combinando nuestro conocimiento, los pocos recursos económicos a los cuales teníamos acceso y cientos de horas de trabajo voluntario. Nuestro objetivo era conseguir que las personas en nuestro país valorasen la gran contribución de las trabajadoras del hogar pagadas – nos referimos en femenino ya que constituyen el 96%<sup><a id="ffn3" href="#fn3" class="footnote">3</a></sup> – así como también comprender que subestimar estas trabajadoras contribuye estructuralmente a la desigualdad social.</p> <p>A pesar de sus propias dificultades sociales y financieras, estas trabajadoras del hogar líderes optaron por un enfoque democrático (comprometido con el proceso de paz<sup><a id="ffn4" href="#fn4" class="footnote">4</a></sup> para ser conscientes de sus derechos y exigirlos por medio del sindicalismo. Estas mujeres valientes han tenido el apoyo constante de la <a href="http://www.ens.org.co/">Escuela Nacional Sindical</a> (ENS) y la <a href="http://www.bienhumano.org/">Fundación Bien Humano</a>.</p> <h2>Un sector organizado</h2> <p>En 2017 en Colombia existían tres sindicatos de trabajadoras del hogar: Sintrasedom, Sintraimagra y la Unión de Trabajadoras Afrocolombianas del Servicio Doméstico (UTRASD). La última tiene su sede en Medellín y es la más influyente a nivel político. Las integrantes del consejo de UTRASD, María Roa, Claribed Palacios, Flora Perea, Nydia Díaz, Gloria Céspedes y Reynalda Chaverra han sido importantes figuras y voces defensoras de los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar. Específicamente, <a href="http://www.trabajadorasdomesticas.org/mar%C3%ADa-roa,-una-de-las-mejores-l%C3%ADderes-de-colombia-2015.html">María Roa fue reconocida como una de las líderes más importantes de Colombia en 2016</a>.</p> <p>UTRASD fue fundada oficialmente en 2013, como resultado de dos acontecimientos importantes. En primer lugar – algunos años antes de 2010 – las líderes afrocolombianas de Medellín comenzaron a movilizarse por sus derechos. Posteriormente, en 2011, la ENS y <a href="https://carabantu.jimdo.com/">Carabantú</a>, una organización para el empoderamiento de las mujeres afrocolombianas de la región, realizaron una investigación titulada <em>«Barriendo la invisibilidad de las trabajadoras domésticas afrocolombianas en Medellín</em>». Las conclusiones de esta investigación motivaron a la ENS a apoyar firmemente al sindicato de trabajadoras de UTRASD en sus tareas durante los últimos siete años. El grupo que comenzó en 2013 con 23 mujeres ha crecido rápidamente y hoy en día tiene casi 400 miembros, una junta directiva dinámica, dos subsecciones en Cartagena y Apartado, nueve comités, tres proyectos de cooperación activos y un ambicioso plan de acción.</p> <h2>Con fundamentos jurídicos</h2> <p>A nivel gubernamental y legislativo, podemos decir que el trabajo del hogar atrajo la atención del público en 2009, cuando el Congreso colombiano comenzó a debatir la <em>Ley de economía del cuidado</em>, promovida por las senadoras Cecilia López y Gloria Inés Ramírez. En 2010, gracias a ellas, la ley 1413 ordenó la medición, por primera vez, de la contribución de las mujeres al desarrollo social y económico del país mediante el trabajo del hogar no remunerado.</p> <p>En 2011, la Organización Internacional del Trabajo causó revuelo en el tema de manera global con el Convenio sobre las trabajadoras y los trabajadores domésticos (C189), el primer llamado internacional a abordar las condiciones de las trabajadoras del hogar. Al año siguiente, Colombia promulgó la ley 1595 para incorporar el C189 y expresar la voluntad del gobierno de proteger a las trabajadoras del hogar, antes de ratificar el convenio en el año 2014.</p> <p>En 2013, se promulgó el decreto 2616 que regulaba la seguridad social, el cual fue seguido por el decreto 721, que otorgaba a las trabajadoras del hogar acceso al sistema de beneficios familiares. Como resultado, de casi un millón de trabajadoras del hogar en Colombia, «en febrero de 2016, más de 19.000 personas se registraron para tener seguridad social de acuerdo a sus ingresos. Según la <a href="http://www.mintrabajo.gov.co/medios-julio-2016/6167-mintrabajo-celebro-sancion-de-la-ley-que-otorga-primas-al-servicio-domestico.html">Superintendencia de Subsidios Familiares en marzo de 2016</a>, el número de trabajadoras del hogar que acceden a beneficios familiares aumentó a más de 104.000 personas».</p> <p>En 2014, la Corte Constitucional de Colombia emitió el fallo C-871 solicitando al Congreso colombiano penalizar la discriminación sufrida por las trabajadoras del hogar en relación con la negación de la bonificación por servicio, es decir, el derecho a un salario mensual por año como bonificación. El año pasado, la Corte Constitucional también reconoció la violación de los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar en el <a href="http://www.corteconstitucional.gov.co/relatoria/2016/t-185-16.htm">fallo 186-16</a>, mediante el cual se las reconocía como sujetos en necesidad de protección constitucional especial. Cinco años exactos después de la adopción del C189 en Suiza, el Congreso de Colombia – liderado por las legisladoras Ángela María Robledo y Angélica Lozano – aprobaron por unanimidad la <a href="https://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline3/latest/embed/index.html?source=1mg28LDWG17bL8n6CUUoSk2E8R3pcIw4Jww9C-J_mTpE&amp;font=Default&amp;lang=en&amp;initial_zoom=2&amp;height=650">Ley de prima 1788</a> , que reconoce la misma bonificación por servicio para las trabajadoras del hogar que para el resto de las personas trabajadoras en Colombia.</p> <p>Estos avances jurídicos y legislativos han contribuido a demostrar a las personas en Colombia que las trabajadoras del hogar tienen los mismos derechos que cualquier otra trabajadora o trabajador.</p> <h2>Los próximos pasos</h2> <p>En 2011, la Fundación Bien Humano comenzó un proyecto denominado «Hablemos de empleadas del hogar» como una estrategia para dar mayor visibilidad a las trabajadoras del hogar y posicionarlas como sujetos con derechos. El proyecto incluye apoyo para el empoderamiento y el posicionamiento público de las organizaciones de base, como la UTRASD. </p> <p>Bien Humano también creó una sólida red de comunicaciones a través de su cuenta en Twitter; <a href="https://twitter.com/Empleadas_hogar">@Empleadas_hogar</a>; una página de Facebook; <a href="https://www.facebook.com/TrabajadorasDomesticas/">Trabajadoras Domésticas</a>; un canal de YouTube: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCr2XcagoAtwQ0xpRglB04LA">Hablemos de Empleadas Domésticas</a>; y la página web: <a href="http://trabajadorasdomesticas.org/">trabajadorasdomesticas.org</a>, para difundir recursos de información. Con la convicción de que «la unidad hace la fuerza», Bien Humano unió fuerzas con la ENS y UTRASD en 2011 como parte de una estrategia que les ha permitido llegar al más alto funcionariado, a otras organizaciones internacionales y nacionales, a medios de comunicación masivos, a los líderes y lideresas y a la ciudadanía de Colombia con el mensaje de que la dignidad y la ley deben comenzar en casa con nuestras trabajadoras.</p> <p>El último acontecimiento político en Colombia fue la creación de una mesa redonda tripartita, un escenario ideal codificado en la Ley de Prima para promover el Convenio C189. En este comité hay espacio para representantes del gobierno nacional (Ministerio de Trabajo), trabajadoras y trabajadores (sindicatos y la UTRASD) y personas empleadoras de la Asociación nacional de empresarios, lo que da lugar a muchas preguntas: ¿cómo es que las personas que contratan a trabajadoras del hogar son representadas por el empresariado? ¿Son comparables los problemas que se enfrentan en el hogar, en la esfera privada, con aquellos en la industria empresarial? ¿Por qué no existe en Colombia una asociación que represente a las personas empleadoras de trabajadoras del hogar? ¿Cómo puede crearse tal asociación?</p> <p>En Colombia, las trabajadoras del hogar han iniciado un camino formal a la organización; el tema se ha introducido en la agenda política y de los medios; los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar han ganado mayor visibilidad a través de los medios de comunicación; las organizaciones de la sociedad civil han demostrado eficazmente su apoyo; y existen bases legítimas para lograr un trabajo digno para las trabajadoras del hogar pero su cumplimiento todavía es limitado, y el camino para lograr los objetivos es largo e incierto. Sin embargo, hay mucho potencial en las tecnologías modernas de la comunicación y la información, y en los medios de comunicación.</p> <p>A pesar de que el gobierno nacional ha manifestado su voluntad política de abordar estos temas ocasionalmente a lo largo de los últimos años, carece de una estrategia permanente, líderes designados y recursos económicos para llevarla a cabo. En el futuro, también es necesario adoptar un plan de inspección para registrar los cambios en los hogares, sancionar el incumplimiento de las normas y poner un fin a la tendencia cultural del abuso de las trabajadoras del hogar. Es de igual importancia crear campañas masivas permanentes para concienciar sobre estas novedades legislativas, así como también que el gobierno apoye a los sindicatos de trabajadoras del hogar más allá de las palabras.</p> <p>Es cierto que en Colombia ahora se habla más de los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar, y que esta causa ha recibido el apoyo de muchas personas y organizaciones, pero el verdadero interrogante es: ¿cómo podemos hacer que el gobierno y las personas empleadoras apliquen en la vida diaria los derechos que actualmente están en papel?</p> <p><em>Este artículo fue redactado en representación del Sindicato de Trabajadoras Afrocolombianas del Servicio Doméstico - UTRASD, Escuela Nacional Sindical - la ENS y la fundación Bien Humano.</em></p> <style> #footnotes li {margin-bottom:12px;} </style> <ol id="footnotes"> <li id="fn1">La «Investigación para erradicar la invisibilidad» fue realizada en 2012 por la Escuela nacional sindical (ENS) y la Corporación afrocolombiana de desarrollo cultural y social (CARABANTÚ) con la misión de describir las condiciones laborales y la discriminación racial hacia mujeres afrocolombianas que trabajan como trabajadoras del hogar en la ciudad de Medellín. Se reportó que el 91% de las trabajadoras del hogar internas trabajaron diariamente entre 10 y 18 horas y el 89% de las trabajadoras no internas trabajaron entre 9 a 10 horas, sin percibir pagos por horas extras en el 90.5% de los casos. <a href="#ffn1">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn2">La misma investigación reveló que el 62% de las trabajadoras del hogar perciben entre 300.000 y 566.000 pesos mensualmente; el 21%, entre 100.000 y 300.000; y el 2.4%, entre 50.000 y 150.000 (el valor del dólar USD en ese momento era de 1.750 pesos). <a href="#ffn2">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn3">De acuerdo con los datos más recientes del Departamento administrativo nacional de estadísticas (DANE) en 2015, en Colombia había 725.000 personas contratadas como trabajadoras del hogar, de las cuales el 96% son mujeres, lo que representa el 7.4% del total de las mujeres empleadas del país. <a href="#ffn3">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn4">Durante los últimos cinco años, en Colombia se ha llevado a cabo un proceso de paz con las Fuerzas armadas revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC), para poner fin a una guerra que ha durado más de 50 años. La población civil, especialmente en las zonas rurales, ha sido muy afectada por el desplazamiento y los abusos tanto de las FARC como del estado. Estos acuerdos se encuentran actualmente en fase de implementación. <a href="#ffn4">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> </ol> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas">Ayudando a las trabajadoras sexuales a ayudarse a sí mismas</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GATHUMBI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/simanti-dasgupta/la-propuesta-de-amnist-para-despenalizar-el-trabajo-sexual-contenido-">La propuesta de Amnistía para despenalizar el trabajo sexual: contenido y descontentos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SIMANTI DASGUPTA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/wendelijn-vollbehr/mejorar-las-estrategias-contra-la-trata-de-personas-por-qu-las-pers">Mejorar las estrategias contra la trata de personas: ¿por qué las personas dedicadas al trabajo sexual tienen que estar involucradas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">WENDELIJN VOLLBEHR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jason-congdon/hablando-sobre-las-prostitutas-muertas-c-mo-la-coalici-n-contra-la-trata">Hablando sobre las «prostitutas muertas»: cómo la Coalición contra la Trata de Mujeres (CATW) utiliza a sobrevivientes para silenciar quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JASON CONGDON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/thaddeus-blanchette-laura-murray/el-poder-de-las-putas-el-movimiento-de-las-prostituta">El poder de las putas: el movimiento de las prostitutas brasileñas en tiempos de reacción política</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">THADDEUS BLANCHETTE, LAURA MURRAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/georgina-orellano/protestas-creativas-de-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-en-argentina">Protestas creativas de las trabajadoras sexuales en Argentina</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GEORGINA ORELLANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/empower-foundation/no-nos-dedicamos-al-trabajo-sexual-porque-seamos-pobres-lo-hacemos-">No nos dedicamos al trabajo sexual porque seamos pobres, lo hacemos para terminar con nuestra pobreza.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">EMPOWER FOUNDATION</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kimberly-walters/m-s-all-de-las-operaciones-de-redada-y-rescate-es-hora-de-reconocer-e">Más allá de las operaciones de «redada y rescate»: es hora de reconocer el daño que se está causando</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KIMBERLY WALTERS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fraser-crichton/despenalizaci-n-del-trabajo-sexual-en-nueva-zelanda-su-historia-e-impa">Despenalización del trabajo sexual en Nueva Zelanda: su historia e impacto</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRASER CRICHTON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/marcelina-bautista/el-trabajo-no-es-indigno-pero-el-modo-en-que-tratas-las-trabajadoras-del-hogar-s-lo-es">El trabajo no es indigno, pero el modo en que tratas a las trabajadoras del hogar sí lo es</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCELINA BAUTISTA</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Andrea Londońo Ana Teresa Vélez María Roa BTS en Español Tue, 06 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0000 María Roa, Ana Teresa Vélez and Andrea Londońo 120207 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The future of work and the future of poverty https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/alf-gunvald-nilsen/future-of-work-and-future-of-poverty <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Global production networks create economic growth, and thus are often said to be good for development. But if that’s true, why do so many poor people live in middle-income countries?&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/6872382610_577ddd1ff5_h.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Neil Moralee/<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/neilmoralee/6872382610/in/photolist-bthKVm-ciN6gf-7Bp4ma-7AvcSn-dxKE21-cebJq3-bWPoke-D8kxit-q27rVB-dBocCB-2cgBHfV-b8ddh-6u8RFS-4iyE8K-fjwVet-7qeFYE-q8YWfE-bX6Qjo-o3frSh-neJfgP-icVyDe-99Fkjh-jtNjc-9bZtbr-dtxytq-5Jr2T7-9pzDuG-9jjs85-6gwUiU-5YXGX9-oh8nTi-dPsJsh-jtkqZ-8nvL3Q-4T5Mfb-8Z8eHh-gPyJfb-9418VV-n7odV-4bPY4u-cyavfA-M1wUwZ-gB6hFv-LXvNdN-L4ihfq-LQT3HL-LQT2jU-LQSXPh-L4ippA-LQSUiu">Flickr. (cc-by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p style="border-top:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;padding: 10px 0;"><strong>On 8 October 2018 we published the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table">BTS Round Table on the Future of Work</a>, in which 12 experts explain recent changes to the nature of work and offer new ideas in labour policy, organising, and activism. This piece has been written in response.</strong></p> <p>In demarcating the most important changes in the nature of work in recent years, Anannya Bhattacharjee, a participant in BTS’s recent Future of Work Round Table, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed#bhattacharjee">rightly points to</a> the emergence of global production networks as a crucial development. Moreover, she is absolutely correct in calling attention to the fact that employment relationships in these global production networks are very often short-term, insecure, and poorly paid. “In India,” she argues, “job creation is really the creation of miserable jobs”. This is no exaggeration. Despite very high levels of economic growth since the early 2000s, more than <a href="https://thewire.in/labour/nearly-81-of-the-employed-in-india-are-in-the-informal-sector-ilo">80% of India’s workers scramble to earn a precarious living in the informal sector</a>. The richest 1% of the population, meanwhile, <a href="https://thewire.in/labour/nearly-81-of-the-employed-in-india-are-in-the-informal-sector-ilo">corner more than 70% of all wealth generated in the economy</a>. </p> <p>In addition to being a sharp diagnosis of the emerging world of work under capitalism in our times, Bhattacharjee’s observations also point us towards an important insight about <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-the-world-banks-optimism-about-global-poverty-misses-the-point-104963?utm_medium=amptwitter&amp;utm_source=twitter">poverty in the Global South</a>. It is created and reproduced through global production networks. </p> <p>The emergence of global production networks since the late 1970s has been propelled by transnational corporations relocating parts of their production process – in particular labour-intensive manufacturing – from the Global North to the Global South. The industrialisation of Southern economies has, in turn, resulted in a massive increase in the size of the global working class. In fact, <a href="https://www.theglobalist.com/what-really-ails-europe-and-america-the-doubling-of-the-global-workforce/">the global workforce doubled between 1980 and 2005</a>.&nbsp; This transformation also accelerated economic growth, and low-income countries became middle-income countries as they were integrated into global production networks. </p> <p class="mag-quote-center">The economic growth lifting countries from low-income status to middle-income status is profoundly unequally distributed.</p> <p>Consequently, actors such as <a href="https://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/trade/publication/global-value-chain-development-report-measuring-and-analyzing-the-impact-of-gvcs-on-economic-development">the World Bank</a> and the <a href="http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/newapproachtoglobalisationandglobalvaluechainsneededtoboostgrowthandjobs.htm">OECD</a> consider participation in global production networks to be an important precondition for successful development. However, there is an inconvenient fact that is often left out of these policy narratives.&nbsp; As development economist <a href="https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/did/people/academic-staff/sumner/index.aspx">Andy Sumner</a> demonstrated in his book <a href="https://global.oup.com/academic/product/global-poverty-9780198703525?cc=za&amp;lang=en&amp;"><em>Global Poverty</em></a>, as many as 70% of the world’s poor currently live in what the World Bank refers to as middle-income countries. Put slightly differently, one billion poor people live in countries that, since the early 1990s, witnessed economic growth precisely because of their integration into global production networks. These countries are, in principle, capable of ending poverty among their citizens. </p> <p>This paradox reveals that the economic growth lifting countries from low-income status to middle-income status is profoundly unequally distributed. It also reveals a fundamental aspect of global production networks: they are comprised of different value tiers, and that different groups capture different amounts of the value created in these networks. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4dQGl_lswYY">Workers in the Global South capture the least value</a>. The work they carry out is poorly paid, temporary, and unstable. Their working conditions are poor and their access to social protection is restricted. Indeed, the share of national income paid to workers in Southern economies <a href="https://blogs.imf.org/2017/04/12/drivers-of-declining-labor-share-of-income/">has been falling</a> since the 1990s. We also know that some <a href="https://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/newsroom/news/WCMS_601903/lang--en/index.htm">55% of workers in the world economy have no access to social protection</a>, while <a href="https://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/multimedia/maps-and-charts/WCMS_369618/lang--en/index.htm">60% lack a permanent contract</a>. The majority of these workers are citizens of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. In short, precarious workers live in poverty in middle-income countries in the Global South. </p> <p>This means that to discuss the future of work is to discuss the future of poverty. In a context where the livelihoods of the majority of the world’s population are dependent on wage labour, the struggle against poverty <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_tuvBHr6WU">has to be a struggle for decent, stable, and well-paid work</a>. It must be a struggle for social citizenship that advances redistribution in favour of the working classes in the Global South. I use the word struggle quite deliberately, for it is nothing short of delusional to think such changes will come about without organising and mobilising workers to challenge the power of transnational corporations and political elites. Power, as we know all too well, concedes nothing without a demand. It never has, and it never will. </p> <div class="bannercontainer1" style="margin-bottom:5px;"><p>Round table on the future of work</p></div> <style> .bannercontainer1 { background-image:url('https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/fowbanner.jpg'); background-size: cover; background-repeat:no-repeat; width:100%; height:130px; display:flex; } div.bannercontainer1 p { color:white; font-size:150%; font-weight:bold; margin:10px 0 0 10px; opacity: 1; letter-spacing: 3px; } #debatetoc {border-bottom:1px solid #999;} #respondents {display:flex;width:100%;flex-wrap: wrap;} .respondentsleft {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .respondentsright {flex-grow: 1;flex-basis:auto;min-width:200px;margin:5px;} .participant {font-size:90%;font-weight:bold;} .affil {font-size:90%;font-style: italic;color: #999;} .rspacing {margin:10px 0px;line-height:14pt;} .question {color:white;margin-bottom: 5px;padding: 5px;} .active {background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.7);} .inactive {background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);} .inactive:hover {background-color:rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.3);color:black;} .tbr {background-color: #AAA;} #debatetoc a {text-decoration:none;} .disclaimer {color:#999;font-size:90%;font-style:italic;} .inlinename {font-size:200%;color:#0e63bc;font-weight:bold;} .inlineaffil {color:#999;font-size:90%;} .biobox {float:left;padding: 0 5px 15px 0;margin:0 15px 15px 0;border-right:1px solid #999;border-bottom:1px solid #999;width:150px;} .break {clear:both;border-top:1px solid #999;} </style> <div id="debatetoc"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/joel-quirk-cameron-thibos/introduction-future-of-work-round-table"><div class="question inactive">Introduction</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-joint-funders-statement"><div class="question inactive">Joint statement from the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Sage Fund</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-has-world-of-work-changed"><div class="question inactive">1. How has the nature of work changed in recent years, and how has that impacted workers?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-do-ethical-consumerism-and-investment-work"><div class="question inactive">2. Are existing strategies to promote ethical investment and ethical consumption effective in improving worker conditions, and how might such programmes be improved?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-to-get-business-leaders-and-policy-makers-on-board"><div class="question inactive">3. What types of interventions would encourage business leaders and policy makers to prioritise the working conditions of workers, and how can workers more effectively participate?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-stopping-race-to-bottom-in-world-of-work"><div class="question inactive">4. What needs to happen in business, politics, or organising in response to the current race to the bottom in the world of work?</div></a> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fow/future-of-work-round-table-how-can-institutions-and-regulations-keep-up"><div class="question inactive">5. Global patterns of work and employment will continue to evolve. How must existing regulations and organisations evolve in order to keep up?</div></a> <p class="disclaimer">This project is supported by the Ford Foundation but the viewpoints expressed here are explicitly those of the authors. The foundation's support is not tacit endorsement within. </p> </div> <!--DEBATETOC--> <div class="break"></div> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Alf Gunvald Nilsen Mon, 05 Nov 2018 09:22:19 +0000 Alf Gunvald Nilsen 120461 at https://www.opendemocracy.net