BeyondSlavery https://www.opendemocracy.net/taxonomy/term/17588/all cached version 11/09/2018 14:31:37 en “Britons never will be slaves”: the rise of nationalism and ‘modern slavery’ https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/elizabeth-faulkner/britons-never-will-be-slaves-rise-of-nationalism-and-modern-slavery <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Right wing voices are using the spectre of ‘enslaved’ Britons to prop up their xenophobic and nationalistic appeals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/7563009630_cbe10281e6_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Majorca. Andrés Nieto Porras/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/anieto2k/7563009630/in/photolist-cwjpgL-KwdSAt-27PKLx2-25j5T66-eQvLja-G6WXWU-SUW1sp-GKopd6-pBzTW4-b86ca6-pUCYMS-bAL47r-fFqNUZ-pJpPFW-d2t6p7-gruFit-fEJTpz-6d87YJ-boFknE-9w7x51-pBJHi3-9yKRJk-dYtUih-bAYze9-9wWMZj-pU3UQK-4efEr5-23htR9f-7WShyQ-bAYGoQ-9wTMSF-SjhRBt-bAZ1pS-d4GFmE-TybGhP-Tuz75Q-SYcyrW-pUjYRe-938K8D-9yNQSY-Tycm9a-98iXqF-ZcYsiU-Wi6q6p-XgAF1j-TjordN-Kwh9op-26s2hT7-SjhojH-pRXfqG">CC (by-sa)</a></p> <p>This summer the <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/warning-to-holiday-makers-of-modern-slavery-risks">British government</a> publicly expressed concerns that holidaymakers heading to Majorca might end up trapped in ‘modern slavery’. In response to this perceived threat, the UK Border Force launched a week-long awareness raising operation on labour exploitation which The Sun described, in its typical style, as <a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6385180/british-bar-touts-magaluf-wages-passports-seized-foreign-office-warning/">“MAGA Slave Hell”</a>.</p> <p>The most interesting feature of this case is the specific focus on Britons as potential victims. It is a marked departure from the established convention of focusing upon ‘outsiders’ as both the victims and the perpetrators, such as foreign nationals working in nail bars and other foreign nationals forcing them to do so. &nbsp;Take, for example, the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority’s (GLAA) <a href="http://www.gla.gov.uk/media/3648/glaa-strategic-plan-2018-2021.pdf">&#39;Strategy for Protecting Vulnerable and Exploited Workers 2018-2021&#39;</a>. Or the <a href="http://www.gla.gov.uk/who-we-are/modern-slavery/who-we-are-modern-slavery-spot-the-signs/">&#39;Spot the signs&#39;</a> guide by the GLAA, which uses leading statements such as “unfamiliar with the local language” or “be distrustful of authorities” as identifying features of slavery .</p> <p>The implied racism of a codified suspicion towards those with low local language ability hints at how ‘modern slavery’ has been caught up in growing ideas of nationalism. It’s no innocent test, as it may first appear, since it reflects a broader suspicion found in society toward any migrant or ‘outsider’ struggling with English. As does the implicit assumption that foreigners who are “distrustful of authorities” are up to no good. The recent BBC documentary <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0bfdn7h/the-prosecutors-series-2-2-modern-day-slavery">&#39;The Prosecutors&#39;</a> reiterates this idea, stating in the programme that “intelligence suggests that modern-day slaves will try to get away from authorities”. It is an observation that entirely ignores the explicitly <a href="http://www.labourexploitation.org/news/hostile-environment-undermines-uk-government%E2%80%99s-modern-slavery-agenda">hostile environment</a> created by the Home Office in response to growing fears around migration. Migrants and even people who ‘look like’ migrants are now routinely stopped, questioned, pressured, detained, and humiliated by this official government policy and the informal xenophobia of nativism and racism underlying it.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Suggesting that modern-day slaves will try to get away from authorities is an observation that entirely ignores the explicitly hostile environment created by the Home Office in response to growing fears around migration.</p> <p>On the other hand, British holidaymakers travelling to Majorca are judged according to a very different rulebook. Their situations are diagnosed under the influence of one of the most powerful images in the western imagination, namely the innocent young girl <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/law/2015/jan/18/i-was-sold-into-sexual-slavery?CMP=aff_1432&amp;awc=5795_1534852547_e2f7c74145ee5235580db8b1d9e160be">dragged off to distant lands</a> to satisfy the sexual appetites of foreign men. The sense of vulnerability is amplified by the UK immigration minister’s more sensationalistic flourishes, as when she said that highlighting the issue will ensure that those tempted by <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-44252095">“an extended stay in the sunshine, do not find their summer turning into a nightmare”.</a> The exploitation that Brits abroad face <a href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/britons-become-victims-of-modern-slavery-in-majorca-m68mjn5km">reportedly includes</a> long hours, low wages and squalid living conditions. The report also stated that female workers will likely be exposed to sexual harassment and abuse. </p> <p>This has proved ripe pickings for outlets like the Daily Mail, which has tapped into growing concerns about ‘protecting our own’ with assertions like <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5240689/Slavery-victims-UK-likely-British.html">“slavery victims in the UK are now more likely to come from Britain than any other nationality”</a>. Headlines such as <a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6385180/british-bar-touts-magaluf-wages-passports-seized-foreign-office-warning/">“MAGA ‘SLAVE HELL’”</a> from The Sun and <a href="https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-news/705318/magaluf-2018-British-rep-bar-workers-modern-day-slavery-conditions-punta-ballena">“Magaluf Brit workers tell of ‘modern day slavery’ conditions”</a> from the Daily Star further ramp up the hype and illustrate the exceptionality of British victims.</p> <p>The established narrative of modern slavery has traditionally concentrated on the issue as a problem for, and created by, ‘outsiders’. Thanks to the rise of right wing nativism, this has started to shift. Modern slavery is increasingly becoming understood as a threat to ‘insiders’ as well, individuals who are seen as more deserving and whose plight is more disturbing than those within the original narrative. The constructed image of the ultimate victim – the ‘British slave’ – has found purchase in the xenophobic nativism and racism currently rising in Britain. This is a troubling shift, as the already ever-expanding umbrella of ‘modern slavery’ is now being tied to larger agendas regarding protecting ‘our own’ . The ideological shift to focusing upon “British slaves” echoes the well-known phrase from James Thomson’s Rule Britannia, in that “Britons never will be slaves”. </p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/elizabeth-faulkner/403-million-slaves-challenging-hypocrisy-of-modern-slavery-statistics">40.3 million slaves: challenging the hypocrisy of modern slavery statistics</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/les-back-and-shamser-sinha/stealing-dream-young-migrants-living-through-anti-immigrant">Stealing a dream: young migrants living through anti-immigrant times </a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/igor-bosc/political-economy-of-anti-trafficking">The political economy of anti-trafficking</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/neil-roberts-darien-lamen/long-legacy-of-frederick-douglass">The long legacy of Frederick Douglass</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/tom-hunt/new-podcast-future-of-trade-unions">NEW PODCASTS: The future of trade unions – masterclass series</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/bridget-anderson/migrants-before-permanent-people-s-tribunal-in-barcelona">Migrants before the Permanent People’s Tribunal in Barcelona</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Elizabeth A. Faulkner Tue, 11 Sep 2018 13:23:43 +0000 Elizabeth A. Faulkner 119622 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Do not be ill for more than 60 days: Tier 4 student visas and immigration policy in the UK https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/bts-anonymous/do-not-be-ill-for-more-than-60-days-tier-4-student-visas-and-immigration <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>International students in the UK get sent back home if they suspend their studies for more than 60 days, even due to unforeseen illness.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/5389428627_c61fafffa5_o.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">The Wills Memorial Building of Bristol University. Robert Cutts/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/panr/5389428627">CC (by-sa)</a></p> <p>Depending on the course, studying at a UK university costs ‘international students’ (non-UK/EU) at least <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/education/2015/apr/23/are-international-students-getting-a-raw-deal">two to three times</a> more than ‘home’ students. </p> <p>A <a href="https://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/policy-and-analysis/reports/Documents/2017/briefing-economic-impact-international-students.pdf">March 2017 report</a> by Universities UK analyses the economic impact of international students studying in the UK in 2014-15. This analysis was done by Oxford Economics, where both EU and non-EU students were grouped as international students. According to this report, around 19% of all students registered at UK universities were international students (14% were non-EU students). This generated £4.8 billion (£4.2 billion by non-EU students) in tuition fees and £6.1 billion in subsistence spending and other costs, contributing to around 82% of export earnings generated by universities in the UK in 2014-15. </p> <p>Overall, international students generated £25.8 billion in gross output in the UK (80% of which was by non-EU students). This supported 206,600 full-time jobs nationally, which in turn generated £1 billion in tax revenues for the UK exchequer – information Universities UK <a href="https://universitiesuk.ac.uk/policy-and-analysis/reports/Documents/2017/economic-impact-international-students-final-WEB.pdf">prominently promotes</a>.</p> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/uniukbox.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">A rosy windfall for all concerned. Screenshot from <a href="https://universitiesuk.ac.uk/policy-and-analysis/Pages/immigration.aspx">Universities UK</a>. Fair use.</p> <p>It is evident that UK universities and the communities supporting them thrive on the inflow of funds from international students. To keep them coming British universities engage in aggressive marketing strategies overseas, presenting a glorious picture of the British higher education system to prospective students. The rude awakening only comes once the student arrives at the door of the Home Office’s “hostile environment”, where gratitude is expressed through suspicion, surveillance, and restriction.</p> <h2>Shown the door because of sickness</h2> <p>I am an international Ph.D. student at a UK University on a Tier 4 visa. I recently went through a prolonged illness, and was largely unable to work for more than two months. In between the medication and test results, I tried to find out about the <a href="https://www.ukcisa.org.uk/Information--Advice/Visas-and-Immigration/Protecting-your-Tier-4-status#layer-3294">administrative procedures required</a> to suspend my studies, if that became necessary. I learned that as a Tier 4 student, I can only apply for a suspension of up to 60 days. If I suspend studies for more than 60 days, my visa will be cancelled. I will be sent back to my home country and I will have to apply for a new Tier 4 visa at a cost of over £1000 (which in my home currency is almost 10 times as expensive). This cost includes around £350 in <a href="https://www.gov.uk/tier-4-general-visa">visa application fee</a>s and around £675 <a href="https://www.gov.uk/healthcare-immigration-application">for access to the National Health Service</a>. Moreover, if I am not able to complete my Ph.D. on time due to illness, I will not be accorded an automatic extension because of this suspension. The extension will then have to be due to other reasons, invoking the risk of questioning my academic performance.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">The university acts as hall monitor and border guard simultaneously.</p> <p>Therefore, as a Tier 4 student, I need to ensure that I do not fall sick for more than 60 days. If I do, I must continue with my studies regardless. The university acts as hall monitor and border guard simultaneously. This is written into the immigration rules. It is a duty of the university to <a href="https://www.ukcisa.org.uk/Information--Advice/Visas-and-Immigration/Protecting-your-Tier-4-status#layer-3294">monitor my attendance</a> and performance, and report back to the Home Office. Accordingly, if I suspend my studies for more than 60 days, then the university is obligated to inform the Home Office. The Home Office will then ensure that I go back to my home country, inform them when I can resume studies, so that I can apply for a new visa again.</p> <p>There’s a bizarre twist here. If I <em>forecast</em> that the duration of my illness will be for more than 60 days, suspend my studies, and leave the country on my own accord for the duration of the suspension, then I will still have to apply for a new Tier 4 visa. <em>But</em>, the time spent away may be added to my maximum study time after I receive a new visa, at the discretion of the university. If I do not leave the country on my own for any reason (including because my illness prevents me from travelling), then my visa will be cancelled and I will not be accorded this benefit.</p> <p>Illnesses, and their treatment, are rarely so easily predictable. It takes time to figure out what is wrong, and to receive results back from the NHS (for which, as a Tier 4 student, I paid a hefty amount of money to access). So, on top of the anxiety caused by a substantial illness itself, international students who fall ill must also cope with the threat of being sent back to start again.</p> <p>I understand the requirements of the immigration rules. As a Tier 4 student I have been reminded of these rules time and again. Yet illnesses or situations of family bereavement cannot be forecasted. They are hard enough to deal with, even without the axe of the Home Office hanging over our head, threatening us with removal unless we get back to work. These restrictive, controlling and impractical immigration rules must be questioned in the name of students’ well-being. There is no reason to send them&nbsp;back and make them reapply, simply because they happened to fall ill over the course of their studies.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ourkingdom/val%C3%A9rie-hartwich/proposed-cap-on-international-students-is-discriminatory-and-danger-to-b">The proposed cap on international students is discriminatory and a danger to British education </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/rebecca-murray/reject-exclusion-of-forced-migrants-from-higher-education">Reject the exclusion of forced migrants from higher education</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beverley-orr-ewing/what-will-brexit-mean-for-future-of-european-student-mobility">What will Brexit mean for the future of European student mobility?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/ourkingdom/nandita-dogra/hypocrisy-of-uk-immigration-policy">The hypocrisy of UK immigration policy</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery BTS Anonymous Tue, 11 Sep 2018 12:48:41 +0000 BTS Anonymous 119624 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Ayudando a las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual a ayudarse a sí mismas https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gathumbi/ayudando-las-trabajadoras-sexuales-ayudarse-s-mismas <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Las leyes que penalizan la prostitución han causado un daño increíble a las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual a lo largo de los años, pero nunca han logrado poner fin al ejercicio. Solo por esta razón deberíamos luchar en su contra. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/anne-gathumbi/helping-sex-workers-help-themselves">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/27663531955_c73668f587_k_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Red Umbrella March for Sex Work Solidarity on 11 June 2016. Sally T. Buck/Flickr. (CC 2.0 by-nc-nd)</p> <p><strong>NAIROBI –</strong> Una vez, cuando estaba reunida con un grupo de trabajadoras sexuales en un prostíbulo en Kenia, las mujeres allí presentes recibieron una llamada que decía que una de sus miembros había sido encontrada abandonada cerca de un río con cortes profundos en la cara, las manos y los muslos.</p> <p>La mujer había sido arrestada bajo custodia policial la noche anterior. Sus compañeras habían ido a la comisaría de policía para rescatarla pero no pudieron encontrarla. Cuando la recogieron de un basurero, descubrieron que había sido violada por la policía, que luego la había dejado en el bosque, donde había sido acosada por otros muchachos, quienes la violaron y golpearon nuevamente. Las trabajadoras sexuales intentaron denunciar el incidente, pero las amenazaron con ser detenidas.</p> <p>El grupo recaudó dinero para llevar a su amiga al hospital donde permaneció durante un mes. Además, se turnaron para alimentar a sus hijas e hijos y asegurarse de que fueran a la escuela. En otras palabras, proporcionaron los servicios sociales que el Estado no proporcionó porque, de no haberlo hecho, su compañera habría muerto y sus hijas e hijos se habrían quedado sin hogar.</p> <p>La mayoría de las trabajadoras sexuales que conocí —no solo en Kenia sino en muchos otros países—, han tenido una mala experiencia con la policía, habitualmente porque les roban su dinero o las chantajean para mantener sexo amenazándolas con denunciarlas. Ese es uno de los motivos por los que apoyo la despenalización del trabajo sexual. Existen muchos otros, pero todos ellos derivan del simple hecho de que penalizar el trabajo sexual —su compra-venta o las actividades necesarias relacionadas— no funciona. Nunca se ha tenido éxito en el afán por eliminarlo. Sí ha servido, en cambio, para llevar a las trabajadoras sexuales a una mayor clandestinidad, dificultándoles aún más el acceso a los servicios de salud, las medidas de seguridad en el trabajo o la denuncia de abusos o explotación a la policía.</p> <p>Al eliminar la amenaza de sanciones legales, la despenalización crea un entorno en el que podemos centrar nuestra atención en promover los derechos humanos de las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual en lugar de castigarles. Esto ya no es una posibilidad abstracta. El 26 de mayo de 2016, Amnistía Internacional <a href="https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2016/05/amnesty-international-publishes-policy-and-research-on-protection-of-sex-workers-rights/">publicó</a> una nueva política de protección de las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual, que incluye una recomendación para despenalizar el trabajo sexual y las actividades asociadas. Así Amnistía Internacional se une a un gran número de organizaciones en todo el mundo que apoyan la despenalización, tales como la Organización Mundial de la Salud, ONUSIDA, Human Rights Watch, y la Alianza Mundial contra la Trata de Mujeres.</p> <p>Son innumerables las pruebas que justifican su apoyo. Nueva Zelanda y Nueva Gales del Sur (Australia) <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/fraser-crichton/decriminalising-sex-work-in-new-zealand-its-history-and-impact">eliminaron las sanciones penales</a> relativas al trabajo sexual en 2003 y 1995, respectivamente. Las conversaciones entabladas con las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual reflejan un ambiente de trabajo mucho más seguro, con mayor capacidad para filtrar a la clientela y trabajar en áreas de mayor seguridad; pueden contactar con la policía en casos de violencia y negociar prácticas de sexo seguras y una remuneración justa. Las trabajadoras sexuales se han formado, se han unido a sindicatos, y se han involucrado en la articulación de normas y regulaciones para dirigir su sector.</p> <p>La despenalización también tiene muchos beneficios potenciales para la salud. En un estudio publicado en <a href="mailto:http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2814%2960931-4/abstract"><em>The Lancet</em></a> en 2014 se concluyó que el cambio en la legislación podría conseguir que en la próxima década hubiera hasta un 46 % menos de nuevas infectadas por el VIH entre las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual. Eso es incluso más efectivo que aumentar el acceso a tratamientos antirretrovíricos, porque cuando se despenaliza el trabajo sexual, quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual tienen la potestad de insistir en el uso del preservativo y están en mejores condiciones de acceder a los servicios de prevención, pruebas y tratamiento del VIH.</p> <p>Por desgracia, en algunas partes del mundo está ganando terreno una idea un tanto distinta. De acuerdo con el llamado modelo suizo, implantado en este país, así como en muchos otros, es ilegal comprar sexo o involucrarse en actividades de terceros tales como la publicidad y la gestión de este tipo de trabajo.</p> <p>Aunque bajo este régimen las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual no se enfrentan a la persecución, siguen sufriendo agresiones. Tienen dificultades para alquilar una vivienda porque las personas propietarias temen ser acusadas de administrar un burdel, y deben llevar adelante sus actividades en lugares más peligrosos porque la clientela tiene miedo a la policía. En Noruega, la policía utiliza la posesión de preservativos por parte de quienes ejercen el trabajo sexual como evidencia contra la clientela. En Suecia, una trabajadora sexual me contó cómo la policía se instaló delante de su puerta para arrestar a cualquier cliente que se presentara. Desde el vecindario finalmente le pidieron que se fuera del departamento. Dichas prácticas crean estigma y conducen a la discriminación.</p> <p>Casi todas personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual alrededor del mundo se oponen al modelo sueco, y sin embargo, hay países en la Unión Europea que aún se plantean su activación —una desatención voluntaria a sus demandas que no tiene cabida en las crisis de salud pública a las que nos enfrentamos en muchas partes del mundo. La penalización no hace nada para proteger a las personas que realizan trabajo sexual o las comunidades en las que viven sino que, por el contrario, hace que tanto las primeras como sus familias queden expuestas a riesgos mayores. La despenalización representa un enfoque más acorde, que ofrece a las personas que ejercen el trabajo sexual las herramientas necesarias para defenderse a sí mismas como ciudadanas iguales ante la ley.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell">Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL CASTELLANOS</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Anne Gathumbi BTS en Español Mon, 03 Sep 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Anne Gathumbi 117614 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Niños y niñas tratadas o reclutadas para la guerra: reflexiones para el proceso de justicia transicional en Colombia https://www.opendemocracy.net/m-nica-hurtado-ngela-iranzo/ni-os-y-ni-as-tratadas-o-reclutadas-para-la-guerra-reflexiones-para-el-p <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>El reclutamiento ilícito y la trata de personas suelen ser reconocidos internacionalmente como delitos diferenciados, sin embargo, en conflictos como el colombiano esta diferencia se torna borrosa.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/PA-33886557.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Pictures of missing people and victims of the armed conflict are displayed during a protest in Bogota. Daniel Garzon Herazo/NurPhoto/Sipa USA/PA Images. All rights reserved.</p> <p>El reclutamiento ilícito y la trata de personas suelen ser reconocidos internacionalmente como delitos diferenciados: el primero es un crimen de guerra y el segundo es propio del crimen organizado; sin embargo, en conflictos como el colombiano esta diferencia se torna borrosa, en particular cuando se trata de reclutamiento de Niños, Niñas y Adolescentes (NNA). Además de cumplir funciones de «soldado», estos niños y niñas participan en economías ilícitas (cultivos ilícitos, minería ilegal y cobro de extorsiones, entre otras); también, realizan actividades indirectamente relacionadas con la guerra como, por ejemplo, cocinar, lavar, buscar leña e incluso satisfacer los deseos sexuales de los integrantes del grupo armado. Un elemento adicional: intentar salir del grupo puede representar un alto riesgo para sus vidas o la de sus familiares. Fuera de una situación formalmente reconocida como «conflicto armado», ¿no serían estos casos interpretados por la sociedad y por la justicia como trata de seres humanos?</p> <p>Más allá de la mirada legalista, el reclutamiento y la trata de seres humanos muestran varias similitudes. Para empezar, ambas son experiencias complejas. Resulta difícil establecer cuándo empiezan y terminan realmente. A diferencia del orden claro de los verbos rectores en los tipos penales, la utilización de un NNA por parte de los grupos armados o la explotación de un infante o adolescente en casos de trata puede iniciarse antes del reclutamiento o la captación propiamente dicha. De igual forma, es difícil determinar cuándo «termina» la condición de reclutamiento o trata. Los NNA pueden reincidir vinculándose a otros grupos armados o insertarse de forma adversa al mercado laboral; es decir, lugares donde están sometidos a explotación extrema y no pueden salir o ejercer su voluntad libremente. </p> <p>Tanto en la trata de personas como en el reclutamiento, la entrada tiende a ser «abierta», es decir, no se utiliza necesariamente la fuerza o violencia, como suele mostrarse en los medios. Distintos estudios sobre reclutamiento ilícito en Colombia han estimado que entre el 78% y el 85% de los NNA que se vincularon a grupos armados ilegales, lo hicieron de forma «voluntaria» (Vargas &amp; Restrepo-Jaramillo, 2016; Hurtado, Iranzo &amp; Gómez, 2017). Es cierto que el consentimiento de una persona menor de edad no tiene validez ante la ley y es cuestionable hasta qué punto se puede hablar de «decisión voluntaria» cuando se toma en medio de condiciones adversas: pobreza, maltrato, abandono y desplazamiento forzado, entre otros. Reconociendo todas estas particularidades, resulta relevante atender a este indicador no solo por las profundas consecuencias que trae para cada NNA tomar esta decisión, sino por las consecuencias legales cuando se desmovilizan siendo mayores de 18 años, pues, ante la ley, resultan ser victimarios antes que víctimas. En un eventual proceso de desmovilización (como el que tuvo lugar con los paramilitares en 2006) o la negociación de paz entre el gobierno Santos y el grupo guerrillero FARC-EP en 2016, probablemente entre el 15% y el 22% que fue reclutado de manera forzada no se vinculará a ningún grupo, pero ¿qué pasará con el entre 78% y 85% restante? ¿Optaría por involucrarse con otro actor armado ilegal que le dé alternativas aparentemente mejores de vida y futuro?</p> <p>El punto más controvertido para comparar es la explotación. Según el Protocolo de Palermo y el tipo penal de trata en Colombia, se debe demostrar «el fin de explotar» y esto se traduce generalmente en dinero y ganancias. Desde esta perspectiva, la participación activa y directa en las hostilidades por parte de los NNA no es explotación, son actividades propias de ser «soldado» irregular en la guerra. Es más, lavar, cocinar, cultivar o buscar leña, también lo harían en sus casas; incluso el abuso sexual dentro de las filas pudieron vivirlo con familiares o vecinos. Sin embargo, las condiciones para oponerse o resistirse son muy diferentes. Negarse a realizar cualquier labor que se le exija, incluida la compañía sexual o someterse a abortos forzados puede representar para estos NNA severos castigos, incluso la muerte. Pero, además, cabe recordar que la «sangre joven» asegura soldados por más años y cuesta menos que tener soldados profesionales. </p> <p>Es cierto que la lucha contra la trata de personas ha sido manipulada en varias ocasiones con propósitos políticos y moralistas. Por ejemplo, en nombre de la lucha contra la trata se han implementado políticas contra la migración no deseada o «cruzadas» para abolir la prostitución (Warren, 2012; Piscitelli, 2012; Kempadoo, 2007). Aun así, en el momento de construcción de paz que vive Colombia, repensar la relación entre trata y reclutamiento puede abrir caminos para comprender la complejidad y violencia sufrida por estos niños y niñas. Decir que son víctimas de reclutamiento ilícito o de trata de personas, por ejemplo, podría conducir al concurso de delitos y así proteger dos bienes legales: la libertad (contra la trata) y la protección de los civiles en conflicto armado (contra el reclutamiento). Idealmente, reconocer la superposición que puede haber en determinadas ocasiones entre reclutamiento y trata puede propiciar una mayor rendición de cuentas por parte de los victimarios, una mejor comprensión del proceso vivido, y una percepción social más empática hacia las niñas y niños de la guerra colombiana. </p> <p>El reclutamiento ilícito en Colombia ha sido poco relevante hasta ahora. A pesar de ser un crimen de guerra y estar tipificado en el código penal, en la práctica ha sido un delito excarcelable. Los condenados por reclutamiento ilícito por hechos cometidos antes de 2004 en la justicia ordinaria, lograron reducir sus penas a tres años por colaborar con la justicia, y así pudieron pagar sus condenas fuera de la cárcel.<sup><a id="ffn1" href="#fn1" class="footnote">1</a></sup></p> <p>De 132 casos de reclutamiento de niñas y niños registrados por la Fiscalía General entre 2008 y 2016, fueron resueltos 35 y se dictaron 86 sentencias condenatorias, de las cuales sólo 19 exigen reparación a las víctimas. Además, la reparación no es integral, sino que se limitó a la indemnización con cantidades reducidas que corresponden a delitos menores como la estafa o el hurto. Los casos de niñas reclutadas que fueron objeto de violencia sexual e incluso víctimas de embarazos y abortos forzados, no recibieron una respuesta diferenciada por parte de la justicia.<sup><a id="ffn2" href="#fn2" class="footnote">2</a></sup></p> <p>En escenarios de justicia transicional como el que vive actualmente Colombia, cobra sentido abrir debates más interdisciplinares sobre la relación entre reclutamiento y trata de NNA. La forma de definir a los actores implicados y los hechos vividos por los NNA, podrá facilitar o no el acceso a justicia, reparación y reintegración de esta población, hoy mayor de edad y con hijos.</p> <h2>Referencias bibliográficas</h2> <p>Hurtado, M., Iranzo Dosdad, Á., &amp; Gómez Hernández, S. (2017). The relationship between human trafficking and child recruitment in the Colombian armed conflict. Third World Quarterly, 1-18.</p> <p>Kempadoo, K. (2007). The war on human trafficking in the Caribbean. Race &amp; Class, 49(2), 79-85.</p> <p>Piscitelli, A. (2012). Revisiting notions of sex trafficking and victims. Vibrant: Virtual Brazilian Anthropology, 9(1), 274-310.</p> <p>Vargas, G. A., &amp; Restrepo-Jaramillo, N. (2016). Child Soldiering in Colombia: Does Poverty Matter?. Civil Wars, 18(4), 467-487</p> <p>Warren, K. B. (2012). Troubling the victim/trafficker dichotomy in efforts to combat human trafficking: the unintended consequences of moralizing labor migration. Indiana Journal of global legal Studies, 19(1), 105-120.</p> <hr /> <style> #footnotes li {margin-bottom:10px;} </style> <ol id="footnotes"> <li id="fn1">En Colombia, para los crímenes de reclutamiento ocurridos entre 2000 y 2004, no es posible la aplicación retroactiva de la Ley 890 de 2005 que aumenta las penas de entre 6 y 10 a 8 y 15 años de cárcel por el delito de reclutamiento ilícito. Además, según la legislación colombiana, si el condenado reconoce sus cargos y colabora con la justicia, la pena puede reducirse a la mitad del mínimo establecido por ley; de modo que, si queda en menos de 4 años, no requiere encarcelación. <a href="#ffn1">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn2">En 2014 se aprobó en Colombia la Ley 1719 sobre víctimas de violencia sexual con ocasión del conflicto armado; no obstante, los casos de niñas que llegaron a la justicia ordinaria por reclutamiento ilícito, y que además fueron sometidas a estas formas de violencia, no encontraron ni en la justicia ni en los programas de asistencia del Estado un trato diferencial que reconociera el alcance de la violencia vivida, garantizara su sanación, empoderamiento y capacidad para encauzar sus futuros. <a href="#ffn2">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> </ol> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/yaatsil-guevara-gonz-lez/traves-de-emigrantes-centroamericanos-en-m-xico-tr-fico-y">Travesía de emigrantes centroamericanos en México. Tráfico y contrabando como forma de negociación social </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/jennifer-gordon/trabajadores-migrantes-y-reclutamiento-en-m-xico">Trabajadores Migrantes y Reclutamiento en México</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/ana-lilia-galv-n-tov-as-fernando-loera-carlos-zavala-gabriella-sanchez/los-menores-de-">Los menores de edad que trabajan en el trafico de migrantes: la historia detras de los &quot;Menores de Circuito&quot; en Mexico</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/andrea-londo-o/aliados-o-obst-culos-el-papel-de-los-empleadores-domesticos-en-colombia">¿Aliados u obstáculos? El papel de los empleadores domésticos en Colombia</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Ángela Iranzo Mónica Hurtado Sat, 01 Sep 2018 09:33:10 +0000 Mónica Hurtado and Ángela Iranzo 119508 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Traffickers, cybergangs and paedophiles: a genuine threat or a fuzzy narrative surrounding displaced Rohingya? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/nicolas-lainez-su-ann-oh/traffickers-cybergangs-and-paedophiles-genuine-threat-or-fuzz <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Claims that Rohingya women and children are at risk of being trafficked for labour and sexual exploitation simplify complexities, magnifying the emotional content. Policies shouldn’t be designed around them.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/PA-37022526.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Masfiqur Sohan/NurPhoto/Sipa USA/PA Images. All rights reserved.</p> <p>The forced migration of the Rohingya (referred to as Bengali in Myanmar) has received much attention since communal violence erupted in Myanmar in 2012. Most of the coverage has focused on the reasons for flight and the conditions needed for repatriation, particularly since the latest outflow in August 2017. In addition, the international media began linking Rohingya and human trafficking when mass graves with the remains of Rohingya were discovered in Thailand in 2015. Recently, a new narrative has emerged describing how criminal gangs and traffickers are taking advantage of the chaos and poverty during flight and in Bangladesh’s refugee camps to traffic Rohingya women and children for sexual and labour exploitation. </p> <p>In this article, we identify the attributes of this latest narrative, its origins, and its implications for public and international policy. In conducting our analysis, we ask the following questions. What is the nature of the threat that trafficking poses to displaced Rohingya? How many cases of trafficking have occurred and what are the circumstances surrounding these cases? Should we be concerned about the scale of this phenomenon? </p> <p>These questions are important given the interventions that are now being designed by governmental and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to address the issue, particularly now that the latest Trafficking in Persons report from the U.S. State Department downgraded Myanmar to its lowest, Tier 3 ranking. This change, which may result in economic sanctions from the U.S. government, was justified by the country’s failure to protect displaced Rohingya who are subjected to “<a href="https://www.state.gov/j/tip/rls/tiprpt/countries/2018/282623.htm">exploitation – or transported to other countries for the purpose of sex trafficking</a>”. Bangladesh remained in the Tier 2 Watch, partly because “<a href="https://www.state.gov/j/tip/rls/tiprpt/countries/2018/282609.htm">Rohingya women and girls are reportedly recruited from refugee camps for domestic work in private homes, guest houses, or hotels and are instead subjected to sex trafficking</a>”.</p> <p>Given the impact on public opinion and policy, we provide a critical analysis of the coverage of the trafficking of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh so as to bring some clarity to an emotionally charged topic. </p> <p class="mag-quote-center">What is the nature of the threat that trafficking poses to displaced Rohingya?</p> <h2>The sex trafficking narrative and its origins </h2> <p>The bare bones of the narrative are that Rohingya women and children are, because of poverty, desperation, and chaos, at risk of being trafficked by criminal gangs for sexual and labour exploitation during the process of fleeing from Myanmar and while residing in refugee camps in Bangladesh. </p> <p>We traced the emergence of this narrative in international media through an analysis of 27 media reports, three NGO reports, two UN press releases and two ‘country sections’ of the 2018 U.S. Trafficking in Persons Report. All were published between September 2017 and July 2018. This narrative derives from multiple sources, with the UN, the International Organisation for Migration Bangladesh, and the BBC appearing as key players in its construction. </p> <p>The first instance of a complete narrative appeared in an article published 17 October 2017 by the Australian outlet ABC. It was titled “<a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-20/sexual-predators-human-traffickers-target-rohingya-refugee-camps/9068490">Sexual predators, human traffickers target Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh</a>”. In it, the United Nations coordinator in Bangladesh set the tone, stating that “rape, human trafficking, and survival sex have been reported among the existing perils for women and girls during flight”. This fear was then echoed by organisations including <a href="https://www.thedailystar.net/rohingya-crisis/rohingya-children-in-bangladesh-makeshift-camps-risk-trafficking-sexual-abuse-and-child-labour-warns-save-the-children-1479802">Save the Children</a> in Bangladesh, <a href="https://www.presstv.com/Detail/2017/10/20/539210/Rohingya-Myanmar-sex-trafficking-Bangladesh-Unicef">CARE</a>, and <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/rohingya-muslim-crisis-latest-prostitution-refugee-camps-sex-trade-black-market-bangladesh-burma-a8017256.html">UNICEF</a> in the following weeks.</p> <p>The second iteration of the narrative came in a November 2017 <a href="https://news.un.org/en/story/2017/11/636002-un-warns-trafficking-sexual-abuse-shadow-rohingya-refugee-crisis">press release by the IOM</a>, which &nbsp;emphasised that “desperate men, women and children are being recruited with false offers of paid work in various industries including fishing, small commerce, begging and, in the case of girls, domestic work”. Additionally, it reported that many Rohingya are confined and exploited, and in some cases, forced into marriage and prostitution.</p> <p>This new message spread rapidly through media outlets like <a href="http://www.asiaone.com/asia/human-trafficking-rife-rohingya-camps-aid-agencies">Asia One</a>, provoking further anxiety about the plight of the displaced Rohingya. In the months that followed, <a href="http://www.thecitizen.in/index.php/en/newsdetail/index/7/12683/the-story-gets-worse-rapedtraumatised-rohingya-women--face-new-threat-from-sex-traffickers">IOM Bangladesh</a> reiterated that “a lot of girls are coming who have been separated from families. Many people say to them that they will help them but then these girls disappear”. </p> <p>The third significant addition to the narrative – the involvement of cybergangs and paedophiles – was published by the <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-43469043">BBC</a> in March 2018. The journalist described the plight of two trafficked 14-year-old girls: Anwara, who was abducted and raped, and Masuda, who was raped by the Burmese military, forced to leave Myanmar, separated from her family, lured by a trafficker with a false job offer, exploited sexually, and eventually saved by a local charity. The reporter suggested that Rohingya women and children are trafficked to Chittagong and Dhaka in Bangladesh, Kathmandu in Nepal, and Kolkata in India. There cybergangs offer the women’s sexual services to local and foreign men, including paedophiles.</p> <p>The content of this report was widely disseminated by aid and human rights organisations, including <a href="https://www.amnesty.org.uk/blogs/childrens-human-rights-network-blog/violence-exploitation-sex-trafficking-rohingya-children">Amnesty International UK</a>. Media outlets, such as <a href="https://womenintheworld.com/2018/03/21/investigation-reveals-how-sex-traffickers-target-young-rohingya-girls-living-in-refugee-camps/">Women in the World</a>, stressed the “even darker side to the already dire humanitarian crisis unfolding in Bangladesh”, and the Malaysian <a href="http://www.thesundaily.my/news/2018/03/21/rohingya-children-trafficked-sex">Sunday Daily</a> emphasised that crime syndicates “are supplying underage girls to foreigners for sex”. In a separate investigation, two <a href="https://pulitzercenter.org/reporting/pimps-and-traffickers-prey-vulnerable-rohingya-girls">PBS</a> journalists reinforced this notion when they reported that “foreigners, white men, Americans, Europeans” are acting as sexual predators.</p> <p>This culminated in the downgrading of Myanmar to Tier 3 by the U.S. State Department in its annual Trafficking in Persons report. The reason given in a news clip published in the <a href="https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se-asia/myanmar-downgraded-in-us-trafficking-report">Straight Times</a> of Singapore was that Myanmar is failing to protect Rohingya refugees who are subjected to labour and sexual exploitation. Bangladesh remained in Tier 2 Watch, partly for the trafficking of Rohingya women from the refugee camps for sexual purposes.</p> <h2>Deconstructing the Rohingya sex trafficking narrative </h2> <p>The Rohingya sex trafficking narrative alerts us to a real risk faced by a vulnerable group. However, its rapid emergence, dissemination, and incorporation into global policy raises troubling questions. Exactly how many cases of trafficking have occurred and what are the details surrounding these cases?</p> <p>From the material examined, the threat of sex trafficking appears amorphous and obscure. We found nine stories that briefly depict different trajectories and scenarios leading to abduction, forced marriage, sexual abuse, and forced or voluntary prostitution. We did not find figures indicating the scale of trafficking, or the number of women who work as forced or voluntary sex workers in and outside the camps. We also found no evidence of the structure and modus operandi of criminal networks.</p> <p>When <a href="https://news.un.org/en/story/2017/11/636002-un-warns-trafficking-sexual-abuse-shadow-rohingya-refugee-crisis">IOM</a> suggests that trafficking is rife in Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar refugee camp, they provide no data to sustain their claims about trafficking rings and sexual assault. Instead, <a href="https://womenintheworld.com/2018/03/21/investigation-reveals-how-sex-traffickers-target-young-rohingya-girls-living-in-refugee-camps/">aid experts</a> and <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/rohingya-muslim-crisis-latest-prostitution-refugee-camps-sex-trade-black-market-bangladesh-burma-a8017256.html">reporters</a> use adverbs as in “[t]he investigation found that young Rohingya girls living in refugee camps in Bangladesh are being targeted <em>en-masse</em> by sex traffickers who try to force them into lives of prostitution”, or the conditional tense as in “children and youths <em>could</em> fall prey to traffickers and people looking to exploit and manipulate them” (emphasis added in both quotations). </p> <p>Moreover, we are provided with generalisations based on personalised and emotionally charged stories of trafficked victims, such as that of Masuda in the BBC report. Masuda’s story is a tragedy, but the empirical biases and narrative tropes leave the reader unable to assess the severity and magnitude of the trafficking threat. Are traffickers, sex clients, and paedophiles really connected? Are tens, hundreds, or thousands of Rohingya women and children being trafficked? In other words, are we dealing with anecdotal cases or systemic issues? </p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Are tens, hundreds, or thousands of Rohingya women and children being trafficked? In other words, are we dealing with anecdotal cases or systemic issues?</p> <p>Moreover, the Rohingya sex trafficking narrative sets three key players in scene: the “<a href="http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/13774.html">savage,” the “victim” and the “saviour</a>”. These fight for power, life, and human rights in a theatre of chaos following a humanitarian crisis. According to <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-43469043">relief experts and reporters</a>, this setting produces trauma and desperation, and in turn exploitation by unscrupulous traffickers.</p> <p>Three main groups have been identified as the savage: the Burmese military, “<a href="https://www.cbsnews.com/news/rohingya-refugee-women-girls-myanmar-sexual-violence-bangladesh-dibarah-mahboob/">accused of using rape and sexual abuse as weapons in its violent campaign against the Rohingya Muslim minority</a>”; opportunistic traffickers who “<a href="https://news.sky.com/story/pimp-says-rohingya-plight-good-for-business-11124977">know exactly who to target. From the most desperate, they hunt the most vulnerable</a>”; and <a href="https://news.un.org/en/story/2017/11/636002-un-warns-trafficking-sexual-abuse-shadow-rohingya-refugee-crisis">local and foreign sex predators who exploit desperate women and children</a> and are organised in “<a href="https://www.amnesty.org.uk/blogs/childrens-human-rights-network-blog/violence-exploitation-sex-trafficking-rohingya-children">networks, online and offline, [that] are dedicated to specifically targeting refugee minors for prostitution</a>”.</p> <p><a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1369183X.2017.1417028">Research</a> calls into question the existence of well-structured criminal groups in charge of complex trafficking operations. Instead, an array of recruiters, brokers, carriers, moneylenders, document forgers, and employers provide different services to migrants. <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/toc/anna/676/1">Some offer free services for altruistic reasons, some charge reasonable amounts for their services, and others abuse their power to gain substantial profit and control</a>.</p> <p>The victims are the Rohingya women and children living in the refugee camps. According to the reports, after having faced sexual and physical violence, dispossession, and forced dislocation they become traumatised, desperate, and vulnerable. This makes them easy prey for traffickers. While some young women are lured and abused, others trade sex as a means of survival, particularly the latest arrivals “<a href="https://news.sky.com/story/pimp-says-rohingya-plight-good-for-business-11124977">who are more desperate and have nothing</a>”. No distinction is made between trafficking for sexual exploitation, which by definition involves deception, transportation, and exploitation, and sex work, which is a legitimate form of labour in which individuals engage under more or less constraining circumstances. Here, forced trafficking and voluntary sex work are conflated. </p> <p class="mag-quote-right">The Rohingya sex trafficking narrative sets three key players in scene: the “savage,” the “victim” and the “saviour”.</p> <p>Moreover, this narrative reduces Rohingya women and children to naïve, helpless, traumatised and passive pawns in need of rescue and assistance. In the sex trafficking narrative, the voices of the women described as trafficked are replaced by that of the reporter. They appear as archetypes of the powerless victim, deprived of agency. However, the reality of sex providers is often a mix of coercion and consent, and of ambiguous pathways leading simultaneously to exploitation and agency. </p> <p>The saviours are the representatives of organisations such as the IOM and the UNHCR, and NGOs like CARE and Save the Children. These organisations provide assistance to refugees, develop preventive and protective initiatives to limit trafficking, and create “<a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/rohingya-muslim-crisis-latest-prostitution-refugee-camps-sex-trade-black-market-bangladesh-burma-a8017256.html">an opportunity for women to rebuild their lives</a>”. Other saviours include the <a href="http://www.asiaone.com/asia/human-trafficking-rife-rohingya-camps-aid-agencies">Rapid Action Battalion</a> – a top police unit in Bangladesh – that cracks down on traffickers and saves victims; the journalists who risk their lives to conduct undercover investigations; the artists who listen to “<a href="https://www.cbsnews.com/news/rohingya-refugee-women-girls-myanmar-sexual-violence-bangladesh-dibarah-mahboob/">the displaced Rohingyas’ stories of trauma and resilience</a>”; and the <a href="https://www.thedailystar.net/rohingya-crisis/rohingya-children-in-bangladesh-makeshift-camps-risk-trafficking-sexual-abuse-and-child-labour-warns-save-the-children-1479802">prime minister of Denmark</a>, who visits the Rohingya camps to witness their situation first-hand. These saviours play different roles in the Rohingya sex trafficking narrative, but all share a human rights agenda and face numerous challenges in eliminating trafficking. </p> <p>This positions globally privileged individuals and institutions as “‘defending’ and ‘civilizing’ ‘lower,’ ‘unfortunate,’ and ‘inferior’ peoples”, as <a href="http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/13774.html">Mutua Makau</a> puts it in his book <em>Human rights: a political and cultural critique </em>(p. 14). In reality, these actors are part of a structure of wider international political organisations that enforce policies, distribute funds for programmes, and apply certain human rights and economic frameworks partly based on an economy of emotions distilled by the media. Their intentions are laudable but the narrative places them in a position of power and expertise because of their access to resources and political influence. Their knowledge about the issue of trafficking is privileged over that of the Rohingya whose voices are withheld. </p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>At an everyday level, we are surrounded by a myriad of narratives that help us to make sense of reality. Narratives are storytelling devices that simplify the complex and contradictory forces of our world and, in this case, magnify the emotional content of their subject. They are selective in their representations, and their power is in the way they frame reality. Their duty, however, does not extend to providing us with detailed facts, substantiated data and structural analyses. Thus, narratives may be useful for selling newspapers, and raising awareness and funds, but they are unreliable for expanding and deepening our knowledge of a subject or for designing intervention programmes and policies. </p> <p>This is why we have undertaken a brief analysis of the narrative that has been constructed around the trafficking of Rohingya women and children during flight and from camps in Bangladesh. The trafficking of Rohingya for labour and sexual exploitation has become an issue of serious concern for civil society and the U.S. State Department. However, it appears that narratives rather than data have shaped programme design and international policy. This has real implications for the people who have been trafficked or who may be, for those who use sex work as a survival strategy, and for both Myanmar and Bangladesh. The interests of displaced Rohingya would be better served by policies based on the collection and analysis of hard evidence and in-depth analysis rather than hearsay and anecdotes.</p> <p><strong>This commentary first appeared under the same title in <a href="https://www.iseas.edu.sg/articles-commentaries/iseas-perspective">ISEAS Perspective</a> 2018, n. 47.</strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/natalie-brinham/breaking-cycle-of-expulsion-forced-repatriation-and-exploitation-for-r">Breaking the cycle of expulsion, forced repatriation, and exploitation for Rohingya</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/amal-de-chickera/ten-reflections-inspired-by-rohingya-crisis">Ten reflections inspired by the Rohingya crisis</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/amal-de-chickera/rohingya-refugee-making-factory">The Rohingya refugee making factory</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Su-Ann Oh Nicolas Lainez Fri, 31 Aug 2018 07:47:59 +0000 Nicolas Lainez and Su-Ann Oh 119396 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Voces desde las cadenas de suministro: entrevista con Daniel Castellanos https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/daniel-castellanos/voces-desde-las-cadenas-de-suministro-entrevista-con-daniel-castell <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>La vida en los EE.UU. como trabajador o trabajadora extranjera invitada no es nada fácil. Estás atada a un empleador, sin poder dejarlo, y afrontando desafíos para organizarte laboralmente. <strong><em><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/daniel-castellanos/voices-from-supply-chain-interview-with-daniel-castellanos">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <iframe width="460" height="259" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BDlueC4-LcE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Daniel Castellanos</p> <p>DC: Mi nombre es Daniel Castellanos. Soy cofundador de la National Guestworker Alliance (Alianza Nacional de Trabajadores y Trabajadoras Invitadas), una organización de personas que vinieron a trabajar a los EE. UU con visado. Hace más de 10 años que organizamos a las trabajadoras y trabajadores, principalmente en respuesta a las difíciles condiciones de trabajo, que como antiguo trabajador invitado, conozco de primera mano. Soy originario de Perú y padre de dos hijos. Me di cuenta de que para convertirse en una trabajadora o trabajador invitado tienes que endeudar a tu familia. Por ejemplo, tuve que pagar $5000 para venir a EE.UU. —y eso es muchísimo dinero—. El segundo gran problema al que nos enfrentamos es que, como persona trabajadora invitada, estás vinculado a un solo empleador: no puedes abandonarlo sin perder tu visado. Esto es horrible. Como persona libre, puedes buscar trabajo en el lugar que quieras, pero yo, como trabajador invitado en los EE.UU, no tengo este derecho. Estoy atado a un empleador, sin importar si me trata bien o mal. Tengo que quedarme con él o ella, quién también está en posesión de mi contrato. Si no me quiere, puede llamar al departamento de policía y hacer que me deporten. Estamos luchando contra esto. El Gobierno de los EE.UU. no lo entiende, cree que con este esquema de personas trabajadoras invitadas ganamos todas, pero no es así.</p> <p><strong>BTS: ¿El problema con el trabajo por invitación es entonces que, incluso llegando de forma legal, la explotación sigue siendo muy grave?</strong></p> <p>DC: Sí. Se oye mucho sobre los problemas que enfrentan las personas migrantes indocumentadas, pero yo llegué legalmente, y aun así la situación era mala. De hecho, en cierta forma, es aún peor. Como trabajador o trabajadora indocumentada podría cambiar de empleador, pero no como trabajador invitado. Además, el empleador me cobra por todo. Las personas trabajadoras invitadas viven en la propiedad del empleador, lo que significa que las controla todos los días. Puede llamar a la puerta y decirles que vayan a trabajar a las dos o tres de la mañana. Algunos incluso te obligan a practicar la misma religión que ellos, lo que es simplemente inaceptable. Desafortunadamente, estos problemas existen también de forma paralela en otros países. Sabemos que los programas de trabajo por invitación fueron reproducidos en Canadá y Corea, reproduciendo a su vez los mismos problemas.</p> <p><strong>BTS: ¿Es esta la razón por la que viniste a la Conferencia Internacional de Trabajo 2016 (ILC por sus siglas en inglés)? ¿Cuáles fueron tus metas?</strong></p> <p>DC: Vinimos a la ILC de la OIT porque pensamos que la OIT, como la mayor institución internacional, puede empujar a los gobiernos en la dirección correcta. Reúne a todos los actores clave y nos da la oportunidad de hablar desde la perspectiva de las personas trabajadoras para mostrarle al mundo cómo mejorar las cosas para estas personas. Al fin y al cabo, este solo es un paso en un largo camino de negociaciones. No se solucionará mañana, pero pondremos estos temas sobre la mesa y la gente las verá. Y eso ayudará.</p> <p><strong>BTS: A muchas de las personas aquí reunidas nos gustaría ver estas discusiones convertidas en una convención de trabajo digno. ¿Qué piensa de eso?</strong></p> <p>DC: Sí, absolutamente; es crucial. Este es un problema global, no solo en la UE, sino para trabajadoras y trabajadores en todas partes. En América Latina hay personas trabajadoras sin ningún tipo de beneficios. Esta mañana, conversaba con personas indonesias que hacen relojes suizos Rolex, y que reciben sueldos irrisorios. Necesitamos denunciar estas injusticias, y mostrarle a la gente que para mantener una economía global es necesaria una regulación global.</p> <p><strong>BTS: Porque las compañías más grandes se están embolsando la mayor parte del dinero en la cadena de suministro, ¿es así?</strong></p> <p>DC: Así es. Es muy común, pero sabemos que tener este tipo de convenciones puede cambiar las cosas y ayudarnos a obtener acuerdos más justos para las trabajadoras y trabajadores.</p> <p><strong>BTS: ¿Qué aspectos clave cree que tenemos que cambiar para generar trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro?</strong></p> <p>DC: Tres cosas. La primera es una mejor comprensión por parte del gobierno sobre este tema. Los gobiernos de todo el mundo no entienden que el capital está castigando a las personas trabajadoras. En segundo lugar, necesitamos que los gobiernos aumenten la protección de las y los trabajadores. Necesitamos libertad para organizarnos, no tener que enfrentarnos a listas negras o a la deportación. El Gobierno tiene que protegernos. Y tercero, ¡necesitamos empleados y empleadas satisfechas y felices! Es necesario mostrarles a los empleadores que, desde la perspectiva comercial, un empleado o una empleada feliz es siempre mejor. No será fácil, pero tenemos que convencerlos.</p> <p><strong>BTS: Gracias Daniel.</strong></p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj">El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALF GUNVALD NILSEN</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Daniel Castellanos BTS en Español Wed, 29 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Daniel Castellanos 118843 at https://www.opendemocracy.net El pueblo adivasi en la India: ¿esclavas y esclavos modernos o trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alf-gunvald-nilsen/el-pueblo-adivasi-en-la-india-esclavas-y-esclavos-modernos-o-trabaj <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>El pueblo adivasi de la India trabaja a menudo en condiciones normalmente definidas como «esclavitud moderna», pero no se trata de esclavas y esclavos. Su falta de libertad es al mismo tiempo el motor y el resultado del capitalismo indio moderno. <b><i><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alf-gunvald-nilsen/adivasis-in-india-modernday-slaves-or-modernday-workers">English</a></i></b></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/4587561360_b48a30ce44_o%20%281%29.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">A young Muria (Adivasi) man works a field. Collin Key/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/collin_key/4587561360/in/photolist-7X1w8e-bxjDTR-bxjFsR-7ZNvvK-7VFcTf-7YLJUP-7VPvpx-7YS6yR-7Zosaw-7WEpBn-7Xzt8T-81Q4vG-81gDdR-7YmxDy-7XsYVN-7VVuzt-7XZpYF-817CxU-7WvUsS-7ZiXAW-81BsqV-81Le2V-e1nvFG">CC (by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p>La India ocupa una posición distintiva dentro de las representaciones de la «esclavitud moderna». Según los recientes índices de esclavitud global generados por Walk Free Foundation, «los problemas de esclavitud moderna en este país son enormes». En <a href="http://www.globalslaveryindex.org/">2014</a>, Walk Free declaró que más de 14 millones de personas —de una población de 1.200 millones— están atrapadas en «todas las formas de esclavitud moderna». Por consiguiente, Walk Free y otros consideran a la India como <a href="http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-others/at-14-million-india-has-most-number-of-people-under-modern-slavery-report/">el país con el número absoluto más elevado en el mundo de personas que viven en condiciones de esclavitud moderna</a>.</p> <p>A esta <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/joel-quirk-andr%C3%A9-broome/politics-of-numbers-global-slavery-index-and-marketplace-of-ac">política de los números</a> se le adjunta una serie de ulteriores argumentos según los que la vulnerabilidad a la esclavitud moderna es mayor entre algunos grupos que otros. «Las mujeres y hombres de la India más vulnerables a la esclavitud moderna», afirma <a href="http://www.ungift.org/doc/knowledgehub/resource-centre/2013/GlobalSlaveryIndex_2013_Download_WEB1.pdf">el informe de 2013</a>, «son los de las castas &#39;inferiores&#39; (dalits) y las comunidades indígenas (adivasis), especialmente las mujeres, niñas y niños». De igual modo, el informe de 2014 afirma: «Los hechos sugieren que los miembros de las castas y tribus &#39;inferiores&#39;, las minorías religiosas y las trabajadoras y trabajadores migrantes se ven afectados por la esclavitud moderna de manera desproporcionada».</p> <p>Estas declaraciones dependen enormemente de la manera en que se defina y aplique el concepto de esclavitud.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2014/nov/28/global-slavery-index-walk-free-human-trafficking-anne-gallagher">Si asumimos la definición de esclavitud moderna de la Walk Free Foundation</a>, es cierto que la India tiene el mayor número absoluto de esclavas y esclavos modernos y que grupos específicos, como las personas dalits y adivasis, están sobrerrepresentadas en sus categorías. Sin embargo lo que quiero poner en entredicho es precisamente la afirmación de que la «esclavitud moderna» es una descripción apropiada de las condiciones altamente explotadoras y opresivas bajo las que muchas personas pobres de la India se ganan la vida. Quiero hacer esto haciendo referencia a los pueblos adivasi de la India.</p> <h2>Los pueblos adivasi</h2> <p>¿Quiénes son los pueblos adivasi de la India? En pocas palabras, el término «adivasi», que significa habitante original, se refiere a una gama de grupos étnicos que viven predominantemente en zonas montañosas y boscosas de toda la India rural. La constitución india los considera pertenecientes a la categoría de «tribus registradas», una designación que refleja el hecho de que las autoridades indias no reconocen a la gente adivasi como indígena, sino que más bien la definen como «tribal» según un conjunto específico de características. Estas incluyen su dependencia de la agricultura de subsistencia y su identidad étnica y cultural distintiva, que tiende a excluir a esta comunidad incluso de los escalones «más bajos» del sistema de castas de la India. Constituyendo aproximadamente un ocho por ciento de la población nacional, el pueblo adivasi está enormemente sobrerrepresentado entre la gente pobre en India: <a href="http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/2011/01/14101798/poverty-social-exclusion-india">según datos recientes</a>, casi la mitad del pueblo adivasi —un 44,7 por ciento— vive por debajo de un umbral de pobreza muy bajo: 816 rupias (£8,32/$12,75) al mes para hogares rurales.</p> <p>Al leer detenidamente el Índice Global de Esclavitud, sería muy fácil concluir que la otredad étnica y la miseria son las razones por las que el pueblo adivasi es muy vulnerable a lo que Walk Free Foundation define como esclavitud moderna. Sin embargo, pensar en este sentido supone que ciertas formas de trabajo son cualitativamente diferentes del trabajo «normal» en una economía capitalista debido a la falta de libertad que las caracteriza.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/genevieve-lebaron-neil-howard/forced-labour-is-big-business-states-and-corporations-ar">Esta lógica errónea</a>, que apoya el argumento de la esclavitud moderna en sí misma, supone además que ciertos grupos son más propensos que otros a participar en dichos trabajos debido a las formas de discriminación basadas en criterios como la etnicidad, el género y la casta. El problema con esta lógica es que <a href="http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/modern-slavery-julia-oconnell-davidson/?K=9781137297273">permite al capitalismo salirse con la suya</a>. Lo mismo cabe afirmar al asignar a la población adivasi el papel de esclavas y esclavos modernos. ¿Por qué es así?</p> <h2>Las fuentes de pobreza y vulnerabilidad</h2> <p>Si queremos entender el motivo por el que el pueblo adivasi trabaja tan a menudo en condiciones que Walk Free define como esclavitud, debemos empezar con analizar la pobreza. Las personas adivasi son extremadamente pobres, un hecho reconocido en el Índice Global de la Esclavitud, y es la pobreza la que las obliga a elegir la migración laboral. A menudo este es el primer paso para trabajar bajo diferentes grados de falta de libertad. Déjennos entonces preguntar algo muy básico: ¿de dónde viene esa pobreza?</p> <p>En general, destacan dos causas: la pérdida de los medios de subsistencia y de las tierras.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/jhabua-on-its-way-to-becoming-vidarbhaii/article212295.ece">En primer lugar, la pobreza de la población adivasi procede de la merma de sus medios de subsistencia agrícola</a>. Históricamente, el núcleo de la vida tribal es el cultivo de subsistencia, que ahora es prácticamente incapaz de sostener un hogar durante un año entero. Mientras algunos aspectos de esta situación son específicos de los medios de subsistencia del pueblo adivasi, esta situación es sintomática de <a href="http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/columns/Chandrasekhar/a-crisis-ignored/article2883236.ece">una crisis mayor de la agricultura pequeña y marginal en el contexto de la reforma neoliberal de la India</a>. Dicha crisis se manifiesta con fuerza sobre todo en <a href="http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/columns/sainath/in-16-years-farm-suicides-cross-a-quarter-million/article2577635.ece">el cuarto de millón de granjeras y granjeros que se suicidaron en la India</a> entre 1995 y 2011 por graves problemas económicos.</p> <p>Además, <a href="http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/other-states/indian-peoples-tribunal-releases-report-on-narmada-projects/article484041.ece">muchas personas adivasi que han elegido la migración laboral han sido desposeídas de sus tierras debido a la construcción de grandes represas, plantas industriales y minas</a> que están destinadas a impulsar el surgimiento de la India como superpotencia económica. Recordemos las cifras por un momento: las personas adivasi constituyen el ocho por ciento de la población de la India. Sin embargo, incluso estimaciones conservadoras sugieren <a href="http://www.outlookindia.com/article/unacknowledged-victims/265069">que también constituyen entre el 40 y el 50 por ciento de los entre 20 y 30 millones de personas que han sido desposeídas por infraestructuras y proyectos de desarrollo a gran escala</a> desde la independencia en 1947. Ya que las leyes para el reasentamiento y la rehabilitación han sido lamentablemente inadecuadas, la gran mayoría de las personas que han sido desposeídas no tienen otra opción para sobrevivir más que la migración laboral y <a href="http://www.thehindu.com/news/death-as-destiny-for-migrant-labourers-of-alirajpur/article1699819.ece">cualquier trabajo que puedan encontrar dentro de los circuitos migratorios</a>. En otras palabras, la pobreza que obliga al pueblo adivasi a recurrir a formas de trabajo que carecen profundamente de libertad es producida por el funcionamiento básico del capitalismo indio.</p> <p>Al describir los tipos de trabajo que constituyen la esclavitud moderna para las poblaciones adivasi de la India, el Índice Global de la Esclavitud de 2013, entre otros, afirma lo siguiente: «Las personas víctimas de trata interna son una parte significativa de la mano de obra en los ámbitos de la construcción, el sector textil, la fabricación de ladrillos, las minas, el procesamiento de pescado y gambas, y la industria hotelera&quot;. Si nos olvidamos por un momento del uso de la <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/prabha-kotiswaran-sam-okyere/role-of-state-and-law-in-trafficking-and-modern-slavery">expresión profundamente problemática de «trata de personas»</a> en relación con la migración laboral en la India, esta declaración señala un hecho importante; en la India, cuando las personas pobres emigran para trabajar, su destino más común es la llamada «economía informal». Esta es <a href="http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/columns/Chandrasekhar/indias-informal-economy/article6375902.ece">un área que representa el 94 por ciento de la mano de obra en la India</a>. Un ámbito en el que la gran mayoría de trabajadoras y trabajadores soporta bajos salarios, largas horas de trabajo, una falta abismal de protección social y condiciones laborales con diferentes niveles de falta de libertad. Significativamente, esto está profundamente entrelazado con la economía formal de la India; proporciona mano de obra, productos y servicios a precios muy bajos.</p> <p>Para decirlo de manera más directa: la pobreza que obliga a las personas adivasi, y a otra gente, a trabajar en pésimas condiciones ayuda a fomentar un proceso de crecimiento que —<a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2013-02-18/cameron-leading-biggest-british-business-delegation-to-india">como señaló David Cameron durante un evento comercial indo-británico en Mumbai en 2013</a>— convertirá a la India en la tercera economía más grande del mundo en 2030. Eso significa que cuando descubrimos al pueblo adivasi trabajando en condiciones de falta de libertad, no estamos viendo a esclavas y esclavos modernos. Sino que nos estamos dando de frente con las trabajadoras y los trabajadores modernos, y con el capitalismo indio moderno. Esto, a su vez, afecta a la forma en la que pensamos en soluciones políticas a este problema.</p> <p>Cuando Walk Free Foundation habla de medidas para frenar las condiciones laborales que definen como esclavitud moderna, normalmente se refieren a leyes contra el trabajo infantil, el trabajo sexual, la trata de personas y la servidumbre por deudas. El modelo básico aquí implica medidas punitivas contra los trabajos ilegales. Sin embargo, ningún castigo revertirá la crisis en el medio rural de la India, ni subirá los salarios y mejorará las condiciones laborales de la población adivasi que trabaja duro en el sector informal. Estos objetivos supondrían una contribución genuina para la erradicación de las formas de trabajo que se etiquetan equivocadamente como esclavitud moderna. No obstante, hacer esto implicaría <a href="http://www.downtoearth.org.in/content/agrarian-crisis-farmers-15-states-protest-delhi-jantar-mantar">hacer causa común con agricultoras y agricultores pobres y marginales para lograr una política agrícola alternativa</a> que sirviera de protección frente a los caprichos de las fuerzas del mercado y revirtiera la degradación ecológica en curso. Además, implicaría aunar fuerzas con quienes están luchando contra <a href="http://www.caravanmagazine.in/perspectives/weak-ground-bjp-land-acquisition">las tentativas del gobierno actual para debilitar la legislación progresista sobre los derechos de la tierra, el re-asentamiento y la rehabilitación</a>. También implicaría colaborar con <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alf-gunvald-nilsen/citizen-workers-and-class-politics-in-neoliberal-india">sindicatos innovadores que defiendan los derechos de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores en el sector informal de la India</a>.&nbsp;El hecho de que las medidas propuestas por Walk Free ni siquiera hagan referencia a estos hechos es solo un testimonio de la absoluta irrelevancia de esta organización para las trabajadoras y trabajadores modernos en la India moderna.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud">Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Alf Gunvald Nilsen BTS en Español Tue, 28 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Alf Gunvald Nilsen 117610 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Renta básica y el movimiento contra la esclavitud https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/renta-b-sica-y-el-movimiento-contra-la-esclavitud <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>La renta básica incondicional no solo es factible, sino que además tiene más potencial de emancipación que cualquier otra política puesto que está dirigida a la vulnerabilidad económica que es el corazón de toda explotación laboral. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/neil-howard/basic-income-and-antislavery-movement">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none caption-xlarge'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/howard internal 4932358.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/555228/howard internal 4932358.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="306" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload caption-xlarge imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>Protestors demand basic income in Spain in 2014. Joaquin Gomez Sastre/Demotix. All Rights Reserved.</span></span></span></p> <p>Ya en mayo del 2014 argumenté, <a href="http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2014/05/abolitionism-hostage-capitalist-f-2014514772623122.html">en una publicación para Al-Jazeera</a> que el movimiento mundial contra la esclavitud corre el riesgo de convertirse en una forma de ocultar la injusticia político-económica estructural. Sugería que, si el movimiento se centraba en hacer que las personas que consumen y son activistas “se sientan mejor por sentirse mal” en vez de abordar esa injusticia, se estaría desperdiciando una oportunidad generacional para hacer que el mundo sea más justo.</p> <p>No tiene por qué ser así. Existe una alternativa que comienza por promover una <a href="http://www.basicincome.org/bien/aboutbasicincome.html">renta básica incondicional</a> como una estrategia genuina contra la esclavitud. Solo una renta básica universal eliminará realmente la vulnerabilidad económica que se encuentra en la raíz de <a href="http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2014/04/capitalism-coercion-2014417133923106962.html"><em>toda</em> explotación laboral</a>.</p> <h2>La esclavitud y el mercado</h2> <p>La esclavitud, al igual que la trata de personas y el trabajo forzoso, es principalmente un <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/neil-howard/slavery-and-trafficking-beyond-hollow-call">fenómeno del mercado</a>. Aunque a menudo se describe como algo ajeno a las relaciones mercantiles, la realidad es que los mercados crean tanto el suministro de trabajadoras y trabajadores vulnerables como la demanda de su trabajo. Cuando una trabajadora se encuentra en condiciones de explotación extrema, casi siempre es el resultado de una situación de vulnerabilidad económica que a su vez coincide con la demanda de un empleador por su trabajo.</p> <p>Esto sucede porque, en las sociedades de mercado, la libertad de rechazar cualquier trabajo es la cara opuesta a la <a href="http://www.thinkafricapress.com/economy/forced-labour-about-politics-much-crime">libertad de morir de hambre</a> a menos que lo aceptes. A menos que seas una persona rica independiente, tienes que trabajar para sobrevivir. Para las personas más pobres, para quienes <a href="http://www.ophi.org.uk/policy/multidimensional-poverty-index/">los extremos son asuntos de vida o muerte</a>, el precio a pagar por decir no, incluso a un empleo horrible, a menudo es demasiado alto.</p> <p>Esta es la razón por la cual las políticas «favorables al mercado» <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/bridget-anderson/extreme-exploitation-is-not-problem-of-human-nature">nunca serán suficientes</a> para abolir la «esclavitud moderna». Las políticas favorables al mercado no alteran el equilibrio de poder entre quienes son económicamente débiles y quienes son económicamente fuertes. Confían en la buena voluntad o en la aplicación de la ley, persuadiendo a las empresas a «comportarse mejor», a las consumidoras y consumidores a comprar más éticamente, y a las fuerzas policiales a eliminar a las manzanas podridas. Pero estas políticas no hacen nada con respecto a la obligación económica que hace que las personas más pobres sean vulnerables a empresas malévolas, expertas en evadir a las autoridades.</p> <h2>Renta básica</h2> <p>Entonces, ¿qué se debe hacer? La política con el mayor potencial de emancipación es la renta Básica incondicional (RBI). La RBI tiene un pedigrí largo y respetado. Thomas Paine abogó por <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agrarian_Justice">una versión de la RBI</a> en los albores de la Revolución Americana, y ha tenido partidarios modernos que van desde <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertrand_Russell">Bertrand Russell</a> a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Rawls">John Rawls</a>.</p> <p>La idea es tan simple como <a href="http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/~wright/Redesigning%20Distribution%20v1.pdf">brillante</a>: otorgar a cada ciudadana y ciudadano una cantidad de dinero suficiente para garantizar su supervivencia sin ningún tipo de compromiso. La recibes por el mero hecho de ser parte de la ciudadanía. Nunca te enriquecerás, pero siempre evitará que pases hambre, o que tengas que venderte como esclava o esclavo por falta de una alternativa mejor.</p> <p>Cuando las personas oyen hablar por primera vez sobre la RBI, a menudo su reacción visceral es preguntarse, «¿es factible?»,«¿No dejaría todo el mundo de trabajar?” Estas preocupaciones son comprensibles, pero también están fuera de lugar.</p> <p>Con respecto a la viabilidad, hay dos puntos importantes. El primero es que la viabilidad económica de tal método de redistribución de la riqueza ya ha sido probada, en principio, por la misma Gran Bretaña. De hecho, el estado de bienestar opera sobre la misma base, gravando progresivamente para distribuir la riqueza de manera más igualitaria.</p> <p>Segundo, es probable que la RBI sea <a href="http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/cash-transfers-can-work-better-than-subsidies/article6665676.ece">más barata y eficiente</a> que cualquier otro sistema existente de protección social. Actualmente, los gobiernos de todo el mundo desperdician miles de millones de dólares en políticas que no llegan a las personas más vulnerables. En Occidente, las costosas prestaciones dependientes de los recursos <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/dec/08/starve-benefit-sanctions-unemployed-hungry-government">excluyen</a> a muchas de las personas más necesitadas, mientras que los gobiernos subsidian <a href="http://npi.org.uk/publications/income-and-poverty/monitoring-poverty-and-social-exclusion-2014/">salarios de pobreza</a> y otorgan <a href="http://www.taxjustice.net/">ventajas fiscales a las empresas</a>. En los países empobrecidos, los subsidios al combustible y a la agricultura con frecuencia <a href="http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/cash-transfers-can-work-better-than-subsidies/article6665676.ece">no alcanzan los objetivos previstos</a> ya que las y los burócratas corruptos malversan fondos para adquirir influencia política. En estas circunstancias, los costos de distribuir un ingreso básico directamente a las personas se compensarán reduciendo otros programas menos eficientes y eliminando el peso muerto de los intermediarios políticos.</p> <p>¿Trabajarían las personas si recibiesen una RBI? Por supuesto que sí. Muy pocas personas están satisfechas con simplemente subsistir; casi todas quieren por lo menos mejorar las vidas de sus hijas e hijos. Ninguna persona que defienda la renta básica incondicional quiere que esta sea lo suficientemente alta como para desalentar el trabajo. Por el contrario, el objetivo es darles a las personas la «<a href="http://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Real_Freedom_for_All.html?id=a46FAAAAMAAJ&amp;redir_esc=y">verdadera libertad</a>» de decir <em>¡No!</em>&nbsp;a los malos empleos y <em>¡Sí!</em>&nbsp;a los buenos. Cabe recordar que en Occidente, es el propio sistema punitivo de seguridad social el que crea trampas de desempleo. Si en vez de exenciones de impuestos o complementos proporcionáramos a la gente una RBI, entonces nadie enfrentaría nunca la opción de perder dinero al aceptar un trabajo.</p> <p>La RBI tiene beneficios más allá de estos fundamentos prácticos, y por primera vez en la historia, tenemos <a href="http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/basic-income-9781472583116/">evidencia empírica detallada de un país en vías de desarrollo</a> que lo demuestra. UNICEF acaba de completar un proyecto piloto con la Asociación de mujeres trabajadoras por cuenta propia en India para evaluar la RBI entre miles de residentes en el estado de Madhya Pradesh. Los hallazgos son sorprendentes.</p> <p>En primer lugar, muestran un <em>aumento</em> en la actividad económica, con surgimiento de pequeñas empresas, <em>más</em> trabajo realizado, más equipo y más cabezas de ganado para la economía local. En segundo lugar, quienes reciben una RBI registraron mejoras en nutrición infantil, asistencia y rendimiento escolar, salud y atención médica, saneamiento y vivienda. Se registraron mayores beneficios para las mujeres que para los hombres (a medida que se incrementó la autonomía financiera y social de las mujeres), para las personas con discapacidad que para otras, y para las personas más pobres en relación a las más ricas.</p> <p>Pero hay una tercera dimensión que realmente debería hacer que el movimiento contra la esclavitud observe y tome nota. Se trata de la «dimensión emancipadora». La seguridad económica proporcionada por la RBI no sólo aumentó la participación política de las personas pobres, sino que además les dio el tiempo y los recursos necesarios para representar sus intereses frente a las personas poderosas. También <em>las liberó de las garras de los prestamistas</em>. Tal como el autor del estudio de UNICEF <a href="http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/cash-transfers-can-work-better-than-subsidies/article6665676.ece">indica</a>:</p> <p><em>El dinero es un bien escaso en las aldeas en India y esto hace que su precio suba. Las personas que prestan dinero y poseen la tierra pueden fácilmente someter a la población a servidumbre por deudas, y cobrar tasas de interés exorbitantes que las familias no pueden pagar.</em></p> <p>A menos que, por supuesto, reciban una RBI, en cuyo caso tienen la liquidez necesaria para mantener su libertad incluso en casos de crisis económicas. Para quien dude del potencial transformador de este trabajo, es cuestión de ver este <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvErJvuWrWc">video de 12 minutos,</a> con el que es imposible no sentirse inspirado.</p> <h2>Potencial histórico</h2> <p>El movimiento contemporáneo contra la esclavitud se encuentra a la vanguardia de una coyuntura histórica crítica. En el contexto de la crisis económica mundial, los antiguos modelos sociales <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/stuart-weir/welfare-state-is-dead-%E2%80%93-what-is-rising-from-grave">están decayendo,</a> pero los nuevos aún <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/apr/09/precariat-charter-denizens-citizens-review">no están listos para nacer</a>. En este vacío hemos visto el aumento de una grave explotación laboral, junto con un activismo político y de consumo como respuesta.</p> <p>A la vanguardia de esta respuesta se encuentran el movimiento abolicionista moderno, y lo hace con un poder discursivo sin igual. Nadie que tenga un espacio en la mesa de discusión <em>apoya </em>la esclavitud: todo el mundo quiere erradicarla. Es por esto que el llamado por la abolición de la «esclavitud moderna» no tiene detractores. Atrae a aliados que van desde la <a href="http://www.freedomfund.org/">élite empresarial</a> global al <a href="http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2014/12/11/3602687/pope-francis-modern-slavery/">mismísimo Papa</a>. Más de 50.000 personas por semana se inscriben al Movimiento Global <a href="http://www.walkfreefoundation.org/">Walk Free,</a> y en los últimos años hemos asistido a una oleada de presión para acabar con la explotación extrema.</p> <p>¿Qué significa todo esto? Significa que el movimiento abolicionista actual tiene la oportunidad del siglo. Pueden ir a lo seguro y abogar por políticas favorables al mercado que, en el mejor de los casos, arreglan situaciones por encima. O pueden optar por soluciones más grandes y revolucionarias, y organizar un cambio mundial en dirección a una mayor justicia social.</p> <p>Seamos claros: la RBI no es simplemente la herramienta más efectiva para abolir la esclavitud moderna. Es una herramienta de justicia social radical, para cambiar por completo el juego económico, para emanciparnos <em>a todas y todos</em> de la vulnerabilidad económica. Si el movimiento abolicionista moderno tiene una misión histórica, es la de completar la tarea de su predecesor: deben lograr que la libertad no sea solo legal, sino factible.&nbsp;</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030">¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GENEVIEVE LEBARON</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Neil Howard BTS en Español Mon, 27 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Neil Howard 117612 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The long legacy of Frederick Douglass https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/neil-roberts-darien-lamen/long-legacy-of-frederick-douglass <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A new book seeks to simultaneously situate Douglass among his contemporaries and the political challenges of today.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/1024px-Frederick_Douglass_portrait.jpg" width="100%" /></p> <p style="margin-top: 0px; padding-top: 0px;" class="image-caption">Frederick Douglass. <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frederick_Douglass_portrait.jpg">Wikimedia Commons.</a></p><p> <iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/464861424&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" allow="autoplay" style="margin: 20px 0;" scrolling="no" width="100%" height="166" frameborder="no"></iframe></p> <p><b>Darien Lamen: So Neil, can you talk about why you decided to put this volume together, and who you hope picks it up?</b></p> <p><b>Neil Roberts:</b> What I wanted to do was to have, in a <a href="http://www.kentuckypress.com/live/title_detail.php?titleid=3502">single volume</a>, something that had not been made before. That’s a single volume that combines new essays with reprints of important essays from Frederick Douglass’s contemporaries, all on Douglass’s political thought. Douglass has, rightly so, been written about extensively in the areas of literature, history, rhetoric and public policy. But interestingly, he has not been treated as widely and as systematically in terms of his political thought, in terms of his contribution to different concepts.</p> <p>I wanted to assemble this volume so that scholars of Douglass, lay intellectuals, and even those who are relatively unknowledgeable about Douglass could all access very accessible works. In addition, the book has a very extensive, thematic bibliography. So beyond just the book it offers a lot for those who are interested in biographies of Douglass, works by Douglass, or secondary works either about Douglass or about themes that Douglass wrote about in his wide career.</p> <p>In my introduction (“Political Thought in the Shadow of Douglass”), instead of writing a summation of the essays in the book, I spent a large degree of time trying to reflect on, 200 years after his birth, why Douglass is significant in our current moment. I am really excited about its publication this summer, and my hope is that it can be a resource for readers who are interested in Douglass and in wanting to keep his legacy alive.</p> <div style="width: 230px; float: right; padding-left: 10px;"><a href="http://kentuckypress.com/live/title_detail.php?titleid=3502#.W31Ba5NKjAx"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/robertscover.jpg" width="230" /></a><br /><span class="image-caption" style="margin-top: 0px; padding-top: 0px;"><a href="http://kentuckypress.com/live/title_detail.php?titleid=3502#.W31Ba5NKjAx">Visit the publisher's page</a></span></div> <p><b>Darien: On this question of Douglass’s significance to our current moment, you write that the Black Lives Matter movement actually embodies his "spirit of rational hopefulness", and that this can be seen, for example, in its defiant embrace of the refrain "we gon' be alright" from Kendrick Lamar's To Pimp a Butterfly. Can you talk about that, and why you see this movement as having captured the spirit of Frederick Douglass?</b></p> <p><b>Neil:</b> So, Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi started the #BlackLivesMatter movement as a hashtag on Twitter. They did this in the wake of the shooting of seventeen-year-old Trayvon Martin, the deaths of Michael Brown, Renisha McBride, Eric Garner, Sandra Bland, and several other unarmed black youths and adults. That led to a rapid proliferation of Black Lives Matter chapters and different utterances, from “I can't breathe” to “Hands up, don't shoot!”, to Kendrick Lamar’s “Alright” on To Pimp a Butterfly.</p> <p>Black Lives Matter has become a national, hemispheric and international network that uses social media as a conduit to organise and mobilise. I think that Black Lives Matter, in many regards, captures the spirit or the “afterlife” of Frederick Douglass because it’s a movement that is profoundly concerned with identifying anti-black acts and developing processes of re-humanisation as well. Instead of silence. Instead of denigrating others. Instead of not taking action.</p> <p>Frederick Douglass declared near the end of the Fourth of July oration that “I, therefore, leave off where I began, with hope". But he also insisted that "Oceans no longer divide, but link nations together”. And in Douglass's address, “The Nation’s Problem” – given Washington, DC in 1889 – Douglass asserted that "the duty of today is to meet the questions that confront us with intelligence and courage".</p> <p>The different contributors, myself included, are not claiming to have all the answers in A Political Companion to Frederick Douglass. But we've taken that idea from Douglass that I see in the Black Lives Matter movement, and tried to confront the problems that we face today with intelligence and courage. I’m hoping that the volume can not only contribute to Douglass’s legacy, but actually capture the spirit of movements that have emerged recently and will likely emerge into the future.</p> <p><i>This interview was <a href="https://soundcloud.com/user-581431118/new-book-examines-political-afterlives-of-douglasss-work">originally produced for radio</a> by Darien Lamen and the Rochester Community Media Center. It has been transcribed and republished with permission, and has been lightly edited for readability. Additionally, for a TV interview with Neil Roberts on the </i><a href="http://www.kentuckypress.com/live/title_detail.php?titleid=3502">A Political Companion to Frederick Douglass</a><i>, see <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOkiNLtC-4Q">the recent episode</a> of the show</i> African Ascent <i>on Boston’s BNN network.</i></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/international-scientific-committee-of-unesco-slave-route-project/reparations-for-ensla">Reparations for enslavement, UNESCO, and the United Nations decade for peoples of African descent</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/sandra-e-greene/slaves-narratives-from-past">Slave narratives from the past</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/joel-quirk/reparations-are-too-confronting-let%E2%80%99s-talk-about-%27modernday-slavery%27-instea">Reparations are too confronting: let’s talk about &#039;modern-day slavery&#039; instead</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/undefined/wall-of-silence-around-slavery">A wall of silence around slavery</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/andrea-major/%27not-made-by-slaves%27-ambivalent-origins-of-ethical-consumption">&#039;Not made by slaves&#039;: the ambivalent origins of ethical consumption</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/genevieve-lebaron/slaves-of-state-american-prison-labour-past-and-present">Slaves of the state: American prison labour past and present</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/james-brewer-stewart/%E2%80%98new-abolitionists%E2%80%99-and-problem-of-race">The ‘new abolitionists’ and the problem of race</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/joel-quirk-genevieve-lebaron/use-and-abuse-of-history-slavery-and-its-contemporary-leg">The use and abuse of history: slavery and its contemporary legacies</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Darien Lamen Neil Roberts Thu, 23 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Neil Roberts and Darien Lamen 119394 at https://www.opendemocracy.net ¿Podemos acabar con el trabajo forzoso para el 2030? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/genevieve-lebaron/podemos-acabar-con-el-trabajo-forzoso-para-el-2030 <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Si la Alianza 8.7 quiere realmente erradicar el trabajo forzoso de las cadenas de suministro, debe realizar un cambio radical en su manera de abordarlo. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/genevieve-lebaron/can-world-end-forced-labour-by-2030">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img width="100%" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/8394332909_b9bd64d445_o.jpg" /><span class="image-caption">Rice farmers working in the field in Kandal province. ILO/ Khem Sovannara/Flickr.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/iloasiapacific/8394332909/">(CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)</a></span></p><p>El gran interés del mundo en la esclavitud moderna y la trata de personas se debe, en parte, a que se ha demostrado que muchas compañías de marcas de primera línea se benefician de prácticas laborales de explotación en sus cadenas de suministro. Firmas importantes han tenido que tomar medidas y responsabilizarse por sus trabajadoras y trabajadores, presionadas por <a href="https://cleanclothes.org/resources/publications/follow-the-thread-the-need-for-supply-chain-transparency-in-the-garment-and-footwear-industry">campañas</a> y <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2014/jun/10/supermarket-prawns-thailand-produced-slave-labour">denuncias públicas</a> que comprueban estos vínculos. Además, en los últimos años hemos observado un aumento en el número de iniciativas <a href="http://3blmedia.com/News/Global-Business-Coalition-Against-Human-Trafficking-Expands-Scope-and-Steps-Efforts-End">corporativas</a> y <a href="https://oag.ca.gov/sites/all/files/agweb/pdfs/sb657/resource-guide.pdf">gubernamentales</a> destinadas a mejorar los estándares laborales en todo el mundo. En general, el mecanismo principal adoptado ha sido una mayor transparencia en las cadenas de suministro, y no tanto la regulación punitiva o las sanciones. El argumento es que las «buenas» empresas encontrarán y solucionarán los casos ocultos de explotación, mientras que las «malas» empresas quedarán expuestas y serán castigadas por quienes consumen y el mercado.</p> <p>La tendencia hacia «trabajo decente para todas las personas» renovó su impulso en 2015, cuando Naciones Unidas lo reconoció como uno de los 17 <a href="http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/">Objetivos de desarrollo sostenible (ODS)</a> a alcanzar para el 2030. Desde ese momento, se constituyó una gran red de agentes institucionales conocidos como <a href="http://www.alliance87.org/">Alianza 8.7</a> —bautizada así por la sección del ODS 8 dedicada en particular al trabajo forzoso— para liderar el esfuerzo mundial en torno a este objetivo. Como quizás era de esperar, debido a su composición, reina un gran entusiasmo en la Alianza por el desarrollo de enfoques de gobernanza voluntarios y liderados por el sector privado, para erradicar el trabajo forzoso en las cadenas de suministro. Entre ellos se cuentan aquellos que persiguen una mayor transparencia en estas cadenas. Existe un único problema: hay muy poca evidencia que sustente su entusiasmo.</p> <p>La explotación laboral severa se mantiene como un problema endémico en muchos sectores y regiones del mundo. Un gran conjunto de investigaciones académicas, periodismo de investigación y campañas de trabajadoras y trabajadores ha dejado claro que los abusos laborales tales como el incremento de horas extra obligatorias, el robo de salarios, la manipulación de relaciones entre deudas y créditos, los casos de acoso sexual y violencia, junto a otras formas de coerción y explotación florecen hoy en día en la economía mundial. Si la Alianza 8.7 desea alcanzar su objetivo o avanzar de manera demostrable hacia la erradicación del trabajo forzoso, la trata de personas, la esclavitud moderna y los terribles casos de trabajo infantil dentro de los próximos trece años, debe abordar de forma dramática y significativa las causas fundamentales de estos problemas en las cadenas de suministro globales.</p> <h2>Los límites de la transparencia </h2> <p>Las iniciativas y estrategias en discusión en la actualidad implican, en general, una expansión de las auditorías sociales existentes, las certificaciones éticas y los programas de concienciación. Al perpetuar el statu quo, ignoran el creciente volumen de investigación empírica que <a href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14747731.2017.1304008">cuestiona</a> la eficacia de estos tipos de programas, y la necesidad de un cambio de enfoque radical para enfrentar este desafío. ¿Por qué?</p> <p>La poca eficacia de las «iniciativas de transparencia» se debe en parte a problemas de diseño. Por ejemplo, la calidad de las auditorías sociales y éticas varía en gran manera porque son las empresas que las realizan las que deciden sobre su profundidad, exigencia y alcance. Además, la mayoría de las auditorías se centran en los proveedores de primer nivel —es decir, en las personas contratadas directamente por la empresa para producción—. Sin embargo, sabemos que <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1748-5991">el trabajo forzoso prospera y afecta a trabajadores y trabajadoras contratadas por agencias laborales</a> o contratistas, y no tanto a productores directos. También aparece entre subcontratistas no autorizados del sector ilegal e informal, desde trabajo desde casa hasta operaciones mineras ilegales. Estas personas raramente son alcanzadas por las auditorías sociales. Asimismo, en general las auditorías se centran en cadenas de suministro de productos y no en las del plantel laboral, lo que ignora las «<a href="https://theconversation.com/why-businesses-fail-to-detect-modern-slavery-at-work-82344?utm_source=twitter&amp;utm_medium=twitterbutton">redes no regularizadas a través de las cuales agentes de terceras partes pueden reclutar y transportar víctimas del trabajo forzoso o de trata de personas para ser utilizadas por empresas</a>».</p> <p>Debido a la gran repercusión de casos de explotación laboral descubiertos recientemente en cadenas de suministro «éticamente certificadas», se cuestiona aún más a las iniciativas corporativas «de buena fe». Entre ellas: el derrumbe de la fábrica textil Rana Plaza en Bangladesh en 2013, poco después de aprobar una auditoría; el descubrimiento de un <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2014/jun/10/supermarket-prawns-thailand-produced-slave-labour">abuso laboral descontrolado</a>, incluyendo asesinatos por parte de empleadores en el «éticamente certificado» sector pesquero de Tailandia; y el descubrimiento de <a href="http://thesourcefilm.com/">trabajo infantil en plantaciones de café</a> que habían sido certificadas como libres de explotación. Todos estos ejemplos cuestionan la confianza que se deposita en los programas voluntarios de gobernanza de las cadenas de suministro, y plantean serias preguntas sobre la integridad de las iniciativas de «supervisión» llevadas a cabo por la industria. Existe muy poca evidencia sólida del trabajo de las industrias para abordar la lucha contra el trabajo forzoso, la esclavitud moderna, o la trata en las cadenas de suministro globales, y mucha de sus fallas.</p> <h2>Los límites de la legislación «poco severa»</h2> <p>Iniciativas gubernamentales recientes y de gran impacto —como la Ley californiana de transparencia en las cadenas de suministro (2010), la <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/patricia-carrier-joseph-bardwell/how-uk-modern-slavery-act-can-find-its-bite">Ley sobre esclavitud moderna del Reino Unido</a> (2015), y el requerimiento propuesto por Australia para <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/komala-ramachandra/australia-s-modern-slavery-proposal-falls-short">informes sobre la esclavitud moderna en las cadenas de suministro</a>— también priorizan una mayor transparencia antes que castigar las violaciones. Se han aprobado docenas de estas leyes desde 2009, las cuales exigen que las grandes empresas revelen qué están haciendo para prevenir y solucionar el trabajo forzoso en las cadenas de suministro. Sin embargo, en la mayoría de las jurisdicciones no existe sanción para aquellas que informen de no estar haciendo nada. La mayoría de estas leyes son muy poco severas, ya que incrementan las obligaciones de informar pero no establecen responsabilidad extraterritorial, no crean estándares públicos vinculantes y no sancionan el incumplimiento, todo lo cual es fundamental.</p> <p>Mi colega, Andreas Rühmkorf y yo hemos publicado recientemente un <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1758-5899.12398/full">estudio</a> sobre la eficacia de este tipo de legislación en la revista <em>Global Policy</em>. Observamos a 25 empresas importantes e investigamos si sus códigos de conducta, los códigos de conducta de proveedores, los términos y condiciones de compra y la sustentabilidad que reportaban evolucionaron a partir de la entrada en vigor de la Ley sobre esclavitud moderna del Reino Unido y, de ser así, de qué forma sucedió. Encontramos que el progreso significativo fue muy reducido.</p> <h2>Crear una ratonera más eficaz </h2> <p>El enfoque de la Alianza 8.7 frente al trabajo forzoso y la esclavitud en las cadenas de suministro globales debería basarse en la evidencia de lo que funciona. En la actualidad, existe una marcada falta de evidencia sobre la efectividad de las leyes poco severas sobre la transparencia y los esfuerzos voluntarios de las industrias para reducir los casos de explotación laboral en la totalidad de las cadenas de suministro globales. Queda por descubrir si sería mejor comenzar de nuevo o trabajar seriamente para mejorar las iniciativas existentes. En cualquier caso, es importante comprender que el obstáculo principal para tener éxito con cualquiera de las dos opciones no es técnico, sino político.</p> <p>Una característica curiosa de muchas de las iniciativas ya mencionadas es que con frecuencia durante su diseño y ejecución dejan a un lado a trabajadoras y trabajadores, en vez de empoderarlos para ejercer sus derechos y controlar la eficacia de las iniciativas. Además, aun cuando se incluye al plantel laboral en iniciativas de participantes múltiples, éste suele informar de que únicamente se le permitió participar de forma superficial.</p> <p>Esto es una señal de alarma importantísima. Si el objetivo de estas iniciativas es reducir el trabajo forzoso y la esclavitud, entonces las personas empleadas son una parte esencial de la lucha. Nadie tiene más razones para supervisar y promover estándares laborales que ellas y, además, son más efectivas en su trabajo cuando conforman una parte organizada e involucrada de cualquier proceso de ejecución de iniciativas. Los programas de <a href="https://wsr-network.org/">«responsabilidad social de trabajadores y trabajadoras»</a> liderados por grupos como la <a href="http://www.ciw-online.org/">Coalición de Trabajadores de Immokalee</a> en Estados Unidos, por ejemplo, son buenos ejemplos de cómo puede involucrarse al plantel laboral en la gobernanza de la cadena de suministro.</p> <p>Otra gran señal de alarma es el entusiasmo con el que las empresas han aceptado las leyes de transparencia. Un supuesto fundamental en la bibliografía sobre economía política en los negocios es que las empresas se resisten a cualquier regulación que pueda impactar en sus actividades. Aun así, las empresas han estado luchando a favor de estas leyes de transparencia.</p> <p>En el Reino Unido, por ejemplo, el gobierno quitó la cláusula sobre la transparencia en las cadenas de suministro de una versión posterior de la Ley sobre esclavitud moderna, y una coalición industrial lo presionó para que la volviera a incluir. Las empresas no son organizaciones humanitarias benevolentes; cuando luchan por nuevas legislaciones, es necesario cuestionar sus motivos. ¿Se promueve este tipo de leyes en particular para cerrar el camino a formas más severas de legislación? Tales preguntas deben tomarse seriamente en cuenta si se quiere alcanzar un progreso significativo.</p> <p>Para terminar, debemos pensar con cuidado y ser escépticos en extremo con respecto al poder desproporcionado de agentes industriales en el inicio, diseño y ejecución de iniciativas en contra de la esclavitud, tanto públicas como privadas. El poder corporativo impide eliminar de raíz las causas de la explotación laboral en las cadenas de suministro globales. Aunque las razones detrás de la demanda de trabajo forzoso por parte de las empresas varían según el tipo, sector e industria a la que pertenecen, hay patrones claros de las causas fundamentales que pueden ser abordados. Esto, sin embargo, requiere cambios fundamentales en los modelos empresariales dominantes en la economía minorista global. Si la Alianza 8.7 desea tener éxito en esta tarea, eso es lo que debería impulsar.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc">Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Genevieve LeBaron BTS en Español Thu, 23 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Genevieve LeBaron 118842 at https://www.opendemocracy.net The political economy of anti-trafficking https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/igor-bosc/political-economy-of-anti-trafficking <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Politicians are far more likely to back anti-trafficking measures that don’t disrupt prevailing power balances at home. That’s a major reason why so many interventions fail.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/332949793_579effd1c1_o.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Tobias Leeger/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/saibotregeel/332949793/in/photolist-vqsnF-foqxdP-foqeYX-jEcFMe-dLCVvG-6xJmrb-7RTbZC-2tGGGJ-foqy5X-foqDog-p9SVo-8qP69H-iETJQZ-dxt4P-MkHeA-dM4dpQ-9ExWvy-96KYqu-7S4zUu-8rtDso-bJ4uL2-bpYL4N-g4gP95-bCTGWF-dxtgH-a5FV9x-bv9Hsy-RpBpdJ-27UZdLA-7RTfNQ-6gAyV1-7RTbcL-byT8rV-aQft8p-bCTHba-dYKLvF-HHGzvT-bCTHuH-6jtT8V-rKHjzu-6AnAN2-7RTeEU-sq8RDS-7RTbSJ-9NJdLE-cXeAR-7RQ2Tz-6zeYUp-7RTehS-6X1URo">CC (by-nd)</a></p> <p>The International Labour Organisation’s Work in Freedom Programme (WIF)* seeks to reduce the vulnerability of migrant women to forced labour. It is a five-year programme operating in five countries in South Asia and the Middle East, and spans several, women-heavy sectors such as domestic and garment work. WIF is part of the global effort to achieve Target 8.7 of the sustainable development goals (SDGs), which focuses on forced labour and human trafficking, and falls within the larger aim of <a href="https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdg8">SDG 8</a> to “promote … decent work for all”.</p> <p>The WIF programme has sought to review, test, and document a variety of strategies and policies for their efficacy in areas with high migration outflows or inflows, and in the recruitment pathways linking both. The programme has furthermore engaged interested policy makers and stakeholders in reviewing different policy solutions that could reduce vulnerability to forced labour. These include but are not limited to policies, laws, and administrative practices around anti-trafficking, migration, skills development, recruitment, and labour.</p> <p>So far, we have found that policy makers show greater interest in tackling human trafficking and forced labour when doing so does not disrupt power relationships in which they have a direct stake. For example, policy makers in countries or cities of destination tend to support information campaigns designed to educate migrant workers about risks. This is especially true when the campaigns target prospective migrants before they leave their countries of origin. They have also supported prosecution efforts targeting labour recruitment intermediaries in countries or districts of origin.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Policy makers show greater interest in tackling human trafficking and forced labour when doing so does not disrupt power relationships in which they have a direct stake.</p> <p>However, policy makers proved more circumspect when it came to implementing labour laws in countries of destination, even where systemic labour abuses were well documented. Their resistance became more pronounced when implementation would affect the balance of power between employer and migrant worker, or contractor and migrant worker (e.g. support to freedom of association or collective bargaining, embodied in ILO Conventions Nos. 87 and 98, respectively).&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <p>Likewise, policy makers in countries, states, or districts of origin regularly demonstrated concern for the abusive conditions faced by migrant workers in the countries of destination. When it came to addressing the reasons why migrants were leaving their homes, or regulating large-scale, formalised migrant facilitators, they were less enthusiastic.</p> <p>The overall result of this political economy of migration and anti-trafficking policy-making is that forced labour, however well documented, tends to be systemically ignored. Registered recruiters and intermediaries sometimes find themselves targeted by anti-trafficking interventions. It is far more likely, however, that informal labour recruitment intermediaries – often thought of as ‘unscrupulous middlemen’ – are on the sharp end of anti-trafficking policy. Finally, significant time and resources are spent on educational campaigns for migrant workers. </p> <h2>Information deficits and the need for labour governance</h2> <p>In an environment of scarcity in quality employment, both employers and labourers tend to rely on labour intermediaries (e.g. contractors) to meet their needs. Pathways to jobs in domestic, garment, and other low-income sectors are thus not only shaped by the rules and practices governing migrant mobility, but are also joined together by a variety of agents and contractors.</p> <p class="mag-quote-right">Forced labour, however well documented, tends to be systemically ignored.</p> <p>The fluidity and segmentation of labour supply chains is such that none of the key stakeholders – e.g. labourers, labour recruiters, regulators, and employers – can guarantee on their own a fair migration outcome for any worker. If working conditions are poor, each stakeholder in the recruitment process has a vested interest not to volunteer information that could make the migrant worker change her mind. The more intermediaries that are involved in the recruitment process, the more likely it is that they will omit information if not outright misinform migrants about working conditions. This leads many workers to claim they were deceived during the recruitment process, yet each individual link in the chain is often able to plausibly deny this charge.</p> <p>Domestic, garment, and textile work employs increasing numbers of women.<sup><a id="ffn1" href="#fn1" class="footnote">1</a></sup> While employment in these sectors may improve the livelihoods of some of those involved, the intensity of the labour, the long hours, and the insufficient pay still make achieving a decent standard of living extremely difficult. <sup><a id="ffn2" href="#fn2" class="footnote">2</a>, <a id="ffn3" href="#fn3" class="footnote">3</a>, <a id="ffn4" href="#fn4" class="footnote">4</a></sup></p> <p>These challenges can be at least partly addressed through better labour governance based on rights-based approaches and international labour standards.<sup><a id="ffn5" href="#fn5" class="footnote">5</a></sup> A policy paper prepared in February 2017 by the ILO concluded that:</p> <blockquote> <p>“while some anti-trafficking laws and policies can be useful, they tend to focus on prosecution of recruiters, protection of victims and information for migrants. However, they rarely account for the power dynamics behind labour abuses, and as a result tend to avoid the economic and labour laws, policies and practices that generate vulnerability to forced labour”.<sup><a id="ffn5" href="#fn5" class="footnote">5</a></sup></p> </blockquote> <p>Another paper documenting lessons learned in the programme concluded that:</p> <blockquote> <p>“Laws, polices and administrative practices to prevent human trafficking tend to prioritize educating migrants and holding recruiters accountable while glossing over working and living conditions. Policy guidance on improving working conditions is more important than educating workers about risks they often can’t mitigate or holding labour recruiters accountable for practices that do not necessarily depend on them. It is important to prioritize addressing labour and working conditions in destinations rather than over-emphasizing prevention through pre-employment interventions”.<sup><a id="ffn6" href="#fn6" class="footnote">6</a></sup> </p> </blockquote> <p>Meanwhile common anti-trafficking policies used by South Asian governments – such as migration bans for women or interception-focused, anti-trafficking committees in areas of origin – undermine the human rights of migrants and are ineffective.<sup><a id="ffn7" href="#fn7" class="footnote">7</a>, <a id="ffn8" href="#fn8" class="footnote">8</a></sup> </p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>There are no easy and simple fixes for human trafficking and forced labour. To address forced labour, rights-based laws, policies, and practices anchored in and fully responsive to local political economies are necessary. Only then can incremental and well-planned interventions expand decent work options. This is always challenging. Yet, livelihood, labour, and mobility rights can only effectively address forced labour when the policies implementing them disrupt prevailing power dynamics and improve working conditions, income levels, rest time, and above all the dignity of workers and their families.<sup><a id="ffn5" href="#fn5" class="footnote">5</a>, <a id="ffn9" href="#fn9" class="footnote">9</a></sup></p> <p><em>* <a href="http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---asia/---ro-bangkok/---sro-new_delhi/documents/publication/wcms_526175.pdf">Work in Freedom</a> is an integrated development cooperation programme aiming to reduce vulnerability to trafficking and forced labour of women migrating to garment and domestic work. The programme is funded by UK Aid. The view reflected in this article do not reflect the views of UK Government.</em></p> <hr /> <h2>References</h2> <style> #footnotes li {margin-bottom:10px;} </style> <ol id="footnotes"> <li id="fn1">NSSO (2012): “National Sample Survey Office (NSSO)’s 68th Round of Employment and Unemployment Survey (2011-12),” New Delhi: Government Press. <a href="#ffn1">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn2">Truskinovsky, Yulya, Janet Rubin &amp; Drusilla Brown (2014): &quot;Sexual Harassment in Garment Factories: Firm Structure, Organizational Culture and Incentive Systems.&quot; Geneva: International Labour Organisation and International Financial Corporation. &nbsp; <a href="#ffn2">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn3">Rustagi, Preet, Balwant Singh Mehta, &amp; Deeksha Tayal (2017): “<a href="http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---asia/---ro-bangkok/---sro-new_delhi/documents/publication/wcms_622812.pdf">Persisting servitude and gradual shifts toward recognition and dignity of labour: A study of employers of domestic workers in two metropolitan cities of Delhi and Mumbai</a>,” New Delhi: ILO. <a href="#ffn3">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn4">Mezzadri, Alessandra and Ravi Srivastava (2015): &quot;<a href="https://www.soas.ac.uk/cdpr/publications/reports/file106927.pdf">Labour regimes in the Indian garment sector: capital-labour relations, social reproduction and labour standards in the National Capital Region</a>&quot;, London: Centre for Development Policy and Research. <a href="#ffn4">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn5">International Labour Organisation (2017, February): &quot;<a href="http://www.ilo.org/newdelhi/whatwedo/publications/WCMS_545580/lang--en/index.htm">Policy Brief on Anti Trafficking Policies, Laws and Practices</a>,&quot; New Delhi: ILO. <a href="#ffn5">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn6">International Labour Organisation (2017, October): &quot;<a href="http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---asia/---ro-bangkok/---sro-new_delhi/documents/publication/wcms_600474.pdf%C2%A0">Lessons Learned by the Work in Freedom Programme</a>,&quot; New Delhi: ILO. <a href="#ffn6">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn7">Shrestha, Jebli and Eleanor Taylor-Nicholson (2015): <em>No Easy Exit: Migration Bans Affecting Women from Nepal,</em> Geneva: International Labour Organisation, Work in Freedom Programme. <a href="#ffn7">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn8">Global Alliance Against Trafficking in Women (GAATW) (2007): <em>Collateral Damage: the impact of human trafficking measures on human rights around the world, </em>Thailand: GAATW Publications. <a href="#ffn8">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> <li id="fn9">International Labour Organisation (1930), Forced Labour Convention No. 29, Art. 2(f). <a href="#ffn9">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> </ol> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters-vibhuti-ramachandran/recipe-for-injustice-india-s-new-trafficking-bil">A recipe for injustice: India’s new trafficking bill expands a troubled rescue, rehabilitation, and repatriation framework</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/martina-tazzioli/open-cities-open-harbours">Open the cities, open the harbours</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/annie-pickering/when-workers-lead-on-enforcing-labour-standards-case-study-of-electron">When workers lead on enforcing labour standards: a case study of Electronics Watch</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/prabha-kotiswaran/criminal-law-as-sledgehammer-paternalist-politics-of-india-s-2018-tr">The criminal law as sledgehammer: the paternalist politics of India’s 2018 Trafficking Bill</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/jennifer-rosenbaum-shikha-silliman-bhattacharjee/big-brands-missing-voice-in-fight-to-">Big brands: the missing voice in the fight to end gender-based violence at work</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/elena-arengo/it-comes-with-job-how-brands-share-responsibility-for-mass-faintings-in-c">It comes with the job: how brands share responsibility for mass faintings in Cambodian garment factories</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/aaron-halegua/sexual-harassment-at-walmart-s-stores-and-suppliers-in-china">Sexual harassment at Walmart’s stores and suppliers in China</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Igor Bosc Wed, 22 Aug 2018 10:12:49 +0000 Igor Bosc 119391 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Organizándose contra la economía de los pequeños encargos (gig economy): ¿lecciones de América Latina? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/adam-fishwick/organiz-ndose-contra-la-econom-de-los-peque-os-encargos-gig-economy-lecc <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Las nuevas estrategias de organización y control de las trabajadoras y trabajadores en América Latina sugieren formas de abordar la inseguridad de la economía de los pequeños encargos. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/adam-fishwick/organising-against-gig-economy-lessons-from-latin-america">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/2429650665_76b0f0f2c5_b.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Alex Steffler/Flickr. (CC 2.0 by-nc)</p> <p>Quienes trabajan en la llamada «economía de los pequeños encargos» se enfrentan a condiciones de precariedad y explotación cada vez mayores. Desde mensajeras y mensajeros con entrega a domicilio a taxistas, <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyond-slavery-themes/labour-rights-in-gig-economy">esta serie</a> ha demostrado que las condiciones de trabajo son cada vez más perjudiciales y se observan pocos signos de mejora.</p> <p>Para combatir esta situación se han desarrollado nuevas e innovadoras estrategias de organización y movilización. Estrategias nuevas y más directas de lucha sindical han estado en el centro de <a href="https://iwgb.org.uk/2017/03/24/iwgb-wins-second-major-test-case-for-couriers-in-the-so-called-gig-economy/">disputas exitosas</a> lideradas por el Sindicato Independiente de Trabajadoras y Trabajadores de Gran Bretaña en Londres, y por medio de huelgas espontáneas por parte de las conductoras y conductores de Uber y otros grupos a lo largo de <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-02-01/uber-drivers-plan-strike-to-protest-fare-cuts-in-new-york-city">Estados Unidos</a>, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/nov/22/uber-drivers-go-slow-protest-central-london-minimum-wage-guarantee">el Reino Unido</a>, <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/12/23/striking-uber-drivers-blockade-paris-airport/">Francia</a> y <a href="http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/companies/ola-uber-drivers-begin-strike-in-chennai-threaten-to-picket-transport-commissioner-office/articleshow/57497523.cms">otros países</a>.</p> <p>Hasta ahora, estas formas de economía de los pequeños encargos han tenido menos calado en América Latina. Esto puede estar a punto de cambiar ya que, de acuerdo a un <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-10-13/can-uber-conquer-latin-america">informe reciente de Bloomberg,</a> la oficina central de Uber está respondiendo a la reciente representación negativa de la prensa recurriendo a la región como su nueva «tierra prometida».</p> <p>Tres razones pueden explicar por qué la economía de los pequeños encargos ha tenido poco éxito hasta ahora en la región. En primer lugar, se basa en un modelo de negocio que requiere condiciones particulares de mercado, es decir, un gran volumen de personas que consumen, que tienen ingresos relativamente altos y que viven junto a una cantidad significativa de mano de obra excedente. Tales condiciones no son comunes en América Latina al mismo nivel que en Europa y América del Norte.</p> <p>En segundo lugar, es posible que exista poca necesidad de impulsar una mayor precariedad en la mano de obra de la región. El sector informal domina en estas áreas y, después de décadas de ajuste estructural y del retorno de un neoliberalismo severo a los países de la región, el trabajo precario es la norma.</p> <p>En tercer lugar, en las ocasiones en que Uber y Lyft –las dos empresas predominantes de viajes compartidos en la economía de plataformas– han querido establecerse en las principales ciudades –de <a href="http://uk.reuters.com/article/us-argentina-uber-tech-idUKKBN15E25J">Argentina</a> y <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/sep/30/rio-de-janeiro-brazil-uber-ban">Brasil</a>, por ejemplo– una combinación entre las protestas de la clase trabajadora y la regulación ha contenido su ambición.</p> <p>Trabajadoras y trabajadores de la región se han movilizado a través de tácticas innovadoras para enfrentar y, en algunos casos, superar el impacto negativo de la creciente precariedad que caracteriza el trabajo en la economía de los pequeños encargos. Solo tenemos que recordar la variedad de <a href="https://www.akpress.org/horizontalism.html">formas de organización horizontal y prácticas radicales</a> que surgieron de la crisis de 2001 en Argentina, por ejemplo, y que siguen resonando en las <a href="http://ppesydney.net/labour-centred-development-latin-america/">fábricas recuperadas por la clase trabajadora</a> e incluso en la <a href="https://www.viewpointmag.com/2017/03/21/the-strike-of-those-who-cant-stop-an-interview-with-veronica-gago-and-natalia-fontana/">huelga de mujeres de 2017</a>.</p> <p>En este artículo reflexionaré sobre algunas de las lecciones que pueden extraerse de los trabajadores y trabajadoras latinoamericanas para organizarse en contra de condiciones similares a las que sustentan el crecimiento de la economía de los pequeños encargos en el Norte global. Específicamente, tendré en cuenta lo que podemos aprender de las experiencias de ocupación del lugar de trabajo y control obrero como estrategias para hacer frente a la economía de pequeños encargos.</p> <h2>El control obrero en América Latina</h2> <p>La experiencia reciente de ocupación del lugar de trabajo y el control obrero en América Latina es muy variada. Abarca contextos político-institucionales enormemente diversos y una amplia gama de sectores económicos: desde <a href="http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/10.1163/1569206x-12341320">Unidades de Producción Socialista</a> creadas a través de comunas y apoyadas por el estado en Venezuela, a incautaciones de tierras y agricultura comunal organizada por el <a href="http://www.mstbrazil.org/content/history-mst">Movimiento de Trabajadoras/es Sin Tierra</a> en Brasil bajo el lema «Ocupar, Resistir, Producir».</p> <p>Sin embargo, las más conocidas son las empresas recuperadas por las trabajadoras y trabajadores en Argentina. Surgieron <em>masivamente</em> después de 2001, según un <a href="http://www.recuperadasdoc.com.ar/informe-mayo-2016.pdf">informe reciente de la Facultad Abierta</a>&nbsp; en Buenos Aires, y ahora existen 376 lugares de trabajo controlados por quienes trabajan en ellos y que emplean a 15.948 personas.</p> <p>Como ha documentado <a href="http://www.workerscontrol.net/authors/social-innovations-autogestion-argentina%E2%80%99s-worker-recuperated-enterprises-cooperatively-reor">Marcelo Vieta</a>, estos lugares controlados por quienes trabajan allí —que van desde fábricas industriales y hoteles hasta servicios de parques y centros médicos— han enfrentado una serie de desafíos que han sido superados a través de innovaciones muy variadas.</p> <p>Estas incluyen obtener acceso a fondos como colectivos, a través de la solidaridad de los vecindarios, y mediante la construcción de nuevas «economías solidarias»; establecer estructuras de trabajo horizontales mediante asambleas de trabajo y rotación de empleos; imponer pagos equitativos en todos los lugares de trabajo; comunicación abierta a través de asambleas, con detalles claros de tareas, objetivos de trabajo y cuentas; y ofreciendo espacio y servicios —desde viviendas hasta atención médica— a las comunidades aledañas.</p> <p>Es importante destacar que estas ocupaciones y las transformaciones posteriores del lugar de trabajo y de las relaciones sociales entre las personas trabajadoras derivaron, al menos inicialmente, de la auto-actividad independiente de trabajadoras y trabajadores precarios que operan en condiciones cada vez peores. Estas personas se unieron para resolver directamente los problemas que enfrentaban en el trabajo y en la vida cotidiana.</p> <p>Esta es la base fundamental de la acción colectiva autónoma que resulta vital para reflexionar sobre la importancia del control obrero como medio para enfrentar y superar las condiciones de precariedad e inseguridad laboral.</p> <h2>La posibilidad del control obrero en la economía de pequeños encargos</h2> <p>Pero, ¿cómo podemos trasladar estas experiencias en América Latina a la clase trabajadoras que se organiza dentro de la economía de pequeños encargos en condiciones y contextos tan diferentes? Para empezar, muchos de estos ejemplos de control obrero se relacionan con lugares de trabajo más tradicionales, con instalaciones fijas —fábricas, tierras, hoteles, centros médicos, etc.— que pueden controlarse ingresando, ocupando y limitando el acceso a ese espacio.</p> <p>La economía de pequeños encargos, por su propia naturaleza, es flexible y móvil: en la mayoría de casos está representada por una plataforma virtual con <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/mar/22/rights-gig-economy-self-employed-worker">trabajadores y trabajadoras «autónomas»</a> que operan independientemente, repartidas en ciudades principales sin ocupar un espacio concreto.</p> <p>Sin embargo, los propios términos de trabajo ofrecidos en la economía de pequeños encargos se prestan a pensar —y actuar— sobre la utilización de esta independencia para tomar el control. Ann Pettifor, una analista financiera del Reino Unido, <a href="https://www.thenews.coop/106530/sector/mutuals/taxi-drivers-need-take-control-back-uber-says-economist/">hizo recientemente este llamado a las trabajadoras y los trabajadores de Uber</a>:</p> <p>«Así que las y los conductores son dueños del automóvil, lo han comprado, han invertido en él, lo mantienen, invierten en su mantenimiento, lo aseguran... Pagan por todo eso y además pagan algo por la aplicación. Entonces Uber en California, en Silicon Valley, les permite retener parte de las ganancias, pero ¿por qué razón debería Uber ser una compañía de este tipo? ¿Por qué tiene que funcionar de esta manera? ¿Por qué las y los taxistas no se juntan y forman un colectivo?»</p> <p>Es esta opción&nbsp; —asociarse a través de una experiencia de trabajo compartida y precaria, y desarrollar una forma colectiva y cooperativa de organización del trabajo—, lo que representa una clara posibilidad de oposición a los caprichos de la economía de pequeños encargos. El control obrero puede parecer un sueño lejano, pero es posible que, como ya lo imaginó Marx, los contornos de un modo alternativo de organización del trabajo y la vida se puedan ver ya dentro de las innovaciones del capital.</p> <p>Las cooperativas en EE.UU., por ejemplo, han logrado desafiar el dominio de Uber. Las cooperativas de taxis creadas en <a href="http://wagingnonviolence.org/feature/austin-uber-worker-coop/">Austin</a>&nbsp; y en <a href="https://www.thenation.com/article/denver-taxi-drivers-are-turning-ubers-disruption-on-its-head/">Denver</a> han demostrado cómo las y los conductores pueden competir con —y vencer a— las empresas de transporte compartido de la economía de pequeños encargos. Además, las condiciones de trabajo precarias que forman parte de la economía de pequeños encargos son claramente análogas a las experiencias de trabajo precario en toda América Latina, por lo que pueden ofrecer algunas lecciones importantes de organización estratégica.</p> <p>En un <a href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0023656X.2016.1086537">artículo</a>, Maurizio Atzeni explora las nuevas posibles bases de solidaridad que han surgido entre las trabajadoras y trabajadores precarios en Buenos Aires, centrándose en profesionales técnicos del teatro y —aún más interesante para la discusión acerca de la economía de pequeños encargos— los servicios de mensajería en moto. Partiendo de un concepto desarrollado en sus escritos anteriores, describe las condiciones de los nuevos modos de solidaridad que surgen del «encuentro vivo» que ocurre en el lugar de trabajo.</p> <p>Atzeni muestra cómo, a pesar de las modalidades de trabajo fragmentadas, difusas y cada vez más precarias, es en la experiencia compartida de este proceso laboral, influida por los contextos institucionales e históricos específicos de la organización laboral en Argentina, donde pueden comenzar a surgir las bases de la acción colectiva.</p> <p>A partir del aumento de una precariedad similar —amenazas de desempleo y mayor inseguridad en el trabajo— es que se desarrollaron los ejemplos de control obrero anteriormente destacados en Venezuela, Argentina y Brasil. Las decisiones aparentemente espontáneas de movilizar, ocupar y reutilizar lugares de trabajo fueron posible gracias a nuevas solidaridades que surgieron «desde abajo».</p> <p>En combinación, estos factores pueden apuntar a nuevas direcciones estratégicas para las personas trabajadoras de la economía de pequeños encargos. Las denuncias conjuntas y la solidaridad emergente entre las trabajadoras y trabajadores precarios pueden resultar en nuevas tácticas impulsadas por los sindicatos, pero también pueden ofrecer la base para establecer formas colectivas de propiedad basadas en las experiencias en América Latina.</p> <p>A medida que el capitalismo cambia, aumentando la inseguridad y agravando la explotación, también lo hacen los fundamentos de las medidas colectivas y los términos en que las personas trabajadoras pueden comenzar a luchar. América Latina proporciona un ejemplo útil de cómo establecer nuevas formas de vida y de trabajo, y cómo impulsar el control obrero frente a la inseguridad y la precariedad de la economía de pequeños encargos.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DAVID A. FEINGOLD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di">La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Adam Fishwick BTS en Español Wed, 22 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Adam Fishwick 118841 at https://www.opendemocracy.net La organización regional y la lucha para conseguir un salario digno en Asia https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anannya-bhattacharjee/la-organizaci-n-regional-y-la-lucha-para-conseguir-un-salario-di <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Un sistema de producción a escala mundial exige una respuesta equivalente de las trabajadoras y trabajadores organizados. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/anannya-bhattacharjee/regional-organising-and-struggle-to-set-asia-floor-wage">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img width="100%" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/2893257623_cd6aba44d8_o.jpg" /><span class="image-caption">Sam Sherratt/Flickr.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/sherrattsam/2893257623/">(CC BY-SA 2.0)</a></span></p> <p><strong>Neil Howard (openDemocracy): Una de las preguntas sin resolver sobre el activismo laboral es si existe o no la posibilidad de que se dé una relación de solidaridad entre norte y sur, ya sea con grupos más tradicionales o con grupos más marginados en cualquiera de las circunscripciones. Hay activistas que creen que es imposible o, al menos, muy poco probable que esa solidaridad consiga solucionar algo. ¿Qué opina usted al respecto?</strong></p> <p><strong>Anannya Bhattacharjee:</strong> Me opongo completamente a esas divisiones binarias tan insustanciales, sin perspectiva histórica y tan desactualizadas. Teniendo en cuenta que la migración es uno de los fenómenos más grandes de nuestros tiempos, tenemos que entender que el Norte global está siendo moldeado por poblaciones muy nuevas que pronto serán las principales minorías o incluso las mayorías de estos países. Tenemos que hablar con rigurosidad. No podemos decir «así funciona el Norte global». Me sorprende muchísimo escuchar a personas conocidas del mundo académico que afirman tal cosa. Tienen dinero para viajar y para investigar. Si es eso lo único que ven cuando viajan a estas regiones, es que deben de estar relacionándose con la gente equivocada.</p> <p>También estoy en contra de la creencia de que Sur global es mejor, de que allí todo se hace bien por el hecho de ser el Sur. Las actuaciones falsas son muy habituales, hay muchas élites en el Sur a las que no les importa la justicia en absoluto y dentro de nuestros movimientos hay problemas. El movimiento obrero, como el resto de movimientos, está dividido. Creo que lo primero que hay hacer es crear alianzas y construir nuevas perspectivas. Y no digo que la historia no sea importante, pero lo verdaderamente importante es el presente. Tenemos que redefinir a diario nuestras filosofías y enfoques. Debemos pararnos a reflexionar en profundidad, que es algo que falta en muchos espacios. Mientras estemos presentes, mientras sigamos perfeccionándonos y estemos abiertas y abiertos al cambio, que es en lo que consiste este mundo, creo que el trabajo saldrá adelante solo.</p> <p>Me gustaría decir también que la gente fanática no suele confiar en los demás. Hay supuesto líderes radicales que dicen «esto es la clase trabajadora y esto es lo que piensa.» No sé qué decirte. Pásate de vez en cuando a ver cómo van las cosas, ¿no? No digo que debamos ceder a la espontaneidad; soy organizadora y creo en las organizaciones e instituciones, pero confiar en la gente es muy importante. A mí también se me olvida a menudo. Olvidarse de confiar en la gente es un complejo de clase media.</p> <p><strong>Neil (oD): ¿Puede ponernos un par de ejemplos de organizaciones emergentes que estén trabajando para impulsar una gestión más progresista de la cadena de suministro?</strong></p> <p><strong>Anannya:</strong> Claro. Un ejemplo local: en una cadena de suministro global son muy importantes las relaciones que se tienen a gran escala. Por lo tanto, aunque yo pueda estar involucrada en una lucha en una fábrica en particular, tenemos que conocer no solo lo concerniente a esa fábrica y su administración, sino también quién compra los productos. La empresa líder es responsable de las condiciones en las que se encuentran las trabajadoras y los trabajadores, y también es responsable de las limitaciones con las que se podría encontrar la administración de la fábrica. Es muy importante conocer la empresa líder y la cadena de suministro, y tener camaradas en los diferentes países involucrados.</p> <p>Voy a comentar algo que no ha vuelto a suceder porque la lucha en la que participamos terminó con ello. Hubo un caso en el que la gente que trabajaba en una fábrica se sindicalizó y llevó a cabo un encierro dentro del edificio. Una de las subcontratas introdujo personal armado con pistolas y palos para golpearles e incluso secuestraron a uno de ellos. Hicimos una huelga de hambre y a las 14 horas la policía tuvo que traerle de vuelta. En aquel momento, me dijeron que en este tipo de sitios, cuando una persona es secuestrada, nadie espera volver a verla. Me parecía inconcebible. No podía dejar que esto ocurriera estando yo a cargo. De todas formas dicen que es algo que apenas ocurre. La policía había pactado con la empresa subcontratista para destruir el sindicato: la empresa que quería comprar era una británica llamada Marks and Spencer.</p> <p>Aquí fue cuando Labour Behind the Label, nuestras compañeras y compañeros del Reino Unido, se implicaron. En aquel momento hicimos una enorme campaña global, y ahora estamos trabajando junto con las trabajadoras y trabajadores en un caso que puede hacer historia. Creemos que los resultados serán positivos, pero lo cierto es que nada de esto habría ocurrido si no hubiésemos usado los contactos internacionales. Lo que hizo que el departamento de trabajo actuara fueron las conexiones internacionales y los efectos de la llamada mala reputación. Desde entonces hemos dejado de ver esta forma de violencia tan descarada. Quiero dejar claro que aunque las cosas están mejorando, se dan otras formas de violencia. Pero este es un ejemplo dentro del contexto de la fábrica. Quería usar un caso local como ejemplo porque cuando hablo sobre las campañas internacionales, la gente cree que quienes nos dedicamos a la organización no hacemos trabajo en primera persona en las localidades. Quiero acabar con esos prejuicios.</p> <p><strong>Neil (oD): ¿Podría hablar un poco más sobre el salario digno en Asia y explicar cómo se consiguió que tuviera éxito la aplicación a escala regional?</strong></p> <p>La Campaña por un Salario Digno en Asia es otra campaña que ha dado frutos. Hace diez años, el asunto del salario ni siguiera figuraba en la agenda de la cadena de suministro de la industria textil. Siempre se evitaba este tema y las marcas eludían el problema aseverando «pagamos salarios dignos», que no era otra cosa que el salario mínimo del país, el cual sabemos que está a un nivel paupérrimo y que no es digno. Las consumidoras y consumidores activistas en Europa nos comentaban que cuando les decían a las grandes marcas que debían pagar un salario digno, estas respondían cosas como «el pueblo asiático no nos lo pide» o «como no sabemos lo que es, no lo pagamos».</p> <p>Muchas de las personas que trabajábamos en la industria textil comenzamos a pensar en el tema de los salarios, en lo difícil que nos resulta negociar salarios más altos por encima del salario mínimo porque las marcas siempre amenazan con irse del país. Eso nos hizo pensar que necesitábamos enfocar el tema de forma regional en vez de nacional porque este no funcionaría debido a que los países asiáticos tienen su propio sistema interno de competencia regional y el trabajo se estaba convirtiendo en un factor divisorio dentro de esa competencia comercial. Nos dijeron que era imposible lograr una sindicalización y proponer un salario regional. Preguntaban: «¿cómo se puede proponer una cifra con tantos países diferentes?» Lo hicimos mediante un largo proceso que nos llevó tres años en el que hubo reuniones con sindicatos en distintos países. Este proceso no estaba financiado. Nos invitaban a una conferencia en algún sitio y aprovechábamos para conocer a la gente de la zona. Fue un proceso político, y así es como empezó.</p> <p>Con el salario mínimo en Asia, las personas que trabajan pueden ver lo que, como mínimo, deberían pagarles por contribuir en la producción de la cadena de suministro. Es importantísimo que se reconozca el valor del trabajo y que este se traduzca en un valor numéricamente inteligible, y con el asunto del salario digno en Asia ocurrió eso. Hubo empresas que nos atacaron numerosas veces para evitarlo. Estuvimos unos dos años visitando distintos sitios, nos llamaron para asistir a varias reuniones y ahora el salario digno en Asia se considera un punto de referencia internacional y fiable. Puede que no quieran pagarlo, pero muestra lo que un salario mínimo debería ser. Sirve como punto de referencia.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Es importantísimo que se reconozca el valor del trabajo y que este se traduzca en un valor numéricamente inteligible.</p> <p>Para nosotras esto ya es un triunfo, porque se ha convertido en el centro de atención. A las grandes empresas se les pregunta continuamente por qué no pagan un salario digno, o si lo hacen, es a la defensiva. Eso para mí es un logro. Aunque la victoria será definitiva cuando la gente lo reciba. Con este objetivo en mente, nos encontramos en una especie de transición entre la construcción de alianzas y el hacer campaña a un modo más de negociación. En los próximos años, lo que nos gustaría ver son acuerdos vinculantes, con plazos de tiempo acordados dentro de los cuales los salarios dignos deban ser abonados. Somos realistas y no les pedimos que se paguen de la noche a la mañana. Lo que queremos es que se comprometan a hacerlo dentro de un plazo acordado, y desde nuestras organizaciones trabajaremos para ayudar a garantizar que llega al bolsillo de las y los trabajadores.</p> <p>Sé que hay personas que dicen que la campaña es abstracta y que el salario también lo es. No conocen a las personas que trabajan en estas empresas. El salario es de lo que más se habla. Ni siquiera hablan sobre los golpes o las patadas que reciben. Hablan del salario. Las personas que afirman que el salario es un concepto abstracto no tienen ni idea, sinceramente. Eso lo escuché ayer y me molestó muchísimo. Es que básicamente es la prioridad número uno para las y los trabajadores. Por eso se hizo la campaña, porque es la prioridad número uno.</p> <p>Hay quienes dicen no ver que se produzcan cambios reales, pero es que el cambio se puede dar de diferentes maneras. Para mí, una forma de cambio es que una persona se dé cuenta del valor que tiene su trabajo y que pueda exigirle a la directiva lo que desde la campaña por el salario digno en Asia se cree que debería cobrar. Y claro, evidentemente el trabajo no termina hasta que estas personas reciben ese salario. Aquí es donde comienza la siguiente etapa de la negociación. Pero el hecho de que hayamos tardado 10 años en llegar hasta aquí da cuenta de la complejidad del conflicto al que nos enfrentamos.</p> <p>Tenemos que trabajar a diferentes niveles, y no es nada fácil hacerlo. Necesitas apoyo desde muchos frentes para poder abarcar tantos niveles de trabajo, pero he conocido a gente que ha podido hacerlo. Me molesta cuando activistas de clase media y con formación no trabajan desde varias posiciones, sino que se quedan en una única posición y criticando el resto de posibilidades. Es una visión muy estrecha, como esa historia de los tres hombres ciegos que tocaban tres partes distintas de un elefante y tenían que adivinar lo que era. Todos se equivocaron en sus suposiciones porque ninguno de ellos conocía el todo de lo que palpaban.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK AND ANDRÉ BROOME</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DAVID A. FEINGOLD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra">Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHARAN BURROW</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Anannya Bhattacharjee BTS en Español Tue, 21 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Anannya Bhattacharjee 118029 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Cadenas globales de suministro: ¿qué quiere la mano de obra? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/sharan-burrow/cadenas-globales-de-suministro-qu-quiere-la-mano-de-obra <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>De acuerdo con las trabajadoras y los trabajadores del mundo, las cadenas globales de suministro no son sostenibles ni pueden serlo, a menos que se funden sobre los principios del trabajo digno. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/ilc/sharan-burrow/global-supply-chains-what-does-labour-want">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/8249606196_ba7d8d9231_k_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Garment factory, Sri Lanka. M.Crozet for the ILO/Flickr. (CC 2.0 by-nc-nd)</p> <p>Las empresas multinacionales buscan constantemente reducir costos para incrementar ganancias, y la presión resultante recae no solo sobre los salarios de las personas trabajadoras, sino también sobre sus condiciones laborales. Esto, a su vez, conlleva a que el empleo dentro de las cadenas globales de suministro sea en general precario y/o informal, con violaciones a los derechos humanos. A pesar de que algunas compañías han prometido públicamente que asegurarán a sus empleadas y empleados el pago de un salario digno y la inversión en los lugares de trabajos para que sean seguros, esto no es de ninguna manera la norma; e incluso cuando así lo declaran, estas promesas no siempre se cumplen. Los planes empresariales y la «responsabilidad social empresarial» tienen poco o nada de impacto positivo a la hora de garantizar derechos laborales a quienes trabajan en estas empresas. De hecho, han pospuesto abordar cuestiones estructurales fundamentales.</p> <p>Que hasta el 94% de la fuerza de trabajo de la que dependen las empresas multinacionales más grandes se encuentre «oculta», significa que existen vacíos de gobernanza graves en las cadenas globales de suministro. Mientras que las trabajadores y trabajadores producen bienes y servicios en <em>diversos</em> países, la mayoría de las leyes y convenciones internacionales se terminan en la frontera de cada país <em>en particular.</em> Hoy en día, guías voluntarias como las <a href="http://www.oecd.org/corporate/mne/">Guías para las Empresas Multinacionales </a>&nbsp;de la Organización para&nbsp;la&nbsp;Cooperación&nbsp;y el&nbsp;Desarrollo Económicos («OECD», por sus siglas en inglés), que incorpora los <a href="http://business-humanrights.org/en/un-guiding-principles">Principios Rectores sobre las empresas y los derechos humanos</a> de las Naciones Unidas, y la ya obsoleta Declaración<a href="http://www.ilo.org/empent/Publications/WCMS_094386/lang--en/index.htm"> de las Empresas Multinacionales</a> («MNE», por sus siglas en inglés) de la Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT) son algunas de las pocas «regulaciones» mundiales de las cadenas globales de suministro. Ninguna de ellas, sin embargo, es efectiva a la hora de asegurar el respeto hacia las trabajadoras y los trabajadores en las cadenas de suministro.</p> <p>Un problema importante para las personas trabajadoras, aun en países con una legislación sustantiva, es la falta de los recursos adecuados para enfrentar situaciones en las que se violan sus derechos de forma inevitable. En estos casos, es poco probable que las empresas locales tomen responsabilidad, ya que los procesos administrativos o legales son lentos, débiles o corruptos. A su vez, como no existe causa de acción o jurisdicción sobre las empresas líderes —ni en los países de acogida ni en los de origen—, estas compañías son normalmente inmunes a cualquier responsabilidad legal.</p> <p>La OIT puede y debe llenar el vacío en la gobernanza, tanto mediante la adopción de un nuevo criterio sobre las cadenas globales de suministro como también mediante medidas complementarias, que la posicionen en el centro de las relaciones industriales globales para el nuevo siglo.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">El convenio de la OIT sobre el trabajo decente en cadenas globales de suministro puede y debe ser la columna vertebral de cualquier nuevo enfoque hacia la normativa laboral y su cumplimiento a nivel internacional.</p> <h2>Un nuevo convenio</h2> <p>El convenio de la OIT sobre el trabajo decente en cadenas globales de suministro puede y debe ser la columna vertebral de cualquier nuevo enfoque hacia la normativa laboral y su cumplimiento a nivel internacional. Este enfoque se construye sobre la base de instrumentos existentes como los convenios fundamentales, y requiere la ratificación de estos. La obligación que tienen los estados con respecto a la aprobación de leyes y normativas, junto a normas de la OIT, que regulen la conducta de las empresas bajo su jurisdicción, <em>allá donde sea que los supuestos daños ocurran,</em> es crucial para este convenio.</p> <p>La debida diligencia obligatoria es otro componente clave de tal instrumento (el cual ya se requiere cuando se trata de trabajo forzoso, según el Protocolo sobre Trabajo Forzoso de la OIT en 2014). Así mismo, la transparencia obligatoria también aseguraría que las empresas y las personas trabajadoras supieran quién forma parte de la cadena de suministro. Ello, a su vez, daría lugar a más control y, en última instancia, a una mayor responsabilidad. </p> <p>Otras exigencias pretenden terminar con la ilegalidad en las «zonas francas de procesamiento» —esenciales para la productividad de las cadenas de suministro—, eliminar el trabajo forzoso y formalizar el trabajo informal. Un convenio vinculante sobre las cadenas globales de suministro debe asegurar el fomento de relaciones laborales seguras, la eliminación de prácticas discriminatorias y la erradicación de formas de trabajo involuntarias y no convencionales. Por último, debe destacar el poder del diálogo social, lo cual incluye un marco para una verdadera negociación transnacional. Esto podría, finalmente, impulsar las relaciones industriales al siglo XXI.</p> <p>Como parte del seguimiento inmediato al debate sobre el Convenio Internacional de Trabajo, y como uno de los resultados principales, la OIT debe convocar una reunión tripartita de personas expertas para debatir los aspectos principales de cualquier nuevo convenio. Ese tiene que ser el resultado principal del Convenio Internacional de Trabajo de 2016.</p> <h2>Una OIT del siglo XXI</h2> <p>La OIT debe posicionarse en el centro de la gobernanza mundial de las cadenas de suministro. La economía mundial necesita una OIT que esté equipada para responder a los problemas globales que surgen de las cadenas de suministro. Esto incluiría, por ejemplo, investigación y soporte técnico para la negociación y fijación de salarios mínimos nacionales y sectoriales; el establecimiento de servicios para la inspección laboral a nivel global para investigar, exponer e informar a agentes sociales y a gobiernos en dónde se encuentran la explotación y el abuso; y la mediación y solución de disputas transnacionales entre trabajadoras y trabajadores y empresas multinacionales, cuando sea solicitado por cualquiera de las partes. Esta es la OIT que nos gustaría ver emerger.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner">Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARK ANNER</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Sharan Burrow BTS en Español Mon, 20 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Sharan Burrow 118840 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Voces de la cadena de suministro: una entrevista con Mark Anner https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/mark-anner/voces-de-la-cadena-de-suministro-una-entrevista-con-mark-anner <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>BTS habla con el director del Centro de los Derechos Laborales Globales sobre lo que genera «una carrera hacia el abismo» en las cadenas de suministro. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/mark-anner/voices-from-supply-chain-interview-with-mark-anner">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/6265437185_911124db60_b.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Sorting coffee beans in El Salvador. Dennis Tang/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/tangysd/6265437185/in/photolist-axE1c4-a9vuXb-a9sGL8-a9vuhW-a9sGwB-a9sFBr-a9vtZj-GKSdW9-a9vu9C-GZzN4M-H3FJ6S-H3FC1W-GXiVWA-HASFLU-H3FJiq-GPVoNv-HGz57E-GPPrxG-H6D4vv-Gb9L8h-Uuqmjk-PAcrWs-FPfAbb-FPfAsU-UfkdvW-Lbf2yH-Km8nBo-Lbf5ap-KRG9sd-Lbf5hZ-KRG531-Km8nQE-Lbf3Qa-Km8nkm-Lbf43e-GZzLmt-H3FBi3-GZzVGc-H3FGiJ-GFtwkG-GZzQsV-H6D4WR-Gb9CNN-GZzRzz-PW9M4U-PYS2xi-PAcs4G-PAcs89-PYS2sZ-PW9Pdy">CC (by-sa)</a></p> <p><strong>BTS: Gracias por acompañarnos Mark, sabemos que eres un hombre ocupado. También sabemos que llevas más de dos décadas investigando las condiciones laborales de las cadenas de suministro mundiales. ¿Puedes contarnos un poco acerca de tu investigación?</strong></p> <p>MA: En 1998 hice mi primera visita a una fábrica de ropa que estaba en El Salvador. La estábamos recorriendo, hablando con las personas que trabajaban allí, con la dirección. Y, mientras estábamos allí, entró la propietaria y empecé a conversar con ella. Me explicó que el salario mínimo acababa de subir un 10%. Así que le pregunté: «¿Qué ha hecho al respecto?» Y me dijo que había llamado a la empresa líder que le proporcionaba a ella los pedidos (en aquel entonces fabricaba vestidos para niñas) y que les comunicó que se veía obligada a ajustar sus precios debido a que tenía que pagar un salario mínimo legal más alto. Esto era importante, ya que ahora sabemos que aproximadamente el 80% de sus gastos generales eran costes de mano de obra.</p> <p>¿Y entonces qué ocurrió? Llamó a la firma principal y les dijo: «Lo siento, ya no puedo hacer el trabajo por este precio porque sencillamente el salario mínimo ha subido». Y el representante de la firma principal hizo un pequeña pausa y le dijo: «no, no lo entiendes, ese <em>es</em> el precio. Solo hay una pregunta y esa pregunta es: &quot;¿puedes hacerlo por este precio?&quot; Porque si no puedes, con una o dos llamadas telefónicas podemos mover la producción a Haití.» A lo que, por supuesto, ella respondió rápidamente: «¡No, no, tranquilo! Encontraré la manera de hacerlo por ese precio.»</p> <p>Le pregunté que qué pasó entonces. Me dijo que tomó el megáfono y básicamente les dijo a las personas que tenían que trabajar un 10% más rápido. Por lo que, si entonces realizaban 1000 operaciones al día, como por ejemplo coser mangas, ahora tendrían que hacer 1100 para mantener sus trabajos.&nbsp;<em>Esa es la raíz del problema de la cadena de suministro</em>. Hay dinámicas en la producción que comienzan en la parte superior de la cadena, como la fijación de precios y el abastecimiento, y que afectan directamente a las condiciones laborales de la base.</p> <p><strong>BTS: Esa es una historia impactante, Mark, gracias. Pero, ¿puedes explicarnos algo más sobre este tipo de prácticas de las principales empresas y las consecuencias que tienen sobre el trabajo digno (o, más habitualmente, indigno) en las cadenas de suministro?</strong></p> <p>MA: Bueno, hay dos dinámicas fundamentales que realmente importan aquí: la fijación de precios y el abastecimiento. La fijación de precios se refiere al precio pagado por unidad para fabricar un artículo determinado. El abastecimiento, aunque abarca diversos aspectos, se refiere básicamente al <em>plazo de entrega</em>, es decir, al plazo de tiempo que quien compra otorga a quien provee para realizar el trabajo.</p> <p>Hay dos problemas principales. Uno es que el precio siempre es bajo y cada vez lo es más. Tenemos datos que lo demuestran. Estuve en Bangladesh hace apenas un par de meses investigando. Tenía el ejemplar de una camiseta, que hace dos años se fabricaba por 2 dólares. La fábrica que la hacía había encontrado la manera de confeccionarla obteniendo beneficios por ese precio de 2 dólares. Pero ahora el comprador multinacional ha comunicado a esa fábrica que debe producir la misma camiseta con la misma calidad por solo 1,6 dólares. Así es cómo aprietan con los precios. Y esto afecta a las trabajadoras y trabajadores en términos de salarios muy bajos.</p> <p>El problema del plazo de entrega se refiere al plazo de tiempo que se otorga a un proveedor para fabricar el producto por el que se le ha contratado. Aquí surgen dos problemas. Uno es que el plazo de entrega es cada vez más corto y el otro es que fluctúa. Digamos que tenemos una fábrica diseñada para producir 100 unidades al mes. La fábrica no tiene un único comprador a quien vender, ya que no se puede fiar de sus pedidos, y por lo tanto acepta encargos hasta que llega aproximadamente a la capacidad de producción de 100 unidades. Y entonces, de repente, uno de los compradores dice: «Eh, ¿sabes que en un principio dijimos que necesitábamos que fabricaras este pedido en dos semanas? Bueno, pues realmente necesitamos que lo tengas en una semana, porque esta camiseta en concreto se está vendiendo más rápidamente de lo previsto. Necesitamos acortar el plazo de entrega.»</p> <p>Entonces es cuando la fábrica suministradora, se ve obligada a trabajar horas adicionales. Tenemos gran cantidad de pruebas de este tipo de casos. Lo he visto con mis propios ojos en muchos lugares de Asia y también en América Desde la gerencia se cogen los megáfonos y se dice: «Lo sentimos, no os podéis ir a casa aún, debéis quedaros en la fábrica hasta que terminemos con este pedido.» Así que no hay ninguna estabilidad ni fiabilidad en los plazos de entrega. Y eso definitivamente tiene consecuencias.</p> <p><strong>BTS: ¿Qué crees que podría cambiar esta situación?</strong></p> <p>MA: La respuesta comienza en la parte superior de la cadena de suministro y requerirá forzar a las empresas líderes a modificar sus prácticas en un par de aspectos básicos.</p> <p>En primer lugar, respecto a la fijación de precios, debemos empezar con una mayor transparencia, y es necesario fijar unos precios sostenibles y justos. Los precios que pagan las empresas líderes deben cubrir al menos el coste del salario mínimo, de los subsidios de la seguridad social, las horas extras, edificios seguros y un impuesto nacional que proporcione algo a la sociedad en su conjunto.</p> <p>En segundo lugar, respecto al plazo de entrega y al abastecimiento, necesitamos que se fuerce a las empresas líderes a garantizar prácticas de producción <em>estables</em>. Ahora mismo, a las grandes empresas no les preocupa la estabilidad porque nadie les obliga a aplicar estas prácticas. Sin embargo, debe haber un estándar sobre el plazo de antelación mínimo que debe aplicar la empresa compradora para modificar los plazos de entrega de cualquier pedido. Necesitamos disponer de algún tipo de mecanismo vinculante que garantice que las empresas compradoras permanezcan con las proveedoras durante periodos de tiempo más largos. En resumen, debemos establecer reglas básicas que rijan cómo se lleva a cabo el negocio.</p> <p><strong>BTS: ¿Son estos los aspectos que te gustaría que se incluyeran en el próximo convenio sobre trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro?</strong></p> <p>MA: Sin duda. Es realmente importante. Por suerte, ahora nos encontramos en el largo camino para lograr un convenio, aunque aún estemos muy lejos de la meta. Pero estos son los aspectos que se deben incluir. Por supuesto es complicado regular la fijación de precios en un mercado libre. Pero un convenio podría exigir transparencia en la fijación de precios, y se podrían determinar los precios mediante la definición de un estándar. En un mercado libre está legalmente justificado decir que el precio pagado por &quot;x&quot; o &quot;y&quot; debe cubrir el coste básico de la producción, los salarios, las prestaciones sociales, etc.</p> <p><strong>BTS: ¿Y qué papel debería representar la OIT en el futuro?</strong></p> <p>MA: La OIT es imprescindible. Tiene el programa para el trabajo decente, que se está convirtiendo en un elemento definitorio de la organización. Se encuentra en un posición idónea para abordar los problemas que plantean las cadenas de suministro, y me gustaría verla en el núcleo de la gobernanza del mercado en el siglo XXI.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK AND ANDRÉ BROOME</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DAVID A. FEINGOLD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista-">¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Mark Anner BTS en Español Thu, 16 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Mark Anner 118026 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Shadows of slavery: refractions of the past, challenges of the present https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alice-bellagamba-marco-gardini-laura-menin/shadows-of-slavery-refractions-of-past-chal <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The past of slavery has many presents, and the present of exploitation many pasts. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery">This collection</a> brings together five years worth of research into how the legacies of 19th-century enslavement interact with contemporary bondage and exploitation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="https://cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/40978028724_26a16f9606_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Refraction. GETaiwan NTU/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ntugetaiwan/40978028724/in/photolist-25r67hC-3JccDL-4Fa7pG-rb6mkE-6t4xL4-4Bdxun-oxqQQR-bMuB1k-Djm9Ca-5wFoHL-f6UcNd-Jyjsb-e5GFMo-qrozXh-o9HSoP-jzM5C-abkWTh-a3xv4J-2jXoKY-52WiaD-hjUWmF-dmyA3e-o5KoPi-C9xuv-bBUPmh-ag3Jw-e5ttJK-8y9Dhg-5hSmS8-k9zqGV-dexVTf-8PhZDS-dijpa-7GXg69-CM5hZZ-oeo5v-5Vpni2-5mdqXy-7GTW8g-8sqgN7-2Ty2dq-ppRzon-5hSnop-3zGBD-6D7AuF-oib5B9-64wiKY-8XAfj7-92AQJQ-a9xone">CC (by-nc)</a></p> <p>Interest for slavery, the slave trade, and abolition has grown steadily since the 1990s, when UNESCO launched the <a href="http://www.unesco.org/new/en/social-and-human-sciences/themes/slave-route/">Slave Routes Project</a> in order to turn this past of violence and sufferance into a path to inter-cultural dialogue and collaboration. Historians, literary critics, feminist thinkers, political philosophers, sociologists, and anthropologists have all deepened our understanding of the key role slavery played in different periods of human history, and in the making of Western modernity. Public awareness has broadened through museum exhibitions and commemorative initiatives, as well as through a rising concern for forms of human bondage and exploitation that continue to thrive today. </p> <p>Emotionally and politically charged, the issue of ‘modern slavery’ has, over the past three decades, prompted a discussion on the present importance of past slave systems and the slave trade, and the historical roots of contemporary world inequalities. Everybody agrees on the need to explore these interconnections, but how to do it is a different issue entirely.</p> <p>Activists, governments, and international organisations engaged in the struggle against ‘human trafficking’ and ‘modern slavery’ have their own style. To rally political and popular support, they <a href="http://www.antitraffickingreview.org/index.php/atrjournal/article/view/260/244">draw heavily</a> on the iconography of the Atlantic slave trade. They celebrate the abolitionist traditions of the North Atlantic, and downplay the deep involvement of countries such as the United Kingdom into the global history of the slave trade. Moved by powerful motivations (to end slavery, to rescue humanity, and to protect the vulnerable victims), their approach echoes a benevolent paternalism that risks, paradoxically, perpetuating oppositional representations of the ‘civilised’ West and the ‘savage’ Rest, while <a href="https://glc.yale.edu/sites/default/files/pdf/bunting-quirk_contemporary_slavery_intro_rev.pdf">“tacitly minimizing, or otherwise legitimating, the much larger excesses of global capitalism”</a>.</p> <p>The conversations on slavery in the Global North and Global South are very different. While the Global North tends to emphasise its leading role in the nineteenth and twentieth century struggles against slavery, the regions of the Global South that experienced plantation slavery or served as slave-reservoirs for other areas of the world prefer to discuss reparation. This is a topic that always gets <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/joel-quirk/reparations-are-too-confronting-let%E2%80%99s-talk-about-%27modernday-slavery%27-instea">conveniently pushed into the corners of international politics</a> as the world leaps from one crisis to another. Even the expression ‘modern’ slavery, which <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyond-slavery-themes/msa-oral-history-project">the UK Modern slavery Act sanctioned in 2015</a>, is historically ambiguous. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/julia-oconnell-davidson/modern-slavery-response-to-rahila-gupta">North Atlantic slavery is ‘modern’</a> compared to that of Antiquity and the Mediterranean world; and the ‘modern’ slaveries of today are new in relation to the slave systems of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries that abolition wiped out. </p> <p>Establishing long term continuities in <a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2lN4rGTopsaaXhmX2hMSXVyRFE/view">today’s reductive anti-slavery rhetoric</a> displaces the causes of contemporary dehumanisation and exploitation into a remote and stereotyped past. At the same time, claiming discontinuity between the historical and the contemporary obscures the morphing of historical slavery into other types of unfreedoms, such as nineteenth century apprentice and indenture contracts in the Caribbean and Indian Ocean, or twentieth century social stigma, racial discrimination, and political marginality attached to slave ancestry.</p> <h2>Interrogating the present in light of the past</h2> <p><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery">This collection</a> is an outcome of five years of collective research and discussion aimed at bringing the legacies of nineteenth century enslavement together with examples of contemporary bondage and exploitation that may or may not fall under the rubric of ‘modern slavery’. It demonstrates one way of creating a contextually balanced understanding of how the past and present connect with each other, and do not. It interrogates, in the first place, which past matters in specific situations: is it the centuries-long past of the Atlantic slave trade, or the nineteenth century histories of regional and interregional enslavement?</p> <p>Between 2014 and 2018, under the auspices of the ERC grant ‘Shadows of Slavery in West Africa and Beyond (SWAB): a Historical Anthropology’ (Grant Agreement: 313737), a group of anthropologists directed by <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/alice-bellagamba">Alice Bellagamba</a> investigated the shadows of slavery, and their specific ethnographic manifestations, in Africa and beyond. In particular, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/marta-scaglioni">Marta Scaglioni</a>, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/valerio-colosio">Valerio Colosio</a>, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/marco-gardini">Marco Gardini</a>, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/alessandra-brivio">Alessandra Brivio</a>, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/laura-menin">Laura Menin</a>, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/antonio-de-lauri">Antonio De Lauri</a>, and <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/gloria-carlini">Gloria Carlini</a> carried out fieldwork in Southern Senegal, Tunisia, Chad, Madagascar, Ghana, Morocco, Pakistan, and Southern Italy. Other researchers have joined this conversation on the shadows of slavery with fresh case-studies from Mauritania (<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/e-ann-mcdougall">Ann McDougal</a>, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/giuseppe-maimone">Giuseppe Maimone</a>), Tanzania (<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/joanny-b-lair">Joanny Bélair</a>), Santo-Domingo (<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/ra-l-zecca-castel">Raul Zecca Castel</a>), Italy (<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/irene-peano">Irene Peano</a>), Costa Rica (<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/layla-zaglul">Layla Zaglul</a>), Yemen (<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/luca-nevola">Luca Nevola</a>), and the Emirates (<a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/bts-anonymous/the-multiple-roots-of-emiratiness">Anonymous</a>). Moreover, the contributions of <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/mike-dottridge">Michael Dottridge</a>, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/james-esson">James Esson</a>, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/nicola-phillips">Nicola Phillips</a>, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/benjamin-selwyn">Benjamin Selwyn</a>, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/susan-ferguson">Susan Ferguson</a> and <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/author/david-mcnally">David McNally</a> have provided a conceptual frame to deconstruct the common wisdom of capitalist development as gateway to freedom. </p> <p>All together, these contributions <a href="https://books.google.it/books?id=U6lqGeEfYNQC&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;source=gbs_ge_summary_r&amp;cad=0#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">‘descend’</a> into the everyday worlds of people who live the consequences of historical slave systems or who happen to find themselves ‘trapped’ in novel forms of socio-political inequality, racism, labour exploitation and sexual and moral violence. We seek to interrogate their stories in ways respectful of histories and contexts. Often, discussions on the continuities/discontinuities between ‘old’ and ‘modern’ slavery end up being constrained by terminological disputes, as if terminological clarification may clear consciences of the disquieting similarities (and differences) between yesterday’s slave systems and today’s examples of dehumanisation, indignity and exploitation.</p> <p>We engage with lexicons of slavery to disclose the shifting meanings and practices hidden behind contemporary usages of indigenous terms that, back in the nineteenth century, identified the slave in contexts such as Southern Senegal, Mauritania and Madagascar. We consider critically the notion of ‘modern’ slavery, and posit the relation between past and present as an ethnographic and theoretical question. For sure, the present appropriates the past if not for declared political agendas, at least to make sense of on-going processes. But the past weighs on the present of individuals and creates collectives by shaping habits, thoughts, and life paths either explicitly or implicitly. With <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery">this collection</a>, we begin to develop a comparative reflection on the multiple challenges the past of slavery and the slave trade poses to our understanding of present situations of discrimination, exploitation and unfreedom.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">The past of slavery has many presents, and the present of exploitation many pasts.</p> <h2>Lessons from the field</h2> <p>Our experience of interrogating the shadows of slavery in a variety of regions inside ad outside Africa has taught us three lessons. The first is the importance of listening to what the people who live the consequences of past slave systems or experience conditions close to ‘modern’ slavery have to say about their lives and trajectories. In the last decade, African slavery studies have taken great care in uncovering the perspective of the enslaved and their descendants, and have discussed at length <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sandra-e-greene/slaves-narratives-from-past">the potential and limits of this approach</a>.</p> <p>We have joined this effort by meeting people of alleged slave ancestry in Southern Senegal, Tunisia, Chad, Madagascar and Mauritania. It is alleged slave ancestry because, in the words of <a href="https://benedettarossicom.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/rossi-african-post-slavery-ijahs-2015.pdf">Benedetta Rossi</a>, there is often not direct evidence that these people hail from enslaved ancestors though they endure the consequences of being grouped among the slave descendants in societies in which these origins are liability.</p> <p>Which historical reading do they provide of their predicament? How has their understanding of slavery and freedom changed over time? Once we start approaching the past and the present of slavery ‘from below’ – from the perspectives of the people directly involved in these dynamics – we quickly found that focusing on evolving ideas of, and aspirations toward, freedom might be much more theoretically inspiring that academic discussions over whether or not this or that experience fits within the boundaries of ‘modern’ slavery.</p> <p>The second lesson is that the study of the past is illuminating only if we accept that its teachings are varied and disturbing. It does not provide clear-cut and definitive answers, but instead opens up further questions. There is not, in other words, one reassuring answer to the key question of the legacies of centuries-old histories of slavery and the slave trade in the contemporary world, but many different answers depending on the place and the history. This is perhaps because contingent and contextual dynamics of slavery and emancipation have left a highly diversified legacy, or legacies, that articulate at different levels. One single past of slavery can be at the source of multiple and diverging presents, as much as one present of exploitation can result from multiple past processes. </p> <p>The third and most important lesson is that we cannot fully understand the present manifestations of socioeconomic inequality, political marginalisation, and individual or group-based exploitation in contexts marked by past histories of slavery without historicising the ways a slave-dealing and slave-holding past refracts in post-slavery contexts. These refractions can be the result of explicit political efforts, and even misleading in terms of historical accuracy.</p> <p>Furthermore, we cannot fully understand the extent to which slavery continues to cast a shadow over the present if we lose sight of the global dynamics of poverty, of how entire regions have been re-structured to suit global economies, and of how certain modes of production require very specific ideas of the human being in order to function. Living in the shadows of slavery and the slave trade also means experiencing the lived effects of broader socio-political historical and contemporary dynamics – from the processes of colonisation and nation-state building to the impact of structural adjustment plans imposed by the World Bank and the subsequent neoliberal restructuring of economies and class structures worldwide.</p> <h2>Themes and contexts</h2> <p>Four major streams of discussion have attracted our attention for their potential in problematising the past and the present of slavery.</p> <p>The first, <strong>lives and experiences (part 1)</strong>, looks at the current predicament of people of slave ancestry and of people who dwell in, or hail from, regions that served as slave reservoirs for the African internal slave trade of the nineteenth century. Thanks to scholarly efforts, and the contribution of West African organisations such as the <a href="http://www.iramauritanie.org/">Initiative pour la résurgence du mouvement abolitionniste</a> in Mauritania, <a href="https://www.peaceinsight.org/conflicts/niger/peacebuilding-organisations/timidria/">Timidria</a> in Niger, and <a href="http://temedtkidal.unblog.fr/">Temedt</a> in Mali, the struggles of people of slave ancestry for social and political recognition have gained visibility over the last two decades. Other aspects, however, deserves attention. These include the effects of rural poverty on both slave and master descendants, the depreciative stereotypes attached to migrants hailing from former slave reservoirs, and the ways freedom is conceived of by people of alleged slave ancestry. Often, their emancipation has paved the way to other kinds of dependencies, which reframe freedom in terms of relatedness rather than individual autonomy.</p> <p>Our second stream, <strong>race, colour and origins in North Africa and the Middle East (part 2)</strong>, touches on the sensitive issue of the racial legacies of slavery in North Africa and the Middle East. This specific geographical focus enables us to grasp the multifaceted ways in which descent-based and racial discrimination have developed out of the ashes of historical slavery and the slave trade to involve also the people originally from areas of sub-Saharan Africa that served as historical slave reservoirs for North Africa. The crucial point is how these legacies combine with current political and social developments to create specific racial prejudice and racisms, as well as forms of activism and political awareness.</p> <p>The third stream, <strong>labour exploitation in global agriculture (part 3)</strong>, focuses on the working conditions and the dynamics of exploitation in the globalised agricultural sectors of Tanzania, the Dominican Republic, Italy, Costa Rica, Chad, and Madagascar. It brings together contributions that explore past and present causes of the everyday abuses experienced by migrants, women, small farmers, and sharecroppers who find themselves trapped on the wrong side of local and global agricultural labour chains. From the impact of current large scale agricultural investments to the long legacy of plantation systems that associated slavery with agriculture, from the gendered nature of labour exploitation to the forms of social and economic subordination experienced by slave descendants, migrants, and small farmers, the cases presented here illustrate how the shadows of slavery interlace with processes of capital accumulation to create a history of never-ending sufferance and misery. At the same time, these cases offer fresh ethnographic insights into the different, often hidden tactics that people activate in order to reinforce their rights or simply to survive.</p> <p>Last but not least, our fourth stream, <strong>global capitalism and modern slavery (Part 4)</strong>, focuses on the relationships between global capitalism and labour exploitation. It does this by exposing the limits of the category of ‘modern slavery’ in understanding the extent to which contemporary examples of unfreedom and labour exploitation are the result of a global system of production and capital accumulation. The common agenda of all our contributors is to show how the past of slavery has its many presents, and the present of exploitation its many pasts. It is precisely to the complex, and often unexpected, interweaving of historical and contemporary dynamics that <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery">this collection</a> is dedicated.</p> <h2>Acknowledgments</h2> <p>This editorial project, and the research leading to the contributions of Alice Bellagamba, Marta Scaglioni, Valerio Colosio, Marco Gardini, Alessandra Brivio, Laura Menin, Antonio De Lauri, and Gloria Carlini were funded by the European Research Council as part of the ERC project 313737: Shadows of Slavery in West Africa and Beyond: a historical anthropology. We wish to thank Giulio Cipollone, Sandra E. Greene, Bruce Hall, Eric Hahonou, Martin A. Klein, Baz Lecocq, Paul Lovejoy, Ann McDougal, Ismael Montana, Julia O’Connell Davidson, Benedetta Rossi, Joel Quirk, Cameron Thibos and all the &nbsp;Beyond Trafficking and Slavery team for the intellectual and moral support throughout these five long years. Without the assistance, the patience and the friendships of the many men and women we met while carrying out fieldwork in Africa and other regions of the world, the results we achieved would have been unthinkable. We thank them all. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery">This collection</a> is in memory of Ugo Fabietti. He established the study of cultural and social anthropology at the University of Milan-Bicocca; his contribution will continue to define our evolving field. His personal kindness, humor and sympathy will be with us always. </p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-anoth-sidebox"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>The shadows of slavery</strong></p> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alice-bellagamba/living-in-shadows-of-slavery">Living in the shadows of slavery</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALICE BELLAGAMBA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marta-scaglioni/emancipation-and-music-post-slavery-among-black-tunisians">Emancipation and music: post-slavery among black Tunisians</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARTA SCAGLIONI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/e-ann-mcdougall/life-in-nouakchott-is-not-true-liberty-not-at-all-living-legacies-of-s">‘Life in Nouakchott is not true liberty, not at all’: living the legacies of slavery in Nouakchott, Mauritania</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">E. ANN MCDOUGALL</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/valerio-colosio/memories-and-legacies-of-enslavement-in-chad">Memories and legacies of enslavement in Chad</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">VALERIO COLOSIO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/gloria-carlini/ghetto-ghana-workers-and-new-italian-slaves">Ghetto Ghana workers and the new Italian ‘slaves’</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GLORIA CARLINI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/antonio-de-lauri/brick-kiln-workers-and-debt-trap-in-pakistani-punjab">Brick kiln workers and the debt trap in Pakistani Punjab</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marco-gardini/malagasy-domestic-workers-from-slavery-to-exploitation-and-further-emanc">Malagasy domestic workers: from slavery to exploitation and further emancipation?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCO GARDINI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alessandra-brivio/kayaye-girls-in-accra-and-long-legacy-of-northern-ghanaian-slavery">Kayaye girls in Accra and the long legacy of northern Ghanaian slavery</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA BRIVIO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/laura-menin/racialisation-of-marginality-sub-saharan-migrants-stuck-in-morocco">The racialisation of marginality: sub-Saharan migrants stuck in Morocco</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LAURA MENIN</span><hr /> <p><strong>Shadows of slavery III: 'Blackness' in North Africa and the Middle East</strong></p> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/laura-menin/being-black-in-north-africa-and-middle-east">Being 'black' in North Africa and the Middle East</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LAURA MENIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/laura-menin/in-skin-of-black-senegalese-students-and-young-professionals-in-rabat">“In the skin of a black”: Senegalese students and young professionals in Rabat</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LAURA MENIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/luca-nevola/on-colour-and-origin-case-of-akhdam-in-yemen">On colour and origin: the case of the akhdam in Yemen</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LUCA NEVOLA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/giuseppe-maimone/are-haratines-black-moors-or-just-black">Are Haratines black Moors or just black?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GIUSEPPE MAIMONE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marta-scaglioni/she-is-not-abid-blackness-among-slave-descendants-in-southern-tunisia">“She is not a ‘Abid”: blackness among slave descendants in southern Tunisia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARTA SCAGLIONI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/bts-anonymous/the-multiple-roots-of-emiratiness">The multiple roots of Emiratiness: the cosmopolitan history of Emirati society</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BTS ANONYMOUS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alice-bellagamba/whom-should-i-marry-genealogical-purity-and-shadows-of-slavery-in-sou">Whom should I marry? Genealogical purity and the shadows of slavery in southern Senegal</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALICE BELLAGAMBA</span><hr /> <p><strong>Contemporary agriculture and the legacies of slavery</strong></p> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marco-gardini/struggling-on-wrong-side-of-chain-labour-exploitation-in-global-agricult">Struggling on the wrong side of the chain: labour exploitation in global agriculture</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCO GARDINI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/joanny-b-lair/agricultural-investments-in-tanzania-economic-opportunities-or-new-forms">Agricultural investments in Tanzania: economic opportunities or new forms of exploitation?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOANNY BÉLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/ra-l-zecca-castel/extorted-and-exploited-haitian-labourers-on-dominican-sugar-plantati">Extorted and exploited: Haitian labourers on Dominican sugar plantations</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">RAÚL ZECCA CASTEL</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/irene-peano/containment-resistance-flight-migrant-labour-in-agro-industrial-district-o">Containment, resistance, flight: Migrant labour in the agro-industrial district of Foggia, Italy</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">RAÚL ZECCA CASTEL</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/layla-zaglul/navigating-unsafe-workplaces-in-costa-rica-s-banana-industry">Navigating unsafe workplaces in Costa Rica’s banana industry</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LAYLA ZAGLUL</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/valerio-colosio/problem-of-working-for-someone-debt-dependence-and-labour-exploitation">The problem of “working for someone”: debt, dependence and labour exploitation in Chad</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">VALERIO COLOSIO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marco-gardini/working-for-former-masters-in-madagascar-win-win-game-for-former-slaves">Working for former masters in Madagascar: a ‘win-win’ game for former slaves?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCO GARDINI</span><hr /> <p><strong>Global capitalism and modern slavery</strong></p> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/michael-dottridge/eight-reasons-why-we-shouldn-t-use-term-modern-slavery">Eight reasons why we shouldn’t use the term ‘modern slavery’</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/antonio-de-lauri/brick-kiln-workers-and-debt-trap-in-pakistani-punjab">Brick kiln workers and the debt trap in Pakistani Punjab</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/james-esson/modern-slavery-child-trafficking-and-rise-of-west-african-football-academi">Modern slavery, child trafficking, and the rise of West African football academies</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES ESSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/gloria-carlini/ghetto-ghana-workers-and-new-italian-slaves">Ghetto Ghana workers and the new Italian ‘slaves’</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GLORIA CARLINI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/nicola-phillips/what-has-forced-labour-to-do-with-poverty">What has forced labour to do with poverty?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/benjamin-selwyn/harsh-labour-bedrock-of-global-capitalism">Harsh labour: bedrock of global capitalism</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/susan-ferguson-david-mcnally/capitalism%E2%80%99s-unfree-global-workforce">Capitalism’s unfree global workforce</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SUSAN FERGUSON and DAVID MCNALLY</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Laura Menin Marco Gardini Alice Bellagamba Wed, 15 Aug 2018 13:48:43 +0000 Alice Bellagamba, Marco Gardini and Laura Menin 119192 at https://www.opendemocracy.net ¿Promover el trabajo digno en las cadenas de suministro? Una entrevista a Benjamin Selwyn https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-selwyn/promover-el-trabajo-digno-en-las-cadenas-de-suministro-una-entrevista- <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Gobiernos, líderes empresariales y sindicatos de trabajo se reúnen para discutir sobre el trabajo decente en las cadenas mundiales de suministro. Entrevistamos al profesor Benjamin Selwyn, de Sussex, para saber por qué esto es tan importante. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/ilc/benjamin-selwyn/promoting-decent-work-in-supply-chains-interview-with-benjamin-selwyn">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/7873455530_bc577efbf6_k_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Workers unload coffee in Papua New Guinea. counterculturecoffee/Flickr. (CC 2.0 by-nc-nd)</p> <p><strong>BTS: Ben, usted ha hecho muchísimo trabajo sobre las cadenas de suministro y su rol en la estructura del capitalismo contemporáneo. Sus libros recientes también han sido muy críticos con la autoridades. ¿Cuáles son sus expectativas para la Conferencia Internacional del Trabajo de este año? ¿Se logrará algo positivo desde la perspectiva de los derechos de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores?</strong></p> <p>BS: El discurso institucional sobre las cadenas mundiales de producción —o, como las llaman algunas veces, «cadenas de valor mundiales» («GVC», por sus siglas en inglés) — es validado y promovido por un amplio espectro político. Es aceptado por instituciones como el Banco Mundial y la Organización Internacional del Trabajo. Y se construye sobre la base del supuesto de que con el desarrollo «todo el mundo gana».</p> <div style="width: 115px; float: right; padding-left: 10px;"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/selwyn.jpg" alt="" width="115" /><br /><span class="image-caption" style="margin-top: 0px; padding-top: 0px;">Benjamin Selwyn</span></div> <p>Ese discurso sostiene que la participación en las cadenas de valor mundiales puede ser bueno para las corporaciones transnacionales (que en su mayoría se encuentran radicadas en el Norte global) y para las empresas proveedoras y sus trabajadoras y trabajadores (que, en su mayoría, se encuentran en el Sur global). La idea es que, si las empresas proveedoras y sus trabajadoras y trabajadores pueden vincularse productivamente con «empresas líderes» como Apple o Walmart, ambas partes se beneficiarán por el aumento de la competitividad, la rentabilidad y el desarrollo.</p> <p>Pero el gran problema con ello es que ignora que la integración con las GVC a menudo está basada (y es propensa a reproducir) numerosas formas de pobreza. Por ejemplo, al observar las industrias textil, alimenticia y de alta tecnología, podemos ver que una enorme número de personas de clase trabajadora recibe una paga inferior a su costo de subsistencia. Y, por lo general, las trabajadoras y trabajadores deben hacer muchas horas extra solo para poder sobrevivir.</p> <p>Por lo tanto, una de mis esperanzas, es que la OIT reconozca que las GVC elogiadas por las instituciones dominantes como el Banco Mundial o publicaciones como <em>The Economist</em> no son simplemente sistemas neutrales de producción. Más bien, reproducen de forma sistemática mucha riqueza para una minoría muy pequeña de la población mundial y mucha pobreza para decenas de millones de personas. Un mejor término sería «cadena mundial de pobreza» (GPC), ¡y me encantaría ver a la OIT afirmando eso!</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Un mejor término sería «cadena mundial de pobreza», ¡y me encantaría ver a la OIT afirmando eso!</p> <p><strong>BTS: ¡Bueno, este sería un nuevo planteamiento, con seguridad! Y sé que usted no es la única persona dentro de la comunidad que aboga por la justicia social y los derechos de trabajadoras y trabajadores a quien le gustaría verlo. Pero, desde la perspectiva de la gobernanza, y teniendo en cuenta que la OIT no tilda a las GVC como GPC, ¿cómo cree que <em>debería</em> ser la gobernanza de la cadena mundial de producción?</strong></p> <p>BS: En la actualidad, las cadenas de producción están manejadas por empresas líderes para garantizar el tipo de producto, la calidad, el tiempo de entrega, y sobre todo, el precio. Una gran cantidad de estudios académicos y de la sociedad civil han documentado cómo las enormes ganancias de las empresas líderes están aseguradas gracias el pago de salarios de pobreza a trabajadoras y trabajadores que realizan su labor bajo condiciones arduas y peligrosas.</p> <p>Pero las cadenas de producción deberían estar regidas según el principio de «retribuciones justas». Bajo ese principio, las trabajadoras y los trabajadores recibirían salarios muchos más altos y las empresas líderes tendrían menos ganancias. Para lograr la gobernanza de la cadena de suministro basada en ese principio, tenemos que saber exactamente con cuánto «valor» contribuyen las trabajadoras y los trabajadores al producto final. Esta es un área en la que la OIT haría una contribución útil, puesto que es una de las pocas instituciones internacionales que se ocupa de los derechos de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores y que tiene la capacidad de investigación para producir ese tipo de conocimiento.</p> <p>En mi opinión, esto podría formar la base de un discurso alternativo sobre la globalización. Podría ser utilizado como parte de las estrategias políticas, educativas, de campaña y organizacionales dirigidas por las organizaciones de trabajo para exigir una mayor participación sobre el valor producido.</p> <p><strong>BTS: Bueno, a mí —y sospecho que a muchas de las personas que nos leen— definitivamente me gusta como suena eso. Una OIT sin cadenas puestas por los gobiernos y las organizaciones empresariales sin dudas podría ser una fuerza progresista en el mundo. Pero más tangiblemente, si pensamos que las empresas son prácticamente responsables y por lo tanto deberían <em>asumir </em>la responsabilidad por cosas como las condiciones de trabajo, ¿qué podemos hacer para promover su responsabilidad legal en las cadenas mundiales de suministro?</strong></p> <p>BS: La idea de la responsabilidad social corporativa (CSR) ha ganado mucho terreno durante las últimas dos décadas. Pero bajo la presión de la continua acumulación competitiva de capital, es poco probable que las corporaciones lleguen a regularse alguna vez hasta el punto en que empiecen a sacrificar las ganancias en beneficio de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores.</p> <p>La mejor esperanza para la fuerza de trabajo es que las organizaciones de trabajo estén bien informadas sobre cómo funcionan las cadenas mundiales de suministro y qué estrategias se pueden utilizar para presionar a las corporaciones para que concedan mejores condiciones de trabajo y salarios más elevados. Se trata de luchar. Y si bien la OIT puede jugar un papel importante en esa lucha, esto solo será posible si formula una concepción mas crítica de las GVC.</p> <p>Por ejemplo, la mayoría de las instituciones de desarrollo (incluida la OIT) sostienen que los salarios bajos en los países pobres persisten a causa de la baja productividad de las empresas. Pero esto no es verdad. Muchas industrias en el Sur global tienen niveles comparables de productividad con aquellos en el Norte global, pero florecer porque los salarios de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores son solo una fracción del salario de los del norte. El problema no es la rentabilidad, sino la estrategia de maximización de ganancias por parte de las empresas líderes.</p> <p>Si las trabajadoras y los trabajadores tuvieran un control significativamente mayor sobre los procesos de producción, de toma de decisiones y de gestión —o al menos de participación en ellos— podrían contribuir a la transformación de las «cadenas de pobreza globales» en vehículos para un desarrollo humano genuino. Para esto se necesita de un cambio fundamental en la balanza de las fuerzas de clase. Y lamentablemente, la OIT no considera que el cambio en las fuerzas de clase sea una prioridad o que sea incluso posible . Es por ello que apela a las corporaciones y a otras instituciones internacionales para una mejor regulación corporativa, incluso cuando sospecha que esto generará poco en términos de mejoras en las condiciones de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores.</p> <p><strong>BTS: Entonces, para usted, ¿el principal objetivo debería ser la organización proactiva de la clase trabajadora, al igual que contar con una estrategia para lograr el apoyo de la OIT?</strong></p> <p>BS: Definitivamente. Con demasiada frecuencia la OIT se remonta a una supuesta época dorada de corporativismo, donde los estados, empresas y sindicatos acordaban objetivos de productividad, condiciones de trabajo y salarios. Pero en la globalización contemporánea esto es solo un deseo. Sería mucho mejor que la OIT reconociera los beneficios de organizar la militancia de trabajadoras y trabajadores en busca de mejores condiciones.</p> <p>Hay muchos casos de supuestos «acuerdos progresistas» diseñados para contribuir simultáneamente con la competitividad a nivel de la empresa y mejorar las condiciones de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores. Uno de ellos es el acuerdo Mejores Fábricas Camboya, que buscaba establecer condiciones mínimas. Pero incluso con este acuerdo, las trabajadoras y los trabajadores se enfrentan a condiciones muy duras a cambio de salarios de pobreza.</p> <p>Por eso, los sindicatos militantes y los movimientos sociales fuertes son esenciales si es que las trabajadoras y los trabajadores quieren lograr cualquiera de los beneficios de empleo dentro de las GVC. Sin estos, las corporaciones siempre aprovecharán para quedarse con la mejor parte del valor producido dentro de ellas, y dejarán a las trabajadoras y los trabajadores con lo menos posible.</p> <p><strong>BTS: Entonces, ¿cuál es su visión acerca del llamado de ciertos sindicatos o movimientos sociales para que se realice una convención internacional vinculante sobre responsabilidad corporativa para normas de trabajo en las cadenas de suministro? ¿Vale la pena? ¿O es una pérdida de tiempo?</strong></p> <p>En mi opinión, el equilibrio de poder contemporáneo global —donde las corporaciones monopolizan la mayoría del valor creado dentro de la GVC y donde las instituciones internacionales proclaman las virtudes de un sistema de mercado relativamente libre— sugiere que cualquier beneficio para las trabajadoras y los trabajadores en una convención internacional vinculante será relativamente mínimo.</p> <p>Por lo tanto, preferiría que todos nosotros (en especial la OIT) tratáramos de movilizar a la opinión pública sobre la naturaleza explotadora y generadora de pobreza de las GVC. Es crucial que construyamos una campaña ideológica para legitimar una concepción radicalmente distinta de la influencia de la trabajadora y el trabajador dentro de las cadenas de valor mundiales.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK AND ANDRÉ BROOME</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DAVID A. FEINGOLD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda-">Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Benjamin Selwyn BTS en Español Wed, 15 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Benjamin Selwyn 118839 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Las trabajadoras y trabajadores del ladrillo y la trampa de la deuda en Punyab, Pakistán https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/antonio-de-lauri/las-trabajadoras-y-trabajadores-del-ladrillo-y-la-trampa-de-la-deuda- <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>La deuda es una herramienta usada en todos lados como forma de control social; también en la fabricación de ladrillos en Punyab, Pakistán, donde pasa de generación en generación. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/antonio-de-lauri/brick-kiln-workers-and-debt-trap-in-pakistani-punjab">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u561905/WP_20151101_019-w920.jpg" width="920" height="517" alt="WP_20151101_019-w920.jpg" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Photo by author. All rights reserved.</p> <p>Las fábricas de ladrillos del sur y centro de Asia han llamado la atención de las agencias humanitarias, el activismo y la academia como sitios de explotación laboral severa. Los trabajadores y trabajadoras de estas fábricas son descritas como «<a href="http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2014/07/pakistan-kiln-workers-live-like-slaves-20147212238683718.html">esclavas y esclavos</a> modernos» que necesitan ser <a href="http://www.freetheslaves.net/tag/brick-kiln-slavery/%20%5D.">salvados</a>. Pero hemos de ir más allá de esta versión simplista del «paradigma victimizador» para poder entender la <a href="http://www.shadowsofslavery.org/publications/SWAB-WPS_1-2015_debtor_forever.pdf"><em>naturaleza social</em></a> de la servidumbre y para situar esta misma en el contexto social y global de los sistemas de dominación y dependencia. Esto es lo que propongo en las próximas 1000 palabras; usando como caso de estudio una de las fábricas de ladrillos que investigué en las áreas pakistaníes de Gujrat, Islamaban y Rawalpindi en 2015 y 2016. Primero debemos entender el papel crucial de la deuda como un engranaje del capitalismo y las formas en las que esta restringe las opciones del llamado trabajo «libre».</p> <h2>La servidumbre por deudas y el crecimiento del capitalismo indio.</h2> <p>La academia del sur de Asia está dividida sobre cuándo y cómo el capitalismo se arraigó en la India colonial (de la cual Pakistán formaba parte), aunque la mayoría está de acuerdo en que ya era una realidad a finales del siglo XIX. Uno de sus distintivos en el sector agrícola e industrial fue el aumento de las horas de trabajo junto a la reducción de los salarios por hora provocado por la imposición de la deuda.</p> <p>Se concedieron préstamos a las trabajadoras y los trabajadores en el «mercado del crédito» a un precio extremadamente alto que liquidaban con los bajos salarios que obtenían en el mercado laboral. Los salarios se mantuvieron bajos de forma artificial para asegurar el desarrollo de un ciclo que uniera deuda con dependencia laboral. Las trabajadoras y los trabajadores se endeudaron «voluntariamente» para cubrir su supervivencia y debían aceptar trabajos con paga baja «de forma voluntaria» para hacer frente a su endeudamiento. Este flujo de demanda tanto de crédito como de salario fue continuo, y la deuda se convirtió en un aspecto crucial en la creación y el mantenimiento del capitalismo en el subcontinente.</p> <h2>La vida y la deuda actual en la fabricación de ladrillos.</h2> <p>Las repercusiones de estas dinámicas pueden verse hoy en las fábricas de ladrillo pakistaníes. Mi investigación se centra en las personas que están en lo más bajo de la jerarquía de la fabricación de ladrillos, gente que trabaja por piezas hechas para saldar la deuda acumulada con el dueño de la fábrica. Esta deuda viene camuflada como «adelanto» (<a href="http://www.punjablabour.gov.pk/article/detail/23"><em>peshgi</em></a>) que la gente solicita para pagar cosas como matrimonios, tratamientos de enfermedades o para comprar bienes como motocicletas. Aunque la deuda es mantenida por una sola persona, <em>todas</em> las personas que viven en la casa están involucradas en producir ladrillos para liquidarla. Y puesto que las familias afrontan deducciones regulares como parte de la amortización de la deuda, a veces están obligadas a pedir adelantos adicionales asegurando que el <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYqtxt2ri8Y">ciclo</a> de la deuda se transfiera de generación en generación.</p> <p>Faisal es un ejemplo de este endeudamiento. Conocí a Faisal en octubre del 2015 en una fábrica cerca de Rawalpindi. Tenía 41 años y me dijo que había estado viviendo en fábricas de ladrillos durante 25. Su hijo y dos hijas han crecido en esas fábricas con él. «No me di cuenta de que no era una persona libre» dijo, «hasta que le pedí un segundo préstamo al dueño de la fábrica. Era joven y necesitaba el dinero porque mi padre no tenía trabajo... No hay otra forma de conseguir dinero para personas como nosotros».</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">«No me di cuenta de que no era una persona libre» dijo, «hasta que le pedí un segundo préstamo al dueño de la fábrica.</p> <p>La falta de una protección básica en lo social y económico, junto a la imposibilidad de acceder a crédito, son los prerrequisitos fundamentales de este tipo de dependencia-deuda. La historia de Faisal es solo un ejemplo, como la de Syeda. Syeda es una chica de 18 años que conocí en una fábrica en Gujrat en junio del 2015. «En Pakistán» dijo, «en cuanto pides un crédito, te conviertes en una deudora para siempre. A nadie le importa. Pedimos créditos para poder sobrevivir». Cuando la volví a ver en febrero del 2016, estaba embarazada: «he de seguir trabajando» me dijo, «aunque me cueste más ahora».</p> <p>Ya que la deuda domina todo el futuro de gente como Faisal y Syeda, es justo decir que su propio futuro está encadenado. Pero como dijo Seyda: «si no fuera por la fábrica, ¿cómo podría permitirme tener un hijo? Es una mala vida. Pero al menos es una vida». Este tipo de relaciones <em>pueden</em> dar una cierta seguridad en situaciones de pobreza absoluta e inseguridad, y hace que las trabajadoras y los trabajadores intercambian su servilismo por protección.</p> <h2>Deuda: una relación social</h2> <p>Y, aun así, el panorama completo de la servidumbre por deudas bajo el capitalismo solo puede surgir cuando nuestro análisis recupera «lo social». «<em>Pesghi</em> es la única posibilidad que tenemos para cumplir con nuestros deberes en la sociedad» me explicó Faisal. «Hay varios problemas en los que pensar, la <em><a href="https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Siwan_Anderson/publication/4866043_The_Economics_of_Dowry_Payments_in_Pakistan/links/542d831c0cf277d58e8ccdc7.pdf">dote</a></em> es uno de ellos». En su caso, también tenía que preocuparse de las remesas y del futuro de sus hijas e hijos. Estos deberes socio-culturales requieren dinero, y cuando eres demasiado pobre o estás demasiado excluida o excluido para acceder al dinero, necesitas endeudarte.</p> <p>Los factores socio-culturales también pueden observarse en otras dinámicas. En Rawalpindi, el dueño de una fábrica me dijo: «las personas inmigrantes y las familias de casta baja tienden a aceptar las condiciones de trabajo que las personas locales rechazan. Están dispuestas a vivir de una forma que otras personas considerarían inaguantable». En muchas ocasiones esto incluye estar terriblemente endeudadas y que esa misma deuda condicione su trabajo. En parte, este es el resultado de la pobreza en la comunidad migrante y la casta baja. Pero no se debe únicamente a esto. Las familias de casta baja, por ejemplo, también afrontan inmovilidad social debido a su estatus y la deuda les da una alternativa a pedir en las calles. Las personas migrantes, por otra parte, utilizan la fábrica de ladrillos como una alternativa a la agricultura, pero su aislamiento social y económico refuerza la relación para con la deuda que acumulan.</p> <h2>Libertad de ficción</h2> <p>La deuda, en sí misma, no conlleva a la servidumbre. Este tipo de explotación es potenciado por la forma en la que el endeudamiento interactúa con la incertidumbre social, legal y económica y con las desigualdades e injusticias culturales. En situaciones de vulnerabilidad y marginalidad sociales, la deuda puede significar la frontera entre la «libertad» de elección de una persona y una vida sin libertad. Parafraseando a Marx, las personas pueden «elegir» su endeudamiento, pero no lo hacen en condiciones producidas por ellas mismas.</p> <p>Esto es lo que se esconde tras la narrativa de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores «que se endeudan voluntariamente en deudas que deben pagar», que es lo que habitualmente se escucha entre quien poseen las fábricas. Esa moralidad monetaria-individual oscurece la forma en la que «la servidumbre moderna» está implantada en las redes de desigualdad social local con implicaciones y conexiones globales. Alguien llamada «persona libre» puede crear su deuda usando el sistema de préstamos y «anticipos». Pero haciendo eso, juega un micro papel en un macro contexto de injusticia y dependencia. Las personas expertas en esclavitud moderna harían bien en tener esto en cuenta.</p> <p><em>La investigación para este ensayo fue llevaba a cabo en el marco del ERC GRANT 313737 - Shadows of Slavery in West Africa and Beyond. A Historical Anthropology (<a href="http://www.shadowsofslavery.org/%22%20%5Ct%20%22_blank">www.shadowsofslavery.org</a>)</em></p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/lucha-contra-la-trata-de-personas-encubrimiento-de-los-programas-de-luc">Lucha contra la trata de personas: encubrimiento de los programas de lucha contra la inmigración</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK AND ANDRÉ BROOME</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DAVID A. FEINGOLD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza">¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Antonio De Lauri BTS en Español Tue, 14 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Antonio De Lauri 118838 at https://www.opendemocracy.net ¿Qué tiene que ver el trabajo forzoso con la pobreza? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nicola-phillips/qu-tiene-que-ver-el-trabajo-forzoso-con-la-pobreza <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Las mediciones de la pobreza basadas en los ingresos no son fiables para determinar qué personas son más vulnerables al trabajo forzoso. Es necesaria una comprensión más minuciosa de la vulnerabilidad para reducir de manera eficaz el trabajo forzoso en la economía mundial. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/nicola-phillips/what-has-forced-labour-to-do-with-poverty">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/9317170534_600e946256_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Harvesting sugar cane in India. AIDSVaccine/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/iavi_flickr/9317170534/in/photolist-fcjWch-6U6EmD-5qRpKH-5r8oDQ-dyVNKy-e9egAN-e98zLH-5qRpPv-5r43Ri-7sWGUg-9PYQt1-9NMHL8-9NTvZe-mMJxok-7sWELe-9uEip6-BsepXx-cC7kB-2J6tPd-ALfkuN-9aCydT-9tLiYM-rniYM2-qeFTma-96SGFx-9tLh4t-9u9MjR-mMydG-dgz9DT-2J6uSh-nzMSz6-8zjcX6-bu9FfF-9ucLvQ-bXWE8q-7vSdhD-9uVufa-pXi5ZE-9NWmUs-9fXb6-qeFBRc-9v9jmi-92CVp3-8oJ3Hr-wvUWSi-nzuTbM-kKzCr-dQC67o-9u9Nyx-7YBF9k">CC (by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p>¿Quién es vulnerable al trabajo forzoso y por qué? Si le hiciéramos esta pregunta a un grupo de personas elegidas al azar, tanto si estuvieran bien informadas sobre el trabajo forzoso como si no, muchas mencionarían inmediatamente la pobreza; y tendrían razón al hacerlo. Por intuición, parece obvio que las personas que viven en condiciones de acuciante necesidad económica permanente son más vulnerables a los diferentes medios por los que son engañadas y explotadas en condiciones de trabajo forzoso en todo el mundo.</p> <p>Los estudios disponibles confirman esta intuición. Por las <a href="http://www.ilo.org/sapfl/Informationresources/Factsheetsandbrochures/WCMS_181921/lang--en/index.htm">últimas estimaciones</a> sabemos que el trabajo forzoso se encuentra con más frecuencia (pero no exclusivamente) en las regiones relativamente más pobres, como el sur de Asia, y en las zonas más pobres de los diferentes países. Un <a href="http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/@ed_norm/@declaration/documents/statement/wcms_096992.pdf">estudio</a> llevado a cabo en Pakistán concluyó que el 66 por ciento de las familias rurales de la provincia meridional de Sindh vivían en condiciones de extrema pobreza, y casi todas ellas eran aparceras y labradoras sometidas a condiciones de servidumbre.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.capturingthegains.org/publications/workingpapers/wp_201316.htm">Los estudios sobre familias</a> de la India también muestran que las que tienen mayores niveles de ingresos tienen una menor probabilidad de usar o vender el trabajo de sus hijas e hijos.</p> <p>Aunque, en realidad, la situación no es tan sencilla. Existen nuevos estudios sobre los vínculos entre el trabajo forzoso y la pobreza en la economía mundial, pero lo poco que sabemos sugiere que la situación es más compleja y variada de lo que solemos pensar. Mis colegas investigadoras e investigadores y yo, por ejemplo, nos hemos centrado en Brasil.&nbsp;<a href="http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12116-012-9101-z">Recientemente, analizamos datos</a> sobre más de 21.000 personas liberadas de condiciones similares a la esclavitud (terminología preferida en Brasil y utilizada en la legislación pertinente) en el sector agrícola entre 2003 y 2010. Vinculamos esa información con nuestras conversaciones tanto con trabajadoras y trabajadores como con las personas implicadas en el extenso programa contra la esclavitud de Brasil. Una de las conclusiones más llamativas a las que llegamos fue que las personas con mayor probabilidad de trabajar en condiciones similares a la esclavitud no son las más pobres entre las pobres.</p> <p>Al contrario, tienden a pertenecer a la categoría de «trabajadoras y trabajadores pobres». Se trata de personas de todo el mundo que viven por encima del umbral de la pobreza extrema de 1,25 USD al día, generalmente a niveles de salario mínimo o ligeramente por debajo (aunque, a veces, por encima). De hecho, el número de personas que vive entre los umbrales de pobreza de 1,25 USD y 2 USD al día —la clasificación utilizada por el Banco Mundial— se duplicó entre 1981 y 2008. No es ninguna coincidencia que nuestra investigación hallara indicadores de enorme vulnerabilidad al trabajo forzoso en esta categoría, incluyendo el sector agrícola brasileño.</p> <p>El otro motivo para este patrón de vulnerabilidad es sencillo. Las encargadas y los encargados de la contratación de personal, y las empresarias y empresarios del sector agrícola, buscan trabajadoras y trabajadores (la mayoría de las veces varones jóvenes entre 18 y 34 años) con la forma física necesaria para resistir el trabajo manual más intenso. No buscan personas indigentes con desnutrición crónica.</p> <p>Nuestra investigación también reveló dos factores que fueron más importantes en este contexto que los niveles de pobreza basados en el ingreso. El primero fue la educación: en los datos que analizamos, el 68 por ciento de las personas que trabajaban eran analfabetas o no contaban con más de cuatro años de escolarización. El segundo fue la inseguridad económica, donde la disponibilidad de trabajo es errática y los ingresos son precarios. En otras palabras, la clave es la inseguridad y la imprevisibilidad de los ingresos, no el nivel general de los mismos.</p> <p>En otros entornos, la situación es diferente. La mayoría de las víctimas de la trata de personas para el trabajo forzoso en países como el Reino Unido tampoco son las extremadamente pobres, y rara vez son las que cuentan con menor grado de educación. La investigación sobre los patrones de migración globales ayuda a explicar por qué esto es así. Las personas más pobres entre las pobres son las que menos se mueven debido a la falta de recursos para ello. La tendencia a emigrar aumenta con la educación, pero las trabajadoras y los trabajadores inmigrantes suelen acabar en puestos de trabajo muy por debajo de su <a href="http://www.migrationobservatory.ox.ac.uk/briefings/characteristics-and-outcomes-migrants-uk-labour-market">nivel educativo</a> y su <a href="http://www.migrationpolicy.org/pubs/credentialing-strategies.pdf">formación</a>.</p> <p>Así, puesto que la trata de personas suele comenzar con la decisión de un individuo de emigrar, se puede dar por sentado que las víctimas de la trata de personas suelen ajustarse a este perfil. Pueden ser relativamente pobres o con un grado relativamente menor de educación, pero no es raro que tengan formación universitaria. En estos supuestos, las fuentes de vulnerabilidad podrían en cambio ser la falta de oportunidades de empleo o de salarios dignos, junto con una amplia gama de otras formas de deprivación social y personal.</p> <p>¿Qué nos indica todo esto y por qué es importante? Nos indica que el trabajo forzoso está profundamente conectado con la pobreza; pero definir la pobreza en términos de ingresos, y sobre todo centrarse en la pobreza extrema y la indigencia, a menudo puede ser una guía poco fiable para saber quiénes son las personas más vulnerables y por qué.</p> <p>La pobreza tiene muchas otras dimensiones: educación, oportunidad, acceso a servicios y redes de seguridad social, derechos de mujeres y niñas, acceso a un trabajo y salario dignos, y muchos otros problemas de «desarrollo humano». Cuál de estas está más estrechamente vinculada con los patrones de esclavitud varía en diferentes contextos y para diferentes grupos de personas.</p> <p>Esto es importante porque las respuestas políticas efectivas dependen del conocimiento de estas variaciones. Hay quien pide que el trabajo forzoso se integre mejor en las estrategias nacionales e internacionales de reducción de la pobreza. Así debería ser, ya que la inclusión del trabajo forzoso en las prioridades y la legislación nacional es un prerrequisito indispensable para resolver el problema del trabajo forzoso y la esclavitud en la economía mundial. Sin embargo, al hacerlo debemos desviar el enfoque de las medidas centradas en el nivel de ingresos y la pobreza extrema, y, por consiguiente, abrir las estrategias de reducción de la pobreza a un conocimiento más preciso y matizado de la vulnerabilidad y el trabajo forzoso. Las políticas de protección social centradas en las familias con los ingresos más bajos tienen poca probabilidad de surtir efecto sobre la vulnerabilidad de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores a los trabajos forzosos. De hecho, tales políticas pueden acabar teniendo un efecto opuesto y aumentar la vulnerabilidad de dichas personas, lo que provocaría que las redes de seguridad social no surtiesen efecto y que acabasen dependiendo más de trabajos de alto nivel de explotación. Las estrategias más efectivas en este panorama pueden estar relacionadas con la educación, las competencias y las políticas del mercado laboral.</p> <p>El reto, y es bastante grande tanto para la investigación como para la política, es descubrir qué formas de pobreza, en qué contextos, hacen a las personas más vulnerables al trabajo forzoso, y elaborar las estrategias apropiadas sobre esa base. Una vez más, un único modelo no engloba a todo el mundo.&nbsp;</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gallagher/trata-de-personas-de-la-indignaci-n-la-acci-n">Trata de personas: de la indignación a la acción</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/lucha-contra-la-trata-de-personas-encubrimiento-de-los-programas-de-luc">Lucha contra la trata de personas: encubrimiento de los programas de lucha contra la inmigración</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK AND ANDRÉ BROOME</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DAVID A. FEINGOLD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Nicola Phillips BTS en Español Mon, 13 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Nicola Phillips 118837 at https://www.opendemocracy.net La mano de obra del mundo, prisionera del capitalismo https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/susan-ferguson-david-mcnally/la-mano-de-obra-del-mundo-prisionera-del-capitalismo <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>La migración neoliberal y los regímenes fronterizos ejemplifican un régimen <em>de facto</em> de trabajos forzosos. La migración se ha convertido en un elemento clave para proporcionar mano de obra precarizada al capital, aunque durante mucho tiempo el motor más valioso del capitalismo global han sido los trabajos forzosos. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/susan-ferguson-david-mcnally/capitalism%E2%80%99s-unfree-global-workforce">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/9732645396_1bca496ff1_k.jpg" width="920" height="615" alt="9732645396_1bca496ff1_k615h.jpg" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Rukesh Dutta/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/rukesh_dutta/9732645396/in/photolist-fQ3moY-bjUkXd-dz2PuC-FjCCcR-52r1RU-52mLbz-7SWtyJ-7STbJx-7SWtCS-bJVXAn-bJVXoZ-bJVXt2-dD4UHa-bJVXmH-bw2c5S-ftJPEm-bw2cqN-bw2ccW-bJVXxe-e5eGaD-bJVXE8-bw2c4U-bJVXCD-oGvaLC-f4CQdt-2EboQw-2E6Xnp-6Cw2cd-Xqbvuj-9AKWpf-6KAHTG-92icZ3-rxaEUF-92XtUv-bPwGae-87BF8n-87ET8y-56poR8-6mccKv-6mgmNf-6mchjt-6mcdAM-6mcgLa-24Feos-K9kxeX-5nxVaw-5nxVB3-5ntF3V-xxqmY-gAHci">CC (by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p>Nuevas formas de trabajos forzosos han proliferado en las últimas décadas ocultas tras la retórica de los mercados libres. Los millones de trabajadoras y trabajadores migrantes precarios que realizan los trabajos más duros en hogares, campos, hoteles y zonas de construcción representan solo la versión más reciente de un proceso centenario que ha visto cómo decenas de millones de personas eran expoliadas y luego trasplantadas para trabajar en minas, proyectos ferroviarios, plantaciones y fábricas clandestinas. Desde la captura y venta de 12 millones de personas africanas transportadas a América hasta la conocida migración culí —que, a partir de 1880, movió a no menos de 17 millones de hombres y mujeres indias y de otras regiones de Asia que fueron sometidas a una situación de esclavitud—, la gente pobre que habita fuera del corazón del capitalismo ha sido siempre el alimento de la industria y el comercio modernos. Sin embargo, se pensaba que la Segunda Guerra Mundial y el régimen de los derechos humanos (DDHH), que emergieron durante las décadas de 1940 y 1950, lo habían cambiado todo al prohibir expresamente las prácticas esclavistas en varias cartas internacionales, recoger derechos fundamentales y abrir el camino hacia la obtención de la ciudadanía en países «de acogida» del Norte global.</p> <p>Si bien sabemos que estos gobiernos mantienen una retórica de apoyo a dichos principios, la realidad de sus prácticas es diametralmente opuesta. El actual sistema neoliberal sostenido por el trabajo de personas migrantes —firmemente afianzado gracias a las democracias liberales y que es fundamental para la continua expansión del capitalismo— es un régimen <em>de facto</em> de trabajos forzosos. Es al mismo tiempo producto directo de la expulsión de millones de personas de sus tierras en el sur y de la demanda masiva en el norte de suministros de fuerza de trabajo barata. El capital no quiere solo trabajadoras y trabajadores, sino mano de obra precaria y con salarios bajos. La migración y los regímenes fronterizos son eficaces en esta labor, ya que a la gente que cruza las fronteras o emigra internamente hacia zonas liberalizadas se le priva sistemáticamente de su derecho a votar, cambiar de empresa, afiliarse a un sindicato o acceder a los sistemas educativo y sanitario. También se aprovecha la amenaza constante de deportación para garantizar la observancia de estas condiciones. Además de facilitar la explotación severa de trabajadores y trabajadoras migrantes, este sistema castiga también a la mano de obra ciudadana, que ve rebajada sus demandas y expectativas recordándole que siempre puede ser sustituida por migrantes vulnerables.</p> <p>La piedra angular de este sistema es el continuo trasvase transnacional de las vidas de trabajadoras y trabajadores migrantes que hace que sus costes de reproducción a corto y largo plazo sean irrisorios. Para este reajuste es crucial separar radicalmente el sitio de acumulación de capital (el lugar de trabajo) del sitio de renovación de mano de obra (principalmente hogares en sus países de origen). Los países receptores del norte no tienen que pagar un solo céntimo para dar cobertura sanitaria, formación y educación a las trabajadoras y trabajadores migrantes antes de su llegada y después pagan el mínimo indispensable. Mientras tanto, las remesas que las personas migrantes devuelven con su trabajo—valoradas formalmente <a href="http://econ.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/EXTDEC/EXTDECPROSPECTS/0,,contentMDK:22759429~pagePK:64165401~piPK:64165026~theSitePK:476883,00.html#Remittances">en 530 mil millones USD en todo el mundo en 2012</a> y de las que dependen 500 millones de personas en el planeta— son vitales para la supervivencia de sus familiares. Son esenciales incluso para las economías de algunos países de origen: la exportación de fuerza de trabajo hacia el Norte global es ahora usada como política de ‘desarrollo’ en lugares como Filipinas y México, que a su vez sufren la pérdida de millones de personas formadas y cualificadas. Así, las empresas del Norte, apoyadas por políticas creadas con el único objetivo de exportar gente, no solo tienen acceso a una mano de obra cuya reproducción no implica coste alguno, sino que además, los salarios enviados a sus hogares una vez que las trabajadoras y trabajadores de bajo coste hayan emigrado permiten la reproducción barata de la siguiente generación de potenciales trabajadoras y trabajadores migrantes.</p> <p>Este sistema de reproducción social reajustado desde el punto de vista del espacio, evoluciona dentro de un orden racializado y de género que devalúa y deshumaniza a las trabajadoras y trabajadores migrantes. La organización jerárquica del capitalismo global aprovecha las diferencias inherentes a los orígenes geográficos y sociales de las personas trabajadoras migrantes, proceso que se intensifica mediante normativas que bloquean la obtención de la ciudadanía en los países receptores. La abyección social resultante es expresada de diversas maneras, incluso mediante <a href="http://www.fortmcmurraytoday.com/2013/10/07/canadian-employees-replaced-with-temporary-foreign-workers">pánico moral</a>, que a menudo hace uso de discursos racistas sobre las trabajadoras y los trabajadores migrantes que ‘quitan’ el trabajo a la población ciudadana. Asimismo, la figura de la mujer emigrante es generalmente sexualizada —tanto si su empleo se desarrolla como trabajadora del hogar en casas de clase media y alta, en maquiladoras o dentro del comercio sexual— (ej. pruebas habituales de embarazo, trabajos ordinarios ‘apropiados’ para mujeres y la intimidación por parte de supervisores masculinos). Estas mujeres, que son despojadas de sus derechos reproductivos y del derecho a asistencia sanitaria, cohibidas por la amenaza de la deportación, son especialmente vulnerables ante posibles agresiones sexuales o abusos, debido a la falta de regulación en sus lugares de trabajo y al cambio en las convenciones de género —tal es el caso de las mujeres que trabajan en las maquiladoras.</p> <p>Cabe enfatizar que esta degradación social tiene una profunda conexión con las condiciones del régimen neoliberal de las migraciones. Basado en el expolio y en la negación de los derechos básicos, este régimen garantiza a las trabajadoras y trabajadores migrantes una vida atormentada, llena de tensión e inseguridad Para el capitalismo, son los sujetos ideales: mano de obra barata formada por personas racializadas y feminizadas disponibles para ser ferozmente explotadas.</p> <p>Esto no es nada nuevo. El capitalismo siempre ha dependido de procesos sociales de abyección que frecuentemente se han asegurado y perpetuado en y a través de sistemas de trabajo forzoso y migración. Por mucho que intentemos pensar en estas épocas de trabajo forzoso como puntos críticos para el establecimiento histórico del capitalismo, el momento que estamos viviendo pone en evidencia que la esclavitud no es una reliquia del pasado. De hecho, no es que el capital dependa cada vez más de la migración, sino que depende específicamente del flujo transnacional de personas que se ven privadas de la plena ciudadanía, personas que constituyen en diversos grados una mano de obra sin libertad. A pesar de todo, como hicieron las personas esclavizadas de África, o las trabajadoras y trabajadores culíes antes que ellas, la gente sigue encontrando vías para organizarse, resistir y recuperar su dignidad frente a la dura opresión.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gallagher/trata-de-personas-de-la-indignaci-n-la-acci-n">Trata de personas: de la indignación a la acción</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/lucha-contra-la-trata-de-personas-encubrimiento-de-los-programas-de-luc">Lucha contra la trata de personas: encubrimiento de los programas de lucha contra la inmigración</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK AND ANDRÉ BROOME</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DAVID A. FEINGOLD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios">Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta David McNally Susan Ferguson BTS en Español Thu, 09 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Susan Ferguson and David McNally 117611 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Stealing a dream: young migrants living through anti-immigrant times https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/les-back-and-shamser-sinha/stealing-dream-young-migrants-living-through-anti-immigrant <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the cacophony of opinion surrounding the ‘migrant crisis’ those least heard are young migrants themselves. Les Back and Shamser Sinha have spent ten years listening to those voices in London, which they’ve now collected into the book <em>Migrant City</em>.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/12674767973_3275a59fcd_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;"> Lena Vasiljeva/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/94150506@N08/12674767973/in/photolist-kj2uWi-qjWzRp-9RhMDx-Nv4wVJ-dgf9xL-arnpjF-nr8RuF-u3kzjJ-RnHA5y-39td2p-EA1j6u-5VbujW-e8aD78-99WK9X-ojQ9HZ-QGAvJS-ihjYnM-nSfiHq-nHmXXV-JjyfcG-fQkxPz-VYopA3-scsF8U-mMc9ai-S9opq9-QbCyki-EC5iV3-ibsbjy-8bNSbx-JhFyHD-24z5j6C-22K6Ccm-bT2Svr-bpGSh6-zhaxxH-xSzJU5-f8sCp4-amgr3P-o3yj6K-EZoGPu-vfFdSy-qR8e63-HiMLsH-e3fzmJ-27BQbNj-sXpLgT-HBKBxY-UDJ4Mw-jEmKUg-hLPhsZ">CC (by-nc)</a></p> <p>London is a city of migration and this is not only because the person you walk past in the street, or who is standing at the bus stop, has journeyed here from somewhere else. It is much more than both this and the superficial idea that the capital has breached a particular threshold, or measure, of cultural diversity. The language of ‘diversity’ – be it in academic circles or economic city branding or political slogans – renders the experiences we are concerned with in this book into a succession of surface clichés or flat travesties.&nbsp; Rather, we argue, migrant experiences – if you really listen to them – tell us something defining about the global co-ordinates and historical composition of the city itself. In the biographies of the lives described in this book the traces can be found of the relationship between London and the wider world, historically, economically and politically. We have not only tried to portray London through the eyes and ears of young migrants, we contend that their story – migrant’s stories – are themselves London’s story. </p> <p>Vlad, who came to Britain from Albania as a child refugee and crossed the channel smuggled underneath a lorry, watched the reporting of the ‘migration crisis’ during the summer of 2015 with dismay. Sitting in a pub in Barking he commented: “I am not very happy with the way the media treats refugees because I can promise you one thing, if all these refugees… if you sent all the foreigners ‘back home’ London would be a graveyard because there are so many refugees and foreigners which keep London moving forward. And when I hear it on the news say ‘oh refugees this and foreigners that’ I think ‘you bloody bastards’. I am sorry to say [it] but that’s how I feel because all these people here have struggled for many years.” </p> <p class="mag-quote-center">If you sent all the foreigners ‘back home’ London would be a graveyard.</p> <p>By contrast the terms of the public debate about immigration are shaped by the self-interested terms of the ‘host society’, where <em>national selfishness</em> shapes its parameters. Hard working ‘ordinary people’ are counter posed with migrants as though migrants are not hard working. This divides the ‘them’ and the ‘us’. The presumption being that our hard work means we are more deserving of for example welfare or NHS care. These notes of national selfishness can be equally true on the Left and Right of the political spectrum; it is particularly evident in the aftermath of the referendum result and the decision to leave the European Union. Across the political spectrum getting the ‘best deal for Britain,’ means limiting migrant privilege in favour of ours.</p> <p>We argue for a re-scaling of the migration debate, to show that the co-ordinates of the relationship between here and there have shifted. In many respects Vlad’s life shows us the importance of understanding how he moves all the time between different geographical scales, from Barking to Has in Albania and back again. It is also true that the map of London’s migrant city is infinitely connected on a global scale. </p> <p>So, whose crisis is being referred to in the headlines that Vlad mentions about the ‘migration crisis’? &nbsp;The circumstances where Syrian refugees are being forced out of their homes under conditions of civil war are only one dimension of this. &nbsp;We argue that to answer this question requires an understanding of the continued power of racism in the age of human mobility. Racism is a lens through which the world can be comprehended: it filters what is visible and amplifies what is heard. It is not a sober sense but an intoxicated one. The ‘migrant crisis’ provides a single cause for every political problem within the toxic culture of blame. &nbsp;Someone, it seemed, needed to be liable for all that is wrong and the migrant is so often a convenient container for all the blame, the bearers of all society’s bad news. There are not enough houses because there are too many of them, that why there are not enough jobs too. Too many migrants means there isn’t a bed for my relative in the hospital; because the nurses are not like us we don’t get the ‘right kind’ of care on the wards. Here the itinerant stranger absorbs all the blame for these real or exaggerated, yet intensely felt, woes. From this point of view the migrant is both a symptom of the crisis and the cause of all its multiple associated problems. &nbsp;</p> <p>In the aftermath of Brexit a widely proliferating sense of uncertainty has taken hold. Brexit has made almost every mobile citizen – from university lecturers to workers in Costa coffee bars – think twice about their future in the UK and whether or not a life here is imaginable. Les met Charlynne in Westfield shopping centre to catch up and, whilst they avoided the topic initially, the conversation turned inevitably to the EU referendum. With her usual good-natured irreverence Charlynne commented: “I was wondering when you was going to mention Brexit?” &nbsp;Her personal life has seen many changes through the duration of the project. She travelled to London from Dominica to study but has made a home and life in London. What did she think the vote meant for her? “Well actually I am part of the EU… If you were part of the EU you weren’t eligible to vote, if you were part of the Commonwealth you could. Guess what – I don’t know where my Dominican passport is! So I couldn’t vote. I have a French passport through my Dad. It was a tough time and it is still an uncertain time for me because here I am in the UK!”</p> <p>In many respects Charlynne’s biography reveals the complex interconnection between European integration and London’s colonial past and current postcolonial reality. She continued: “I came here because it was part of the EU and it was a safe place for me to come to and obviously I wasn’t an asylum seeker because there was nothing happening at home, where I was being killed or any of those things. I don’t want it to seem graver than it was. But Britain was a safe haven for me because it was better than what I had left behind at the time, and a place where I could build and make something better for myself.” Charlynne did a degree, trained as a teacher and now she’s working as teacher educating the children of Plaistow. This contribution is not recognized in the way the debate unfolded about the EU referendum and the issue of immigration. </p> <p>For Charlynne this comes back to the legacy of empire. “I mean everything comes back down to the fact that Britain went out and colonized everybody and now they are trying to shut everybody out” she said. “You know it feels so unfair, that’s what it is and I have been thinking that for the last… how long and actually we didn’t asked to be colonized. We didn’t asked to be asked to come here but now that we are you are telling us that, even though you took over what was ours and you gave us something else that you wanted us to aspire to, now that we are aspiring you are saying: ‘well, no we can’t’? It’s like you are stealing a dream that you’ve tried to implant in us in the first place. I am sure lots of people might be feeling that way. It’s just really hard to voice it into words.” &nbsp;What Charlynne gives us is a deep insight into the paradox of what we call a world of divided connectedness in which divisions and hierarchies coexist with linkages across time and place. What she names so eloquently is the dream of modernity itself and its promise of economic, experiential and technological progress. While that dream is dangled in a variety of forms – be it educational opportunity or a possibility of lucrative work – the limits, borders and controls of an increasingly severe and exclusionary immigration system place it beyond reach. </p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Even though you took over what was ours and you gave us something else that you wanted us to aspire to, now that we are aspiring you are saying: ‘well, no we can’t’? It’s like you are stealing a dream that you’ve tried to implant in us in the first place.</p> <p>While the geopolitical hinterlands of London remain shaped by its history as an Imperial metropolis, other contemporary economic and political links extend beyond this. &nbsp;In this sense the late Ambalavaner Sivanandan’s postcolonial slogan “we are here because you were there” needs to be updated. It is perhaps better to say that migrants are here because Britain’s geopolitical and economic interests remain active in the world. Jessielyn from the Philippines told us how mining by the Australian-UK company Billiton had ruined the land where she was from as well as causing her father who was a miner to contract bronchial pneumonia. She said, “you can’t work on that land anymore, you don’t know, there’s a hole”. This pre-empted her being here. The great conceit of the contemporary migration debate is the predominant atmosphere of national selfishness, historical amnesia and disavowal of any responsibility for Britain’s external economic and political involvements.</p> <p><em>This piece is extracted from Les Back and Shamser Sinha’s new book</em> Migrant City, <em><a href="https://www.routledge.com/Migrant-City/Back-Sinha/p/book/9780415715416">available now</a> from Routledge.</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/bridget-anderson/migrants-before-permanent-people-s-tribunal-in-barcelona">Migrants before the Permanent People’s Tribunal in Barcelona</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/martina-tazzioli/open-cities-open-harbours">Open the cities, open the harbours</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/ahmad-almouhmad/reflections-on-world-refugee-day">Reflections on World Refugee Day</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/ottavia-ampuero-villagran/nameless-and-un-mourned-identifying-migrant-bodies-in-medite">Nameless and un-mourned: identifying migrant bodies in the Mediterranean</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Can Europe make it? Les Back and Shamser Sinha Wed, 08 Aug 2018 07:55:59 +0000 Les Back and Shamser Sinha 119174 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Inmovilidad como protección en el régimen de controles migratorios https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/inmovilidad-como-protecci-n-en-el-r-gimen-de-controles-migratorios <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Los regímenes migratorios nunca han sido una cuestión de «proteger a las personas migrantes», sino un modo de ejercer poder sobre ellas. ¿Cuándo empezaremos a llamarlos por lo que son? <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/nandita-sharma/immobility-as-protection-in-regime-of-immigration-controls">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img width="100%" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/20410173726_75064dd768_o.jpg" /><span class="image-caption">From protest at&nbsp;Yarl's Wood Detention Centre.&nbsp;iDJ Photography/flickr.&nbsp;(CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)</span></p> <p>Para entender mejor los esfuerzos de hoy en día para terminar con la «trata de personas» o la «esclavitud moderna», debemos examinar las primeras restricciones a la movilidad humana, instituidas en el siglo diecinueve tras la abolición de la trata de esclavos y esclavas y las relaciones laborales de esclavitud. Al igual que con las políticas contra la trata hoy en día, esta primera forma de organizar el control de fronteras se centró en una narrativa de «rescate y protección» para normalizar la regulación de la migración. Sin embargo, lejos de proteger a nadie, estas restricciones construyeron una imagen de la persona «inmigrante» plagada de estereotipos raciales y de género; la entrada y permanencia en el territorio de un país fue, y todavía es, controlada y explotada.</p> <h2>Las lógicas imperialista y de Estados-nación, y la movilidad humana</h2> <p>A finales del siglo diecinueve y principios del siglo veinte, tanto los estados imperialistas como los estados que intentaban nacionalizar su soberanía implementaron diferentes restricciones a la movilidad humana, aunque por diferentes razones. Los estados imperialistas gobernaban sometiendo a sus súbditos y súbditas a sus poderes tributarios, gravámenes y trabajos forzosos. Cuantas más personas súbditas tuviera el estado dentro de su territorio, más personas podía explotar, más riqueza acumular, y más poder ejercer. Por ello, los estados imperialistas<em> facilitaron </em>el movimiento de la gente dentro y a través de sus imperios. De hecho, estuvieron activamente envueltos en esos movimientos —a menudo a escala masiva—, incluso cuando inmovilizaban a la mayoría de las personas a través de relaciones laborales que les quitaban la libertad. Desde finales del siglo quince, los imperios europeos estuvieron activamente involucrados en movilizar a las personas a través de redes de esclavitud, servidumbre por deudas, destierro y servidumbre; en el imperialismo tardío, también se involucrarían en la concepción de los regímenes migratorios emergentes.</p> <p class="mag-quote-right">Los controles migratorios dentro del Imperio Británico estuvieron íntimamente vinculados con el reemplazo de la trata de esclavos.</p> <p>Los controles migratorios dentro del Imperio Británico estuvieron íntimamente vinculados con el reemplazo de la trata de esclavos y esclavas por mano de obra contratada, principalmente en las colonias británicas en Asia. El sistema de trabajo denominado peyorativamente «coolie» se sustenta en un requerimiento legal de que las personas trabajadoras desempeñen sus tareas por un periodo de tiempo fijo por contrato, usualmente cinco años (pero algunas veces podía ser mayor o menor). Durante este, estaban atadas quien los contrataba y no eran libres de cambiar de empleador o de lugar de trabajo.</p> <p>Los primeros esfuerzos para regular la migración de súbditas y súbditos del Imperio Británico tuvieron lugar en colonia Mauricio. En 1835, el mismo año en que las esclavas y esclavos fueron liberados en Mauricio, el Consejo Británico local aprobó dos ordenanzas que regulaban la migración de personas desde la India británica. Estas ordenanzas, que pretendían regular y disciplinar a los trabajadores «coolie» de la India, solo admitirían «coolies» que tuvieran permiso del gobernador de la colonia. Y, en la India en 1837, el gobierno indio británico estableció condiciones específicas para el movimiento legal de personas que dejaban Calcuta como «coolies», tales como la existencia de un contrato laboral firmado.</p> <p>Es importante notar que los dos tipos de control fueron impulsados en nombre de la protección de los «coolies». Los «coolies», como las víctimas de trata de estos días, fueron descritos por los británicos como personas simplonas, ingenuas, sin educación, que serían engañadas por inescrupulosos agentes de migración. Así, los segundos plantearon que las restricciones de migración eran necesarias para asegurar que el traslado de las trabajadoras y trabajadores «coolie» provenientes de la India británica fuera «voluntario», y que —a diferencia de las personas esclavas que las precedieron— ofrecieran «de forma libre» su fuerza de trabajo.</p> <p>A fines del siglo diecinueve y comienzos del siglo veinte, la formación de los primeros Estados nación del mundo intensificó la presión para promulgar más y más regulaciones y restricciones de movilidad. Los primeros controles nacionales de migración comenzaron en las Américas, donde las ex colonias se habían transformado de forma exitosa en estados autogobernados, que nacionalizarían así sus soberanías para fines del siglo diecinueve.</p> <p>Cada uno de esos Estados nación anunció su recién descubierta soberanía nacional mediante la implementación de controles de migración racistas, muchas veces con un gran componente de género en ellos. Con la institucionalización de la idea de que las «naciones» eran unidades de distintas clases sociales de (las llamadas) razas homogéneas, los estados se dedicaron a regular y restringir el movimiento dentro de sus territorios de quienes poseían una imagen de raza negativa, y de regular la «respetabilidad» sexual de las mujeres a quienes se permitía ingresar. Por ejemplo, las primeras restricciones a la entrada libre de las personas a los Estados Unidos de América —la Ley Page de 1875— expresamente prohibía la entrada de dos tipos de personas: los «coolies» de la China y las mujeres consideradas como «prostitutas».</p> <h2>Consecuencias hoy en día</h2> <p>Hoy en día tenemos un sistema globalizado de controles migratorios, en el cual es casi imposible moverse libremente a través de las fronteras ahora nacionalizadas, sobre todo para aquellas personas que no tienen mucho que ofrecer al mercado capitalista globalizado (más que su fuerza de trabajo). Las medidas de control de fronteras han sido racionalizadas como un esfuerzo para proteger a las personas migrantes y para «terminar con la trata». Hoy, como en el pasado, el tropo «rescate» es un recurso poderoso para legitimar aún acciones criminales contra aquellas personas consideradas migrantes.</p> <p>El mayor peligro para la gente que intenta cruzar las fronteras nacionales es la policía de migraciones y la vigilancia de los estados. Las categorías con las que los estados clasifican a la mayoría de las personas migrantes —«ilegal» o «trabajador/a temporario/a extranjero/a» son dos de las más usadas— son las peores amenazas a su libertad. Que una persona sea categorizada como «ilegal» o «temporaria» atrapa a un creciente número de personas que se desplazan a condiciones de trabajo y de vida deficientes, y limita en forma grave sus derechos y su movilidad. De este modo, las políticas de migración nacionales crean las condiciones legales que hacen que algunas personas sean «baratas» o incluso «desechables». En pocas palabras: sin políticas nacionales de migración, no habría personas migrantes a quienes subordinar, abusar o utilizar como chivos expiatorios; o que precisen ser rescatadas.</p> <p>Sin embargo, no sabemos nada sobre ninguno de estos peligros y explotaciones de la vida real, a pesar de la constante multiplicación de reportes sobre ‘trata de personas’ y ‘esclavitud moderna’. El discurso estatal de acabar con la trata o con la esclavitud moderna depende por completo de la aceptación de la legitimidad de los regímenes nacionales de migración. Depende de la falta de preocupación de estos regímenes sobre las grandes disparidades y la explotación fruto de las relaciones sociales capitalistas: relaciones en las cuales la movilidad humana —y las restricciones del estado en su contra— siempre han sido, y seguirán siendo, una parte integral. Las políticas contra la trata perjudican mucho a las personas migrantes, en especial a las que menos opciones tienen. Hacen mucho para desviar nuestra atención de las prácticas de los estados y de los empleadores, y para canalizar nuestra energía en favor de la ley y el orden, de «ser duros» con los «tratantes».</p> <p>De esta manera, las medidas contra la trata son ideológicas: hacen que la plétora de controles migratorios y fronterizos no nos parezcan problemáticos, e intentan colocarlos fuera de los límites de la política. Las razones por las que es tan difícil y cada vez más peligroso para la gente el moverse o vivir de manera segura en los lugares a los que se desplazan, son dejadas de lado en el apuro de criminalizar a los ‘tratantes’ y de ‘enviar a casa’ (es decir deportar) a las «víctimas de la trata». Hoy en día, como en los discursos pasados de ‘proteger a los coolies’, las prácticas discursivas ‘contra la trata’ fracasan espectacularmente en atender las necesidades de la gente al no exigir su libre movilidad a través del territorio, y su libertad en los mercados laborales nacionales.</p> <p><strong>Una <a href="http://www.antitraffickingreview.org/index.php/atrjournal/article/view/262">versión más larga de este artículo</a> apareció en <em>Anti-Trafficking Review</em>.</strong></p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gallagher/trata-de-personas-de-la-indignaci-n-la-acci-n">Trata de personas: de la indignación a la acción</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/lucha-contra-la-trata-de-personas-encubrimiento-de-los-programas-de-luc">Lucha contra la trata de personas: encubrimiento de los programas de lucha contra la inmigración</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK AND ANDRÉ BROOME</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DAVID A. FEINGOLD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori">Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BEN LEWIS</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Nandita Sharma BTS en Español Wed, 08 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Nandita Sharma 118836 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Shadows of slavery part four: global capitalism and modern slavery https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alice-bellagamba-marco-gardini-laura-menin/shadows-of-slavery-part-four-global-capital <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery#sospt4">fourth section</a> of our collection <em>Shadows of Slavery</em>&nbsp;takes a step back from empirical case studies to explore neoliberal capitalism's reliance on an irregular, migratory workforce as a whole.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/12280883893_de1653c501_o.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Sugar cane harvest. Steven Baird/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/studio601photography/12280883893/in/photolist-jHdJVt-6U6EmD-fDdD7x-85foJJ-dyVNKy-fDdDsa-8oVnYC-5qRpKH-AG46f-buN15i-fDdDbp-5WQKa7-mMydG-7YER8h-5UjXXK-yLuu43-9ucLvQ-26ZFhbU-pXi5ZE-277V6aL-cEjv5-8LhjS1-qeFBRc-9u9Nyx-aptrGo-buN23T-92CVp3-25Qvfbp-BsepXx-7sWF3F-9NMHL8-8HjFKc-hmAF2L-wvUWSi-9uEjtk-dspahG-dvugWh-bqaPWz-26ZFfJq-Az4ir1-6vzeQV-289pGyr-apts7E-axyzSg-8z1JRF-bCb1y1-pi79T6-pi6YEv-286v7ua-phSJ4o">CC (by-nc)</a></p> <p>‘Modern slavery’ has become a catch-all and media attractive category that conflates together human trafficking, debt bondage, sex trafficking, and forced marriage, as well as various types of bounded labour that are perceived as comparable to slave systems of the past. This concept has become the core of a ‘new abolitionist’ agenda that is informing the activities and policies of governments, international agencies, and NGOs all over the world.</p> <p>For its critics, the modern slavery framework falls far short of addressing the structural causes that produce labour exploitation and unfreedom under global neoliberal capitalism. Activists and international organisations fighting against so-called ‘modern slavery’ generally limit their focus to ‘bad’ exploiters and exploited ‘victims’. These are considered exceptions in an allegedly ‘free’ capitalistic labour market, and it is to this market that ‘rescued victims’ should be returned in order to be ‘freed’. They tend to frame labour exploitation as a simple lack of law enforcement or as a juridical matter, ignoring its wider economic and political roots.</p> <p>The ‘new abolitionist’ agenda pays very little attention to the fact that current forms of labour exploitation represent a constitutive part of a neoliberal capitalistic order. It is an order characterised by increasingly precarious labour conditions; reduced welfare, public services, and labour rights; the privatisation of public resources; spiralling debt; shrinking and tamed labour unions; and the legal and political marginalisation of large sectors of the (migrant and non-migrant) workforce. All these aspects are crucial to understanding how labour exploitation is structured in the neoliberal order that connects – and divides – the Global North and South.</p> <p><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery#sospt4">This final part of <em>Shadows of slavery: refractions of the past, challenges of the present</em></a> brings together selection of pieces from Beyond Trafficking and Slavery that help problematise the concept of ‘modern slavery’ and the relationship between global capitalism and current forms of exploitation and unfreedom. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/michael-dottridge/eight-reasons-why-we-shouldn-t-use-term-modern-slavery">Michael Dottridge focuses</a> on the many shortcomings of the concept of ‘modern slavery’, both when it is used as a heuristic tool as well as for the political and social effects it triggers in the current international debate.</p> <p>Moving along this line and with a bottom up approach, the following three articles present case studies that point out the ambiguities of framing current forms of harsh exploitation under the label of ‘modern slavery’. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/antonio-de-lauri/brick-kiln-workers-and-debt-trap-in-pakistani-punjab">Antonio De Lauri analyses</a> debt traps among kiln workers in Pakistani Punjab, showing how “we need to go beyond this simplistic ‘victim paradigm’ in order to understand the <em>social nature</em> of bondage as well as to situate that bondage within both local and global systems of domination and dependence”.</p> <p><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/james-esson/modern-slavery-child-trafficking-and-rise-of-west-african-football-academi">James Esson explores</a> the case of football academies in Ghana recently accused of promoting child trafficking. He invites us to move away from the modern slavery paradigm, focusing instead on the “broader structural conditions that funnel youth into the football industry” as a venue of upward social mobility and successful migration. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/gloria-carlini/ghetto-ghana-workers-and-new-italian-slaves">Gloria Carlini</a>, meanwhile, discusses how the voices of Ghanaian migrants working in the tomato fields of South Italy should be considered more seriously before subsuming them under the category of ‘new slaves’, since many of them distance themselves from this definition. The bottom up/ethnographic approach of these contributions lights up ambiguities and contradictions that are generally obscured by the generalist, salvific, and often paternalistic framework of the ‘new abolitionist’ agenda. &nbsp;</p> <p>The last three articles consider labour exploitation in the neoliberal world from a wider perspective, able to link particular cases to structural forces of a global scale. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/nicola-phillips/what-has-forced-labour-to-do-with-poverty">Nicola Phillips argues</a> that those who are the most exploited are not always the poorest ones. While income certainly play a crucial role in these dynamics, other factors – e.g. education, migrants and gender rights, and the precarious and erratic nature of work –&nbsp;are relevant as well. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/benjamin-selwyn/harsh-labour-bedrock-of-global-capitalism">Benjamin Selwyn explores</a> how global supply chains are becoming tools of labour exploitation for international firms and global capital, and argues that several forms of activism and campaigns “understand harsh labour as a consequence of corporate malpractice, rather than as a structural feature of the global economy”.</p> <p><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/susan-ferguson-david-mcnally/capitalism%E2%80%99s-unfree-global-workforce">Susan Ferguson and David McNally’s article</a> closes this fourth section, reminding us how the global migrant workforce is vital to capitalist expansion and that capitalism has always been perpetuated through legal and illegal regimes of migrancy and forced labour. As they argue:</p> <blockquote> <p>“[…] the current era makes it clear that unfree labour is not a relic of the past. Indeed, capital is not only increasingly reliant on migration, but specifically on the transnational flow of people who are deprived of full citizenship, people who to varying degrees comprise an unfree global workforce”.</p> </blockquote> <p>In this perspective, the modern slavery framework – maybe unconsciously, maybe not – has often the ambiguous consequence of obscuring, rather than illuminating, processes of labour exploitation in the current era. Their causes are in the capital’s constant need of cheap workforce and the inability – or unwillingness – of governments to translate the abstractness of labour rights into an effective system of social justice and redistribution. The same old history – we could say – with some new developments. </p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-anoth-sidebox"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Global capitalism and modern slavery</strong></p> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/michael-dottridge/eight-reasons-why-we-shouldn-t-use-term-modern-slavery">Eight reasons why we shouldn’t use the term ‘modern slavery’</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/antonio-de-lauri/brick-kiln-workers-and-debt-trap-in-pakistani-punjab">Brick kiln workers and the debt trap in Pakistani Punjab</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/james-esson/modern-slavery-child-trafficking-and-rise-of-west-african-football-academi">Modern slavery, child trafficking, and the rise of West African football academies</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JAMES ESSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/gloria-carlini/ghetto-ghana-workers-and-new-italian-slaves">Ghetto Ghana workers and the new Italian ‘slaves’</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GLORIA CARLINI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/nicola-phillips/what-has-forced-labour-to-do-with-poverty">What has forced labour to do with poverty?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NICOLA PHILLIPS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/benjamin-selwyn/harsh-labour-bedrock-of-global-capitalism">Harsh labour: bedrock of global capitalism</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN SELWYN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/susan-ferguson-david-mcnally/capitalism%E2%80%99s-unfree-global-workforce">Capitalism’s unfree global workforce</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SUSAN FERGUSON and DAVID MCNALLY</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Laura Menin Marco Gardini Alice Bellagamba Tue, 07 Aug 2018 13:23:13 +0000 Alice Bellagamba, Marco Gardini and Laura Menin 119164 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Shadows of slavery part three: labour exploitation in global agriculture https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marco-gardini/shadows-of-slavery-part-three-labour-exploitation-in-global-agriculture <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery#sospt3">third section</a> of our collection <em>Shadows of Slavery</em> explores how social and economic relations bind people to the wrong side of agricultural value chains.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/gardini_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Cimarron County, Oklahoma, USA, 1936. <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dust_Bowl#/media/File:Farmer_walking_in_dust_storm_Cimarron_County_Oklahoma2.jpg">Public Domain.</a></p> <p>In a famous passage of John Steinbeck’s 1939 novel <em>The Grapes of Wrath</em>, a tenant farmer and a man on a tractor debate the bank’s demand that the latter demolish the former’s house and drive him from the land his family had cultivated for generations:</p> <blockquote> <p style="margin-bottom:15px;">“Sure, cried the tenant men, but it’s our land. We measured it and broke it up. We were born on it, and we got killed on it, died on it. Even if it’s no good, it’s still ours. That’s what makes it ours – being born on it, working it, dying on it. That’s what makes ownership, not a paper with numbers on it.</p> <p style="margin-bottom:15px;">We’re sorry. It’s not us. It’s the monster. The bank isn’t like a man.</p> <p style="margin-bottom:15px;">Yes, but the bank is only made of men.</p> <p style="margin-bottom:15px;">No, you’re wrong there – quite wrong there. The bank is something else than men. It happens that every man in a bank hates what the bank does, and yet the bank does it. The bank is something more than men, I tell you. It’s the monster. Men made it, but they can’t control it.”</p> </blockquote> <p>The “monster” that men created, but could not control, did not die with the Great Depression. It continued to resurface, assuming different names and forms across time and changing economic and political contexts. According to current neoliberal beliefs, for example, there is a growing need for refined theoretical methodologies, technical procedures, and privatisation policies to develop what are increasingly known as effective ‘agriculture value chains’: i.e. the integrated range of value adding activities that theoretically should link farmers to new global or regional markets, improve and ‘rationalise’ agricultural production, and keep prices low for a growing global population.</p> <p>As often happens, however, the naming of a concept like ‘agriculture value chain’ carries with it unintended meanings and a certain degree of bitter irony. For those who have dedicated themselves to the study of old and new slaveries and forms of labour exploitation in the agrarian sector, for example, the word ‘chain’ acquires obviously a very different connotation. Of course, there are strong differences between the iron chains that trapped men and women during the Middle Passage and the ‘immaterial’ economic chains that oblige present-day, formally ‘free’ small farmers to sell their products, their labour, and often their land at miserable prices. The labour conditions of slaves in the American plantation system of the past and those of (migrant) agricultural labourers ‘freely’ choosing to work for landowners today are also different. Yet, because slavery in the past was so often linked to agricultural work, the current expression ‘agricultural value chain’ evokes a number of questions about who today possesses the power to forge, enlarge, and hold these chains, to make huge profits out of them, and to trap others within them. Slavery has been formally abolished everywhere, but capitalism has found new ways to ensure a supply of cheap labour at its disposal. </p> <h2>Who controls the chains?</h2> <p><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery#sospt3">Part three of <em>Shadows of slavery: refractions of the past, challenges of the present</em></a> seeks to provide answers for these questions as they relate to global agriculture – from Tanzania to the Dominican Republic, from Italy to Costa Rica, from Chad to Madagascar. Its contributors discuss the working conditions, the dynamics of exploitation, and the degree of unfreedom for all those trapped on the wrong side of local and global agriculture value chains. All contributions draw on extensive fieldwork, and explore individual and collective histories to shed light on the changes and continuities of labour exploitation in agrarian sectors around the world.</p> <p>The cases of migrants, small farmers, women, and sharecroppers allow us to compare how past and present interlace across a variety of contexts to produce labour exploitation and social marginalisation. The causes have to do with neoliberal reforms and large-scale investments; the political and legal frameworks transforming migrants into easily exploitable manpower; the gendered nature of labour exploitation; the multifaceted forms of debt linking small farmers to local and global markets; and the legacies of past forms of slavery that continue to exclude individuals and groups from landownership. Only by considering the articulation of these different causes can we understand how old chains broke and new ones appeared, how forms of labour exploitation and bondage reformed after the formal abolition of slavery, and how current processes of capital accumulation chain people to lives very different from the positive images found in neoliberal rhetoric. </p> <p>By considering the case of a privatised estate in Tanzania, for example, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/joanny-b-lair/agricultural-investments-in-tanzania-economic-opportunities-or-new-forms">Joanny Belair explores</a> the collateral socio-economic impacts that neoliberal reforms have had on local peasants. Going beyond the self-promoting images of a big private company working in the sugar industry – which emphasises the company’s attention to employee needs as well as its overall importance as a regional employment generator – Belair demonstrates how workers must face exploitative labour conditions, social insecurity, and chains of indebtedness, while villagers are exposed to increasing land dispossession. Belair questions whether those at the bottom of the local social hierarchy truly benefit from large-scale agricultural investments. Answering her own question, she demonstrates how locale elites seize new opportunities while the most vulnerable Tanzanian citizens bear the social costs of these investments.</p> <p>The pains associated with neo liberal reforms of the agricultural sector are also <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/ra-l-zecca-castel/extorted-and-exploited-haitian-labourers-on-dominican-sugar-plantati">described by Raúl Zecca Castel</a> in his account of the working conditions of Haitian labourers who migrated to the Dominican Republic. Zecca Castel provides a vivid picture of how the recently privatised Dominican sugarcane plantations profit from the increased socio-economic vulnerability of migrants, who constitute a cheap and unorganised workforce. The Dominican government, which from the 1950s to the 1990s promoted the migration of unskilled labour from Haiti, is now denying citizenship to thousands of those initial migrants’ descendants, effectively pushing them into the ranks of irregular migrants who make up the plantation workforce. </p> <p>The exploitation of migrant labour is at the centre of <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/irene-peano/containment-resistance-flight-migrant-labour-in-agro-industrial-district-o">Irene Peano’s contribution</a>. By analysing industrial tomato production in Foggia, Italy, Peano explores the formal and informal methods of controlling migrants that structure local dynamics of exploitation. In this context, asylum-seeker reception centres, migrant detention centres, shantytowns, labour camps, and prisons contribute to form a ‘special economic zone’ that disciplines, governs, and extracts profit from migrant labour. At the same time, Peano points out that containment and control are never total, and draws attention to the forms of resistance and self-organisation typical of these spaces.</p> <p>Despite the increasing importance of migrants, and their exploitation, for global agriculture, the citizenship divide is not the only axis worth considering. Drawing on her analysis of sexual harassment in the Costa Rican banana industry, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/layla-zaglul/navigating-unsafe-workplaces-in-costa-rica-s-banana-industry">Layla Zaglul Ruiz shows</a> how gender influences the exploitation and vulnerability of labourers. She describes how forms of male domination are translated onto the shop floor of the banana farm, and how gendered forms of exploitation interlace with hierarchy in the workplace. </p> <p>Dynamics of exploitation are furthermore not limited to employer/employee relations. They also extend to small farmers who control their own land but lose control of production. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/valerio-colosio/problem-of-working-for-someone-debt-dependence-and-labour-exploitation">Valerio Colosio explores</a> the debt trap in which farmers of the Guéra region of Chad find themselves when obliged to sell their products in disadvantageous conditions. This makes them vulnerable to traders who loan them cereals during the hungry season with high interest rates, and then claim back a much larger part of the harvest later on. However, this scenario is still considered by farmers as preferable to “working for someone else”, a condition perceived as unworthy for the household head and perilous to the following harvest. As Colosio points out, the unequal relation between farmers and traders is part of a longer history that, after the colonial abolition of slavery, transformed precolonial, slave raiding elites into a powerful class of traders able to exert a substantial degree of control over agricultural production.</p> <p>The <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marco-gardini/working-for-former-masters-in-madagascar-win-win-game-for-former-slaves">last contribution from Marco Gardini</a> explores the post-slavery context of the Malagasy highlands that sees landless slave descendants continuing to work for former masters –&nbsp;a situation frequently seen by both sides as ‘win-win’. Sharecropping agreements, however, also reinforce power structures, economic inequalities, and the re-production of statutory distinctions. When that system breaks down, and former masters start to slip from their dominant position, what was once a ‘win-win’ situation has a tendency to quickly turn against the sharecroppers. The ‘win-win game’ rhetoric hides the fact that sharecropping agreements contribute to reinforce the social prestige of landowners at the expense of the tenants, often expanding the stigma of slave origin even to people who are not slave descendants.</p> <p>Taken together, these contributions provide fresh ethnographic material for an analysis from below of contemporary human bondage in the agricultural sector, and of the different, often hidden tactics that subordinated people use to renegotiate their marginalised positions, reinforce their rights, or simply struggle to survive. These stories demonstrate how similar dynamics affect very different, albeit increasingly interconnected, places, and remind us that an exploitative relation is never a private or circumstantiated problem, but always a collective history. This is as crucial today as it was in 1939, when John Steinbeck published <em>The Grapes of Wrath</em>:</p> <blockquote> <p style="margin-bottom:15px;">“One man, one family driven from the land; this rusty car creaking along the highway to the west. I lost my land, a single tractor took my land. I am alone and bewildered. And in the night one family camps in a ditch and another family pulls in and the tents come out. The two men squat on their hams and the women and children listen. Here is the node, you who hate change and fear revolution. Keep these two squatting men apart; make them hate, fear, suspect each other. Here is the anlage of the thing you fear. This is the zygote. For here ‘I lost my land’ is changed; a cell is split and from its splitting grows the thing you hate – &#39;We lost our land.’ The danger is here, for two men are not as lonely and perplexed as one. And from this first ‘we’ there grows a still more dangerous thing: ‘I have a little food’ plus ‘I have none.’ If from this problem the sum is ‘We have a little food’; the thing is on its way, the movement has direction. Only a little multiplication now, and this land, this tractor are ours. The two men squatting in a ditch, the little fire, the side-meat stewing in a single pot, the silent, stone-eyed women; behind, the children listening with their souls to words their minds do not understand. The night draws down. The baby has a cold. ‘Here, take this blanket. It’s wool. It was my mother’s blanket - take it for the baby’. This is the thing to bomb. This is the beginning from ‘I’ to ‘we.’</p> <p>If you who own the things people must have could understand this, you might preserve yourself. If you could separate causes from results, if you could know Paine, Marx, Jefferson, Lenin, were results, not causes, you might survive. But that you cannot know. For the quality of owning freezes you forever into ‘I’, and cuts you off forever from the ‘we’.&quot;</p> </blockquote> <p>&nbsp;</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-anoth-sidebox"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Contemporary agriculture and the legacies of slavery</strong></p> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marco-gardini/struggling-on-wrong-side-of-chain-labour-exploitation-in-global-agricult">Struggling on the wrong side of the chain: labour exploitation in global agriculture</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCO GARDINI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/joanny-b-lair/agricultural-investments-in-tanzania-economic-opportunities-or-new-forms">Agricultural investments in Tanzania: economic opportunities or new forms of exploitation?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOANNY BÉLAIR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/ra-l-zecca-castel/extorted-and-exploited-haitian-labourers-on-dominican-sugar-plantati">Extorted and exploited: Haitian labourers on Dominican sugar plantations</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">RAÚL ZECCA CASTEL</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/irene-peano/containment-resistance-flight-migrant-labour-in-agro-industrial-district-o">Containment, resistance, flight: Migrant labour in the agro-industrial district of Foggia, Italy</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">RAÚL ZECCA CASTEL</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/layla-zaglul/navigating-unsafe-workplaces-in-costa-rica-s-banana-industry">Navigating unsafe workplaces in Costa Rica’s banana industry</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LAYLA ZAGLUL</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/valerio-colosio/problem-of-working-for-someone-debt-dependence-and-labour-exploitation">The problem of “working for someone”: debt, dependence and labour exploitation in Chad</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">VALERIO COLOSIO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marco-gardini/working-for-former-masters-in-madagascar-win-win-game-for-former-slaves">Working for former masters in Madagascar: a ‘win-win’ game for former slaves?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCO GARDINI</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Marco Gardini Shadows of slavery II: Labour exploitation in global agriculture Tue, 07 Aug 2018 12:09:58 +0000 Marco Gardini 119162 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Entrevista: ¿la detención como nueva forma de gestión migratoria? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/ben-lewis-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-detenci-n-como-nueva-forma-de-gesti-n-migratori <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>La detención se está convirtiendo en el método preferido por los estados para procesar y disuadir a las personas migrantes, pero hay muchas otras alternativas disponibles. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/safepassages/cameron-thibos-ben-lewis/interview-detention-as-new-migration-managem">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/13107673853_21a309ab71_k.jpg" width="920" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">BBC World Service/Flickr. (CC BY-NC 2.0)</p> <p><strong>Ben Lewis:</strong> Soy Ben Lewis y trabajo con la Coalición Internacional contra la Detención («IDC» por sus siglas en inglés). Somos una red global de organizaciones no gubernamentales que trabaja en 70 países.</p> <p><strong>Cameron Thibos (oD): ¿Podríamos hablar un poco sobre el incremento actual de las medidas de seguridad que se está dando en nuestras fronteras de cara a la migración?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ben:</strong> Esta es una de estas nuevas tendencias en migración que son bastante preocupantes. Ha estado sucediendo durante las últimas dos décadas. Vimos un gran incremento después del 11 de septiembre, cuando las naciones comenzaron a considerar la migración desde una perspectiva de seguridad más que de protección o gobernanza regular de la migración. Por lo tanto, cosas como los muros o las vallas fronterizas, el uso de la detención como medidas de disuasión o como parte de un programa de gestión migratoria, son todos ejemplos de los tipos de problemas que están surgiendo a medida que las fronteras se vuelven más duras y «seguras».</p> <p><strong>Cameron: Se enfocan en la detención. ¿De qué manera se utiliza esto como método de control migratorio?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ben:</strong> Creo que es importante destacar que, en el marco de la ley internacional, la detención solo debe ser una medida excepcional. Es decir, puede ser una medida excepcional en el contexto penal (por ejemplo, cuando hay personas que pueden considerarse como un peligro para otra gente) o desde el punto de vista institucional (cuando eres un peligro para ti mismo, por ejemplo).</p> <p>Pero desde un punto de vista administrativo y ejecutivo, se supone que es incluso mucho menos común. Pero lo que estamos viendo es que en lugar de utilizarla como una medida excepcional de último recurso, los gobiernos ahora prefieren utilizar la detención como primer recurso cuando se ocupan de personas indocumentadas que cruzan su frontera.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Pero lo que estamos viendo es que en lugar de utilizarla como una medida excepcional de último recurso, los gobiernos ahora prefieren utilizar la detención como primer recurso cuando se ocupan de personas indocumentadas que cruzan su frontera.</p> <p>Las perspectiva histórica que gobernó la gestión de la migración se ha basado en personas que van y vienen, y que determinan su condición migratoria luego del hecho. Así es como sus abuelas y mis abuelos o bisabuelas emigraron hacia donde sea que terminamos nosotros. Ahora, sin embargo, la obligación de obtener un permiso para viajar antes de partir recae más sobre el individuo.</p> <p>Como resultado, las naciones están deteniendo a las personas en las fronteras cuando entran al país sin autorización previa. También están utilizando cada vez más la detención en el contexto de retornos, para deportar a las personas de vuelta a su país de origen o —a veces por conveniencia— a otro país con el que no tienen ninguna relación.</p> <p><strong>Cameron: ¿Cuáles son las condiciones en estos centros de detención? ¿En qué se diferencian de las cárceles o los refugios?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ben:</strong> Las condiciones de detención varían mucho de país en país, incluso de régimen en régimen. Algunas detenciones por inmigración se gestionan en establecimientos penales, porque las entradas y estadías irregulares son criminalizadas. Por lo tanto, les pueden procesar en virtud del derecho penal y alojar en un establecimiento penal, junto con otros u otras delincuentes. Esto es ilegal, según la ley internacional; pero está sucediendo cada vez más a nivel nacional.</p> <p>Otras veces, realmente depende del país. Hemos visto centros de detención de inmigrantes que son comisarías situadas cerca de las fronteras, campos improvisados cerrados en Grecia e Italia. Existe un nuevo enfoque de puntos críticos que la Unión Europea ha estado implementando y que no otorga protección alguna, y ha sido muy criticado por ello. En Malta, hemos visto el uso de contenedores. Australia tenía una política de detención extraterritorial que fue descrita de variadas formas, desde campo para personas refugiadas hasta campos de concentración.</p> <p>Pero, en general, una cosa está clara: la persona no es libre de marcharse. Existe, entonces, privación de la libertad, lo que desencadena todo tipo de protecciones jurídicas internacionales, tanto de debido proceso como de derechos fundamentales, en el marco de la ley internacional.</p> <p>En términos de tasas de riesgo, varios estudios han demostrado que existen altas tasas de suicidio y autolesión. También reina una falta de materialización de derechos económicos, sociales y culturales, como el acceso a la atención médica y a la educación, familias separadas y desgarradas, mucha violencia física y social infligida a las personas inmigrantes en los lugares de detención. Todo ello hace que no sean lugares de protección ni, con certeza, apropiados para personas en situaciones de vulnerabilidad.</p> <p><strong>Cameron: Creo que muchas personas consideran la detención como un primer paso razonable, en especial cuando sienten que hay una crisis; ganan tiempo reteniendo a las personas migrantes hasta que simplemente alguien pueda descubrir qué hacer con toda esa gente. ¿Cuál sería un mejor sistema que pudiera satisfacer las necesidades del país y proteger los derechos humanos?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ben:</strong> Creo que, antes que nada, tenemos que desafiar esta retórica de crisis, que ha sido un enfoque tan predominante en el discurso mediático y político durante los últimos dos años. Estadísticamente, según las cifras, la migración se ha mantenido en un 3% de la población total. Ese porcentaje no ha aumentado, solo que hoy en día somos más personas en el mundo y, por lo tanto, hay más personas migrantes.</p> <p>Sin duda las personas que huyen de Siria a menudo sufren de crisis individuales o personales, como así también las personas abandonadas en lugares de conflicto o guerras civiles. Pero las naciones que responden a la migración, en general, no están en crisis. Estas nuevas llegadas inmigratorias son controlables, en su mayoría; y creo que la solución yace en la forma en que se ha manejado la migración desde tiempos inmemoriales: vías legales para quienes entran a un país o para quienes entran a un país sin permiso previo, y regular su condición después del hecho.</p> <p>Esto es algo que se ha hecho durante siglos. Solo hace relativamente poco tiempo, y creo que es importante destacar esto, hemos recurrido a esta estrategia tan centrada en medidas de seguridad, que fomenta la idea de «soluciona tu condición migratoria con anticipación o no vengas». Creo que eso tiene un impacto real en cosas como el derecho al asilo, la protección de las niñas y niños y las víctimas de la trata, y está causando una ruptura importante en la forma en que se supone debiera funcionar el régimen internacional de protección.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Solo hace relativamente poco tiempo, y creo que es importante destacar esto, hemos recurrido a esta estrategia tan centrada en medidas de seguridad, que fomenta la idea de «soluciona tu condición migratoria con anticipación o no vengas».</p> <p><strong>Cameron: Hablando del problema de regularización de una condición antes de viajar, me gustaría hablar del aumento de la externalización de fronteras. La idea de que el control de las fronteras y los regímenes de protección deberían trasladarse al extranjero. ¿Cuáles son los beneficios o los riesgos asociados a ese modelo?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ben:</strong> La externalización de fronteras ha sido uno de los temas predominantes aquí en las «Jornadas de la sociedad civil» del Foro Mundial sobre Migración y Desarrollo (celebrado en diciembre de 2016, donde se realizó esta entrevista). Uno de los mensajes principales que se ha divulgado es que si las naciones van a externalizar sus fronteras, también necesitarán externalizar la protección. Lamentablemente, eso no está sucediendo.</p> <p>¿Qué queremos decir con «externalización de fronteras»? Este es un concepto relativamente nuevo que la gente todavía está intentando definir. Incluye cosas como acuerdos comerciales bilaterales o acuerdos políticos bilaterales con otras naciones para empujar la frontera cada vez más lejos, en lugar de procesar y reforzar las fronteras en la propia jurisdicción territorial.</p> <p>Eso puede significar, por ejemplo, que Estados Unidos proporcione capacitación a las autoridades de la frontera en México para alentarlas a arrestar y detener a más personas que se dirigen hacia Estados Unidos. O puede que sea a través de intervenciones directas con dinero en efectivo, como en el acuerdo de la UE con Turquía, que fomenta cosas como la construcción de centros de detención o la quema de barcos para que la gente no pueda llegar a las costas de Europa.</p> <p>Con frecuencia y de forma problemática, esto se maquilla como protección para las mismas personas migrantes: «solo estamos tratando de ayudar o proteger a la gente, y evitar que se suban a barcos destartalados y mueran en el mar». Estos son argumentos vacíos. Si proteger y salvar vidas fuera realmente la preocupación de los países europeos o de Estados Unidos, por ejemplo, sería mucho más simple pagar un billete de avión; el costo, sin duda, sería mucho más bajo que lo que se invierte en la actualidad en seguridad en las fronteras.</p> <p>De hecho, con lo que las personas inmigrantes pagan en operaciones de tráfico <em>debido</em> al cierre y la externalización de las fronteras, podrían comprarse un billete de avión en primera clase y llegar cómodamente a lugares como Alemania, Suecia, Italia, Grecia y cualquier otro lugar, para allí solicitar asilo de forma individual. Entonces, realmente tenemos que deconstruir el discurso utilizado por las naciones y analizar de forma crítica las razones que dan los gobiernos para justificar este endurecimiento y externalización de fronteras.</p> <p><strong>Cameron: ¿Tenemos alguna razón para confiar en que los países lleven a cabo una externalización de las fronteras de buena fe, velando por los intereses de las personas migrantes? ¿O deberíamos ser más escépticos al respecto?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ben:</strong> Creo que es necesario distinguir entre los procesos externos para obtener un visado o un permiso de asilo. Los visados de estudiante o de turista también se están externalizando cada vez más; es decir, que debes obtenerlo antes de llegar al país de acogida. Cabe mencionar que, como ciudadano estadounidense, puedo obtener un visado a mi llegada en muchos contextos. Si esto es así, ¿por qué no hay más personas que puedan tener acceso a visados a la llegada al país? Ciertamente, esta es una forma más tradicional o histórica de concebir el procesamiento de visados.</p> <p class="mag-quote-right">Tener que solicitar un visado antes de huir para salvar nuestras vidas, es totalmente contrario al objetivo de proteger a las personas refugiadas.</p> <p>La nueva tendencia preocupante, sin embargo, es el procesamiento de asilo en el país de origen. En otras palabras, cada vez más se exige a la gente que se quede donde está —a menudo, un lugar peligroso, o de conflicto, o donde carece de protección— y que solicite asilo allí, en lugar de primero llegar a un lugar seguro y a continuación solicitar asilo. Esto pone patas arriba la Convención sobre personas refugiadas. Tener que solicitar un visado antes de huir para salvar nuestras vidas, es totalmente contrario al objetivo de proteger a las personas refugiadas. Es una tendencia muy preocupante, y todavía hay mucho que aprender sobre la efectividad de su funcionamiento.</p> <p>Bill Frelick del Observatorio de Derechos Humanos («HRW», por sus siglas en inglés) escribió <a href="https://www.hrw.org/news/2016/12/06/impact-externalization-migration-controls-rights-asylum-seekers-and-other-migrants">un informe realmente brillante</a> sobre cómo se procesa el asilo externo en América Central. En mi opinión, hace una crítica bastante mordaz de ese sistema, de las tasas de reconocimiento, de la voluntad del funcionariado para adjudicar de forma favorable asilo o refugio, para que después se obligue a las personas a irse de todas maneras y se las ponga en una situación en que el país de acogida ya los podría haber identificado como no merecedores de la protección internacional de refugiados. Creo que esto plantea algunos asuntos delicados.</p> <p><strong>Cameron: ¿Alguna otra cosa que le gustaría agregar?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ben:</strong> Oh, hay mucho más que decir, pero quizás hay dos cosas específicas para nuestro trabajo en la <a href="http://www.idcoalition.org/">Coalición Internacional contra la Detención</a>. Una es que en los últimos dos años nos hemos centrado más especialmente en la prohibición absoluta de la detención de niñas, niños y familias migrantes, otra tendencia en aumento que estamos observando y que es bastante preocupante. Para justificar esto se utiliza de nuevo la retórica de crisis, donde se implementa la detención de una manera muy coercitiva y dañina, incluso para las personas más vulnerables. Creo que hay un mensaje muy claro desde la sociedad civil, así como también desde una cohorte amplia de personas expertas de la ONU: esto es una práctica inaceptable a nivel global y debe terminar.</p> <p>La otra tiene que ver con lo que me preguntó antes sobre la normalización de las prácticas de detención. Creo que uno de los antídotos preparados para esto son las alternativas a la detención. Se ha investigado mucho y se han desarrollado las mejores prácticas en torno a este tema, y nuestra organización ha trabajado bastante para identificar esas mejores prácticas exitosas y elementos clave en las alternativas a la detención.</p> <p>Descubrimos que hay más de 250 ejemplos en los 70 países en los que tenemos miembros en terreno, que van desde la intervención temprana y los programas de detección, hasta modelos de viviendas comunitarias y alternativas de liberación para personas que puedan haber sido detenidas por error. Existen muchas opciones, y no es necesario usar medidas de detención severas y coercitivas para cumplir los objetivos de migración legítima de un país. De hecho, las alternativas tienden a facilitar más la cooperación con los procesos continuos de migración regular que las naciones pretenden alcanzar.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chus-lvarez/traduciendo-beyond-trafficking-and-slavery-la-historia-detr-s-del-hecho">Traduciendo Beyond Trafficking and Slavery: la historia detrás del hecho</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHUSA ÁLVAREZ</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kamala-kempadoo/revisitando-la-carga-del-hombre-blanco">Revisitando la «carga del hombre blanco»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KAMALA KEMPADOO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gallagher/trata-de-personas-de-la-indignaci-n-la-acci-n">Trata de personas: de la indignación a la acción</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/lucha-contra-la-trata-de-personas-encubrimiento-de-los-programas-de-luc">Lucha contra la trata de personas: encubrimiento de los programas de lucha contra la inmigración</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK AND ANDRÉ BROOME</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DAVID A. FEINGOLD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas">¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHRIS GILLIGAN</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Cameron Thibos Ben Lewis BTS en Español Tue, 07 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Ben Lewis and Cameron Thibos 118835 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Shadows of slavery part two: race, colour and origins in northwest Africa and the Middle East https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/laura-menin/shadows-of-slavery-part-two-race-colour-and-origins-in-northwest-africa-an <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery#sospt2">second section</a> of our collection&nbsp;<em>Shadows of Slavery</em>&nbsp;explores how race, colour and origins shape social dynamics and political imaginations across northwest Africa and the Middle East.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/4108105015_f7f54a82cc_o.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Guillaume Colin & Pauline Penot/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/guillaumecolin/4108105015/in/photolist-7g27uP-a3As7-csxk9E-ekdNB1-9zFcb-6TvGe6-dTcmH5-9X7TyJ-2xW5Yg-gD4EV-6B48Md-7Cn7LA-8MvDVc-ecSSxk-2zK2dH-9Hrqg6-9QiK2L-2zzQHv-6QEr1H-cr15Uy-EBfWF-2zGcKH-6QMEcw-cubBZJ-xSnhn-5oafhf-g1Jbc-5ofqvW-9QiNnQ-bhQ9n-bhQ9Y-bsLUZv-bXkxV5-agaEg3-9L9bEF-f78fcb-5iYUP-eFkQYx-eFrXjA-eFkRkX-nxfMPK-nxfEBP-nxhU2G-ng4gzU-nxySAL-5nL3Jd-dNfWJo-3Ltzx-8sgjjF-y9trg">CC (by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p>Over the past decade, growing public and media attention to the racial and colour-based discrimination faced by black Africans in the Maghreb and in the Middle East – be they sub-Saharan African migrants, slave descendants, black Maghrebians or <em>haratin</em> (a term generally translated as &#39;freed blacks&#39; or &#39;free blacks&#39;) – has opened up new spaces to debate the relationship between &#39;racism&#39; and legacies of slavery in the two regions.</p> <p>Whereas societal debates on slavery and its contemporary legacies are far from new in a context like Mauritania, where former slaves and slave descendants have struggled for decades against enduring slavery and descent-based discrimination, in many other North African and Middle Eastern countries they have emerged only relatively recently or remain unspoken. This is perhaps because, as the Moroccan historian Chouki El Hamel <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13629380208718472">notes</a>, a “culture of silence” has long prevented these countries from engaging with, and discussing overtly, questions of race, slavery, and colour. </p> <p>Contributors featured in <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery#sospt2">this second section of <em>Shadows of slavery: refractions of the past, challenges of the present</em></a> seek to unpack the questions of race, colour, and origin in different post-slavery contexts in West Africa, North Africa, and the Middle East by interrogating their connections with local histories of slavery and their contemporary legacies. Drawing on fresh case studies from Mauritania, Yemen, Morocco, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, and Senegal, the contributors reflect on the complex intersections of historical and contemporary dynamics that shape present imaginations of &#39;blackness&#39;, black identities, and belonging. They also look at new forms of racial discrimination and activism based on specific constructions of race. The ambition is to offer a comparative reflection on the multiple ethnographic manifestations, and performative powers, of the racial legacies of slavery in contemporary northwest Africa and the Middle East.</p> <p>Only a few authors have looked at the racial legacies of slavery in these contexts to date, in contrast to the relatively large amounts of scholarly attention shown to the memory of the transatlantic slave trade and race in the post-slavery Americas. That has thankfully started to change, especially after Bernard Lewis’ (1990) <a href="https://books.google.it/books/about/Race_and_Slavery_in_the_Middle_East.html?id=WdjvedBeMHYC&amp;redir_esc=y"><em>Race and Slavery in the Middle East</em>: <em>A historical inquiry</em></a> opened up new lines of inquiry and research on the topic. Since then, a growing body of historical works (think Ronald Segal, Bouazza Benachir, Ehud Toledano, John Hunwick, Eve Troutt Powell, Paul Lovejoy, Terence Walz, Kenneth Cuno, Bruce Hall, Chouki El Hamel, Ismael Montana and Behnaz Mirzai) has significantly enriched our knowledge of the history of slavery and race in West Africa and the Mediterranean Muslim world. Along with historians, a number of anthropologists have furthermore explored the shadows of slavery in the lived experiences of slave descendants and <em>haratin</em>, especially in Mauritania and in the Maghreb area. </p> <p>Alongside growing scholarly attention to questions of race, colour and (post-)slavery, since the early 2000s magazines such as <em>Jeune Afrique</em> have published <a href="http://www.jeuneafrique.com/112359/archives-thematique/etre-noire-en-tunisie/">personal testimonies</a> of both Black Maghrebians and sub-Saharan Africans, opening societal discussions on the previously taboo topics of racism and racial discrimination. The questions posed regarding identity and discrimination in these early narratives became more urgent following the protests and revolutions that took place in many North African and Middle Eastern countries in 2011.</p> <p>In post-revolution Tunisia, for example, we have seen unprecedented forms of black rights activism that question the very idea that black emancipation can exist without a continued struggle against racism. In 2014, in Morocco, the national campaign “<a href="https://telquel.ma/2014/03/19/campagne-de-lutte-contre-le-racisme-une-premiere-au-maroc_132875">My name is not a negro</a>” (<em>ma smitish &#39;azzi</em>) gave public visibility to the issue of racism in Moroccan society. In March 2016, a network of associations launched the international anti-racist campaign <a href="http://www.jeuneafrique.com/313144/politique/ni-esclave-ni-negre-coup-denvoi-de-la-premiere-campagne-transmaghrebine-contre-le-racisme/">“Neither serfs nor negro: stop that&#39;s enough”</a> (<em>ni oussif, ni azzi: baraka et yezzi</em>) in Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, and Mauritania. From Mauritania to Yemen, local anti-racist movements and societal debates have enabled novel political practices, languages and subjectivities to emerge.</p> <p>To what extent, we ask, are current anti-racist movements and debates on race able to capture the complexity and multiplicity of the experience of ‘blackness’? What histories and vocabularies are mobilised to raise public awareness and attain political goals? </p> <h2>The politics of &#39;blackness&#39; in northwest Africa and the Middle East</h2> <p>Tracing the local meanings of race, with its complex relations to ideas of colour, origin, and descent, some of the pieces in this section discuss the varied ways in which the racial legacies of slavery are evoked and mobilised in the different forms of activism, political subjectivities, and societal debates.</p> <p>In Mauritania, where slavery was abolished in 1981, the anti-slavery organisation El Hor has denounced the persistence of slavery and its consequences on the lives of the <em>haratin</em> in terms of the socio-political stigmatisation and chromatic demonisation. However, as <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/giuseppe-maimone/are-haratines-black-moors-or-just-black">Giuseppe Maimone shows</a>, with IRA Mauritanie, a local organisation founded by Biram Dah Abeid in 2008, ideas of colour and racial discrimination have started to replace the classic focus on slavery and descent-based forms of discrimination of previous antislavery movements.</p> <p><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/e-ann-mcdougall/politics-of-slavery-racism-and-democracy-in-mauritania">Ann McDougall’s piece</a> expands this discussion by comparing Dah Abeid’s political language and action to the political thought of the Messaoud, the founder of the NGO SOS Esclaves established in 1995. Differently from Dah Abeid, Messaoud does not conceive the historical enslavements of the <em>haratin</em> in Mauritania and their current marginality to mere chromatic opposition between socially ‘blacks’ and ‘whites’, as it was in the United States, but rather regards slavery as the key social institution to understand present unequal relations. Central to Maimone’s and McDougall’s pieces is the idea that the history of slavery plays a critical role in present-day racism and descent-based discrimination, and to the different forms of activism and political vocabularies that struggle to end them.</p> <p>Colour is a powerful tool for political mobilisation, as <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/luca-nevola/on-colour-and-origin-case-of-akhdam-in-yemen">Luca Nevola’s piece on Yemen</a> shows. There a political discourse based on colour has been mobilised by the <em>akhdam</em>, a dark-skinned marginalised group, to gain a public voice and denounce their socioeconomic and political discrimination. As Nevola argues, in a society in which individuals and groups are ranked according to their genealogical origin, an emphasis on colour entails a crucial shift in the common-sense representations of this group. This is not only because questions of race and colour have long been surrounded by silence. It is also because, despite the presence of longstanding colour prejudices in these regions, local constructions of race conventionally centre on questions of genealogical origin (<em>asl</em>) and social status more than mere skin colour. In this sense, an idea of anti-black racism, or racism based on skin colour, emerges as the product of both recent local developments and global encounters. Crucially, indeed, Nu&#39;man al-Hudheyfi, the political leader of the <em>akhdam</em>, reference prominent figures like Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela to give international visibility to their political struggle. </p> <p>While in Mauritania societal debates and anti-racist activism centre mainly on the situation of the <em>haratin</em> and in Yemen on the situation of the <em>akhdam</em>, in Morocco sub-Saharan African migrants remain the focus of attention. The growing public attention to violence and discrimination against sub-Saharan Africans has recently opened a debate on the issue of anti-black racism and its connections to the history of slavery. Against the backdrop of these debates, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/laura-menin/in-skin-of-black-senegalese-students-and-young-professionals-in-rabat">Laura Menin shows</a> how Senegalese students and young professionals experience, interpret, and reckon with racism in their everyday lives. Their stories suggest that while the legacies of slavery continue to affect local constructions of ‘blackness’, current racism against black Africans also speaks to contemporary Moroccan dynamics where media stigmatisation, unemployment, widespread poverty and social insecurity work together to nourish social tensions and resentment vis-à-vis the new comers. </p> <p>In other contexts, colour attribution reveals more about local dynamics of power, status and origin than colour itself. This emerges clearly in <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marta-scaglioni/she-is-not-abid-blackness-among-slave-descendants-in-southern-tunisia">Marta Scaglioni’s piece</a> on the meanings and practices associated to ‘blackness’ among the ‘Abid Ghbonton, a community of slave descendants in southern Tunisia. She shows how visions of ‘blackness’ rooted in the history of slavery in Tunisia re-emerge, in different guises, in her interlocutors’ everyday lives and aesthetics. This makes both ‘blackness’ and colour central concerns, especially for women in relation to marriage, beauty, and social prestige.</p> <p>Not all countries have, like post-revolution Tunisia, begun to centre questions of race and colour in public debates, however. In other contexts, like the Emirates, these remain taboo topics. Former slaves became Emirati citizens in 1971, several years after abolition in 1963, and since then the process of modern state-building has sought to include them within a single ‘Arab’ national identity. As a consequence, the roots of many Emiratis in the Indian Ocean and East Africa have become lost. They have not been forgotten however. As an <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/bts-anonymous/the-multiple-roots-of-emiratiness">anonymous contributor demonstrates</a>, even though the slave past is officially silenced the daily dynamics of colour, origin, and race expose the limits of Emirati citizenship in absorbing difference.</p> <p>It is often when marriage is at stake that questions of colour and origin matter, making a slavery past vividly present in people&#39;s lives. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alice-bellagamba/whom-should-i-marry-genealogical-purity-and-shadows-of-slavery-in-sou">Alice Bellagamba&#39;s contribution</a> focuses precisely on marriage in the Kolda region of Senegal as one important site where the shadows of slavery become palpable. In this context, a marriage between a slave descendant and a person of free or noble ancestry is not only met with social opprobrium on the side of the latter, but also considered unideal by the person ‘marrying up’. Even though an increasing number of young people aspire to a marriage based on love rather than on local norms, questions of origin and race continue to have an impact in a context where marriage remains a key factor of social reproduction.</p> <p>Taken together, the pieces in this section reveal that the processes of abolition and emancipation followed different paths and took place at different times in North Africa and the Middle East, and that the consequences have also varied greatly depending on the context. Yet while not all black-skinned people are descendants of slavery, nor are all slave descendants black, one important legacy that this history has left behind across the board is the close connection between blackness and slavery in the popular imagination. This had led socially ‘white’ people to position socially ‘black’ people in lower or subordinate positions.</p> <p>Perhaps most importantly, what the pieces in this section demonstrate is that there is not one single answer to the question of the (racial) legacies left by centuries of African slavery and the slave trade in these regions, but many different situations that require careful examination and contextualisation. The multiple ways in which ideas of race, colour and origin are embodied, contested, and mobilised by different social actors reveal precisely this irreducible diversity and complexity.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-anoth-sidebox"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Shadows of slavery III: 'Blackness' in North Africa and the Middle East</strong></p> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/laura-menin/being-black-in-north-africa-and-middle-east">Being 'black' in North Africa and the Middle East</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LAURA MENIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/laura-menin/in-skin-of-black-senegalese-students-and-young-professionals-in-rabat">“In the skin of a black”: Senegalese students and young professionals in Rabat</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LAURA MENIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/luca-nevola/on-colour-and-origin-case-of-akhdam-in-yemen">On colour and origin: the case of the akhdam in Yemen</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LUCA NEVOLA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/giuseppe-maimone/are-haratines-black-moors-or-just-black">Are Haratines black Moors or just black?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GIUSEPPE MAIMONE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marta-scaglioni/she-is-not-abid-blackness-among-slave-descendants-in-southern-tunisia">“She is not a ‘Abid”: blackness among slave descendants in southern Tunisia</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARTA SCAGLIONI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/bts-anonymous/the-multiple-roots-of-emiratiness">The multiple roots of Emiratiness: the cosmopolitan history of Emirati society</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BTS ANONYMOUS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alice-bellagamba/whom-should-i-marry-genealogical-purity-and-shadows-of-slavery-in-sou">Whom should I marry? Genealogical purity and the shadows of slavery in southern Senegal</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALICE BELLAGAMBA</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Laura Menin Shadows of slavery III: 'Blackness' in North Africa and the Middle East Mon, 06 Aug 2018 17:35:50 +0000 Laura Menin 119154 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Shadows of slavery part one: lives and memories https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alice-bellagamba/shadows-of-slavery-part-one-lives-and-memories <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery#sospt1">first section</a> of our collection <em>Shadows of Slavery</em>&nbsp;explores the continuing power of the past in shaping the everyday lives of 'slave descendants'.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/34177537076_21b33fcce8_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Yoann Gauthier/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/144239902@N04/34177537076/in/photolist-U59P3C-kPLRK-iJWYsC-TZPeFi-52bbnj-9JKisg-9rKcWX-yusz8T-9t1zKt-boSHze-edKCAU-edKEkL-dZUYxo-52bbDJ-8DaViS-5EqZVq-6Arq1i-JGydp-9CjmXV-djw3H2-kPQ6x-6R1ScJ-8CobW9-9Cnka7-KuvvMM-7Z6noB-Maf84-eFkQNp-dWruhS-8NMd4E-LfBWhu-9pMJGt-y1uMoM-edEmSM-5zxV5V-osM6Vm-9KzhUG-bK2vhK-5W22c9-edKYG7-KHB6ZY-iUhEbo-zxovcb-9CniYQ-f2m6vQ-XvXz3R-6AYYE4-3kHERW-3Lt1m-3rwe3i">CC (by-nc)</a></p> <p>“I do not know the day, and I do not know the time. I only know it will end one day!” said Mohammadou, while we were talking about the legacies of slavery in one of the rural communities of the Upper Gambia in 2008. After decades of travel and work out of The Gambia, Mohammadou was ageing at home. His comment referred to the marginalities associated with his slave ancestry and to the rather conservative attitude of his community in this respect.</p> <p>His father settled in the village during the early part of the twentieth century, when the British colonial administrations had already declared the end of slavery and of the slave trade. He married a freed slave woman, who continued to serve the family of the former masters throughout her life. “Slavery is in the womb”, goes a local proverb. Mohammadou and his siblings inherited their mother’s status, while her labour obligations died with her.</p> <p>Being ‘slaves’ meant, for them, acknowledging and valorising her sufferance and sacrifice. Socially, they remained on the corners of village leadership, because they knew that the offspring of the former masters would hardly accept to follow people that hailed from a once subordinate social stratum. Out of the village, slave ancestry was irrelevant, but within its boundaries, it shaped marriage alliances and political and religious careers as much as networks of solidarity and collaboration. For however much they disliked it, Mohammadou and his siblings accepted their legacy as a matter of respect towards their mother and because it was the very reason of their belonging to the community.</p> <h2>The present power of the past</h2> <p>In many parts of the African continent, the histories of late nineteenth century internal enslavement and the slave trade matter today. Putting an end to both, and freeing Africans from the grip of slavers and tyrants, was part of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century rhetoric of the ‘civilising mission’, which legitimised the European conquest of Africa.</p> <p>The ground realities of colonialism were different however. The freedom that ‘freed’ slaves, achieved thanks to the colonisers, was always a colonial freedom; framed by the restrictions and abuses that affected the lives of all natives. Besides, colonial administrations supported the interests of former slave owners against those of freed slaves whenever it served political and social stability. Emancipation was real but slow, and interlaced with a variety of unfreedoms. Forced labour, for example, was considered by colonial administrations as perfectly legitimate. Today, it is classified together with ‘modern’ slavery.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">The freedom that ‘freed’ slaves, achieved thanks to the colonisers, was always a colonial freedom.</p> <p>The agency of the slaves, rather than external intervention, was key to their liberation. They entered the ranks of the low skilled colonial labour force. They migrated where nobody cared about their social origins. Those who stayed close to their former masters strove to achieve honour and recognition according not to abstract notions of freedom but in the concrete terms set up by the historical trajectories of their communities. </p> <p>Reading the traces of African late nineteenth and twentieth century processes of slave emancipation, and linking these processes to contemporary marginalities, is a difficult but important task. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/shadows-of-slavery#sospt1">The first part of <em>Shadows of slavery: refractions of the past, challenges of the present</em></a> reaches the conclusion that the legacies of slavery inform and structure current forms of social, political, and economic marginalisation and of racial discrimination in many post abolition contexts. There is no simple determinism however. Rather, these legacies intermingle with changing labour regimes and new historical opportunities of social and political emancipation to produce a variety of different outcomes.</p> <p>The most difficult part is to trace the present of individuals, groups, and regions that in the past experienced enslavement, and to understand the past trajectories of those who today are locally classified as ‘slave descendants’. There is evidence in the colonial archives but also silences. In addition to success stories of upward social mobility, oral history and ethnography disclose individual and collective trajectories fraught with stumbles, dead ends, and steps back into spirals of limited resources, debt, and proletarisation.</p> <h2>On lives and memories</h2> <p>In some cases, a present of social exclusion and economic vulnerability grafts directly onto histories of late nineteenth century capture and purchase. The regions of southern Senegal studied by Alice Bellagamba are precisely this type of context: families of ‘slave descendants’ have kindled memories of how their ancestors turned into slaves, either by capture or purchase. But in many other cases, connections with enslavement are indirect. Mohammadou and his brothers did not know how their mother achieved that status in the first place. Was she born from slave parents? Was she an orphan from another ethnic group? She was classified as a slave, and through marriage their father entered into the same social stratum as a result of the post-abolition strategies put in place by former masters to retain their political, social and economic supremacy. The category of ‘slave descendant’, <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alice-bellagamba/legacies-of-slavery-in-southern-senegal">Alice Bellagamba concludes in her contribution</a>, “tends to simplify and group together multiple, and often divergent, individual trajectories and histories”.</p> <p>The same happens in relation to vernacular terms that indicate the once freeborn section of the population. What freedom is, exactly, and how this much cherished notion changes according to historical periods and to the positionality of individuals and community deserves more attention.</p> <p>The case of Mauritania is emblematic of the resistance of former masters to accept the end of the control exerted over their slaves. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/e-ann-mcdougall/life-in-nouakchott-is-not-true-liberty-not-at-all-living-legacies-of-s">Ann McDougall focuses</a> on the individuals of slave ancestry who leave the rural areas to carve out a living niche in the interstices of the capital city of Nouakchott. Their multiple experiences show a variety of ideas of liberty at work. The crucial point, she suggests, is to understand from people themselves how the legacies of slavery can become a resource to address poverty and reduce vulnerability. Which meaning do they give to that past in their individual and communal lives? </p> <p><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marta-scaglioni/emancipation-and-music-post-slavery-among-black-tunisians">Marta Scaglioni</a>’s contribution on Tunisia points to another important element: relations with a real or alleged slave past evolve across generations. While elderly black Tunisians have turned the association between slave ancestry and music into an economic resource for social emancipation, the youths aspire for more. They are not looking for socio-economic niches that allow them to thrive, but for the empowerment of their rights as Black Tunisians. </p> <p><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/valerio-colosio/memories-and-legacies-of-enslavement-in-chad">Valerio Colosio</a> looks at Chadian local politics to uncover the contemporary reformulation of the Guera region’s relationships with the slave trade. Was the Guera a slave reservoir? Historical evidence to support this interpretation is not enough, but local people think of their past in this terms and act consequentially in the political arena. The label ‘<em>yalnas</em>’, which in Chadian Arabic mean ‘the sons of the people’, refers to this past in an ambiguous way. The term describes the slaves whom the French resettled in the region after the conquest as well as slave raiders.</p> <p>For her part, the case of northern Ghanaian girls moving south in search of work offers <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alessandra-brivio/kayaye-girls-in-accra-and-long-legacy-of-northern-ghanaian-slavery">Alessandra Brivio</a> the chance to show how ‘free’ choice often exists against the backdrop of broader structural constraints. Indeed, the girls she meets in Accra’s markets face biases that stem from a long history of slavery and exploitation. These biases, in turn, legitimise their further exploitation.</p> <p><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marco-gardini/malagasy-domestic-workers-from-slavery-to-exploitation-and-further-emanc">Marco Gardini</a>, by contrast, uses life histories to explore what happens when the present of bondage and the past of slavery collide in the biography of two particular individuals. Fanja and Mirana both endured severe restrictions on their personal freedom while working as domestic workers abroad in order to support the emancipation struggles of their families at home. Their bondage today was a pathway to their freedom from yesterday. Marco, the external observer, agreed with Fanja and Mirana, the insiders, that the continuity between the past enslavement of their ancestors and their own present bondage was striking.</p> <p>The last contribution paves the way to the exploration of the racial legacies of slavery. <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/laura-menin/racialisation-of-marginality-sub-saharan-migrants-stuck-in-morocco">Laura Menin</a> focuses on the sub-Saharan, low skilled labour force in Morocco. Originally on their way to Europe, these migrants were stopped in Morocco by European Union border policies. They integrated onto the margins of Morocco urban economies, and once there ideas of slavery became instrumental to denounce the harshness of their condition, and the brutalities they experienced in Morocco.</p> <p>These individuals may be personally associated with old histories of enslavement, as they hail from countries such as Ghana, Senegal, and Nigeria where the legacies of slavery are significant. That is not the point, however. Here, slavery becomes a metaphorical condition to rally again the injustices of present times. Two things emerge very clearly from each of these pieces. First, in addition to the <a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2lN4rGTopsaUEVaRXk2eXJ2WFU/view">legacies of slavery in the North Atlantic</a>, it is time to push the study of the afterlives of slavery to other regions of the world. Second, these afterlives of slavery are many, and they are varied.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-anoth-sidebox"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span style="font-size:110%"><strong>The shadows of slavery</strong></span><br /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alice-bellagamba/living-in-shadows-of-slavery">Living in the shadows of slavery</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALICE BELLAGAMBA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marta-scaglioni/emancipation-and-music-post-slavery-among-black-tunisians">Emancipation and music: post-slavery among black Tunisians</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARTA SCAGLIONI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/e-ann-mcdougall/life-in-nouakchott-is-not-true-liberty-not-at-all-living-legacies-of-s">‘Life in Nouakchott is not true liberty, not at all’: living the legacies of slavery in Nouakchott, Mauritania</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">E. ANN MCDOUGALL</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/valerio-colosio/memories-and-legacies-of-enslavement-in-chad">Memories and legacies of enslavement in Chad</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">VALERIO COLOSIO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/gloria-carlini/ghetto-ghana-workers-and-new-italian-slaves">Ghetto Ghana workers and the new Italian ‘slaves’</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GLORIA CARLINI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/antonio-de-lauri/brick-kiln-workers-and-debt-trap-in-pakistani-punjab">Brick kiln workers and the debt trap in Pakistani Punjab</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIO DE LAURI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/marco-gardini/malagasy-domestic-workers-from-slavery-to-exploitation-and-further-emanc">Malagasy domestic workers: from slavery to exploitation and further emancipation?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MARCO GARDINI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alessandra-brivio/kayaye-girls-in-accra-and-long-legacy-of-northern-ghanaian-slavery">Kayaye girls in Accra and the long legacy of northern Ghanaian slavery</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA BRIVIO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/laura-menin/racialisation-of-marginality-sub-saharan-migrants-stuck-in-morocco">The racialisation of marginality: sub-Saharan migrants stuck in Morocco</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">LAURA MENIN</span> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Alice Bellagamba Shadows of slavery I: Living in the shadows of slavery Mon, 06 Aug 2018 16:42:14 +0000 Alice Bellagamba 119152 at https://www.opendemocracy.net NEW PODCASTS: The future of trade unions – masterclass series https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/tom-hunt/new-podcast-future-of-trade-unions <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Revitalising trade unions depends on new ideas and learning from what works. A new series of podcasts co-produced with Unions 21 presents new insights on key issues facing unions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/PA-26167791.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Philip Toscano/PA Archive/PA Images. All rights reserved.</p> <p><a href="http://www.unions21.org.uk/">Unions 21</a>, Beyond Trafficking and Slavery, and the <a href="http://speri.dept.shef.ac.uk/">Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute</a> (SPERI) at the University of Sheffield have teamed up to produce a new series of trade union masterclass podcasts. </p> <p>Unions 21 will release new episodes every Monday for the next five weeks, each with a different senior union leader or academic working on union organising. Styled as ‘mini-TED talks’, the topics will range from the need for a renaissance of private sector bargaining, cross-border trade unionism, and union governance to the importance of union learning and education programmes, and how unions can effectively use mobile apps and games.</p> <p>The podcasts are part of BTS and SPERI’s on-going collaboration on the future of union organisation. Each episode begins with a short talk from our guest and ends with analysis from <a href="https://twitter.com/beckyunions21">Becky Wright</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/simonsapper">Simon Sapper</a> from Unions 21 and <a href="https://twitter.com/tomhunt100">Tom Hunt</a> from SPERI. </p> <p>The first podcast is out today (6 August) and the series will run until 3 September, with a new episode released every Monday. Listen in on the <a href="http://www.unions21.org.uk/podcasts">Unions 21 website</a> or subscribe via your preferred podcast provider using this link: <a href="https://unions21.podbean.com/feed.xml">https://unions21.podbean.com/feed.xml</a></p> <h2>Our guests over the next five weeks</h2> <div style="margin-left:25px;text-indent:-8px;"> <p><strong>• <a href="https://twitter.com/mikeclancy1?lang=en">Mike Clancy</a>, general secretary of the <a href="https://www.prospect.org.uk/">Prospect trade union</a></strong>. Mike’s talk focuses on the importance of collective voice at work and the imperative for unions to focus on reviving collective bargaining in the private sector.</p> <iframe src="https://www.podbean.com/media/player/sgpd3-96ad1d&?from=site&skin=1&fonts=Helvetica&auto=0&download=0&share=1&btn-skin=104" height="100" width="100%" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" data-name="pb-iframe-player" style="margin:5px 0 10px;"></iframe> <p><strong>• <a href="https://twitter.com/maryboustedneu?lang=en">Mary Bousted</a>, joint general secretary of the <a href="https://t.co/hjoApXAX5Y">National Education Union</a>. </strong>Mary highlights the importance of unions providing learning opportunities for their members and why learning must be built into unions and not considered a bolt-on.</p> <iframe src="https://www.podbean.com/media/player/azkjq-971de3&?from=site&skin=1&fonts=Helvetica&auto=0&download=0&share=1&btn-skin=104" height="100" width="100%" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" data-name="pb-iframe-player" style="margin:5px 0 10px;"></iframe> <p><strong>• <a href="http://www.open.ac.uk/people/pb9435">Peter Bloom</a>, senior lecturer and head of the Department of People and Organisations at the Open University</strong>. Peter discusses why unions should embrace popular mobile apps like WhatsApp that enable members to self-organise, and how unions can use online games to spread knowledge. </p> <iframe src="https://www.podbean.com/media/player/5rmer-9798de-pb?from=share&skin=1&share=1&fonts=Helvetica&download=0&skin=1&btn-skin=104" height="100" width="100%" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" data-name="pb-iframe-player" style="margin:5px 0 10px;"></iframe> <p><strong>• Garry Elliott, head of organising at <a href="https://www.nautilusint.org/en/">Nautilus International</a>. </strong>Garry talks about how Nautilus, a union for maritime professionals in the UK, Netherlands and Switzerland, operates across borders and the success it has had negotiating with Shell International.</p> <iframe src="https://www.podbean.com/media/player/hupt2-97ed74&?from=site&skin=1&fonts=Helvetica&auto=0&download=0&share=1&btn-skin=104" height="100" width="100%" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" data-name="pb-iframe-player" style="margin:5px 0 10px;"></iframe> <p><strong>• <a href="https://twitter.com/csullivancsp?lang=en">Claire Sullivan</a>, director of employment relations at the <a href="http://www.csp.org.uk/">Chartered Society of Physiotherapy</a>. </strong>Claire discusses why union governance structures are critical for member engagement and to ensure a union is able to focus on its members’ priorities.</p> <iframe src="https://www.podbean.com/media/player/gxvms-98ad76-pb?from=share&skin=1&share=1&fonts=Helvetica&download=0&skin=1&btn-skin=104" height="100" width="100%" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" data-name="pb-iframe-player" style="margin:5px 0 10px;"></iframe> </div> <h2>The Unions 21 podcast</h2> <p>The <a href="http://www.unions21.org.uk/podcasts">Unions 21 podcast</a> is by and for trade unionists. Each episode provides a review of the latest news from the labour movement and features in-depth interviews with trade union leaders and activists, academics and commentators. </p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/antonia-bance/working-lives-of-under-30s-show-future-of-work-for-us-all">The working lives of the under-30s show the future of work for us all</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANTONIA BANCE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/abigail-hunt/back-to-future-women-s-work-and-gig-economy">Back to the future: women’s work and the gig economy</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ABIGAIL HUNT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/jane-mansour/falling-through-gaps-insecure-work-and-social-safety-net">Falling through the gaps: insecure work and the social safety net</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JANE MANSOUR</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/sebastien-flais/new-unions-old-laws-why-flexibility-is-key-in-gig-economy">New unions, old laws: why flexibility is key in the ‘gig economy’</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SEBASTIEN FLAIS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/adam-fishwick/organising-against-gig-economy-lessons-from-latin-america">Organising against the gig economy: lessons from Latin America?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ADAM FISHWICK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/becky-wright/gig/changing-world-of-work-and-trade-union-movement-s-response">The changing world of work and the trade union movement’s response</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BECKY WRIGHT</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/greetje-gretta-f-corporaal/gig/organising-freelancers-in-platform-economy-part-two">Organising freelancers in the platform economy: part two</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GREETJE (GRETTA) F. CORPORAAL</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/janine-berg-valerio-de-stefano/gig/it-s-time-to-regulate-gig-economy">It’s time to regulate the gig economy</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JANINE BERG<br />VALERIO DE STEFANO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/greetje-gretta-f-corporaal/gig/organising-freelancers-in-platform-economy-part-one">Organising freelancers in the platform economy: part one</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">GREETJE (GRETTA) F. CORPORAAL</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alex-j-wood/trade-unions-internet-and-surviving-gig-economy">Trade unions, the internet, and surviving the gig economy</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALEX J. WOOD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/daniel-tomlinson/it-s-not-gig-economy-stupid">It’s not the gig economy, stupid.</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DANIEL TOMLINSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/alice-martin/gig/crisis-of-control-what-should-on-demand-workforce-be-demanding">A crisis of control: what should the on-demand workforce be demanding?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALICE MARTIN</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/tom-hunt/gig/same-as-it-ever-was-labour-rights-and-worker-organisation-in-modern-economy">Same as it ever was? Labour rights and worker organisation in the modern economy</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">TOM HUNT</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/alex-j-wood/three-lessons-labour-movement-must-learn-from-fight-for-15-at-walmart">Three lessons the labour movement must learn from the Fight for 15 at Walmart</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/antonia-jennings/call-for-revival-of-political-and-economic-education">A call for the revival of political and economic education</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/elena-arengo/it-comes-with-job-how-brands-share-responsibility-for-mass-faintings-in-c">It comes with the job: how brands share responsibility for mass faintings in Cambodian garment factories</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/tom-hunt/building-up-bundle-of-sticks-new-ideas-for-union-organising">Building up the bundle of sticks: new ideas for union organising</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/aaron-halegua/sexual-harassment-at-walmart-s-stores-and-suppliers-in-china">Sexual harassment at Walmart’s stores and suppliers in China</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/emily-kenway/unions-in-21st-century-adapt-to-survive-co-opt-to-grow">Unions in the 21st century: adapt to survive, co-opt to grow</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Tom Hunt Labour rights in the gig economy Mon, 06 Aug 2018 09:46:44 +0000 Tom Hunt 119143 at https://www.opendemocracy.net ¿Es utópico luchar por fronteras abiertas? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chris-gilligan/es-ut-pico-luchar-por-fronteras-abiertas <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>En Europa, miles de personas migrantes son prisioneras de los controles fronterizos. Y se preguntan: «¿acaso no somos seres humanos?» ¿Es utópico responderles que sí lo son? y ¿qué es necesario abrir las fronteras? <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/chris-gilligan/is-it-utopian-to-argue-for-open-borders">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/PA-24084170_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Hungarian soldiers patrol the border line between Serbia and Hungary near Roszke, southern Hungary, on 13 September 2015. Matthias Schrader/AP/Press Association Images. All rights reserved.</p> <h2>Por qué debemos luchar por abrir las fronteras</h2> <p>En la Europa contemporánea es preciso que todas aquellas personas que ansíen un mundo que ponga a los seres humanos en el centro se involucren en el desarrollo y la creación de argumentos exitosos a favor de la apertura de fronteras. El carácter inhumano de los controles de inmigración es evidente frente a los miles de seres humanos que mueren cada año en la peligrosa travesía para llegar a Europa. No mueren porque la travesía sea peligrosa en sí misma: mueren porque los Estados nación de Europa han hecho que este viaje sea peligroso.</p> <p>El carácter inhumano de los controles de inmigración es evidente, con los miles de seres humanos atrapados en los cruces de frontera, en campamentos, en centros de detención. Europa los atrae con mensajes de libertad y oportunidad. Europa los atrae con su abundancia y sus oportunidades de aprendizaje, y miles de personas han intentado alcanzar estas oportunidades. Han caminado, remado, nadado; se han arrastrado y corrido hacia la luz de una vida mejor.</p> <p>Y al llegar a las fronteras, al pisar nuestra tierra, al ponerse de pie y decir «queremos las mismas oportunidades que ustedes», las naciones europeas han respondido: «estas oportunidades no son para ustedes. Estas oportunidades son solo para algunas personas privilegiadas». Las personas migrantes quedan atrapadas en las fronteras, en los campamentos, en los centros de detención; quedan atrapadas porque las naciones europeas son incapaces de reconocer su humanidad. Los Estados nación fracasan en reconocer su humanidad. Solo reconocen la nacionalidad. Debemos luchar por fronteras abiertas porque millones de personas, de todas partes del mundo, exigen su libertad de movimiento, y día a día se les niega esa libertada a cientos de miles de ellas.</p> <p>En las fronteras de Europa, en los mares traicioneros, en las rutas, en los campamentos, en los centros de detención y en el tortuoso limbo de la espera por el resultado de las solicitudes de asilo, cientos de miles de personas preguntan: «¿acaso no somos humanos?» Y la respuesta de cientos de miles de ciudadanas y ciudadanos en Europa es: «reconocemos su humanidad». Estas personas están organizando barcos de rescate. Están dando aventones a personas migrantes fatigadas. Están organizando cocinas comunitarias y otros puestos de comida. Están organizando colectas de ropa y juguetes. Están viajando por todo el continente para ayudar a entregar esta ayuda a las personas que la necesitan. Están ayudando a aliviar sus penas. Están ayudando a sepultar con dignidad a las personas muertas. Están entablando amistades con las personas detenidas. Están organizando asesoramiento legal. Están brindando alojamiento. Y están ayudando a mejorar el ánimo, a iluminar los recovecos más oscuros de nuestras almas, para ayudar a las personas a reír y llorar por la felicidad que nos da ser humanos.</p> <p>Todo esto es testimonio de la bondad y generosidad del ser humano. Todo esto es una respuesta a quienes con cinismo creen que los seres humanos son fundamentalmente codiciosos y egoístas. Sin embargo, todo esto es solo lidiar con los síntomas. Debemos desarrollar y proponer alegatos en favor de las fronteras abiertas porque necesitamos soluciones a largo plazo. Si no transformamos el panorama general, limitaremos nuestra perspectiva a lo que es en lugar de a lo que podría ser. Si no nos hacemos cargo de nuestro propio destino como humanidad, seguiremos a merced de otras fuerzas más allá de nuestro control inmediato: el mercado, la competencia entre los estados nacionales, las crisis económicas, los caprichos arbitrarios de la élite mundial...</p> <p>Es necesario que elaboremos y tengamos éxito en el debate por fronteras abiertas, ya que el problema no se trata solamente de personas refugiadas y o que solicitan asilo. Estamos hablando de la libertad del <em>ser humano</em>. Todos los seres humanos, ya sean trabajadores o trabajadoras migrantes, refugiados, solicitantes de asilo, estudiantes, parejas o familiares separadas por las fronteras creadas por los estados, tienen derecho a la libertad de movimiento.</p> <p>Necesitamos un enfoque humano frente a la migración. Debemos elaborar, proponer y ganar razonamientos que prioricen a la humanidad. Razonamientos que prioricen a las personas frente a la rentabilidad. Razonamientos que prioricen el libre movimiento sobre el libre mercado. Razonamientos que prioricen la humanidad sobre el humanitarismo. Razonamientos que prioricen la libertad humana sobre la gestión de los recursos humanos. Razonamientos que prioricen la libertad sobre la economía. Si el modo en el que organizamos actualmente la sociedad humana hace que sea imposible garantizar la libertad humana, entonces existe un problema con esta organización. Es un problema <em>para</em> la humanidad, no un problema <em>de</em> la humanidad. Las personas migrantes no son un problema: son seres humanos. Las personas migrantes no son un problema: las fronteras son un problema. Las personas migrantes no son un problema: son parte de la solución.</p> <h2>¿Qué sucedería si tuviéramos fronteras abiertas?</h2> <img style="padding-top:5px;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/PA-25502447_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Migrants cross a frozen stream as they make their way from the Macedonian border into Serbia in January 2016. Visar Kryeziu/AP/Press Association Images. All rights reserved.</p> <p>La idea de tener fronteras abiertas atemoriza a muchas personas en Europa (y en otras regiones ricas del planeta). Ven un mundo donde la guerra y el conflicto son algo cotidiano. Un mundo donde miles de millones de personas viven con menos de dos dólares por día. Ven un mundo de caos económico, inseguridad laboral, falta de vivienda y pobreza creciente. Un mundo en el que la gente vive con miedo de ataques terroristas. Uno en el que los vientos de cambio mundial derriban las certezas que siempre tuvieron. Ven un mundo en el que las fronteras son un medio para impedir la llegada del horror. Ven las fronteras como una defensa contra la agitada masa de problemas que amenazan con abrumar a la humanidad. Quieren seguridad, protección y certeza. Muchas personas con miedo exigen que se agreguen protecciones, policía y vigilancia en las fronteras. Los estados están construyendo cercas más altas, hacen retroceder a los barcos y les niegan la posibilidad de ingreso. Dicen que si abriéramos las fronteras mañana, sería un caos. Las calles de Europa serían peligrosas, tendríamos gente sin vivienda, habría pobreza.</p> <p>Sin embargo, impedir el libre movimiento de las personas no erradicará la pobreza ni la falta de viviendas, ni terminará con la guerra y la violencia. En el mejor de los casos, esto solo mantendrá la actual distribución desigual de miseria y oportunidades entre Occidente y el resto del mundo. Los ataques terroristas en París y Bruselas fueron horrendos. Fueron brutales e inhumanos. Siria y otras zonas de guerra en todo el mundo sufren ataques similares todos los días; sí, todos los días. Quienes se horrorizan por los ataques en París y Bruselas pero no sienten nada por las personas que se enfrentan a este tipo de brutalidad en otras partes del mundo están negando su propia humanidad. Quienes se niegan a reconocer la humanidad de otras personas, están matando su propia humanidad. La inhumanidad engendra inhumanidad.</p> <p>La reacción punitiva, represiva y fría que hoy caracteriza a gran parte del liderazgo europeo es parte del problema, no parte de ninguna solución. Las sanciones punitivas estatales —contra Afganistán, Iraq y Libia; contra la dinámica emancipadora de la Primavera árabe— han dado lugar a los horrores que la población europea teme sufrir hoy en día.</p> <p>Mantener las fronteras no supondrá un mejor futuro. Limitar la libre circulación no erradicará el miedo. Debemos tener una visión positiva. ¿Es utópico pensar así? Tal vez sí, tal vez no. La visión de un mundo mejor nos acompaña en estado embrionario. Está en las cientos de miles de obras de bondad y generosidad humana hacia las personas migrantes. Está en quienes reconocen la humanidad común que yace en el centro de la pluralidad de la diversidad humana. Podemos lograr un mundo mejor con estas obras positivas como base. En lugar de criminalizar el altruismo, debemos fomentarlo.</p> <h2>Libertad para todas y todos</h2> <p>Todo el mundo quiere libertad. El deseo de libertad es inherente al ser humano. Sin embargo, vivimos en un mundo en el que la libertad ajena se nos presenta como una amenaza a nuestra propia libertad. Nadie se opone a la libertad; a lo sumo, se oponen la libertad de otras personas. Lo que estamos viendo en Europa es una batalla por la libertad. Los estados nacionales están delimitando la zona de batalla. Separan la libertad de su ciudadanía de la libertad de las personas extranjeras.</p> <p>Debemos oponernos a sus intentos de dividir a la humanidad de esta manera. Debemos defender las fronteras abiertas. Debemos defender una sociedad en la que una oportunidad para una persona es una oportunidad para todas las personas. Defendiendo las fronteras abiertas estamos diciendo: «otro mundo es posible». Defendiendo las fronteras abiertas estamos diciendo: «reconocemos nuestra humanidad común». Defendiendo las fronteras abiertas estamos diciendo: «la libertad es indivisible». ¡Abramos las fronteras ya! ¡Otro mundo es posible!</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gallagher/trata-de-personas-de-la-indignaci-n-la-acci-n">Trata de personas: de la indignación a la acción</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/lucha-contra-la-trata-de-personas-encubrimiento-de-los-programas-de-luc">Lucha contra la trata de personas: encubrimiento de los programas de lucha contra la inmigración</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK AND ANDRÉ BROOME</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DAVID A. FEINGOLD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu">Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">FRANÇOIS CRÉPEAU</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Chris Gilligan BTS en Español Mon, 06 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Chris Gilligan 118834 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Una agenda nueva para facilitar la movilidad humana después de las cumbres de Naciones Unidas sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/fran-ois-cr-peau/una-agenda-nueva-para-facilitar-la-movilidad-humana-despu-s-de-las-cu <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>La movilidad es clave para el desarrollo y la prosperidad, y con la visión adecuada podemos crear vías legales más amplias para que la migración funcione para todo el mundo. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/safepassages/fran-ois-cr-peau/new-agenda-for-facilitating-human-mobility-after-un-summits-on-refuge">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/8572086727_81a291fd31_o.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Tastetwo/Flickr. (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)</p> <h2>El fracaso de las políticas de disuasión y de prohibición</h2> <p>Existen múltiples factores que influyen en el proceso de toma de decisiones de una persona que está pensando en migrar con respecto a cuándo, dónde y por qué desea migrar. Algunos de estos factores se describen a menudo como factores de «incitación y disuasión», cuyos ejemplos clásicos —aunque demasiados generalizados— son la pobreza y la guerra por un parte, y la oportunidad y la paz por la otra. Sin embargo, la discusión sobre estos factores es con frecuencia muy superficial, y a menudo no es más que alarmismo en relación con quienes «gorronean de la beneficencia» y «nos quitan el trabajo».</p> <p>Si bien los incentivos económicos para migrar son diversos y muy importantes para la mayoría, también son constantemente evaluados y analizados por quienes podrían ser potenciales migrantes. Es cierto que la mayoría de las personas migrantes, incluidas las refugiadas, intentan ir allí donde hay trabajo, donde pueden comenzar a integrarse y crear un futuro para sus hijas e hijos. También es cierto que en los principales países de destino existen puestos de trabajo disponibles para las personas migrantes, tanto en el mercado laboral formal como en el informal. Las personas migrantes responden a esta demanda de mano de obra; en circunstancias normales, cuando la demanda disminuye en una zona determinada, también disminuye la migración a esa zona.</p> <p>Ahora bien, si se pone un obstáculo entre las razones por las que las personas desean o requieren desplazarse y las razones por las que a la gente del país de destino les gustaría recibirlas, sin existir ningún otro cambio, se crean las condiciones perfectas para que prosperen los mercados laborales sumergidos y los mercados de tráfico de personas. Esta es una de las razones por la que es tan importante regular los canales de migración para las personas refugiadas y para las personas de bajos salarios que tanto se necesitan; las políticas represivas sólo afianzan aún más las operaciones de tráfico de personas y los mercados laborales sumergidos. La prohibición es parte del problema, no de la solución.</p> <p>La única manera de reducir realmente el tráfico de personas y la contratación antiética es debilitar a los traficantes de personas y a los reclutadores abusivos ofreciendo soluciones de movilidad reguladas, seguras, accesibles y asequibles, en forma de visados o de oportunidades de viaje sin visado, con todas las verificaciones de identidad y seguridad que un sistema eficaz de visados pueda proporcionar. En efecto, es necesario hacerse cargo del mercado de la movilidad. Las personas migrantes no desean estar indocumentadas. Prefieren pagar a un funcionario de visados que a un traficante de personas, prefieren llegar en avión que en un barco en mal estado, y prefieren ser parte del mercado laboral formal.</p> <p>Por estas razones, los intentos de externalizar las fronteras nacionales no detienen la migración en mayor grado que otros tipos de obstáculos, ya que no responden a las necesidades de movilidad ni a la escasez del mercado laboral. Además, la premisa de que los países de tránsito retendrán voluntariamente un número ilimitado de personas migrantes dentro de sus fronteras para impedir que lleguen a los destinos que desean, todavía no ha demostrado ser viable, y mucho menos humanitaria.</p> <h2>Desarrollo de políticas de movilidad con visión estratégica y a largo plazo.</h2> <p>El Norte global tiene la capacidad de integrar a millones de personas migrantes y refugiadas, pero no superará la actual sensación de crisis sin una visión y un argumento convincentes. Como ya mencionó el director de Human Rights Watch, Kenneth Roth, «si existiera una crisis, esta sería una crisis política, no de capacidad». No se podrá abordar la actual «crisis migratoria» (en Europa y en otros lugares) hasta que la clase política defina una visión estratégica a largo plazo de la política de movilidad y diversidad basada en los derechos humanos que dé sentido, coherencia y dirección a las acciones emprendidas en la actualidad.</p> <p>Necesitamos cambiar nuestra mentalidad colectiva y aceptar que las personas migrantes llegarán al Norte, sin importar cuán altos sean los muros, porque hay muchas buenas razones para hacerlo (por ejemplo: trabajo, educación, familia, aspiraciones personales). Por lo tanto, el objetivo debería ser que la mayoría de las personas que migran utilicen los canales oficiales para entrar y permanecer en los países de acogida.</p> <p>Hay dos ejes clave, que ya he presentado en varios informes<sup><a id="ffn1" href="#fn1" class="footnote">1</a></sup>:</p> <div style="margin-left:25px;text-indent:-8px;"> <p>• Desarrollar programas de reasentamiento para personas refugiadas que atiendan a un número de personas considerablemente mayor al actual 1%. El patrocinio privado será parte de ello.</p> <p>• El reconocimiento de nuestras propias necesidades de mano de obra <em>en todos los niveles de habilidades</em> y la oferta de más oportunidades de visado o de programas de viaje sin visado.</p> </div> <p>Los beneficios potenciales de dicho plan serían considerables, y de esta forma los movimientos de personas estarían en gran medida en sintonía con las necesidades del mercado. Tras la ampliación de la UE en 2005, un millón y medio de personas provenientes de centro Europa llegaron al Reino Unido e Irlanda y realizaron una gran contribución económica. Cuando la crisis estalló en 2009, muchas de ellas abandonaron el Reino Unido. Se trata de una movilidad que hay que destacar, que se ajusta a las necesidades laborales y a las habilidades individuales. Como objetivo a largo plazo deberíamos buscar esta movilidad no sólo entre las ciudades de nuestros países o entre zonas regionales como la UE, sino también a escala mundial.</p> <p>Esa movilidad facilitada tendría ventajas obvias, tales como:</p> <div style="margin-left:25px;text-indent:-8px;"> <p>• Una reducción importante del mercado para quienes trafican con personas</p> <p>• Permitir que los controles de seguridad se realicen en el extranjero.</p> <p>• Reducir considerablemente la carga de trabajo de los sistemas encargados de determinar la condición de persona refugiada en los países de destino.</p> <p>• Y lo que es más importante, ofrecer la oportunidad de demostrar al electorado de los países de destino que se respetan las fronteras, que las autoridades gestionan adecuadamente la migración, que no hay «situaciones caóticas», que existen mecanismos de acogida, que quienes emplean están integrando a las personas inmigrantes en el mercado laboral, que se han realizado inversiones en programas de integración y que la retórica alarmista de los populistas nacionalistas se basa en estereotipos, mitos y fantasías.</p> </div> <p>Este tipo de movilidad no es ciencia ficción. En las décadas de 1950 y 1960, millones de personas norteafricanas y turcas entraron en Europa a través de programas de transferencia de mano de obra apoyados por el estado, sin visado, o con un visado de visitante de fácil obtención, que luego pudieron convertir en un permiso de trabajo formal al encontrar trabajo. Casi no había mercado para el tráfico de personas. Nadie murió en el Mediterráneo. Sin embargo, los documentos de identidad y de viaje se revisaban en todas las fronteras.</p> <p>Por consiguiente, la idea no es disminuir los controles fronterizos. Al contrario, es hacerlos más eficaces reduciendo así los incentivos para eludirlos. Al facilitar a la mayoría de personas extranjeras el acceso a los documentos de viaje apropiados (tales como visados de reasentamiento de personas refugiadas, visados de visitantes, visados de reunificación familiar, visados de trabajo, visados de residencia o visados de estudiante), permitimos que los gobiernos concentren sus esfuerzos de inteligencia y disuasión en el pequeño porcentaje de individuos que realmente representan una amenaza.</p> <p>Podemos fijarnos el objetivo de lograr esta movilidad en el plazo de una generación, digamos un cuarto de siglo, mediante la expansión progresiva de la apertura de visados y de los regímenes de facilitación de visados, con hitos de referencia a lo largo del proceso.</p> <h2>Una visión a largo plazo requiere inversión a largo plazo</h2> <p>Para responder a la complejidad de la movilidad de las personas, los gobiernos necesitan elaborar una visión estratégica a largo plazo de cómo serán sus políticas de movilidad en una generación a partir de ahora, con plazos precisos e hitos de referencia para la evaluación y la rendición de cuentas. Para determinar las inversiones necesarias para alcanzar los objetivos, los estados ya realizan planificación estratégica en materia de energía, medio ambiente, infraestructuras, transporte público o políticas industriales. En el ámbito de la movilidad, esta estrategia también requerirá inversiones a largo plazo en políticas de diversidad e integración; en estrategias de educación; en proporcionar a las personas migrantes instrumentos para su propio empoderamiento; de acceso a la justicia; y de apoyo contra la marginación y la discriminación que fomentan la privación de sus derechos.</p> <p>Con respecto al objetivo 10.7 de la <em>Agenda para el Desarrollo Sostenible 2030</em>, los gobiernos acordaron «facilitar» la migración y la movilidad en los próximos quince años. «Facilitar» significa hacer que la migración sea más fácil y reducir los obstáculos a la movilidad. No significa fronteras abiertas ni absoluta libertad de circulación. Significa expandir las vías legales y desarrollar muchos más canales creativos de obtención de visados para todas las personas migrantes y refugiadas. Este es el objetivo principal.</p> <p>Los gobiernos y las demás partes interesadas deberían aprovechar esta oportunidad para garantizar que los pactos mundiales sobre personas refugiadas y migrantes no sean el final del proceso, sino el comienzo. Se podría concebir que los gobiernos logren acordar un pacto migratorio, por ejemplo, iniciar una «agenda» a quince años, complementaria a la <em>Agenda de desarrollo sostenible de 2030</em>, que incluiría sucesivos parámetros de referencia y mecanismos de rendición de cuentas.</p> <p>Dicha agenda estaría intercalada con reuniones anuales del Foro mundial sobre migración y desarrollo y con una serie de diálogos de alto nivel en la asamblea general de las Naciones Unidas -por ejemplo, cada cinco años- para garantizar que la implementación de la agenda se mantenga en curso. Dado que la adopción del pacto mundial está prevista para el 2018, la agenda podría comenzar en 2020 y llamarse <em>Agenda 2035 para facilitar la movilidad de personas</em>, o <em>Agenda 2035: implementación del 10.7</em>.</p> <h2>Intercambio de ideas sobre la Agenda de movilidad sostenible 2035</h2> <p>El contenido de la agenda aún está por definirse. Se necesitarán varios apartados, los que podrían incluir: visitas de corta duración, búsqueda de empleo, movilidad de estudiantes, movilidad dentro de las empresas, movilidad de personas jubiladas, movilidad para la creación de empresas, reunificación familiar, patrocinio familiar, residencia de larga duración y acceso a la ciudadanía.</p> <p><strong>La multiplicación del número de oportunidades de visado</strong> no será fácil para muchos países. Podría utilizarse el modelo de la UE de negociación de acuerdos de facilitación y liberalización de visados en otros países. Podría pensarse que para 2035 todos los estados tendrían acuerdos de facilitación de visados con sus países vecinos y de liberalización de visados con la mayoría. Esos acuerdos abarcarían los visados de visitante y de trabajo. No debería desalentarse el uso de un visado de visitante para la búsqueda de trabajo, al contrario: esta sería una manera que permitiría a las empresas empleadoras conocer a personas candidatas para los trabajos ofrecidos.</p> <p><strong>La unificación familiar</strong> debería considerarse un principio clave a implementar por todos los estados. Debería rechazarse completamente la idea de que los trabajadores y las trabajadoras migrantes puedan o deban vivir años, a veces décadas, lejos de sus familias. Todo trabajador o trabajadora migrante que permanezca efectivamente en el país de destino durante al menos seis meses, cualquiera que sea la duración del visado, debería tener la opción de traer a su familia para vivir juntos. Esto no fue un principio clave de los derechos humanos tras la segunda guerra mundial, pero la doctrina de los derechos humanos ha evolucionado y actualmente este principio debería considerarse una prioridad, aunque sólo sea por el bien de las niñas y niños.</p> <p><strong>Será difícil reducir los mercados laborales sumergidos</strong> de forma considerable. En la situación actual las empresas de los sectores económicos con bajos márgenes de ganancia están felices de contar con mano de obra barata, quienes consumen se congratulan de obtener precios bajos, las autoridades están satisfechas de que estas empresas sean rentables y puedan pagar impuestos, y las personas migrantes que son ilegales en virtud de la legislación de inmigración no se quejan por miedo a ser descubiertas, detenidas y deportadas. Sin embargo, la reducción de los mercados laborales sumergidos es fundamental para lograr la movilidad efectiva sin distorsiones. Si esos mercados se formalizaran, las personas migrantes ya no tendrían que vivir en las sombras de la sociedad y bajo el riesgo de ser explotadas, y podrían seguir con su vida si no encontraran un trabajo.</p> <p><strong>El acceso a la residencia permanente</strong> (o a los permisos de residencia de larga duración) debería ser una opción después de un tiempo razonable de residencia efectiva bajo cualquier régimen temporal. Personalmente elegiría cinco o seis años de residencia efectiva como referencia. Esto implicaría la derogación de normas tales como la <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/stephanie-j-silverman/at-any-cost-injustice-of-%E2%80%9C4-and-4-rule%E2%80%9D-in-canada">«4x4» canadiense </a>(cuatro años dentro, cuatro años fuera). Si la trabajadora migrante temporal cuenta con trabajo y paga impuestos, y la persona empleadora está satisfecha, ¿por qué excluirla?</p> <p><strong>El acceso a la ciudadanía</strong> también será difícil para una serie de países que tienen una concepción étnica o culturalmente exclusiva de la ciudadanía. Pero después de cinco o seis años de residencia permanente, que podrían ser seguidos de cinco o seis años más con el estatus de trabajadora o trabajador migrante temporal, pagando impuestos y sin cometer ninguna clase de delito, las personas migrantes deberían tener la opción de integrarse plenamente en la sociedad de acogida. De este modo se aplicaría el principio de «no tributación sin representación».</p> <p><strong>La incorporación de la diversidad</strong> en el relato nacional también se encontrará con resistencia, especialmente en países con una larga historia de discriminación contra las minorías, los pueblos indígenas o las personas extranjeras. Sin embargo, uno de los objetivos de la Agenda 2035 debería ser que se reconociera que, hoy en día, casi todos los países son países de origen, tránsito y destino. Dado que la movilidad debe reconocerse como un factor clave para la prosperidad, la diversidad debe reconocerse como clave para la sostenibilidad: la movilidad como factor de desarrollo no es sostenible si no se reconoce también la diversidad. La movilidad a través de las fronteras y la integración en las sociedades de acogida son interdependientes.</p> <p>En definitiva, los derechos humanos y laborales de las personas migrantes deberían estar en el epicentro de este proceso y centrarse en los siguientes principios:</p> <div style="margin-left:25px;text-indent:-8px;"> <p>• Es necesario reducir la explotación laboral. No se puede tolerar que sectores enteros de las economías nacionales sobrevivan solamente gracias a la «mano de obra barata». La competitividad, la productividad y la innovación requieren garantías para las personas trabajadoras.</p> <p>• Los sistemas de patrocinio (<em>kafala</em>) que vinculan el visado de trabajo a un empleador deberían eliminarse en favor de un visado de trabajo abierto, que permita a las trabajadoras y trabajadores migrantes moverse en el mercado laboral como cualquier otra persona, respondiendo a la demanda y oferta de puestos de trabajo.</p> <p>• Las inspecciones de trabajo deben centrarse en la aplicación de las condiciones laborales para todas las personas trabajadoras, independientemente de su estatus, y no en tratar de identificar a aquellas que están indocumentadas.</p> <p>• Son quienes emplean a personas migrantes indocumentadas las que deben ser denunciadas y castigadas adecuadamente, no las trabajadoras y trabajadores indocumentados. Castigar a las trabajadoras y trabajadores indocumentados los empuja a la clandestinidad, donde son silenciados y corren un mayor riesgo de ser explotados. El castigo al empleador aumenta el costo de la mano de obra barata, proporcionando así un desincentivo efectivo.</p> <p>• Las personas migrantes necesitan ser empoderadas para defender sus derechos. Debe fomentarse la sindicalización de las trabajadoras y trabajadores migrantes, independientemente de su situación. Debe facilitarse que estas personas tengan acceso a la justicia.</p> </div> <h2>Conclusión: negociar algunas ideas cruciales que sean específicas</h2> <p>Todo esto podría ser parte de la Agenda 2035, pero dado que todas estas ideas seguramente encontrarán una fuerte resistencia, es seguro que no todas serán incorporadas. Sin embargo, si pudiéramos ponernos de acuerdo sobre una proporción modesta de aumento de la movilidad y la diversidad habríamos avanzado y allanado el camino para futuros avances.</p> <p>Del mismo modo, sugiero que acordemos un pequeño número de medidas que faciliten la movilidad y refuercen el reconocimiento de la diversidad universal durante los próximos quince años. La negociación del pacto mundial sobre la migración nos ofrece esa oportunidad. A pesar de la actual reticencia de los gobiernos y de los controvertidos debates políticos, acontecimientos como la cumbre de septiembre de 2016 en Nueva York sugieren que la movilidad y la diversidad pueden ser cada vez más reconocidas y celebradas como características centrales de nuestras sociedades.</p> <p>Aunque la retórica de tipo nacionalista populista domina en la actualidad, espero que mediante el desarrollo de una agenda común a largo plazo, podamos ver más allá de sus fantasías y amenazas, y empezar a prepararnos para una narrativa diferente y más productiva.</p> <hr /> <ol id="footnotes"> <li id="fn1">Véase: Informe de la Relatoría Especial sobre los derechos humanos de las personas migrantes a la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas:«Proposals for the development of the global compact on migration», A/71/40767, 20 de julio de 2016; Informe de la Relatoría Especial sobre los derechos humanos de las personas migrantes, al Consejo de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas: «Bilateral and multilateral trade agreements and their impact on the human rights of migrants», A/HRC/32/40, 4 de mayo de 2016; Informe de la Relatoría Especial sobre los derechos humanos de las personas migrantes a la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas: «Recruitment practices and the human rights of migrants», A/70/310, 11 de agosto de 2015; Informe de la Relatoría Especial sobre los derechos humanos de las personas migrantes, al Consejo de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas:«Banking on mobility over a generation: follow-up to the regional study on the management of the external borders of the European Union and its impact on the human rights of migrants», A/HRC/29/36, 8 de mayo de 2015. <a href="#ffn1">&#x21A9;&#xFE0E;</a></li> </ol> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chus-lvarez/traduciendo-beyond-trafficking-and-slavery-la-historia-detr-s-del-hecho">Traduciendo Beyond Trafficking and Slavery: la historia detrás del hecho</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">CHUSA ÁLVAREZ</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kamala-kempadoo/revisitando-la-carga-del-hombre-blanco">Revisitando la «carga del hombre blanco»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">KAMALA KEMPADOO</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gallagher/trata-de-personas-de-la-indignaci-n-la-acci-n">Trata de personas: de la indignación a la acción</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/lucha-contra-la-trata-de-personas-encubrimiento-de-los-programas-de-luc">Lucha contra la trata de personas: encubrimiento de los programas de lucha contra la inmigración</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NANDITA SHARMA</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK AND ANDRÉ BROOME</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">DAVID A. FEINGOLD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ALESSANDRA MEZZADRI</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JOEL QUIRK</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">ANNE GALLAGHER</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">BENJAMIN HARKINS</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">MICHAEL DOTTRIDGE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON AND SAM OKYERE</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">NEIL HOWARD AND JULIA O'CONNELL DAVIDSON</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">SHELDON ZHANG AND NEIL HOWARD</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig">Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">JENNA HOLLIDAY</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta François Crépeau BTS en Español Thu, 02 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 François Crépeau 118833 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Entrevista: la peligrosa invisibilidad de las mujeres migrantes https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/jenna-holliday-cameron-thibos/entrevista-la-peligrosa-invisibilidad-de-las-mujeres-mig <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>En todo el mundo hay mujeres que migran para trabajar o huir de la violencia; pero, en comparación con los migrantes masculinos, apenas son visibles en los debates políticos y en los medios de comunicación. Esto las convierte en un sector vulnerable. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/safepassages/cameron-thibos-jenna-holliday/interview-dangerous-invisibility-of-women-migrants">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/8072110611_8476c7eb54_o.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Women sort pistachios by hand at a privately-owned factory in Herat, Afghanistan. United Nations Photo/Flickr. (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)</p> <p><strong>Jenna Holliday:</strong> Me llamo Jenna Holliday, y soy una especialista e investigadora independiente de género y movimientos migratorios.</p> <p><strong>Cameron Thibos (oD): Uno de los mitos más recurrentes en la prensa de hoy es que la mayoría de personas desplazándose por el mundo son hombres solteros. ¿Podríamos empezar reestructurando nuestra idea sobre la realidad de la migración femenina en el mundo?</strong></p> <p><strong>Jenna:</strong> Las mujeres conforman la mitad del total de personas moviéndose por el mundo a día de hoy. Esto incluye tanto a personas trabajadoras como a otro tipo de personas en movimiento. Se suele presuponer que las mujeres migran con sus familias, pero durante la última década hemos visto un rápido incremento en la migración independiente de mujeres jóvenes que intentan cumplir sus deberes, independizarse o conseguir un nuevo estatus trabajando en otros países.</p> <p>Creo que en este momento se pone mucho énfasis en un sector migrante específico donde, en forma habitual, la primera persona que migra para encontrar un país seguro al que llevar a su familia es el hombre. Por ejemplo, en países en conflicto solemos ver que las mujeres y sus familias permanecen en campos de refugiados, mientras que los hombres dan el primer paso para instalarse en otro lugar.</p> <p>Pero este es solo un tipo muy específico de migración. De hecho, cuando analizamos los datos de la migración laboral, encontramos que hay un gran número de mujeres autónomas que participan en ella. Si analizamos el sureste asiático —Laos, Birmania y Camboya—, tropezamos con un gran número de mujeres (quizá más que hombres) que se trasladan solas, de forma regular y legal, para trabajar en fábricas en zonas de especial trascendencia económica de las fronteras. Fábricas repletas de cientos de estas mujeres, que funcionan en su mayoría en espacios no regulados.</p> <p><strong>Cameron: Creo que hay una relación directa entre la imagen de la falta de libertad de las mujeres en los países en desarrollo y la idea de que no suelen moverse por decisión propia. ¿Está de acuerdo? Y, de ser así, ¿cómo podemos incluir este papel activo de las mujeres en la conversación?</strong></p> <p><strong>Jenna:</strong> Los motivos de las mujeres migrantes para trasladarse dependen de ellas mismas. Solemos hablar de las mujeres como si se tratara de un grupo de personas homogéneo afectado por la misma clase de problemas. Sin embargo, en muchos casos podemos encontrar cuatro mujeres en un mismo pueblo con situaciones familiares idénticas que decidirán migrar por motivos distintos.</p> <p>Habrá casos de quienes se esfuerzan por obtener algún tipo de independencia financiera o de alejarse de sus familias, y que por lo tanto ven la migración como una forma de cambiar sus respectivas situaciones. En otros ejemplos, encontrarás a hijas obedientes que deben irse y sacrificar una parte importante de su juventud para ayudar a su familia. En este caso, nos podemos enredar en conversaciones sobre la falta de protección social en algunos países de origen; la familia tiene la necesidad de conseguir más dinero para ayudar a las parientes mayores o a las niñas y los niños.</p> <p>Pero también podemos encontrar situaciones estructurales en que las mujeres no tienen igual acceso a información o educación financiera, de forma tal que resultan más vulnerables a la explotación y la estafa. Cruzan la frontera y se encuentran en situaciones laborales diferentes de las que esperaban. Creo que es esencial centrar nuestra atención en las mujeres en sí, y ampliar nuestra comprensión de los diferentes factores motivadores de la migración para responder adecuadamente a cada uno de ellos.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">Muchas veces, cuanto más migran y más explotación sufren, más información obtienen para calcular cuál es el menor de los males.</p> <p><strong>Cameron: La cuestión no es solo que la mayoría de las mujeres migrantes estén ausentes en los medios de comunicación, sino también que las políticas normativas se suelen desarrollar entorno a los hombres y los migrantes de género masculino. ¿Por qué, comparativamente, las mujeres están mucho más ausentes en el debate político? ¿Qué tiene que cambiar?</strong></p> <p><strong>Jenna:</strong> Creo que se trata más bien de un enfoque que no tiene en cuenta el género, y no tanto de un enfoque masculino. Todavía se subestima la diferencia que supone para las mujeres la migración en sus distintas etapas. La respuesta inmediata es mejorar la comprensión y llevar a cabo una investigación cualitativa y cuantitativa en cada etapa del proceso migratorio de las mujeres, para así entender mejor los motivos subyacentes, sus destinos, sus vulnerabilidades y también su potencial y sus contribuciones.</p> <p>Ya se han llevado adelante investigaciones de este tipo, y se han identificado situaciones estructurales —tales como el deber (sin duda reproductivo), o la feminización de algunos sectores laborales en los que se espera que las mujeres hagan mejor y por menos dinero ciertos tipos de trabajo—, que impactan en la vida de las mujeres, tanto si migran como si no, y siguen afectándolas como trabajadoras migrantes.</p> <p><strong>Cameron: Así pues, además de la falta de datos, ¿necesitamos crear nuevas políticas o personalizar, reformular y reforzar las existentes?</strong></p> <p><strong>Jenna:</strong> Todo lo que has dicho, absolutamente. Tenemos un marco normativo muy fuerte a nivel internacional con la «Convención sobre la eliminación de todas las formas de discriminación contra la mujer» (CEDAW, en inglés), que describe, de forma muy clara y concisa, cómo desarrollar leyes que no discriminen a las mujeres. Estos principios podrían aplicarse tanto a mujeres como a trabajadoras migrantes, sobre todo a través de las recomendaciones generales. Todo esto, junto con los estándares laborales internacionales, debería ofrecer una orientación clara sobre la forma en que se debería tratar a las mujeres (a diferencia de los hombres) en términos de migración, trabajo y protección social.</p> <p>Hemos visto un aumento en la creación de políticas con perspectiva de género, pero esto debe ir acompañado por un nivel de comprensión para que la sociedad entienda cómo se deben implementar estas políticas. Por ejemplo, puedes crear una ley que diga que las mujeres y los hombres deben estar separados en los centros de formación residenciales de trabajadores migrantes; pero esta separación, en la práctica, puede consistir solamente en una cortina en un vestíbulo. Se trata de llevar esa política y esa legislación a un nuevo nivel de comprensión y de desarrollo para que la gente entienda cuáles son los derechos y los riesgos, y las pueda implementar en la práctica para beneficiar tanto a mujeres como a hombres.</p> <p><strong>Cameron: ¿Puede nombrar tres áreas clave de riesgo que deberían abordarse a través de la política y en la práctica?</strong></p> <p><strong>Jenna:</strong> En cuanto a las trabajadoras migrantes, creo que la soledad es aún un riesgo muy importante. En pocas palabras, las trabajadoras domésticas se encuentran aisladas en los sitios donde trabajan. Están aisladas de las organizaciones, los sindicatos y la negociación colectiva; pero también en términos de restricción de movimientos, de libertades y de la capacidad de anticipar en qué debiera consistir su trabajo.</p> <p>Es muy difícil entender esto cuando no estás rodeada por otras personas que hagan el mismo trabajo que tú y no ves qué trato reciben. Creo que la soledad es un elemento clave, pero esta soledad también tiene lugar durante el ciclo de migración, que podría incluir también aislamiento estructural o aislamiento de tipo político.</p> <p>Asimismo, existe una falta de información sencilla y accesible sobre los derechos de las trabajadoras y los trabajadores, que les dé una orientación práctica sobre lo que pueden esperar y a dónde pueden acudir si no obtienen lo que deberían en términos de protección de derechos laborales. De nuevo, esto se puede aplicar a todo el proceso de migración. Lo que se espera de las trabajadoras y lo que van a recibir casi nunca se especifica desde el principio. Del mismo modo, la forma en que pueden utilizar sus experiencias al volver a su país tampoco queda clara.</p> <p>Como ya hemos dicho, puesto que las experiencias de las mujeres migrantes son diversas, la información también debe serlo. A esto cabe añadir la educación financiera y una mayor inclusión de las mujeres en general en el mundo económico, para que puedan tener un control autónomo sobre sus cuentas y sean capaces de ahorrar, enviar o invertir su dinero. La falta de educación financiera suele ser una muy buena manera de perpetuar la situación estructural de control sobre las mujeres, ya sea por parte de sus empleadores o de sus familias. Así, ellas no son necesariamente conscientes de su propio poder o del rol activo que juegan en cuanto a su capacidad de generar ingresos.</p> <p><strong>Cameron: ¿Podría hablarnos un poco sobre los riesgos y los costes reales de la migración? Por supuesto que debe ser difícil para cualquiera anticiparlos de forma exacta en cualquier situación; pero, en la experiencia que ha tenido hablando con mujeres migrantes, ¿en qué medida se enfrentan a los costes, riesgos y la violencia potencial de forma consciente?</strong></p> <p><strong>Jenna:</strong> Tenemos muchas pruebas para afirmar que las mujeres que han sido víctimas de distintas formas de explotación que podrían describirse como trata o explotación grave <em>vuelven a migrar</em>. De nuevo, hay muchas posibles razones para esto. Por desgracia, parte de ello puede estar relacionado con eventos traumáticos que hayan sufrido.</p> <p>Evidentemente, hay muchas mujeres que han sido explotadas pero que siguen trabajando, igual que es de esperar que muchas personas con condiciones laborales abusivas en su propio país busquen un nuevo empleo. Parte de eso tiene que ver con la naturaleza humana y la esperanza de que la próxima vez sea mejor, también con que se informan, y otra parte es necesidad. Depende del tipo de personas migrantes en las que te fijes.</p> <p>Desarrollé la mayor parte de mi trabajo en el sudeste asiático. Muchas mujeres allí no tenían otra opción que trabajar en la fábrica local, dedicarse al sector del entretenimiento o volver a migrar; las dos últimas ofrecían algo más de ingresos. Muchas veces, cuanto más migran y más explotación sufren, más información obtienen para calcular cuál es el menor de los males. Por supuesto, hay muchas mujeres que han hecho un balance de las posibilidades de forma plenamente consciente.</p> <p><strong>Cameron: ¿Le gustaría añadir algo más?</strong></p> <p><strong>Jenna:</strong> Me gustaría decir que creo que el discurso está todavía muy enfocado en las vulnerabilidades de las mujeres y de las mujeres migrantes. Pero hoy he visto (en el Foro global sobre migración y desarrollo, celebrado en Bangladesh entre el 8 y el 10 de diciembre de 2016) que hay un deseo real de empezar a ver a las mujeres como agentes con derechos y vidas propias.</p> <p>Las mujeres migrantes suelen ser agentes transnacionales increíblemente dinámicos, fuertes y creativos. Gracias a la estrecha conexión que mantienen con sus familias, suelen convertirse en canales importantes y estables de información y de cambio político y cultural, además de su aporte económico. Esto es lo que motiva el cambio en este mundo globalizado. Todo esto se da a través de las relaciones interpersonales, y las mujeres son una parte importante de este cambio interpersonal. Me gustaría ver un mayor enfoque en la contribución y el rol que juegan las mujeres migrantes en el mundo que habitamos y que está en constante evolución.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chus-lvarez/traduciendo-beyond-trafficking-and-slavery-la-historia-detr-s-del-hecho">Traduciendo Beyond Trafficking and Slavery: la historia detrás del hecho</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Chusa Álvarez</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kamala-kempadoo/revisitando-la-carga-del-hombre-blanco">Revisitando la «carga del hombre blanco»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Kamala Kempadoo</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gallagher/trata-de-personas-de-la-indignaci-n-la-acci-n">Trata de personas: de la indignación a la acción</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Anne Gallagher</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/lucha-contra-la-trata-de-personas-encubrimiento-de-los-programas-de-luc">Lucha contra la trata de personas: encubrimiento de los programas de lucha contra la inmigración</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Nandita Sharma</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Joel Quirk and André Broome</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">David A. Feingold</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Alessandra Mezzadri</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Neil Howard</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Joel Quirk</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Anne Gallagher</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Benjamin Harkins</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Michael Dottridge</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Julia O'Connell Davidson and Sam Okyere</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Neil Howard and Julia O'Connell Davidson</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei">Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Sheldon Zhang and Neil Howard</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery DemocraciaAbierta Cameron Thibos Jenna Holliday BTS en Español Wed, 01 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Jenna Holliday and Cameron Thibos 118832 at https://www.opendemocracy.net A recipe for injustice: India’s new trafficking bill expands a troubled rescue, rehabilitation, and repatriation framework https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters-vibhuti-ramachandran/recipe-for-injustice-india-s-new-trafficking-bil <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>India’s proposed trafficking in persons bill replicates the flaws of the existing framework. It must be re-written if it is to better the lives of the women it purports to help.</p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/3105266511_0d2ab89a7c_o.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">carlos/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/clneira/3105266511/in/photolist-5JpixM-8m3Bov-jyB7oj-bh3fEX-3ACBS-dS9BNz-86pfZq-6pqDz9-cjXDYh-4F3ksg-5BmiMm-bG8WvR-7vStdT-pWwVtb-HaX8u4-nWKFML-MoFbh-aDY44b-oYR2Dz-MqZdJ7-bUqDho-4nFuZk-ij7gi2-9bxC3K-boZN4Z-5FjVfY-31DjLD-4p22di-bmQ7kW-j6pCtf-7WRWam-fLtafw-PJWkr-dGayG4-7y3uGs-nFqQZQ-8cTKG4-25m9CuH-e2GEVU-8Bg7q-dSD4WB-72VjtL-6mZMh9-eJ83sU-9hFxVW-dYKk5C-eWt44-9Cm6uU-nxmkMg-bnx8Hi">CC (by-nc-nd)</a></p> <p>The proposed Trafficking of Persons (Prevention, Protection and Rehabilitation) Bill of 2018 (the bill) is driven by anti-trafficking activists’ desires to shape a comprehensive legislation on human trafficking – a laudable goal, given that existing anti-trafficking law and procedures generate an array of harms. We describe these harms below by elaborating on efforts to address sex trafficking under the Immoral Trafficking (Prevention) Act, 1986 (ITPA). We argue that the bill serves to extend rather than redesign the present, flawed anti-trafficking infrastructure. It will create additional complications through vagueness and overlap. Consequently, we recommend that the bill be jettisoned and that the ills of existing legislation (especially the ITPA) be remedied rather than ignored.&nbsp; </p> <h2>Flawed foundations: Ills of the ITPA </h2> <p>Despite its nomenclature, the ITPA is primarily an anti-prostitution rather than anti-trafficking law. It centres on housing those ‘recovered’ from prostitution in protective homes, thereby removing them rather than curbing exploitative practices within the sex industry. Yet, many experience this very form of intervention as an extended mode of trafficking. Women and girls report that at each point of encounter with the ITPA apparatus, they are met with a strong and sometimes violent disregard for their rights and needs. </p> <p>This disregard begins with the practice of rescue. The ITPA gives Special Police officers the power to ‘remove’ persons from prostitution at their discretion. It neither specifies that these persons must have been trafficked, nor that they must consent to being removed. <a href="https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2126796">Seshu and Ahmed (2012)</a>, <a href="https://www.sangram.org/resources/RAIDED-E-Book.pdf">Pai, Seshu, and Murthy (2018)</a>, and <a href="http://www.epw.in/journal/2016/44-45/humanitarian-trafficking.html">Walters (2016</a>) each found that police teams in various locales regularly force rescue upon women who do not consider themselves to be trafficked or who do not wish to leave their work. A study by the National Human Rights Commission has detailed violent, insensitive and inappropriate police conduct during raids and critiqued the focus on removing women from brothels, while their earnings, possessions, and even their children are left behind (Sen and Nair 2004 (Vol. II): 403-404).</p> <p>Hyderabadi sex workers report that during large anti-trafficking raids on train stations, the police sometimes choose arbitrarily which sex workers to process as victims of trafficking and which to charge as sex traffickers in a bid to rapidly amass concrete numbers of trafficking convictions (Walters n.d.). Not all rescues are forced. Observing rescue operations conducted in New Delhi’s G.B. Road, Ramachandran (2017) <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/vibhuti-ramachandran/critical-reflections-on-raid-and-rescue-operations-in-new-delhi">found</a> that some NGO staff do attempt to differentiate between adult women who wish to leave brothels and those who do not. It is however very difficult to make this essential distinction, which the ITPA does not even consider, in the rush of a rescue operation. </p> <p>After rescue, the system of ‘protective custody’ or shelter-based detention further controverts the will of those rescued, infantilising them in the process. The ITPA mandates that, once rescued, not only underage girls but also adult women be locked in state-run or licensed protective homes. They remain there while the court ascertains their “age, character, and antecedents”, verifies the suitability of their families or guardians to “take charge of them”, and initiates the lengthy process of repatriating them. Regardless of their consent, they cannot be released until then. To appeal against such an order by a judicial magistrate, inmates or their families must approach an appellate court, for which they seldom have resources.</p> <p class="mag-quote-center">The ITPA mandates that once rescued, not only underage girls but also adult women be locked in state-run or licensed protective homes.</p> <p>Rescued women spend their time waiting for release in the carceral spaces of the protective homes managed by Women and Child departments of different states. Care offered to the inmates is indifferent at best and abusive at worst. Some shelters do not provide the inmates adequate nutrition, sanitation, or even anti-retroviral and diabetic medications. Shelter staff treat them as <a href="http://sunithakrishnan.blogspot.com/2014/">dangerous</a> and <a href="https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/hyderabad/25-women-rescued-in-trafficking-cases-escape/articleshow/19657168.cms">belligerent</a> <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters-neil-howard/interview-forced-rescue-and-humanitarian-trafficking">adversaries</a> or as <a href="http://www.epw.in/journal/2016/44-45/who-would-live-cage.html">shamefully immoral</a> (Das 2016; Krishnan 2014; Times of India 2013).</p> <p>Inmates cannot support, care for, or readily communicate with their family members. Protective custody also severely limits women’s capacity to earn (Ramachandran 2015). The rehabilitation programmes offered with the help of NGOs miscalculate the socio-economic realities of women’s lives (Walters 2016). Many rescued women in Mumbai said they could not afford to learn new skills; their priority was rather to earn (Ramachandran 2015). Moreover, pursuing supposedly ‘indecent’ career opportunities as dancers or actresses was not supported. Rehabilitation programmes thus remain unattractive even to those who wish to leave the sex trade. </p> <p>Rescued women experience inordinate bureaucratic delays to their release (Ramachandran 2015, Walters n.d.) and are offered scant legal counsel to hasten the process. As their stay in shelter homes lengthens from the prescribed three weeks into several months, many inmates fall into depression; some of them attempt to escape, to riot, or even to commit suicide (Walters 2016). Bangladeshi women and girls in Indian shelters often find themselves in a seemingly interminable legal limbo (Ramachandran 2015). Rescued minors experience even longer stays in shelters while their age is determined through bone ossification tests at government hospitals.</p> <p>Once home, information circulated by traffickers, the police escorting them home, or even some NGOs sometimes causes women to be turned out by their landlords, shunned in their villages, and estranged from their families. Many people designated as victims of trafficking eventually return to the same situations from which they were initially rescued. This is unsurprising given that many are the unwilling objects rather than the agentive subjects of anti-trafficking interventions. Rescue and rehabilitation that deny freedom and agency to an adult woman who has committed no crime violate her basic rights and should be eschewed. Indeed, legal scholars have long questioned the constitutionality of the ITPA procedures (Baxi 1988: 65; Muralidhar 1996: 293-294). </p> <h2>Building on flawed foundations: the new bill offers more of the same</h2> <p>The bill lacks any mention of sexual exploitation, yet builds upon the same model of rescue, rehabilitation, and repatriation established by the ITPA. It does nothing to redress the rights violations authorised by the ITPA. Rather than ameliorating the endemic problem of forced rescues, the bill states that it is not the purported victim but rather an anti-trafficking police officer or unit that should decide whether rescue is necessary. Without mention of consent, Section 16(1) further states that these police units “may remove such person from any place or premises and produce him before the Magistrate or Child Welfare Committee”.</p> <p>The bill repeatedly mentions instances “where the person rescued is a victim” implying that some persons rescued will in fact not be victims, thereby condoning indiscriminate rescue. There is no mandate that the magistrate consider the desires of the purported victim. And while a rescued person may apply for release, this is presumed to be involuntary, predisposing enforcement personnel to disregard the rescued person’s agency. </p> <p>The bill opts out of the progressive legal approach of labour legislation such as the Bonded Labour System (Abolition) Act, 1976 (BLSAA). This encompasses all forms of forced and underpaid labour and prescribes that bonded labour be set free, rather than detained in ‘protective custody’ as in the ITPA. The bill instead favours the ITPA’s approach, rooted in moral anxieties around ‘fallen’ women and the perceived need to detain and reform them.</p> <p>Its extension of the ITPA’s shelter home framework to other forms of human trafficking is perplexing. Are all categories of trafficked persons, including bonded labour or those subjected to forced surrogacy or forced marriage, now also to be subjected to similar punitive conditions in the name of paternalist protection? Further, how are law enforcers to determine who is to be considered bonded labour and set free under the BLSAA, and who is to be sent to shelters as victims of trafficking?</p> <h2>Plagued by vagueness</h2> <p>The bill is vague and confusing, rendering it impracticable and unenforceable. For example, it prescribes that rescued individuals be sent to rehabilitation homes and protection homes, without specifying how these homes would function, who would run them, or how long those rescued are to stay in them. Are these protection homes the same as the ITPA’s protective homes (given the difference in nomenclature)? Are they to follow the same carceral post-rescue procedures governing those institutions? The bill does not clarify.</p> <p>The purpose of protection and rehabilitation homes under the bill being to “enable the immediate and long-term sustainable rehabilitation of victims” (Sec 11 (3) (ii)), Sec 17 (4) empowers the magistrate to place a victim in a rehabilitation home for a “reasonable period.” These provisions do not specify how much time is to be spent in these homes. That is left to the magistrate’s discretion, thus exacerbating the rampant problem of judicial delay.</p> <p>The bill specifies that the inter-state repatriation of victims be completed within three months and inter-country repatriation within six months (Sec 26 (4)). This specific repatriation timeline is a strength of the bill; however, the relationship between victims’ stay in the homes and their repatriation remains unclear. The bill does not define repatriation. As currently envisaged and implemented in anti-trafficking interventions, it is a myopic approach which presumes all rescued persons wish to return to their home and family. In truth, many do not, given contexts of abusive homes, dire poverty, or remote areas with scant employment options. </p> <p class="mag-quote-center">The bill presumes all rescued persons wish to return to their home and family. In truth, many do not.</p> <p>The lack of legal aid while in protective custody inhibits women rescued under the ITPA from negotiating their release. Ramachandran found in her ethnographic research that the impoverished families of women in protective homes scramble to hire lawyers to appeal to the Sessions Court against the magistrate’s orders. Some women seek assistance from the accused in these cases. This increases their financial burden and risk of being exploited, as the accused (even if not involved in trafficking them), expect the women to return the favour by working for them. The bill requires the state-level anti-trafficking committee to liaise with local NGOs to provide legal aid, among other forms of assistance (Sec 12 (3) (iii)). However, it does not specify when and where, how often, and by whom legal aid will be provided, nor for what purposes. This is a missed opportunity. </p> <p>Last, but not least, the bill mentions various forms of victim compensation, which is a strength. However, it does not lay out specific procedures for their disbursement. Ramachandran (2015) found that even when anti-trafficking NGOs help women pursue compensation ordered by courts, it is mired in bureaucratic delays with victims and their families having to run between courts and the Legal Services Authority. The bill should have streamlined this process and identified state agencies responsible for disbursement, so survivors of trafficking are spared from running pillar to post. </p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>The bill has some strengths such as the specification of a timeline for release and victim compensation. However, a comprehensive anti-trafficking bill should remedy the ills of existing procedures and offer more than a one-size-fits-all approach. Rescue and rehabilitation may help some trafficked persons, but others may prefer remaining in and reconfiguring their situations. Victims must have a choice about staying in protection homes, participating in rehabilitation programmes, and returning to their families.</p> <p>The ITPA is moralistic and paternalistic in spirit and its implementation is mired in bureaucratic state practices. With its vaguely worded provisions, its disregard for the choices and preferences of trafficked persons, and its replication of the ITPA framework, the bill is unfortunately rife with similar ingredients of injustice and will further befuddle and burden an already beleaguered system.</p> <p>It must be abandoned. We echo Kotiswaran (2016) in advocating that the bill must think beyond trafficking as a crime and that a comprehensive solution to the wide-spread problem of forced and exploitative labour requires an equally wide-ranging movement for safe migration and labour rights – especially for improved wages across all sectors. If India is to take leadership in developing truly comprehensive and progressive solutions to human trafficking, it must avoid the pitfalls of the Trafficking of Persons Bill, 2018.</p> <h2>References</h2> <p>Baxi, Upendra (1988), Beyond Prostitutional Platitudes, in S.C. Bhatia, ed. <em>Social Audit of Immoral Traffic Prevention Act,</em> University of Delhi, 61-66.</p> <p>Das, Barnali (2016): ‘“Who Would Like to Live in This Cage?” Voices From a Shelter Home in Assam,’ <em>Economic and Political Weekly</em>, <a href="http://www.epw.in/journal/2016/44-45">51(44-45).</a></p> <p>Kotiswaran, Prabha (2016): “<a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/prabha-kotiswaran/empty-gestures-critique-of-india-s-new-trafficking-bill">Empty Gestures: A Critique of India’s New Trafficking Bill</a>”, Open Democracy, 22, June.</p> <p>Krishnan, Sunitha, &quot;<a href="http://sunithakrishnan.blogspot.in/2014/">State Connivance or Apathy?</a>&quot;, 12 October 2014, Sunitha Krishnan Blogspot.</p> <p>Muralidhar, S. (1999), The Case of the Agra Protective Home, in Amita Dhanda and Archana Parashar, eds., <em>Engendering Law: Essays in Honor of Lotika Sarkar</em>, Lucknow: Eastern Book Company</p> <p>Pai, Aarthi, Meena Seshu and Laxmi Murthy (2018): “Raided: How Anti-Trafficking Strategies Increase Sex Workers’ Vulnerability to Exploitative Practices,” India: Sampada Grameen Mahila Sanstha.</p> <p>Ramachandran, Vibhuti (2015): “<a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/vibhuti-ramachandran/rescued-but-not-released-%E2%80%98protective-custody%E2%80%99-of-sex-workers-in-i">Rescued but not Released: the “protective custody” of sex workers in India</a>”, Open Democracy, August 18.</p> <p>Ramachandran, Vibhuti (2017): “<a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/vibhuti-ramachandran/critical-reflections-on-raid-and-rescue-operations-in-new-delhi">Critical Reflections on Raid and Rescue Operations in New Delhi</a>”, Open Democracy, 2017, November 25.</p> <p>Seshu, Meena and Aziza Ahmed (2012): “‘<a href="http://www.antitraffickingreview.org/index.php/atrjournal/article/view/28/48">We Have the Right Not to be “Rescued” …’: When Anti-Trafficking Programmes Undermine the Health and Well-Being of Sex Workers</a>”, <em>Anti-Trafficking Review</em>, No 1, pp 149–65 </p> <p>Sen, Sankar and P.M. Nair (2004): “A report on trafficking in women and children in India” 2001-2003: Volumes 1 and 2. New Delhi: Institute of Social Sciences, National Human Rights Commission, &amp; UNIFEM</p> <p>Walters, Kimberly (2016): “Humanitarian Trafficking: The Violence of Rescue and the (Mis)calculation of Rehabilitation,” <em>Economic and Political Weekly</em> LI(44 &amp; 45):55–61. </p> <p>Times of India, &quot;<a href="https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/hyderabad/25-women-rescued-in-trafficking-cases-escape/articleshow/19657168.cms">25 Women rescued in trafficking cases escape</a>&quot;, 21 April 2013.</p> <p>Walters, Kimberly (2017): “<a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/kimberly-waters/rescued-from-rights-misogyny-of-anti-trafficking">Rescued from Rights: The Misogyny of Anti-trafficking</a>”, Open Democracy, 25 November.</p> <p>Walters, Kimberly (n.d.). “Moral Security: Anti-Trafficking and the Humanitarian State in South India.” Unpublished manuscript.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/prabha-kotiswaran/criminal-law-as-sledgehammer-paternalist-politics-of-india-s-2018-tr">The criminal law as sledgehammer: the paternalist politics of India’s 2018 Trafficking Bill</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/vibhuti-ramachandran/rescued-but-not-released-%E2%80%98protective-custody%E2%80%99-of-sex-workers-in-i">Rescued but not released: the ‘protective custody’ of sex workers in India</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/prabha-kotiswaran/neoabolitionism-s-last-laugh-india-must-rethink-trafficking">Neoabolitionism’s last laugh: India must rethink trafficking</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beyondslavery/prabha-kotiswaran/empty-gestures-critique-of-india-s-new-trafficking-bill">Empty gestures: a critique of India’s new trafficking bill</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters-neil-howard/interview-forced-rescue-and-humanitarian-trafficking">Interview: forced rescue and humanitarian trafficking</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/kimberly-waters/rescued-from-rights-misogyny-of-anti-trafficking">Rescued from rights: the misogyny of anti-trafficking</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyondslavery/kimberly-walters/beyond-raid-and-rescue-time-to-acknowledge-damage-being-done">Beyond ‘raid and rescue’: time to acknowledge the damage being done</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery openIndia Vibhuti Ramachandran Kimberly Walters Mon, 30 Jul 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Kimberly Walters and Vibhuti Ramachandran 119052 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Tráfico de personas: el túnel que se esconde bajo el apartheid económico https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/tr-fico-de-personas-el-t-nel-que-se-esconde-bajo-el-aparthei <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Las políticas de fronteras estadounidenses y europeas defienden la desigualdad económica mucho más que la soberanía o la seguridad nacional. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/neil-howard-sheldon-zhang/human-smuggling-tunnel-underneath-economic-apartheid">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><img width="100%" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u563152/4042930016_d69032e58f_o.jpg" /><span class="image-caption">"Paseo de Humanidad" de Alberto Morackis, Alfred Quiróz and Guadalupe Serrano. Jonathan McIntosh/Flickr.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/jonathanmcintosh/4042930016/in/photolist-7ag5eW-5bi8JQ-tWDbu-35rCyQ-ntAK9u-7bntEw-XbBJvd-6iJVVS-XnFo9S-6ZrG1Y-7bnsvU-dpUN7q-oXdv7r-pQapdc-p4rbqB-7bEzLb-5MY3iq-7acNhB-9AbVek-Xk3f2A-WkfMDG-7bnuQJ-4MxL5f-8vvE48-5f3ocG-6iJVrJ-79Titk-WdexVB-9c9mEq-68NVLK-9EbQY5-eFPHPh-7biJPt-kYgshg-mEyDGA-q8xAGN-eFHDBK-FWdrp-u1sgG-kYgrG8-4JvWT4-79jefq-7bnhnm-rpjkrj-S3EPK4-kYhWVA-WaNU19-58gNQ-TdA5r-TesCJ">(CC BY 2.0)</a></span></p> <p>Me llamo <strong>Sheldon Zhang</strong> y, en la actualidad, soy el presidente de la Escuela de criminología y estudios de justicia de la Universidad de Massachusetts Lowell. Con algunas interrupciones, llevo alrededor de veinte años trabajando en el ámbito del tráfico y la trata. No me atrevería a decir que tengo muchísima experiencia, pero sin duda alguna sé lo suficiente como para resultar peligroso en este campo.</p> <p>Creo que el principal problema, o el principal desafío, al que nos enfrentamos cuando investigamos las actividades de tráfico de personas radica en nuestra incapacidad para lograr influir en el discurso predominante que ha permeado a través de las políticas gubernamentales y globales, así como en el despliegue de recursos y las inversiones en desarrollo mundial. Estos puntos de vista sobre el tráfico de personas aún están demasiado marcados por el modelo o el discurso de la justicia criminal. En otras palabras, partimos de la base de que hay un criminal o una organización criminal que se está aprovechando de las personas vulnerables que quieren migrar, explotándolas sin piedad y tratando sus vidas con desdeño o frivolidad para su propio beneficio.</p> <p>Sin embargo, la realidad es mucho más compleja. No negamos que haya traficantes que se están aprovechando de las personas migrantes, pero lo más habitual es ver que las personas que trafican a otras son una parte integrante de la migración irregular. Son facilitadoras y facilitadores que tienen la intención de hacer dinero, pero que también ofrecen servicios muy necesarios para tratar de reducir la incertidumbre y los riesgos a los que, en caso contrario, tendrían que enfrentarse las personas migrantes.</p> <p>No estoy aquí para promover —ni mucho menos defender— el trabajo de las personas traficantes, pero creo que quienes asumen la incertidumbre y los riesgos relacionados con la migración, lo hacen debido a muchas causas y factores. Al arriesgarse a ir a otras tierras y otros territorios, se enfrentan a una gran variedad de riesgos e incertidumbres y, en gran medida, una persona traficante puede ayudar a facilitar las transacciones, mediando un pago evidentemente.</p> <p>Los gobiernos de todo el mundo están invirtiendo millones y millones de dólares en la lucha contra las denominadas «actividades de tráfico de personas». Sin embargo, desde mi punto de vista, este es un dinero malgastado que, además consigue muy poco, ya que el tráfico de personas no es lo que genera ni sustenta el deseo de migrar. Muy al contrario. Quienes trafican con seres humanos ayudan a reducir el nivel de incertidumbre y los riesgos. Contamos con mucho trabajo empírico en este campo que nos ofrece una visión muy diferente al discurso predominante, y espero que, de alguna manera, quienes investigamos podamos trabajar de forma coordinada. Así, quizás, podamos encontrar un modo más efectivo de transmitir este mensaje a las personas con responsabilidad política.</p> <p><strong>Neil Howard (oD): En tu opinión, aparte de nuestra incapacidad para llegar a los y las responsables políticas con nuestro trabajo, ¿cuál es la razón por la que parecen mantenerse tan impermeables a los datos ya existentes?</strong></p> <p><strong>Sheldon:</strong> Esta es una pregunta muy difícil de responder. Creo que hay dos factores principales: el primero, radica en la tan arcaica mentalidad, prácticamente del siglo diecisiete, del estado nación. Para que un gobierno pueda reclamar un mínimo de legitimidad, tiene que mantener el concepto de estado. En otras palabras, un estado únicamente puede llamarse estado si tiene límites, es decir, fronteras. Así, para impedir que las personas entren en el país de forma «ilegal» o a través de canales irregulares, hay que construir una realidad que vea dichas actividades como actividades criminales. Al aplicar este modelo de justicia criminal, hay que identificar a quienes cometen el crimen o aquellos elementos indeseables que amenazan la condición de estado de cualquier país. Esta mentalidad está profundamente arraigada entre quienes gobiernan.</p> <p>Por otro lado, probablemente sea una tradición que se originó con nuestro conocimiento del crimen organizado. De alguna manera, vemos el tráfico de personas como una actividad organizada y colectiva. Así, al entender el tráfico de personas o la migración irregular como crimen organizado, resulta mucho más fácil caer en un enfoque de blanco o negro y defender un punto de vista muy simplista sobre la cuestión como algo legal o ilegal. Funcionar dentro de un modelo binario es mucho más fácil para cualquier organismo de seguridad. Es fácil presentar todo lo que vemos como una actividad criminal, lo cual facilita, en cierta manera, planificar la aplicación de la ley, independientemente de si el impacto o el resultado es o no favorable.</p> <p><strong>Neil: ¿Quiere esto decir que existe un problema de mentalidad fundamental que ayuda a generar esta impermeabilidad al trabajo de investigación?</strong></p> <p><strong>Sheldon:</strong> Eso creo. Se trata de la impermeabilidad, la falta de voluntad o la incapacidad para aceptar historias o discursos que contradigan el discurso predominante. Quiero decir, las personas responsables de los organismos de seguridad no son tontas: trabajan en este ámbito y estoy seguro de que se han encontrado con historias que contradicen el discurso predominante. Pero creo que para poder mantener su legitimidad y, por así decirlo, la seguridad de sus trabajos y su existencia, se ven obligadas a perpetuar ese discurso.</p> <p><strong>Neil: ¿Y qué podemos hacer al respecto? Sabemos que al poner obstáculos a los movimientos migratorios, se crea e impulsa el negocio del tráfico de personas; y que la forma más eficaz de reducirlo es aumentar la permeabilidad de las fronteras. En efecto, el mensaje para quienes hacen las leyes es que <em>toda</em> norma es contraproducente. Sin embargo, son muy pocas las probabilidades de que las y los responsables políticos puedan aceptar la idea de abrir las fronteras totalmente por las razones expuestas anteriormente. Así que, si no vamos a intentar venderles la idea de las fronteras abiertas, ¿qué podemos venderles? ¿qué política es mejor?</strong></p> <p><strong>Sheldon:</strong> Esa idea de que para resolver, reducir o minimizar la miseria humana, basta simplemente con abrir las fronteras y dejar que la gente vaya y venga con libertad, también supone un desafío fundamental para el concepto de Estado o Estado nación. No es una idea totalmente inconcebible. La Unión Europea y el Acuerdo de Schengen son un ejemplo de ello. Pero, por otro lado, tenemos que admitir que no se trata simplemente de mantener las propias fronteras.</p> <p>En un nivel más profundo, creo que es más un problema de apartheid económico. El concepto lleva un tiempo empleándose, pero hasta ahora no se ha discutido ampliamente. Hemos dejado atrás el apartheid racial, pero el apartheid económico continúa teniendo mucha fuerza. A diferencia de las anteriores generaciones, que impedían el acceso a mejores oportunidades económicas por motivos raciales, ahora intentamos impedir que las personas de un estatus económico inferior al nuestro puedan competir con nosotros o nosotras.</p> <p>Creo que es una cuestión fundamental, pero muy poca gente quiere hablar sobre este tema. Es una cuestión con una gran carga política. Al fin y al cabo ¿porqué se levantan fronteras en Estados Unidos? Porque no queremos que vengan personas mexicanas al país. Si el país vecino fuera Alemania o el Reino Unido, no creo que tuviéramos ningún problema al respecto. Pasaría como con Canadá, con quien la frontera fue básicamente simbólica durante mucho tiempo. Pero queremos fronteras ahora que hay suficiente gente, tanto entre la clase política como entre la población en general, que no quieren que se facilite el acceso a personas con un estatus económico inferior al suyo. Así, entonces, se perpetúa el apartheid económico.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chus-lvarez/traduciendo-beyond-trafficking-and-slavery-la-historia-detr-s-del-hecho">Traduciendo Beyond Trafficking and Slavery: la historia detrás del hecho</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Chusa Álvarez</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kamala-kempadoo/revisitando-la-carga-del-hombre-blanco">Revisitando la «carga del hombre blanco»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Kamala Kempadoo</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gallagher/trata-de-personas-de-la-indignaci-n-la-acci-n">Trata de personas: de la indignación a la acción</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Anne Gallagher</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/lucha-contra-la-trata-de-personas-encubrimiento-de-los-programas-de-luc">Lucha contra la trata de personas: encubrimiento de los programas de lucha contra la inmigración</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Nandita Sharma</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Joel Quirk and André Broome</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">David A. Feingold</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Alessandra Mezzadri</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Neil Howard</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Joel Quirk</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Anne Gallagher</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Benjamin Harkins</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Michael Dottridge</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Julia O'Connell Davidson and Sam Okyere</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado-">Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Neil Howard and Julia O'Connell Davidson</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Sheldon Zhang Neil Howard BTS en Español Mon, 30 Jul 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Neil Howard and Sheldon Zhang 118831 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Sobre la libertad y la (in)movilidad: cómo el estado crea vulnerabilidad mediante el control del movimiento humano https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-neil-howard/sobre-la-libertad-y-la-inmovilidad-c-mo-el-estado- <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Beyond Slavery presenta su siguiente número sobre trata, tráfico y migración argumentando que la movilidad es fundamental para la vida, y que las restricciones estatales al movimiento son la verdadera amenaza para el bienestar humano. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/julia-o%E2%80%99connell-davidson-neil-howard/on-freedom-and-immobility-how-states-create-vulne">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/16025367585_543c22d207_k.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Border Field State Park / Imperial Beach, San Diego, California. Tony Webster/Flickr. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/diversey/16025367585/in/photolist-qq7ct8-eVEcKn-84MguY-5tdhD7-SqPufu-2338CYY-irb7rB-84J87P-28n59zo-9Ruj7G-o3J7k1-6mFwSp-c2imMS-84JbA4-cfLyq3-T3LW6t-qoNQaN-eVDJV2-eUjSGZ-cpmdqN-smHwTu-dDNnsH-hgBHwV-c2vwFJ-89SfMb-8zZNQF-8Uqdkq-GQBam6-cg7VkY-c2ikYU-84J8yz-c2vyMJ-pukbnM-oXgtYp-o6rDfp-op5dCX-ojz6LL-o315V1-omAr5N-cgqcgf-8Un9f4-eUZb67-qh3oUU-eUZa6S-7pQYXG-o6rFe3-onGSrJ-6yevXB-onTBvh-qyAZpH">CC (by)</a></p> <p>La movilidad se entiende ampliamente como parte integral de la libertad humana, tanto que cuando lesiones, enfermedades o la vejez restringen nuestra capacidad de movimiento, se nos suele llamar «personas discapacitadas». Esto también es lo que hace que el encarcelamiento, o incluso el arresto domiciliario, sea un castigo tan significativo y aterrador. Ya sea para ir de tiendas, al trabajo o viajar por placer, la movilidad es y siempre ha sido una parte esencial de la vida económica, social, cultural y política de la humanidad. Ser capaz de moverse libremente es un <em>bien</em>. Sin embargo, en un mundo injusto, también es un privilegio otorgado y distribuido de manera desigual.</p> <p>Históricamente, la movilidad de aquellas personas que carecen de poder social y político ha sido fuertemente restringida por quienes sí ostentan ese poder. Personas esclavas, sirvientas, pobres, mujeres, niñas y niños han visto su movilidad restringida en un momento u otro por quienes están a cargo. Las razones son obvias: la libertad de movimiento permite a la persona subordinada la oportunidad de escapar de la dominación, evadir el control o subvertir el orden social. Controlar la movilidad <em>es</em> controlar a la gente.</p> <p>Los estados liberales modernos no están menos dispuestos a ejercer este control que sus antepasados no liberales. En todo Occidente, los gobiernos criminalizan de forma rutinaria a las personas sin hogar, atan a las trabajadoras del hogar <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/izza-leghtas-kate-roberts/modern-slavery-bill-fails-vulnerable-women">con sus empleadoras y empleadores</a>, y obligan a las familias que reciben asistencia social a mudarse a un lugar donde la vivienda sea más barata. Estas políticas están diseñadas para disciplinar a las poblaciones «indeseables» y para subordinarlas a los órdenes sociales, económicos y raciales dominantes.</p> <p>Donde más claramente encontramos esta injusticia es en las políticas de migración contemporáneas. Los estados ricos <a href="http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/13/us-passport-idUSTRE81B05A20120213"><em>venden</em> la nacionalidad</a> literalmente a los mejores y más ricos postores extranjeros mientras gastan miles de millones para mantener a raya a las personas pobres y no deseadas. Como vimos <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/opensecurity/heaven-crawley/europe%27s-war-on-migrants">durante el año 2015</a> en el Mediterráneo, y como probablemente seguiremos viendo, esto tiene un costo inmenso de vidas humanas. Estas muertes no son una anomalía. La Organización Internacional para las Migraciones ha <a href="http://mmp.iom.int/">estimado</a> que más de 40.000 personas han muerto entre 2000 y 2013 durante traspasos «irregulares», incluyendo 22.000 en las fronteras de la UE. En cualquier otra circunstancia, a esto se le llamaría un crimen contra la humanidad.</p> <p>Es importante destacar que la violencia de los Estados en contra de las personas que podrían ser migrantes no se da únicamente en las fronteras. Aquellas personas migrantes que sobreviven a viajes peligrosos, o que se vuelven «ilegales» como resultado de visados expirados, fallos en sus solicitudes de asilo o porque no son capaces de navegar la burocracia kafkiana, a menudo se encuentran en situaciones que se hacen eco de ciertas características de la esclavitud histórica. Despojadas de su dignidad y sus derechos, son recluidas en centros de detención con fines de lucro para personas migrantes, coaccionadas violentamente a través de las fronteras durante la deportación y separados a la fuerza de su familia y seres queridos.</p> <p>Para aquellas personas «afortunadas» que logran evadir a las autoridades e ingresar a Occidente, e incluso para quienes logran obtener visas de trabajo y llegan por canales legales, lo que les espera a menudo es una vida de exclusión y explotación en los sectores más abusivos de la economía. Con frecuencia se les niega o impide acceder a la protección social básica. Si su presencia es ilegalizada, se les prohíbe contribuir a la economía. Si están presentes legalmente, los visados de trabajo a menudo les niegan la libertad de movimiento entre diferentes mercados laborales. En cualquier caso, son empujadas y empujados al siempre necesitado ejército de reserva de mano de obra.</p> <p>Todo esto es <a href="http://www.discoversociety.org/2013/11/05/586/">ocultado</a> por el discurso político dominante sobre «trata de personas» y «tráfico de migrantes», una distinción entre lo que supuestamente son dos tipos diferentes de movimientos no autorizados. El «tráfico de migrantes», se nos dice, es voluntario y consensual, la «trata de personas» es coaccionada y es el equivalente contemporáneo de la trata transatlántica de esclavos. Pero los términos también se usan indistintamente. Cuando aparecen cuerpos en la costa o se encuentran <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jun/01/map-us-mexico-migrant-deaths-border">descomponiéndose en el desierto</a>, la clase política culpa a «los tratantes» que están «traficando con la miseria humana». Hacen lo mismo cada vez que nos encontramos con cuadrillas de personas migrantes no remuneradas trabajando en nuestros campos. Este encuadre permite que las personas sean vistas como «vulnerables a los tratantes» o «en riesgo de ser esclavizadas» cuando se mueven sin la bendición del estado. También es la razón por la cual «proteger a las personas» se traduce en impedir que se muevan, o en rescatarlas y hacerlas retornar una vez rescatadas. Es lo que permite que el uso de la fuerza letal se presente como una necesidad moral, como en las <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/may/13/migrant-crisis-eu-plan-to-strike-libya-networks-could-include-ground-forces">propuestas de acción militar de la UE para aplastar «redes de tráfico/trata» que operan desde Libia</a>, incluso cuando es más que sabido que el «daño colateral» será la pérdida de vidas humanas. Y sin embargo, en la gran mayoría de los casos, estas personas migrantes y trabajadoras abandonaron su hogar voluntariamente en busca de un futuro mejor. El hecho de que se les haya negado este futuro es una consecuencia de la política, no de la criminalidad.</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chus-lvarez/traduciendo-beyond-trafficking-and-slavery-la-historia-detr-s-del-hecho">Traduciendo Beyond Trafficking and Slavery: la historia detrás del hecho</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Chusa Álvarez</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kamala-kempadoo/revisitando-la-carga-del-hombre-blanco">Revisitando la «carga del hombre blanco»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Kamala Kempadoo</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gallagher/trata-de-personas-de-la-indignaci-n-la-acci-n">Trata de personas: de la indignación a la acción</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Anne Gallagher</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/lucha-contra-la-trata-de-personas-encubrimiento-de-los-programas-de-luc">Lucha contra la trata de personas: encubrimiento de los programas de lucha contra la inmigración</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Nandita Sharma</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Joel Quirk and André Broome</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">David A. Feingold</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Alessandra Mezzadri</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Neil Howard</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Joel Quirk</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Anne Gallagher</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Benjamin Harkins</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Michael Dottridge</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara">Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Julia O'Connell Davidson and Sam Okyere</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Neil Howard Julia O'Connell Davidson BTS en Español Mon, 30 Jul 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Julia O'Connell Davidson and Neil Howard 118829 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Walk Free: ¿midiendo la esclavitud global o enmascarando la hipocresía mundial? https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/julia-oconnell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-midiendo-la-esclavitud-global-o-enmascara <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>La fundación <em>Walk Free</em> dice luchar contra la «esclavitud moderna» midiendo su magnitud, pero ¿será este índice solo un ejercicio de hipocresía política? <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/julia-o-connell-davidson-sam-okyere/walk-free-measuring-global-slavery-or-masking-glob">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/226612892_d099f29338_o_920.jpg" width="100%" /> <p class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">AndyMelton/Flickr. CC (by).</p> <p>Walk Free acaba de publicar su Índice global de esclavitud 2016 (GSI) anunciando que hay 45,8 millones de personas esclavas en el mundo.&nbsp; Los objetivos del Índice son medir el número de personas afectadas por la «esclavitud moderna» país por país y ofrecer un ranking mundial cuantitativo de 162 países de acuerdo a la prevalencia existente en cada uno de ellos. (Es decir, el porcentaje estimado de personas esclavizadas de una población nacional en un momento determinado). </p> <p>Como en rondas anteriores, los países con la prevalencia más alta se encuentran en el mundo en desarrollo (India, China, Pakistán, Bangladesh y Uzbekistán), mientras que aquellos destacados con menciones de honor están en el próspero mundo desarrollado (Luxemburgo, Alemania, los Estados Unidos, etc.).</p> <p>¿Qué mide exactamente el índice? Walk Free dice que la «esclavitud moderna» tiene muchos nombres incluyendo «trata», «trabajo forzoso», «matrimonio precoz y forzado» y las «peores formas de matrimonio infantil». Pero en la base, dice, el término se refiere a las condiciones de niñas y niños, mujeres y hombres que están atrapados en situaciones de terrible abuso y explotación de las cuales no pueden «escapar». </p> <p>En principio esto no suena controvertido, después de todo, muchas de nosotras pensamos en cadenas y grilletes cuando escuchamos la palabra «esclavitud». Pero <em>Walk Free</em> no dice que la esclavitud exista solo donde las personas están encadenadas, sino que amplía el concepto para incluir a las personas que son amenazadas con violencia si intentan escapar a determinadas situaciones o aquellas que están vinculadas por una deuda a un empleador particular. Cuando hablamos de infancia, Walk Free incluye a aquellas niñas y niños que son remunerados por su trabajo y que no necesariamente están sujetos a violencia o deudas, pero no obstante son contabilizados como «esclavos» simplemente por el hecho de ser menores de 18 años cuando realizan un trabajo.&nbsp; </p> <h2>¿Por qué parar en 45,8 millones? </h2> <p>No dudamos de que la libertad y los derechos de las personas etiquetadas como «esclavas» están limitadas por la pobreza, la violencia, el robo de salarios, las deudas, el racismo, el sexismo, la discriminación por motivos de casta y otras formas de opresión. Más bien nuestra pregunta es, si <em>Walk Free</em> realmente quiere liderar una lucha de liberación en favor de estas personas y está dispuesto a ampliar el concepto de «esclavitud», entonces ¿por qué parar ahí?</p> <p>Tomemos como ejemplo el «matrimonio precoz y forzado», que es descrito por Walk Free como una forma de «esclavitud moderna» y comparémoslo con matrimonios que no comienzan siendo forzados y que implican a mujeres con edades por encima de la de consentimiento. Sabemos que para millones de mujeres alrededor del mundo, los matrimonios consensuados se convierten también en violentos y opresivos. Más aun, debido a que las mujeres a menudo no tienen acceso legal ni económico al divorcio y/o al hecho de que como mujeres divorciadas o madres solteras se enfrentan al estigma y la miseria, muchas de las que sufren violencia machista son incapaces de «escapar» de sus abusadores maridos. Así que, ¿por qué estas mujeres no aparecen también en el índice de Walk Free? </p> <div style="width:230px;float:right;padding-left:10px;"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/261136098_826a5e8dd8_z_460.jpg" width="230" /><br /><span class="image-caption" style="margin-top:0px;padding-top:0px;">Alex/Flickr. CC (by-nc-nd).</span></div> <p>De la misma forma, si lo que importa es la ausencia del consentimiento a una relación de por vida, en vez de la presencia de violencia en esa relación, y es eso lo que identifica al «matrimonio precoz y forzado» como esclavitud, entonces podríamos preguntar ¿por qué no se denomina «esclavitud moderna» a la «maternidad precoz y forzada» experimentada por mujeres y niñas en países donde se restringe o deniega el acceso al aborto? </p> <p>Consideremos también las restricciones a la libertad implícitas en muchas formas de endeudamiento. Por ejemplo, la mayoría de las personas migrantes trabajadoras no tienen otra opción para financiar su migración laboral que asumir una deuda, debido a que los costes asociados a su movilidad (incluyendo la búsqueda de un trabajo o la obtención de la documentación adecuada) a menudo son prohibitivamente altos. Tienen que pedir dinero prestado a sus amistades, familias, prestadores particulares o bancos. Pero al llegar a países como Australia o Gran Bretaña, estas personas quedan ligadas a los empleadores que los patrocinan y según las leyes migratorias, pueden ser deportadas si «escapan». Se disuade por tanto a estas personas de «escapar» por el simple hecho de que saben que, si lo hacen, serán incapaces de pagar las deudas a quienes les prestaron el dinero. </p> <p>¿No merecen también estas personas nuestro interés? ¿Por qué el término de «esclavitud» se restringe únicamente a las personas que están atadas a deudas con empleadores que son a la vez acreedores? Y ¿por qué centrar nuestro desprecio moral en el patrocinador malvado que explota la dependencia de otras personas, en vez de centrarnos en el sistema migratorio que conduce a las personas migrantes trabajadoras a esta dependencia, denegándolas el derecho a moverse libremente en el mercado laboral?</p> <p>Recordemos también los muchos millones de personas migrantes privadas de libertad en centros de detención de inmigrantes alrededor del mundo, a menudo <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/aug/12/uk-prisons-inspector-time-limits-detention-migrants-without-trial">sin plazos fijados</a>. En Australia, los Estados Unidos y Gran Bretaña, muchos centros de detención de migrantes son gestionados por compañías privadas y <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/aug/22/immigrants-cheap-labour-detention-centres-g4s-serco">el trabajo de las personas detenidas</a>, quienes cobran menos que el salario mínimo, hace el negocio de <em>almacenar</em> sus cuerpos incluso más lucrativo. ¿No son estas personas también «esclavas modernas»? y ¿qué hay del predominante cautiverio de las <a href="http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&amp;iid=5387">poblaciones negras y latinas</a> en el complejo industrial norteamericano de prisiones y sus <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/mark-karlin/inseparability-of-capitalism-racism-and-imprisonment-interview-with-dennis">fuertes vínculos con la esclavitud transatlántica</a>? ¿Son estas personas esclavas del Estado? Y si es así, ¿por qué no aparecen en el Índice global de esclavitud?</p> <p>Poniendo a estas personas bajo la órbita de nuestra preocupación ridiculiza la adjudicación a Australia y a los Estados Unidos de posiciones altas en la lista de países que están llevando a cabo acciones contra la «esclavitud moderna». Los propios <a href="https://www.humanrights.gov.au/immigration-detention-statistics">números</a> del gobierno australiano muestran que éste tiene a casi 1.500 personas <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2016/apr/26/papua-new-guinea-court-rules-detention-asylum-seekers-manus-unconstitutional">detenidas ilegalmente</a> en las islas de Manus y Nauru. Y, al contrario que muchas de las personas identificadas por Walk Free como «esclavas modernas», estas personas cautivas frecuentemente <a href="https://redflag.org.au/node/5255">comparan su situación con la esclavitud</a> y algunas de ellas incluso han rogado al estado australiano que, si no les permite vivir, <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/julia-oconnell-davidson/let-us-live-or-make-us-die-migrants-challenge-to-their-outlawr">que las mate</a>.&nbsp; </p> <p>Ciertamente, los centenares de miles de personas migrantes atrapadas en funestas condiciones en campamentos improvisados en las fronteras europeas, o detenidas en el campo de refugiados de Lesbos, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/migrant-crisis-turkey-deportations_us_5703b98ee4b0daf53af0cc8f">no son libres para simplemente «escapar</a>». Y ya que hablamos de ello, si queremos exigir el fin a la «trata de personas» porque implica transportarlas sin su consentimiento con el fin de obtener ganancias materiales, entonces, ¿no son también «víctimas de trata» todas las personas migrantes, refugiadas y solicitantes de asilo transportadas forzosamente por la Unión Europea a Turquía, o aquellas <a href="https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/eur44/3022/2015/en/">acorraladas, engrilletadas e incomunicadas por las autoridades turcas</a> a cambio de una remuneración y la promesa de favores políticos por parte de la UE?</p> <h2>¿Un Índice de hipocresía global? </h2> <p>No es posible cuantificar lo que no es posible definir, y quienes elaboran el GSI no han logrado proponer una definición de «esclavitud» que les permita distinguir en el mundo contemporáneo, claramente y sin ambigüedades, entre «persona esclava» y «persona no esclava». En vez de eso, han elegido utilizar la etiqueta de «persona esclava» de una forma muy selectiva y limitada, destacando como intolerables solo las formas de falta de libertad que ellos son capaces de ver e ignorando muchas otras que, o no ven, o no consideran que sean moralmente censurables. Éste no es entonces un índice global de esclavitud sino más bien de hipocresía. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p class="mag-quote-left">Éste no es entonces un índice global de esclavitud sino más bien de hipocresía.</p> <p>Pero el problema con el GSI va más allá del hecho de que es parcial y selectivo (concretamente desde un punto de vista blanco, liberal y burgués). El Índice también invita a hacer política de una forma particularmente peligrosa. Teniendo en cuenta que la esclavitud no está legalmente autorizada en ningún sitio, la primera respuesta de la mayoría de los gobiernos al hecho de que la esclavitud es un gran problema que sigue creciendo, es abordarla como una cuestión de justicia penal. Por ello, las soluciones que proponen son habitualmente draconianas; vigilancia policial más estricta, sentencias más duras, controles migratorios más rigurosos y una creciente militarización de las fronteras. Ahora, ¿pueden estas medidas ayudar a quienes se encuentran en la más dura realidad de las desigualdades y de los sistemas contemporáneos de dominación? ¿Cómo ayudarán estas medidas a asegurar que mujeres maltratadas o trabajadoras y trabajadores pobres atrapados con «visados ligados a un empleador» puedan escapar de quienes los explotan y maltratan? ¿cómo liberarán a las poblaciones <em>almacenadas</em> en <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/dylan-rodr%C3%ADguez/present-tense-of-racial-slavery-racial-chattel-logic-of-us-prison">prisiones</a> y centros de detención o detenidas en contra de su voluntad en <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/teodora-todorova/warehousing-palestine">territorios ocupados</a> o campamentos fronterizos? </p> <p>De manera similar, no está claro cómo las leyes que los países ricos han comenzado a promulgar, en parte como respuesta a la presión de Walk Free y al GSI, para <a href="https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/644/text#toc-HF4BB0BA6977E41648581227DC17880F5">evitar la importación de productos</a> fabricados utilizando la «esclavitud» o el «trabajo forzado», ayudarán a las personas pobres y endeudas de países en desarrollo. Estas leyes contribuyen ciertamente a proteger a la industria doméstica de la competitividad a la que se enfrentan con bienes más baratos producidos en países más pobres. Pero no hacen nada para abordar las desigualdades globales, tanto políticas como económicas, que, de diferentes maneras, dan forma al fenómeno agrupado bajo el paraguas de «esclavitud moderna».</p> <p>El GSI normaliza las injusticias estructurales que provocan que una vasta cantidad de la población mundial sea incapaz de simplemente «escapar» de devastadoras situaciones de violencia, abuso y explotación. No es sorprendente que las élites globales y sus representantes políticos lo apoyen tan alegremente.&nbsp; &nbsp;</p> <hr style="border-top: #0061BF 3px solid;margin-bottom:10px;clear:both;" /> <a href="http://gaatw.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/GAATWlogo.png" width="110" alt="GAATWlogo.png" /></a><a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/u555228/TWB_Logo_RGB_920.jpg" width="220px" style="float:right;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;" /></a> <p><em>BTS en Español has been produced in collaboration with our colleagues at the <a href="http://gaatw.org/">Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women</a>. Translated with the support of <a href="http://translatorswithoutborders.org/">Translators without Borders</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LanguageMatters?src=hash">#LanguageMatters</a></em></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/chus-lvarez/traduciendo-beyond-trafficking-and-slavery-la-historia-detr-s-del-hecho">Traduciendo Beyond Trafficking and Slavery: la historia detrás del hecho</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Chusa Álvarez</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/kamala-kempadoo/revisitando-la-carga-del-hombre-blanco">Revisitando la «carga del hombre blanco»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Kamala Kempadoo</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-gallagher/trata-de-personas-de-la-indignaci-n-la-acci-n">Trata de personas: de la indignación a la acción</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Anne Gallagher</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/nandita-sharma/lucha-contra-la-trata-de-personas-encubrimiento-de-los-programas-de-luc">Lucha contra la trata de personas: encubrimiento de los programas de lucha contra la inmigración</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Nandita Sharma</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk-andr-broome/la-pol-tica-de-los-n-meros-el-ndice-global-de-esclavitud-y-el-m">La política de los números: El Índice Global de Esclavitud y el mercado del activismo</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Joel Quirk, André Broome</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/david-feingold/crear-conciencia-sobre-qu-para-qu-qui-nes-para-qui-nes">Sensibilización: ¿sobre qué? ¿para qué? ¿quiénes? ¿para quiénes?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">David A. Feingold</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/alessandra-mezzadri/la-esclavitud-moderna-y-las-paradojas-de-g-nero-en-la-falta-de-lib">La esclavitud moderna y las paradojas de género en la falta de libertad laboral</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Alessandra Mezzadri</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/neil-howard/la-esclavitud-y-la-trata-de-personas-m-s-all-de-las-protestas-vac-as">La esclavitud y la trata de personas: más allá de las protestas vacías</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Neil Howard</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/joel-quirk/ret-rica-y-realidad-del-fin-de-la-esclavitud-moderna">Retórica y realidad del «fin de la esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Joel Quirk</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/anne-t-gallagher/el-informe-sobre-la-trata-de-personas-de-eeuu-de-2015-se-ales-de-decliv">El Informe sobre la trata de personas de EE.UU. de 2015: ¿señales de declive?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Anne Gallagher</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/benjamin-harkins/por-qu-no-sabemos-si-funcionan-las-iniciativas-contra-la-trata">¿Por qué no sabemos si funcionan las iniciativas contra la trata?</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Benjamin Harkins</span><hr /> <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery/es/michael-dottridge/ocho-razones-por-las-que-no-deber-amos-usar-el-t-rmino-esclavitud-mo">Ocho razones por las que no deberíamos usar el término «esclavitud moderna»</a><br /><span style="font-size:90%;">Michael Dottridge</span><hr /> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> BeyondSlavery BeyondSlavery Sam Okyere Julia O'Connell Davidson BTS en Español Fri, 27 Jul 2018 07:00:00 +0000 Julia O'Connell Davidson and Sam Okyere 118817 at https://www.opendemocracy.net