Wade M. Cole https://www.opendemocracy.net/taxonomy/term/19294/all cached version 17/01/2018 20:56:39 en The international treaty on economic and social rights has positive impacts https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/wade-m-cole/international-treaty-on-economic-and-social-rights-has-positive-impacts <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_right 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/549213/Cole1_0.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xsmall/wysiwyg_imageupload/549213/Cole1_0.jpg" alt="" title="" width="140" height="93" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_xsmall" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span>When countries ratify the international treaty on economic and social rights, good things ensue, even for the world’s poorest nations. A contribution to the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights" target="_blank">openGlobalRights</a> debate on <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/debating-economic-and-social-rights">economic and social rights.</a>&nbsp; <em><strong><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/wade-m-cole/el-tratado-internacional-sobre-derechos-econ%C3%B3micos-y-sociales-tiene-imp" target="_blank">Español</a></strong></em></p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">Previous openGlobalRights authors <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/octavio-luiz-motta-ferraz/where%E2%80%99s-evidence-moving-from-ideology-to-data-in-economic" target="_blank">have noted</a> that we need more empirical research – and less ideological argumentation – on the impact of economic and social rights. The research literature has largely ignored these rights, however, leading <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/shareen-hertel/legal-mobilization-critical-first-step-to-addressing-economic-and-so" target="_blank">Shareen Hertel</a> to <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1528-3585.2006.00247.x/abstract" target="_blank">lament</a> that economic and social rights “have remained the poor step-sister to other types of human rights research, scholarship, and advocacy.” </p><p dir="ltr">More specifically, few scholars have studied the empirical effects of the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), the main linchpin of the international economic and social rights regime.</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">This reluctance is part historical: during the Cold War, the Soviet Union and its satellites emphasized economic and social rights, whereas the United States and its allies championed civil and political rights. It is also partly due to considerations of expense. Many believe that only the wealthier countries of the global North, and not the poorer nations of the global South, have the resources to realize economic and social rights.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">In a recent </span><a style="line-height: 1.5;" href="http://asr.sagepub.com/content/80/2/359.abstract" target="_blank">article</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> published in the American Sociological Review, I investigated whether this North-South resource argument held water. My goal was to analyze the effect of a country’s membership in the ICESCR on the extent of its domestic income inequality. I looked at 24 developed and 83 developing countries, from 1981 to 2005, and focused on the income inequality that remained after accounting for government taxes and transfers.</span></p><p><span class="print-no mag-quote-left">Lower inequality is also&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">linked to other human rights benefits</span>, including fewer violations of physical integrity rights.&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">I chose to focus on inequality for three reasons. First, regardless of a country’s overall wealth, resources can be distributed more or less equitably. Government attempts to reduce inequality, in my view, demonstrate an effort to comply with the ICESCR. Second, when governments use taxes and transfers to reduce inequality, they go some way towards satisfying the ICESCR’s implied objective of equalizing resources. And finally, lower inequality is also </span><a style="line-height: 1.5;" href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-2478.2009.00553.x/abstract" target="_blank">linked to other human rights benefits</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;">, including fewer violations of physical integrity rights.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">My statistical findings were clear: membership in the ICESCR reduces income inequality over time. In both developed and developing societies, the longer a country belongs to the covenant, the lower its level of inequality, controlling for a wide range of economic, political, and demographic factors.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">To be sure, the effect of ICESCR membership was stronger in developed countries; after 25 years of treaty membership, income inequality in high-income nations declined by an average of 29%, controlling for other factors. In lower-income countries, by contrast, inequality declined by only 10%. Still, this latter effect is substantial and statistically significant.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">What this means, then, is that while country wealth conditions the magnitude of the ICESCR’s inequality-reducing effect, it does not account for the effect’s presence. Even poor countries, in other words, can benefit from joining this crucial treaty.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Interestingly, I found no evidence to suggest that domestic political support for or against economic and social rights either promoted or derailed ICESCR compliance. The presence of ‘leftist’ governments or the size of a country’s welfare expenditure did not significantly amplify the effect of treaty membership.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">These results support arguments made by other openGlobalRights authors: avoid the ideological debate, and focus on empirical impacts.</span></p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Cole1.jpg" alt="" width="444" /> <br />Demotix/Giuseppe Bizzarri (All rights reserved) </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;"> Does ICESCR ratification bring countries closer to acknowledging that, "Regardless of a country’s overall wealth, resources can be distributed more or less equitably"?</p><p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> </p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">This non-ideological reading of the international human rights regime is justified by history. Human rights, after all, emerged not only in reaction to the atrocities of World War II and the Holocaust, but also to the calamities of the Great Depression. Moreover, international economic and social rights norms developed alongside the rise and expansion of the postwar Western welfare state, which sought to protect individuals from the harmful effects of global market forces.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The data show that as intended, the ICESCR has helped buffer citizens from the neoliberal agenda dominating world politics during the period covered by my analysis.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Ironically, the fall of communism may have further invigorated the ICESCR. Although the communist bloc was often seen as the primary champion of economic and social rights, the collapse of the Soviet Union actually created opportunities to re-articulate those rights.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The World Conference on Human Rights in 1993, for example, famously asserted that “all human rights are universal, indivisible and interdependent and interrelated,” suggesting that civil and political rights would no longer take pride of place in the international human rights regime.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Then, from 1997 to 2002, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson made the advancement of economic and social rights the centerpiece of her program. NGOs soon followed with their own changes. In 2001, Amnesty International expanded its mission to include economic and social rights, despite its earlier preoccupation with physical integrity rights.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">These trends suggest that compliance with human rights treaties, including agreements once thought too contentious or difficult to implement, stems as much from global processes and dynamics as it does from domestic factors and conditions.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Much work in this area remains to be done. Although my study suggests that the ICESCR helps reduce income inequality, we still don’t know whether – or under what conditions – economic and social rights promote wellbeing in terms of other indicators, including mortality, food security, access to housing, medical care, education, and the like.</span></p><p>These are empirical questions. Finding solid, evidence-backed answers will help us advance the <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/debating-economic-and-social-rights" target="_blank">ongoing debate on economic and social rights</a>.</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4English.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/debating-economic-and-social-rights" target="_blank" onMouseOver="document.Imgs.src=' https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/Economic_Social_Inset_2.png '" onMouseOut="document.Imgs.src=' https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/Economic_Social_Inset_1.png '"> <img src=" https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/Economic_Social_Inset_1.png" width="140" name="Imgs" border="0" alt="Debating economic and social rights – Read on" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/octavio-luiz-motta-ferraz/where%E2%80%99s-evidence-moving-from-ideology-to-data-in-economic">Where’s the evidence? Moving from ideology to data in economic and social rights</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/shareen-hertel/legal-mobilization-critical-first-step-to-addressing-economic-and-so">Legal mobilization: a critical first step to addressing economic and social rights </a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/stuart-wilson/without-means-there-are-no-real-rights">Without means, there are no real rights</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrightsopenpage/c%C3%A9sar-rodr%C3%ADguezgaravito/decline-of-grand-treaties-thoughts-after-lima-clima">The decline of grand treaties? Thoughts after the Lima climate summit</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/eric-posner/twilight-of-human-rights-law">The twilight of human rights law</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/dan-berliner/open-budgets-open-politics">Open budgets, open politics?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/virginia-mantouvalou/workers%E2%80%99-rights-really-are-human-rights">Workers’ rights really are human rights</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/helena-hofbauer/winners-and-losers-how-budgeting-for-human-rights-can-help-poor">Winners and losers: how budgeting for human rights can help the poor</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/audrey-gaughran/cracking-down-on-tax-abuse-will-help-promote-economic-and-social-ri">Cracking down on tax abuse will help promote economic and social rights</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/bertha-mar%C3%ADa-carrillo/in-latin-america-authoritarian-%E2%80%9Cleftists%E2%80%9D-create-new-berlin-w">In Latin America, authoritarian “leftists” create new Berlin Walls</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/sara-bailey/can-legal-interventions-really-tackle-root-causes-of-poverty">Can legal interventions really tackle the root causes of poverty?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> openGlobalRights openGlobalRights Wade M. Cole Global Response article Debating economic and social rights Thu, 14 May 2015 08:30:00 +0000 Wade M. Cole 92643 at https://www.opendemocracy.net El tratado internacional sobre derechos económicos y sociales tiene impactos positivos https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/wade-m-cole/el-tratado-internacional-sobre-derechos-econ%C3%B3micos-y-sociales-tiene-imp <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_right 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/549213/Cole1_0.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xsmall/wysiwyg_imageupload/549213/Cole1_0.jpg" alt="" title="" width="140" height="93" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_xsmall" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p><p>Cuando los países ratifican el tratado internacional sobre derechos económicos y sociales, suceden cosas buenas, incluso para las naciones más pobres del mundo. Una contribución al debate de openGlobalRights sobre los <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/debating-economic-and-social-rights">derechos económicos y sociales.</a>&nbsp;<em><strong><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/wade-m-cole/international-treaty-on-economic-and-social-rights-has-positive-impacts" target="_blank">English</a></strong></em></p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr">Autores anteriores de openGlobalRights <a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/octavio-luiz-motta-ferraz/%C2%BFd%C3%B3nde-est%C3%A1-la-evidencia-ir-de-la-ideolog%C3%ADa-los-datos-en-" target="_blank">han señalado</a> que hace falta más investigación empírica, y menos argumentos ideológicos, sobre el impacto de los derechos económicos y sociales. Sin embargo, la literatura científica ha ignorado estos derechos en gran medida, lo que ha ocasionado que <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/shareen-hertel/legal-mobilization-critical-first-step-to-addressing-economic-and-so" target="_blank">Shareen Hertel</a> se <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1528-3585.2006.00247.x/abstract" target="_blank">lamente</a> de que los derechos económicos y sociales “han permanecido como la hermanastra pobre del activismo, los estudios académicos y la investigación de otros tipos de derechos humanos”.</p><p dir="ltr">Más específicamente, pocos académicos han estudiado los efectos empíricos del Pacto Internacional de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales (PIDESC), el eje principal del régimen internacional de derechos económicos y sociales.</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">En parte, esta renuencia tiene bases históricas: durante la Guerra Fría, la Unión Soviética y sus satélites enfatizaban los derechos económicos y sociales, mientras que Estados Unidos y sus aliados defendían los derechos civiles y políticos. También obedece parcialmente a consideraciones de costos. Muchos creen que solamente los países más ricos del Norte global, y no las naciones más pobres del Sur global, cuentan con los recursos necesarios para hacer efectivos los derechos económicos y sociales.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">En un </span><a style="line-height: 1.5;" href="http://asr.sagepub.com/content/80/2/359.abstract" target="_blank">artículo</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> reciente publicado en la revista American Sociological Review, investigué si este argumento sobre los recursos en el Norte y el Sur era sólido. Mi objetivo fue analizar el efecto de la membresía de un país en el PIDESC sobre su grado de desigualdad de ingresos a nivel nacional. Observé 24 países desarrollados y 83 en vías de desarrollo, de 1981 a 2005, y me enfoqué en la desigualdad de ingresos que seguía existiendo después de tomar en consideración las transferencias y los impuestos del gobierno.</span></p><p><span class="print-no mag-quote-left">Una menor desigualdad también está&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">relacionada con otros beneficios de derechos humanos</span>, incluida una menor cantidad de violaciones de los derechos de integridad física.&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Decidí concentrarme en la desigualdad por tres razones. En primer lugar, independientemente de la riqueza total de un país, los recursos pueden distribuirse más o menos equitativamente. Los intentos del gobierno para reducir la desigualdad, en mi opinión, demuestran un esfuerzo por cumplir con el PIDESC. En segundo lugar, cuando los gobiernos utilizan los impuestos y las transferencias para reducir la desigualdad, contribuyen de cierta manera a satisfacer el objetivo implícito de igualación de recursos del PIDESC. Y finalmente, una menor desigualdad también está </span><a style="line-height: 1.5;" href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-2478.2009.00553.x/abstract" target="_blank">relacionada con otros beneficios de derechos humanos</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;">, incluida una menor cantidad de violaciones de los derechos de integridad física.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Mis resultados estadísticos fueron claros: ser miembro del PIDESC reduce la desigualdad de ingresos con el paso del tiempo. Tanto en las sociedades desarrolladas como en vías de desarrollo, entre más tiempo pertenece un país al pacto, menor es su nivel de desigualdad, controlando para una amplia gama de factores demográficos, políticos y económicos.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Sin duda, el efecto de la membresía en el PIDESC fue más fuerte en los países desarrollados; después de 25 años como miembros del tratado, la desigualdad de ingresos en los países con ingresos altos disminuyó en un promedio de 29 %, controlando para otros factores. En los países de menos ingresos, en cambio, la desigualdad disminuyó solamente en un 10 %. De todas maneras, este último efecto es considerable y estadísticamente significativo.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Esto significa, entonces, que si bien la riqueza de un país condiciona la magnitud del efecto de reducción de desigualdad del PIDESC, no explica la presencia del efecto. En otras palabras, incluso los países pobres se pueden beneficiar de unirse a este crucial tratado.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Curiosamente, no encontré evidencia que sugiriera que el apoyo político a favor o en contra de los derechos económicos y sociales fomentara o desviara el cumplimiento del PIDESC. La presencia de gobiernos “izquierdistas” o la magnitud de los gastos en bienestar social de un país no ampliaban significativamente el efecto de la membresía en el tratado.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Estos resultados apoyan los argumentos presentados por otros autores de openGlobalRights: hay que evitar los debates ideológicos y concentrarnos en los impactos empíricos.</span></p> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Begins--> <div style="color: #999999; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-style: italic; text-align: right;"> <img style="max-width: 100%; background-color: #ffffff; padding: 7px; border: 1px solid #999999;" src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/Cole1.jpg" alt="" width="444" /> <br />Demotix/Giuseppe Bizzarri (All rights reserved) </div> <p style="color: #666666; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;"> Does ICESCR ratification bring countries closer to acknowledging that, "Regardless of a country’s overall wealth, resources can be distributed more or less equitably"?</p><p> <hr style="color: #d2d3d5; background-color: #d2d3d5; height: 1px; width: 85%; border: none; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto;" /> <!--Image/Credit/Caption Ends--> </p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">La historia justifica esta lectura no ideológica del régimen internacional de derechos humanos. Después de todo, los derechos humanos no surgieron solamente como reacción ante las atrocidades de la Segunda Guerra Mundial y el Holocausto, sino también ante las calamidades de la Gran Depresión. Además, las normas internacionales de derechos económicos y sociales se desarrollaron junto con el surgimiento y la expansión del estado de bienestar occidental de la posguerra, que buscaba proteger a los individuos de los perniciosos efectos de las fuerzas del mercado mundial.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Los datos muestran que, según lo previsto, el PIDESC ha ayudado a resguardar a los ciudadanos de los intereses neoliberales que dominaron la política mundial durante el periodo que cubre mi análisis.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Irónicamente, es posible que la caída del comunismo haya estimulado más al PIDESC. Aunque a menudo se percibía al bloque comunista como el principal defensor de los derechos económicos y sociales, el colapso de la Unión Soviética en realidad creó oportunidades para volver a articular esos derechos.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Por ejemplo, la Conferencia Mundial de Derechos Humanos de 1993 hizo la famosa afirmación de que “todos los derechos humanos son universales, indivisibles e interdependientes y están relacionados entre sí”, lo que sugería que los derechos civiles y políticos ya no ocuparían el lugar preferente en el régimen internacional de derechos humanos.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Después, de 1997 a 2002, la Alta Comisionada para los Derechos Humanos de la ONU, Mary Robinson, colocó el avance de los derechos económicos y sociales como la pieza central de su programa. Las ONG pronto siguieron con sus propios cambios. En 2001, Amnistía Internacional amplió su misión para incluir los derechos económicos y sociales, a pesar de su inicial preocupación con los derechos de integridad personal.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Estas tendencias sugieren que el cumplimiento de los tratados de derechos humanos, incluidos los acuerdos alguna vez considerados demasiado conflictivos o difíciles de implementar, depende tanto de los procesos y las dinámicas globales como de las condiciones y factores nacionales.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Hace falta realizar mucho trabajo en esta área. Aunque mi estudio sugiere que el PIDESC ayuda a reducir la desigualdad de ingresos, aún no sabemos si, o en qué condiciones, los derechos económicos y sociales promueven el bienestar en términos de otros indicadores, como por ejemplo la mortalidad, la seguridad alimentaria, y el acceso a la vivienda, la atención médica y la educación.</span></p><p>Estas son preguntas empíricas. Encontrar respuestas sólidas y respaldadas por pruebas nos ayudará a avanzar el <a href="https://opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/debating-economic-and-social-rights" target="_blank">debate actual sobre los derechos económicos y sociales</a>.</p><p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title="imgupl_floating_none"><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_large/wysiwyg_imageupload/537772/EPlogo-ogr-4_2.png" alt="" title="imgupl_floating_none" width="300" height="115" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_large" style=""/></a> <span class='image_meta'></span></span></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-read-on"> <div class="field-label"> 'Read On' Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights-translations/openglobalrights-espa%C3%B1ol "><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/OpenGlobalRights-highlight4-espagnol.png" alt="" width="140" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-sidebox"> <div class="field-label"> Sidebox:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/debating-economic-and-social-rights" target="_blank" onMouseOver="document.Imgs.src=' https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/Economic_Social_Inset_2.png '" onMouseOut="document.Imgs.src=' https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/Economic_Social_Inset_1.png '"> <img src=" https://www.opendemocracy.net/files/Economic_Social_Inset_1.png" width="140" name="Imgs" border="0" alt="Debating economic and social rights – Read on" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/octavio-luiz-motta-ferraz/%C2%BFd%C3%B3nde-est%C3%A1-la-evidencia-ir-de-la-ideolog%C3%ADa-los-datos-en-">¿Dónde está la evidencia? Ir de la ideología a los datos en materia de derechos económicos y sociales</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/stuart-wilson/sin-medios-realmente-no-hay-derechos">Sin medios, realmente no hay derechos</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/helena-hofbauer/ganadores-y-perdedores-presupuestar-con-perspectiva-de-derechos-hum">Ganadores y perdedores: Presupuestar con perspectiva de derechos humanos le sirve a los pobres</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrightsopenpage/c%C3%A9sar-rodr%C3%ADguezgaravito/%C2%BFel-ocaso-de-los-grandes-tratados-reflexiones-tras-">¿El ocaso de los grandes tratados? Reflexiones tras la cumbre sobre el cambio climático en Lima</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/daniel-berliner/%C2%BFpresupuestos-abiertos-pol%C3%ADtica-abierta">¿Presupuestos abiertos, política abierta?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/eric-posner/el-crep%C3%BAsculo-de-las-leyes-de-los-derechos-humanos">El crepúsculo de las leyes de los derechos humanos</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/openglobalrights/audrey-gaughran/tomar-medidas-en%C3%A9rgicas-contra-el-abuso-fiscal-ayudar%C3%A1-promover-los">Tomar medidas enérgicas contra el abuso fiscal ayudará a promover los derechos económicos y sociales</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/openglobalrights/bertha-mar%C3%ADa-carrillo/en-latinoam%C3%A9rica-los-%E2%80%9Cizquierdistas%E2%80%9D-autoritarios-est%C3%A1n-crean">En Latinoamérica, los “izquierdistas” autoritarios están creando nuevos Muros de Berlín </a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> openGlobalRights Wade M. Cole Global Response article Debating economic and social rights openGlobalRights Español Thu, 14 May 2015 08:30:00 +0000 Wade M. Cole 92645 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Wade M. Cole https://www.opendemocracy.net/content/wade-m-cole <div class="field field-au-term"> <div class="field-label">Author:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Wade M. Cole </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="https://faculty.utah.edu/u0782031-Wade_M._Cole/research/index.hml" target="_blank">Wade M. Cole</a> is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Utah.<br /><a href="https://faculty.utah.edu/u0782031-Wade_M._Cole/research/index.hml"></a></p><p><a href="https://faculty.utah.edu/u0782031-Wade_M._Cole/research/index.hml" target="_blank">Wade M. Cole</a> es profesor adjunto de Sociología en la University of Utah.</p> Wade M. Cole Thu, 07 May 2015 14:40:27 +0000 Wade M. Cole 92644 at https://www.opendemocracy.net