Melisa Ross https://www.opendemocracy.net/taxonomy/term/24922/all cached version 13/02/2019 20:18:17 en Truth, memory and democracy in Latin America https://www.opendemocracy.net/democraciaabierta/azucena-mor-n-melisa-ross/truth-memory-and-democracy-in-latin-america <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p class="BodyA">For collective remembrance of crimes to go beyond storytelling and momentary indignation, citizens should be involved in the ideation, creation and dissemination of memory. <strong><em><a>Español</a></em></strong><ins datetime="2017-09-26T11:33" cite="mailto:Francesc%20Badia"></ins></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/557099/share-facebook-anyones-child_0.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/557099/share-facebook-anyones-child_0.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="242" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style="" /></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>Photo: Anyone's Child. </span></span></span></p><p class="BodyA">During the 1970s and 1980s, in the midst of a wave of military dictatorships and while armed conflicts between guerrilla groups and paramilitary forces were paving their way into Latin America’s tumultuous political history, numerous processes of remembering and forgetting started to sprout throughout the region.&nbsp;</p> <p class="BodyA">These early civil society initiatives, later institutionalized within the State’s executive, legislative and judicial branches, played a central role in thematizing the experiences of violence and terror. By responding to the urgent need of gathering evidence concerning human rights violations, they came to complement, even replace State functions in times of authoritarian rule, and shed light on the possibility of peace. The resistance of the Latin American society—whose allure has been broadly documented and consisted in all sorts of institutional and extra-institutional actions aimed at accountability and justice— left a mark on the public sphere that continues to shape today’s political debate and the role of civil society during times of State repression and terrorism.</p> <p class="BodyA">The mobilizations occurred under hoarse circumstances and blatant impunity, and were triggered by numerous members of the civil society, including journalists, activists, students, artists, associations of victims and their families, together with NGOs, religious leaders, and international institutions. They did so with the purpose of denouncing, both nationally and internationally, the abuses and crimes committed by those wielding absolute power in their home countries. By demanding the acknowledgment and active protection of human rights, these groups promoted the understanding of complicated, often unspeakable realities; gathered the testimonies of survivors—generating and preserving social memory—; and years later, became the cornerstone for transitional institutions—allowing for their formation and institutionalization.&nbsp;</p><p class="mag-quote-center">During this period, circa 30,000 citizens were subject to torture, forced into exile or disappearance, anonymously executed or constrained to see the abduction of their children.</p> <p class="BodyA">The transition towards the so-called third wave democracies presented the opportunity to radically change the role of organized citizen participation. As the foundations of memory museums were built, more and more <a href="https://latinno.net/en/concepts/">democratic innovations</a> that aimed at the creation of institutional settings with the goal of documenting the past and preserving social memory started to come into existence.</p> <p class="BodyA">Truth commissions are the first and most widespread model of collaboration between State and civil society aimed at fact finding, documenting and in some cases even participating in judicial procedures. The first attempt of establishing a truth commission occurred in Bolivia, with the National Commission for the Investigation of Forced Disappearances, but perhaps it is safe to say that the most iconic case is Argentina’s CONADEP, which began to unfold one year later, in 1983. Argentina’s National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons was established directly after the doddering end of a military rule and the country’s “Dirty War.” During this period, circa 30,000 citizens were subject to torture, forced into exile or disappearance, anonymously executed or constrained to see the abduction of their children as part of the governments’ anti-insurgency policies and repression of dissent. At the time, practices that eliminated political freedoms and blatantly ignored human rights were shared in many countries throughout the region; yet, so were society’s courageous and determined claims for justice. The struggle for democracy and desire for radical political changes ultimately led to the implementation of other fact-finding institutions in countries such as Chile, Guatemala, Peru, Brazil, and Colombia.&nbsp;</p> <p class="BodyA">The so-called “memory boom” took place, however, in a rather uneven and interrupted form. It responded not only to the context-bound political and historical developments in each State; but also to the strength of civil society organizations, the scope of their demands, and the changing institutional settings that echoed them. The narratives created by these initiatives —especially those by Truth Commissions—were, at the same time, severely contentious among different sectors of the Latin American society; unreconciled truths impacted not only the generations of the Cold War but found a way through time and reached today’s post-conflict politics of memory.&nbsp;</p><p class="mag-quote-center">The so-called “memory boom” took place, however, in a rather uneven and interrupted form.&nbsp;</p> <p class="BodyA">Today, despite the consequences prompted by prevailingly polarized societies, and as the role of organized citizen participation continued to grow and evolve, the landscape of remembrance started to slowly transform itself, in particular through multimedia storytelling. New collaborative spaces assumed the role of dwelling upon not only the unresolved ghosts of the region’s past but also today's staggering numbers of deaths, disappearances and State violence; reclaiming memory, truth, and justice through political experimentation.</p> <p class="BodyA">The <a href="https://interactive.quipu-project.com/">Quipu Project</a>, for instance—named after Inca’s string system for record-keeping —, is a collective-memory transmedia project developed by a team of researchers, human rights defenders, and film producers, together with civil society organizations and different NGOs in Peru. The objective of this innovation is to give voice and seek justice for the women and men who were victims of a sterilization campaign carried out during the government of Alberto Fujimori; in which thousands, mainly indigenous peoples residing in rural areas of the country, were sterilized without their prior consent.&nbsp;</p> <p class="BodyA">The particularity of this participatory space is that, besides having an online platform, it is also carried out throughout different technologies, such as a toll-free telephone line and local radios. These technologies allow the project to denounce the human rights violations perpetrated in far-flung areas of the country by enabling people who do not have access to the Internet to share and listen to testimonies of struggle and resilience. In the same line of thought, the <a href="http://mexico.anyoneschild.org/p/home">Anyone’s Child Project</a> collects the voices of the families who have been torn apart because of the war on drugs in Mexico, with the purpose of advocating for drugs legislation and regulation. This initiative allows the relatives of the victims to anonymously share their testimonies through a toll-free line, and listen to the stories of the men and women who have lost their lives or disappeared because of the war’s crossfires.</p><p class="mag-quote-center">Anyone’s Child Project&nbsp;collects the voices of the families who have been torn apart because of the war on drugs in Mexico, with the purpose of advocating for drugs legislation and regulation.&nbsp;</p> <p class="BodyA">These two innovations might address crimes committed during different moments in time, yet at the core of both projects, history acknowledges a very well-defined purpose that goes beyond timeframes. By involving citizens directly in advocating and denouncing the crimes committed, these initiatives allow survivors, their relatives and political activists to understand past and present abuses not as a given realities to be passively accepted, but as the reflection of failing policies and abusive governments. The possibility to voice a vast number of silenced stories and historically-marginalized sectors of the society could shed light and help both policy-makers and politicians understand and address history’s strong relationship with today’s challenges, like increasing accountability and strengthening the rule of law.</p> <p class="BodyA">Rethinking forms of e-participation and citizen representation in collective remembrance initiatives has been done in Latin America from the local to the national level. In Mexico, for instance, initiatives seeking to discover the real number of missing persons have been created regionally and nationally. The <a href="https://fuundec.org/">Citizen Registry of the Disappeared in Coahuila</a>, for example, is an online space developed by the civil society organization “<em>Fuerzas Unidas por Nuestros Desaparecidos</em>” (lit. united forces for our disappeared) with the aim of creating a database of missing persons who haven’t acquired the "official" status of <em>desaparecido</em>.&nbsp;</p> <p class="BodyA">At the national level, the initiative <a href="http://cienciaforenseciudadana.org/">Citizen Forensic Science</a> set up an online database generated with the information provided by the relatives of victims of forced disappearances. The project offers family members the possibility of contributing to the construction of a DNA bank: the National Citizen Biobank of Relatives of Missing Persons. A similar successful experience of DNA identification occurred in Argentina in 1987, thanks to the active engagement of Argentina´s <em>Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo </em>in the drafting of the law. The National Genetic Data Bank collects the DNA from all surviving relatives of the disappeared and matches it with the potential victims of kidnapping during the dictatorship. This tool has proven to be essential during judicial procedures against former perpetrators. Moreover, any person who fears having been abducted as a child can contrast his DNA with those in the archives, in the hope of matching their identity with that of their missing parents and reunite with their grandparents.</p><p class="mag-quote-center">Rethinking forms of e-participation and citizen representation in collective remembrance initiatives has been done in Latin America from the local to the national level.&nbsp;</p> <p class="BodyA">Another interesting initiative conceived in Mexico is <a href="http://www.memoriayverdad.mx">Memory and Truth</a>, a platform and virtual space created to disseminate and promote the use of existing public information on cases of alleged violations of human rights and crimes against humanity. The purpose of this initiative is to promote transparency, the right of access to information, the guarantee of non-repetition, while at the same time remembering the victims of state negligence and widespread violence. </p> <p class="BodyA">Many of these collaborative spaces are part of a new wave defying representative politics in the region; from the desert of Chihuahua to far south Patagonia, more than 2,400 political innovations have been implemented with the aim to enforce democracy through citizen participation. They can be consulted at <a href="http://latinno.net">latinno.net</a>, a project making participatory political experimentation measurable and comparable. The failures and victories of collective remembrance projects urgently need to be assessed and should not be separated from today’s Latin American politics. For collective remembrance to go beyond storytelling and momentary indignation, history needs to continue embracing its purpose and become a tool for the participatory creation of public policies in which citizens are involved in the ideation, creation and dissemination of memory.&nbsp;</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/joan-subirats/in-design-as-in-politics-who-decides">In design as in politics: who decides?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/yago-bermejo-abati/democratic-cities-or-how-to-produce-collaborative-thinking-and-">Democratic cities: new technologies for participation</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/thamy-pogrebinschi/innovating-democracy-in-latin-america">Innovating Democracy in Latin America</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> DemocraciaAbierta Civil society innovation Political experimentation Latin America Melisa Ross Azucena Morán Tue, 26 Sep 2017 10:40:11 +0000 Azucena Morán and Melisa Ross 113640 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Melisa Ross https://www.opendemocracy.net/content/melisa-ross <div class="field field-au-term"> <div class="field-label">Author:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Melisa Ross </div> </div> </div> <p><strong>Melisa Ross</strong> es Master en Ciencias Sociales y asistente de investigación en el Proyecto LATINNO-Innovaciones para la Democracia en América Latina, con sede en WZB Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung.</p><p class="BodyA"><strong>Melisa Ross</strong> holds a Master in Social Sciences and is a research assistant at the LATINNO Project - Innovations for Democracy in Latin America, based at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center.</p> Melisa Ross Tue, 26 Sep 2017 10:21:14 +0000 Melisa Ross 113639 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Verdad, memoria y democracia en Latinoamérica https://www.opendemocracy.net/democraciaabierta/azucena-mor-n-melissa-ross/verdad-memoria-y-democracia-en-latinoam-rica <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Para que el recuerdo colectivo de los crímenes vaya más allá de la narración y de la indignación momentánea, los ciudadanos deben ser parte de la proyección, creación y difusión de la memoria. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/democraciaabierta/azucena-mor-n-melisa-ross/truth-memory-and-democracy-in-latin-america">English</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/557099/share-facebook-anyones-child.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/557099/share-facebook-anyones-child.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="242" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style="" /></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>Foto: Anyone's Child. </span></span></span></p><p>Durante las décadas de 1970 y 1980, mientras la región se encontraba sumida en numerosas dictaduras militares, y los conflictos entre grupos guerrilleros y fuerzas paramilitares se abrían paso en su desaforada historia política, comenzaron a germinar en ella múltiples iniciativas de memoria y olvido. Estas primeras iniciativas de la sociedad civil, posteriormente institucionalizadas dentro de los poderes ejecutivo, legislativo y judicial de los Estados, jugaron un papel central en la tematización de las experiencias de descomunal violencia y terror vividas en la región. </p> <p>Para responder a la necesidad urgente de reunir pruebas sobre las violaciones de derechos humanos, llegaron a complementar, e incluso a reemplazar las funciones del Estado en tiempos de regímenes autoritarios, vislumbrando, a su vez, la posibilidad de alcanzar la paz. La resistencia de la sociedad latinoamericana—cuyo ímpetu&nbsp; ha sido ampliamente documentado y ha consistido en todo tipo de acciones institucionales y extra-institucionales dirigidas a la rendición de cuentas y a fortalecer el Estado de derecho—dejó huellas que continúan, hasta el día de hoy, configurando el debate político y el papel de la sociedad civil en tiempos de represión estatal y terrorismo.</p> <p>Las movilizaciones ocurrieron en circunstancias de impunidad flagrante, y fueron desencadenadas por numerosos miembros de la sociedad civil, incluyendo periodistas, activistas, estudiantes, artistas, asociaciones de víctimas y sus familias, quienes actuaron en conjunto con ONGs, líderes religiosos e instituciones internacionales. Lo hicieron con el propósito de denunciar, tanto a nivel nacional como internacional, los abusos y crímenes cometidos por aquellos que ejercían el poder absoluto en sus países de origen. Al exigir el reconocimiento y la protección activa de los derechos humanos, estos grupos promovieron la comprensión de realidades complejas, a menudo inefables; reunieron los testimonios de los sobrevivientes, generando y preservando la memoria social; y años más tarde, se convirtieron en la piedra angular de las instituciones de transición, permitiendo su formación e institucionalización.</p><p class="mag-quote-center">Durante ese período, alrededor de 30.000 ciudadanos fueron sometidos a tortura; forzados al exilio o desaparecidos; ejecutados de forma anónima u obligados a presenciar el secuestro de sus hijos.</p> <p>El proceso conocido como la “tercera ola de democratización” dio la oportunidad de cambiar radicalmente el papel de la participación ciudadana organizada. A medida que se construyeron los cimientos de los museos de la memoria, comenzaron a surgir cada vez más <a href="https://latinno.net/en/concepts/">innovaciones democráticas </a>que apuntaban a la creación de entornos institucionales con el objetivo de documentar el pasado y preservar la memoria social.</p> <p>Las comisiones de la verdad son el primer y más extendido modelo de colaboración entre el Estado y la sociedad civil, destinadas a la investigación, documentación y en algunos casos incluso participación en los procedimientos judiciales. El primer intento de establecer una Comisión de la Verdad ocurrió en Bolivia con la Comisión Nacional para la Investigación de Desapariciones Forzadas, pero el caso más emblemático fue seguramente el de CONADEP en Argentina, el cual comenzó a desarrollarse un año después, en 1983. La Comisión Nacional sobre la Desaparición de Personas se estableció después del fin del régimen militar y de la denominada "Guerra Sucia". </p> <p>Durante ese período, alrededor de 30.000 ciudadanos fueron sometidos a tortura; forzados al exilio o desaparecidos; ejecutados de forma anónima u obligados a presenciar el secuestro de sus hijos como parte de las políticas antisubversivas y la represión de la disidencia del gobierno de facto. En aquella época, las prácticas que eliminaban las libertades políticas y descaradamente hacían caso omiso de los derechos humanos se extendían a lo largo de la región; sin embargo, a su vez aumentaban las valientes y decididas reivindicaciones por la justicia de la sociedad civil. Su lucha por la democracia y su deseo de cambios políticos radicales condujeron finalmente a la implementación de comisiones de investigación también en países como Chile, Guatemala, Perú, Brasil y Colombia.</p><p class="mag-quote-center">Es de notar que el llamado "boom de la memoria" tuvo lugar de forma bastante irregular.</p> <p>Es de notar que el llamado "boom de la memoria" tuvo lugar de forma bastante irregular: respondiendo no sólo a los contextos políticos e históricos de cada país; sino también a la fuerza de las organizaciones de la sociedad civil, al alcance de sus demandas y al entorno institucional cambiante que hizo eco de ellas. Las narrativas creadas por estas iniciativas—especialmente por las comisiones de verdad—eran, al mismo tiempo, polémicas entre los distintos sectores de la sociedad latinoamericana. Estas verdades irreconciliables afectaron no sólo a las generaciones de la Guerra Fría sino que se abrieron paso a través del tiempo y continuaron a perjudicar las políticas de la memoria de las generaciones del posconflicto.</p> <p>Sin embargo, hoy, a pesar de vivir en sociedades predominantemente polarizadas y fragmentadas, el papel de la participación ciudadana organizada continúa a crecer y a evolucionarse; y con ello la memoria histórica, que comenzó a transformarse, sobre todo a través de la narrativa multimedia. Nuevos espacios colaborativos han asumido el papel de reflexionar no sólo sobre los fantasmas no resueltos del pasado de la región, sino también sobre el número devastador de muertes, desapariciones y violencia de Estado; recuperando la memoria, la verdad y la justicia a través de la experimentación política.</p> <p>El <a href="https://interactive.quipu-project.com/">Proyecto Quipu</a>, por ejemplo, —que lleva el nombre del sistema inca de nudos que solía preservar registros y narrativas—es un proyecto transmedial de memoria colectiva desarrollado por un equipo de investigadores, defensores de derechos humanos y productores de cine, junto con organizaciones de la sociedad civil y diferentes ONGs en Perú. El objetivo de esta innovación es dar voz y buscar justicia para las mujeres y los hombres que fueron víctimas de una campaña de esterilización forzada llevada a cabo durante el gobierno de Alberto Fujimori; en la que miles de personas, principalmente indígenas residentes en zonas rurales del país, fueron esterilizadas sin su consentimiento previo.</p><p class="mag-quote-center">En México, el proyecto Anyone's Child recoge las voces de las familias en duelo a causa de la guerra contra las drogas, con el propósito de abogar por la legislación y la regulación de las mismas.</p> <p>La particularidad de este espacio participativo es que, además de tener una plataforma en línea, también se lleva a cabo a través de diferentes tecnologías, ya que cuenta con una línea telefónica gratuita y radios locales. Estas tecnologías permiten al proyecto denunciar las violaciones de los derechos humanos perpetradas en zonas remotas del país, ya que permite que las personas que no tienen acceso a Internet compartan y escuchen los testimonios de lucha y resiliencia recopilados. </p> <p>Siguiendo la misma línea, en México, el proyecto <a href="http://mexico.anyoneschild.org/p/home">Anyone's Child</a> recoge las voces de las familias en duelo a causa de la guerra contra las drogas, con el propósito de abogar por la legislación y la regulación de las mismas. Esta iniciativa permite a los familiares de las víctimas compartir anónimamente sus testimonios a través de una línea gratuita y escuchar las historias de los hombres y mujeres que han perdido la vida o desaparecido debido a los fuegos cruzados de la guerra.</p> <p>Estas dos innovaciones abordan crímenes cometidos en diferentes momentos históricos, pero como pilar de ambos proyectos, se puede ver cómo la historia reconoce un propósito bien definido que va más allá de una concatenación de eventos. Al involucrar a los ciudadanos directamente en la defensa y denuncia de los crímenes cometidos, estas iniciativas permiten a los sobrevivientes, a sus familiares y a los activistas políticos entender los abusos pasados y presentes no como una realidad dada para ser pasivamente aceptada, sino como el reflejo de políticas fallidas y gobiernos abusivos.</p><p class="mag-quote-center">Repensar las formas de participación digital y de representación ciudadana en iniciativas de conmemoración colectiva se ha hecho en América Latina desde el nivel local hasta el nacional.&nbsp;</p> <p>La posibilidad de dar voz a un gran número de historias silenciadas y sectores históricamente marginados de la sociedad podría arrojar luz y ayudar tanto a los políticos como a los gobiernos a entender y afrontar la fuerte relación de la historia con los desafíos de hoy, así como a aumentar la calidad de la rendición de cuentas y a fortalecer el estado de derecho.</p> <p>Repensar las formas de participación digital y de representación ciudadana en iniciativas de conmemoración colectiva se ha hecho en América Latina desde el nivel local hasta el nacional. En México, por ejemplo, se han creado iniciativas que buscan descubrir el número real de personas desaparecidas a nivel regional y nacional. El <a href="https://fuundec.org/">Registro de Ciudadanos de los Desaparecidos en Coahuila</a>, por ejemplo, es un espacio en línea desarrollado por la organización de la sociedad civil Fuerzas Unidas por Nuestros Desaparecidos, con el objetivo de crear una base de datos de personas desaparecidas que no han adquirido el status "oficial" de desaparecido. </p> <p>A nivel nacional, por otro lado, la iniciativa <a href="http://cienciaforenseciudadana.org/">Ciencias Forenses Ciudadanas</a> creó una base de datos en línea generada con la información proporcionada por los familiares de las víctimas de desapariciones forzadas. El proyecto ofrece a los miembros de la familia la posibilidad de contribuir a la construcción de un banco de ADN: el Biobanco Ciudadano Nacional de Familiares de Personas Desaparecidas. Una experiencia exitosa similar en la identificación de ADN ocurrió en Argentina en 1987, gracias al compromiso activo de las Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo en la redacción de la ley. El Banco Nacional de Datos Genéticos recoge el ADN de todos los parientes sobrevivientes de los desaparecidos y lo hace coincidir con las posibles víctimas de secuestro durante la dictadura. Esta herramienta ha demostrado ser esencial durante los procedimientos judiciales contra los perpetradores de estos crímenes. Por otro lado, toda persona que dude de su identidad y sospeche haber sido víctima de una adopción clandestina durante la dictadura puede contrastar su ADN con los archivos, con la esperanza de encontrar la identidad de sus padres desaparecidos y reunirse con sus abuelos.</p><p class="mag-quote-center">Muchos de estos espacios de colaboración forman parte de una nueva ola que desafía la política representativa de la región.</p> <p>Otra iniciativa interesante concebida en México es <a href="http://www.memoriayverdad.mx/">Memoria y Verdad</a>, una plataforma y espacio virtual creado para difundir y promover el uso de la información pública existente sobre casos de presuntas violaciones de derechos humanos y crímenes de lesa humanidad. El objetivo de esta iniciativa es promover la transparencia, el derecho de acceso a la información, la garantía de no repetición, al mismo tiempo que se recuerdan aquellos que fueron víctimas de la negligencia del Estado y de la violencia generalizada.</p> <p>Muchos de estos espacios de colaboración forman parte de una nueva ola que desafía la política representativa de la región; desde el desierto de Chihuahua hasta el extremo sur de la Patagonia, se han implementado más de 2.400 innovaciones políticas con el objetivo de reforzar la democracia a través de la participación ciudadana. Estas innovaciones pueden ser consultadas en l<a href="http://latinno.net/">atinno.net</a>, un proyecto que hace que la experimentación política participativa sea mensurable y comparable. Los fracasos y las victorias de los proyectos de memoria colectiva necesitan ser evaluados urgentemente y no deben separarse de la actual política latinoamericana. </p> <p>Para que el recuerdo colectivo vaya más allá de la narración y de la indignación momentánea, la historia necesita seguir abrazando su propósito y convertirse en una herramienta para la creación participativa de políticas públicas, en las que los ciudadanos sean parte de la proyección, creación y difusión de la memoria.</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/joan-subirats/en-dise-o-como-en-pol-tica-qui-n-decide">En diseño como en política, ¿quién decide?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/yago-bermejo-abati/ciudades-democr-ticas-o-c-mo-producir-colaborativamente-pensami">Ciudades democráticas: nuevas tecnologías comunes para la participación</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/thamy-pogrebinschi/innovando-la-democracia-en-am-rica-latina">Innovando la Democracia en América Latina</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> DemocraciaAbierta DemocraciaAbierta Memoria colectiva Experimentación política América Latina Melisa Ross Azucena Morán Tue, 26 Sep 2017 10:15:07 +0000 Azucena Morán and Melisa Ross 113637 at https://www.opendemocracy.net