Guillermo Trejo https://www.opendemocracy.net/taxonomy/term/25932/all cached version 04/07/2018 11:21:23 en Mexico 2018: end of an era and regime change? https://www.opendemocracy.net/democraciaabierta/guillermo-trejo/mexico-2018-will-regime-change-be-possible <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This is a truly historic moment, even though the candidates seem not to acknowledge it. The election opens the opportunity for a democratic shake-up to get Mexico out of a long night of violence. <strong><em><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/democraciaabierta/guillermo-trejo/m-xico-2018-fin-de-era-y-cambio-de-r-gimen">Español</a></em></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/557099/1024px-Mexican_flag_flaming_0.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/557099/1024px-Mexican_flag_flaming_0.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="345" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style="" /></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>Mexican Flag, Source: Wikimedia Commons. All Rights Reserved.</span></span></span></p><p>For almost three decades, the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) and the National Action Party (PAN) center-right coalition dominated Mexican politics. Enemies at the polls, the PRI and the PAN were friends in government. This was a coalition that promoted ambitious market-oriented reforms, but often hindered democratic development.</p> <p>But the PRI-PAN alliance is now dead. The PAN is competing for the presidency at the forthcoming elections (scheduled for July 1st 2018) allied with the Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD), the former standard-bearer of the Mexican left and the most vocal opponent of the PRI-PAN alliance. </p><p>In the midst of a deep crisis of corruption, insecurity and gross human rights violations, the new PAN-PRD alliance is competing with the new standard bearers of the Mexican left, Andrés Manuel López Obrador and his National Regeneration Movement (Morena), for what looks like an imminent alternation of parties in presidential power.</p><p class="mag-quote-center">The question is whether this end of an era will usher in the possibility of completing the regime change which began with the defeat of the PRI in the 2000 presidential elections.</p> <p>At the start of the presidential campaign, the question is whether this end of an era will usher in the possibility of completing the regime change which began with the defeat of the PRI in the 2000 presidential elections, but failed to materialize in the advent of a liberal democracy. To understand the main parameters of the forthcoming elections and the foreseeable future, we must take stock of the democratic deficit legacy of the PRI-PAN coalition.</p> <p>The PRI-PAN alliance was born when the PAN decided to endorse the electoral fraud that led to the presidency of Carlos Salinas de Gortari, from the PRI, in 1988. In exchange, the PRI promoted some profound legislative changes that the PAN had championed for years: the end of agrarian reform, the privatization of the banking system, and the normalization of relations between Church and State. </p><p>The signing of the North American Trade Agreement (NAFTA) cemented the alliance, which moved Mexico into a sustained path of market-oriented reforms and trade liberalization. As part of this quid-pro-quo, the democratization of the electoral management bodies was postponed – right until the 1994 Zapatista uprising, when the government pulled away from the Federal Electoral Institute. Relatively clean elections were held in 2000, and the PAN managed to remove the PRI from the presidency.</p> <p>With the PAN in power, the PAN-PRI coalition reinvented itself. Given the PRI’s promise to support the presidential agenda of economic and social reforms in exchange for impunity, President Vicente Fox aborted a transitional justice project aimed at dealing with the country’s repressive past. Fox did not get near to touching any PRI’s nerves. He also did not reform the Army, the police, the secret service, the Attorney General’s Office or the public prosecutors – the institutions which had played a central role in the repression of thousands of political dissidents for decades. And in true PRI fashion, Fox made use of the Attorney General’s office for political purposes - to harass López Obrador, his political nemesis and main contender to the succession. Under Fox, macroeconomic stability and market-oriented reforms were consolidated but democratic rule of law was postponed.</p><p>The victory of PAN’s Felipe Calderón deepened the PAN-PRI alliance. This time, it was the PRI which allowed Calderón to take office in the midst of serious questioning of the 2006 elections’ process. In exchange, Calderón exonerated a repressive PRI governor (Oaxaca) and a pedophile (Puebla). With the support of the PRI, Calderón started the war on drugs and deployed the Army in the country’s most conflictive areas. Faced with the savage spiral of violence generated by this intervention, Calderón politicized the war on drugs: he supported PAN governors trying to contain soaring violence; he reached out to some PRI governors; but left adrift leftist governors and accused them of corruption, ineptitude and drug trafficking. </p><p>Like Fox, he made use of the Attorney General’s office for political purposes and persecuted left-wing mayors for alleged collusion with drug traffickers. The war resulted in a dramatic increase in the military budget and it gave the armed forces autonomy from civilian rule and impunity for the numerous atrocities committed in combat. Under Calderón, macroeconomic stability was maintained and market-oriented reforms were deepened but the country experienced a bloodshed and the flimsy rule of law trampled on.</p> <p>With Enrique Peña Nieto’s victory and the PRI’s return to the presidency, the PRI-PAN alliance was re-founded. This time, however, the coalition was joined by the PRD, which produced a leftist exodus from this party led by López Obrador. The PRI-PAN-PRD coalition allowed for major second-generation economic reforms. But the lack of effective checks and balances turned Peña Nieto’s presidency into a corruption quagmire both at federal and state levels. </p><p>With no one questioning it, the president maintained his predecessor’s failed war on drugs strategy and the country reached unprecedented levels of criminal violence and human rights violations. In the midst of a profound credibility crisis and in fear of the future, Peña Nieto has politicized the judiciary as never before: he has filled all the key posts in the judicial bodies with stalwarts, he has twisted the law to persecute his critics, and he has trampled again the country’s weak rule of law.</p> <p>With a homicide rate of 24 per 100, 000 inhabitants, more than 120, 000 dead in conflicts related to organized crime, more than 30, 000 disappeared and hundreds of journalists and social activists killed after ten years of the war on drugs, today Mexican voters see insecurity, corruption and impunity as the country's main problems. With the implosion of the PRI-PAN partnership and the PRI’s absolute disrepute, Mexico is faced with the possibility of paying off the historical debt of the PRI-PAN partnership: the development of a democratic rule of law.</p><p class="mag-quote-center">Mexico needs a real democratic shake-up; an accountability shock that would enable the country to get out from a long night of violence.</p> <p>The candidates, however, do not seem to acknowledge the fact that the country finds itself in a truly historical moment. López Obrador toys with the idea of pacifying the country through the granting of pardons, and Ricardo Anaya (the PAN-PRD candidate) babbles his intention to support a truth commission and an international mechanism against impunity. </p><p>Coming from a discredited political class, this sounds like empty words. They are empty indeed if the candidates do not address impunity and its three ramifications: corruption, crime, and gross human rights violations. They are empty if their proposals fail to put the victims at the center of the truth and justice processes. </p><p>Mexico needs a real democratic shake-up; an accountability shock that would enable the country to get out from a long night of violence. This institutional shake-up will come from civil society in cooperation with international institutions and the parties will have to learn not to block it, but to accompany it and carry it through.&nbsp;</p> <p>_________</p><p>A Spanish version of this article was previously published at <a href="https://www.animalpolitico.com/blogueros-blog-invitado/2018/03/29/mexico-2018-fin-de-era-y-cambio-de-regimen/">Animal Político</a>.</p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/esteban-arratia-sandoval/candidate-l-pez-obrador-faces-dilemma-before-drug-lords">Candidate López Obrador before the drug lords</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/massimo-modonesi/mexico-before-election-storm"> Upcoming elections in Mexico: a progressive wind of change is coming</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/laura-dowley/marichuy-mujer-ind-gena-deja-huella-en-la-campa-presidencial-mexicana">Marichuy, mujer indígena, deja huella en la campaña presidencial mexicana</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-country"> <div class="field-label"> Country or region:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Mexico </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-topics"> <div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Civil society </div> <div class="field-item even"> Culture </div> <div class="field-item odd"> Democracy and government </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> DemocraciaAbierta Mexico Civil society Culture Democracy and government Mexican elections 2018 Guillermo Trejo Fri, 06 Apr 2018 16:00:03 +0000 Guillermo Trejo 117048 at https://www.opendemocracy.net México 2018: ¿Será posible un cambio de régimen? https://www.opendemocracy.net/democraciaabierta/guillermo-trejo/m-xico-2018-fin-de-era-y-cambio-de-r-gimen <div class="field field-summary"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>México está en un momento histórico que los candidatos parecen no reconocer. El país necesita una auténtica sacudida democrática que le permita salir de una larga noche de violencia. <em><strong><a href="https://opendemocracy.net/democraciaabierta/guillermo-trejo/mexico-2018-will-regime-change-be-possible">English</a></strong></em></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class='wysiwyg_imageupload image imgupl_floating_none 0'><a href="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/wysiwyg_imageupload_lightbox_preset/wysiwyg_imageupload/557099/1024px-Mexican_flag_flaming.jpg" rel="lightbox[wysiwyg_imageupload_inline]" title=""><img src="//cdn.opendemocracy.net/files/imagecache/article_xlarge/wysiwyg_imageupload/557099/1024px-Mexican_flag_flaming.jpg" alt="" title="" width="460" height="345" class="imagecache wysiwyg_imageupload 0 imagecache imagecache-article_xlarge" style="" /></a> <span class='image_meta'><span class='image_title'>Bandera Mexicana, Fuente: Wikimedia Commons. Todos los derechos reservados. </span></span></span></p><p>Por casi tres décadas, la coalición de centro-derecha entre el PRI y el PAN dominó la política mexicana. Enemigos en las urnas, PRI y PAN se hermanaban a la hora de gobernar. Fue una coalición que favoreció a los mercados, pero que con frecuencia frenó el avance democrático.</p><p>En el marco de la elección presidencial de 2018 esta alianza ha perecido. El PAN va por la presidencia aliado con el PRD, el otrora abanderado de la izquierda mexicana y el más férreo opositor de la alianza PRI-PAN. Y ante un PRI hundido en una gravísima crisis de corrupción, inseguridad y graves violaciones de derechos humanos, la nueva alianza PAN-PRD se disputa con Andrés Manuel López Obrador y Morena –los nuevos abanderados de la izquierda mexicana– lo que pareciera una inminente alternancia de partidos en la presidencia.&nbsp;</p><p class="mag-quote-left">La pregunta es si este fin de era abrirá la posibilidad de concluir el cambio de régimen que inició con la derrota presidencial del PRI en 2000.</p> <p>Al iniciar la campaña presidencial, la pregunta es si este fin de era abrirá la posibilidad de concluir el cambio de régimen que inició con la derrota presidencial del PRI en 2000, pero que nunca se concretó en el advenimiento de una democracia liberal. </p><p>Para entender las claves de la elección y el futuro que viene, hay que hacer un recuento del déficit democrático que nos heredó la coalición PRI-PAN.&nbsp;</p> <p>La alianza PRI-PAN nació cuando el PAN decidió avalar el fraude electoral que llevó al priista Carlos Salinas de Gortari a la presidencia en 1988. Como moneda de cambio, el PRI impulsó profundos cambios legislativos que el PAN había abanderado por años: el fin de la reforma agraria; la privatización de la banca, y la normalización de las relaciones iglesia-Estado. La alianza se cimentó con la firma del TLCAN. Favorable a la privatización y la apertura comercial, esta coalición retardó la democratización de los órganos electorales.</p><p>Sería hasta el levantamiento zapatista de 1994 cuando el PRI sacó las manos Instituto Federal Electoral. Con elecciones limpias, el PAN logró remover al PRI de la presidencia en 2000.&nbsp; Con el PAN en el poder, la coalición PAN-PRI se reinventó. Ante la promesa del PRI de apoyar la agenda presidencial de reformas económicas y sociales a cambio de impunidad, el presidente Vicente Fox abortó un proyecto en ciernes de justicia transicional para mirar a un pasado represivo. Fox no tocó al priísmo ni con el pétalo de una rosa.</p><p>Tampoco reformó al Ejército ni a las policías ni a los servicios secretos ni a las procuradurías –instituciones que jugaron un papel central en la represión de miles de disidentes políticos por décadas. Y a la usanza priista, Fox echó mano de la procuraduría para fines políticos –para perseguir a López Obrador, su némesis político, y el principal contendiente a sucederlo. Con Fox se consolidó la estabilidad macroeconómica pero se postergó el desarrollo de un estado democrático de derecho.&nbsp;</p> <p>El triunfo del panista Felipe Calderón profundizó la alianza PAN-PRI. Fueron los priístas los que le permitieron a Calderón tomar posesión en medio de una grave crisis por una elección cuestionada en 2006. A cambio, Calderón exoneró a gobernadores priístas represores (Oaxaca) y pederastas (Puebla). </p><p>Apoyado por el PRI, Calderón inició la guerra contra el narco y desplegó el Ejército en las zonas más conflictivas del país. Ante la brutal espiral de violencia que generó la intervención, Calderón politizó la guerra contra el narco y apoyó a gobernadores panistas para contener la espiral de violencia; le tendió la mano a algunos gobernadores priístas, pero dejó a la deriva y acusó de corruptos, narcos e ineptos a gobernadores de izquierda.</p><p>Como Fox, utilizó la procuraduría con fines políticos y persiguió a alcaldes de izquierda por supuesta colusión con el narco. La guerra le otorgó al Ejército presupuestos extraordinarios, autonomía frente a los civiles e impunidad ante numerosas atrocidades cometidas en combate. Con Calderón se mantuvo la estabilidad macroeconómica pero el país se ensangrentó y se pisoteó el endeble estado de derecho.</p> <p>Con la victoria de Enrique Peña Nieto y el retorno del PRI a la presidencia se refuncionalizó la alianza PRI-PAN. Pero esta vez el PRD se sumó a la coalición, dando pie a un éxodo izquierdista liderado por López Obrador. La coalición PRI-PAN-PRD permitió la aprobación de profundas reformas económicas. Sin contrapesos, sin embargo, el sexenio de Peña Nieto se convirtió en un lodazal de corrupción tanto en el gobierno federal como en los estados.</p><p>Sin voces que lo cuestionaran, el presidente mantuvo la estrategia fallida de la guerra contra el narco de su antecesor y el país alcanzó niveles insospechados de violencia criminal y de graves violaciones de derechos humanos.</p><p class="mag-quote-center">Hoy México está ante la posibilidad de saldar la deuda histórica de la alternancia: el desarrollo de un estado democrático de derecho.</p><p>En medio de una profunda crisis de credibilidad y temeroso del futuro, el presidente ha politizado el sistema judicial como nunca antes: ha copado todos los órganos judiciales con sus incondicionales, ha torcido la ley para perseguir a sus críticos y ha pisoteado nuevamente el débil estado de derecho.&nbsp;</p> <p>Con una tasa de homicidios de 24 por 100,000 habitantes, más de 120,000 muertes en conflictos asociados al crimen organizado, más de 30,000 desaparecidos y cientos de periodistas y activistas sociales asesinados tras diez años de la guerra contra el narco, hoy el electorado mexicano ve en la inseguridad, la corrupción y la impunidad los principales problemas del país. </p><p>Ante la eclosión de la dupla PRI-PAN y el brutal descrédito del PRI, hoy México está ante la posibilidad de saldar la deuda histórica de la alternancia: el desarrollo de un estado democrático de derecho.</p> <p>Pero los candidatos no parecen reconocer el momento histórico. López Obrador juega con la idea de pacificar al país mediante amnistías y Ricardo Anaya, el candidato del PAN-PRD, balbucea su intención de apoyar una comisión de la verdad y un mecanismo internacional contra la impunidad. </p><p>De boca de una clase política desacreditada, esto suena a palabras vacías. Lo es si los candidatos no atienden la impunidad y sus tres ramificaciones: la corrupción, la criminalidad y las graves violaciones de derechos humanos. Lo es si las propuestas no ponen a las víctimas en el centro de los procesos de verdad y justicia. </p><p>México necesita una auténtica sacudida democrática; un accountability shock que le permita al país salir de una larga noche de violencia. </p><p>Esta sacudida institucional vendrá de abajo y de afuera y los partidos tendrán que aprender a no obstaculizarla, sino acompañarla y encauzarla hacia buen puerto.</p><p>____</p><p><span>Este artículo fue publicado previamente por Animal Político&nbsp;y se puede encontrar&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.animalpolitico.com/blogueros-blog-invitado/2018/03/29/mexico-2018-fin-de-era-y-cambio-de-regimen/">aquí.</a><span>&nbsp;</span></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-sideboxs"><legend>Sideboxes</legend><div class="field field-related-stories"> <div class="field-label">Related stories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/esteban-arratia-sandoval/el-dilema-del-candidato-l-pez-obrador-frente-al-narco">El dilema del candidato López Obrador frente al narco </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/massimo-modonesi/m-xico-antes-de-la-tormenta-electoral">¿Soplan vientos progresistas en México?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/alice-thwaite-jazza-john/c-mo-erosionar-la-polarizaci-n">¿Cómo erosionar la polarización?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/democraciaabierta/laura-dowley/marichuy-mujer-ind-gena-deja-huella-en-la-campa-presidencial-mexicana">Marichuy, mujer indígena, deja huella en la campaña presidencial mexicana</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-country"> <div class="field-label"> Country or region:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Mexico </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-topics"> <div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Civil society </div> <div class="field-item even"> Culture </div> <div class="field-item odd"> Democracy and government </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-rights"> <div class="field-label">Rights:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CC by NC 4.0 </div> </div> </div> DemocraciaAbierta DemocraciaAbierta Mexico Civil society Culture Democracy and government Elecciones 2018 Guillermo Trejo Fri, 06 Apr 2018 15:23:09 +0000 Guillermo Trejo 117042 at https://www.opendemocracy.net Guillermo Trejo https://www.opendemocracy.net/content/guillermo-trejo <div class="field field-au-term"> <div class="field-label">Author:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Guillermo Trejo </div> </div> </div> <p><strong>Guillermo Trejo</strong> es profesor de ciencia política de la Universidad de Notre Dame, Indiana, y fellow del Kellogg Institute for International Studies.</p><p><strong>Guillermo Trejo</strong> is a lecturer in Political Science at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, and a research fellow at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies.&nbsp;</p> Guillermo Trejo Wed, 04 Apr 2018 15:33:08 +0000 Guillermo Trejo 117043 at https://www.opendemocracy.net