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This week's editors

Cat Tully and Allie Bobak introduce this week's theme: Participation and foresight – putting people at the heart of the future

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Brexit is an old people’s home

... And it's English, not British.

10 things you can do to resist hard Brexit

As Article 50 is triggered, here's what you can do to stop Britain's slide to the hard right. Add your own suggestions in the comments.

Crowdpac is an open platform, and the new politics is coming

People with all kinds of perspectives are using our platform to open up politics.

Should the law be changed to make sure the BBC does not lose out in the steadily changing world of digital viewing?

The BBC demands that all distributors of digital TV give prime slots to BBC content – but why should they have this right?

The dark corners of our justice system

By failing to allow access to prisons and youth detention centres, the Ministry of Justice is allowing abuse and violence to flourish.

Postscript to a letter to extremists

We can defeat extremism by building something beautiful together.

The banality of terrorism

Current responses seem to normalise terrorism – cementing it into the everyday reality of daily life, in the same way that we accept poverty, homelessness or inequality. The way things are.

Northern Ireland provides just one of many loopholes for dark-money to flow into British elections

It's not just Northern Ireland's dodgy party donation rules that need an overhaul - across the UK, privacy prevails.

When governments fail to defend the economic realm, citizens revolt

The subordination of society to self-regulating international markets is the reason why British workers and industries so often fall prey to predatory financiers, writes Ann Pettifor. It is also a fun...

Ten years since the first bank collapsed, dodgy debt still threatens another crash

Ten years ago, on 2 April 2007, the US subprime mortgage lender New Century filed for bankruptcy in a Delaware court. It was an obscure first domino to fall. But one and a half years later, Lehman Bro...

Letter to extremists after the London attack

Extremists seek to drive a stake through the arena of co-existence, to sow fear and hatred. But we Londoners are not going to turn on each other, because that’s not what we do.

What role for the Commonwealth?

Is the Commonwealth a part-solution to Britain's trade woes post-Brexit? The government’s Article 50 bill cleared the Lords last week on March 13th: Commonwealth Day. Economists’ and MPs’ po...

Sheffield campaigner scheduled for life-threatening removal to Cameroon on Friday

Paul Blomfield MP works to avert deportation of Pride Mbi Agbor, a popular member of Yorkshire’s City of Sanctuary movement. 

Martin McGuinness's last political act was to usher in another new era

The Sinn Fein leader, who died last night, was one of the most significant politicians in the UK and Ireland for a generation.

How the arms trade has tried to hobble the body set up to stop it from abusing public money

There have long been concerns about the way arms companies have used and abused public money. Joe Lo of Campaign Against Arms Trade focuses on just one of the many ways that arms companies are profiteering at public expense.

Child was held for a staggering 151 days in men’s immigration lockup Morton Hall in Lincolnshire

Today’s inspection report reveals that children were detained among 400 adults. One detainee had been convicted of multiple offences against children. (See also: 'People come in here normal, but they get ill')

‘People come in here normal, but they get ill.’ Protesting against deaths at a UK migrant jail

Intrusive police surveillance deployed against peaceful protestors at Morton Hall. (See also: Child held for 151 days at Morton Hall)

Labour's problems are about far more than one leader

Everything that made Labour strong has been turned on its head. The party must embrace the future, or it will die.

The UK government’s attitude to refugees, then and now

Britain has a history of barbarism towards refugees.

How Sandra Mendoza and Veliama Sivaganam came up with Net Economic Outcome

During recent conversation about Brexit, Trump, and widespread public dissatisfaction with the status quo in the US , Europe and elsewhere, I was reminded of a piece I wrote some years ago as part of ...

UK government wants to move justice online - but can computers perform essentially human functions?

Online courts may replace justice, empathy and judgment with compromise and efficiency.

Colonialism, climate change and the need to defund DAPL

British firms lie deep at the heart of the Dakota Access Pipeline controversy.

Brexit and the UK Parliament

It is the role of Parliament, not least by its select committees, to hold the government to account at every stage along the way.

Why you can’t solve the NHS’s problems by banning smokers and the obese from treatment

NHS underfunding and legal changes are leading local NHS managers to deny healthcare to large groups of people who need it, on the basis of inappropriate ‘lifestyle’ rationing – meaning more pain, and more cost in the long run.

The Sky bid: battle commences

No significant business decision at Sky has ever – ever – been taken without Rupert Murdoch's approval. So what difference might 100% ownership of Sky possibly entail?

For Britain to solve its economic problems, it needs to stop lying to itself about its past

On trade, 'Empire 2.0', and the truth in Liam Fox's nonsense. In May 1840, William Gladstone said that he lived “in dread of the judgments of God upon England for our national iniquity towards Ch...

A very British tug of war over Europe’s child refugees

Parliament has voted to silence the voices of local communities. Their message of European solidarity and warm welcome for refugees is an anathema to the politics of Brexit Britain.

Our criminal justice system is hiding its mistakes

If wrongly convicted of a crime, you would hope to find a transparent justice system that will help prove your innocence. But you might be better off in the Deep South.

No Women’s Day without refugee women

Hand-in-hand with Trump, Theresa May is not merely playing to an anti-migrant populist crowd but helped to create it. This system is working as intended, but it must be disrupted.

The families broken apart because Theresa May thinks they aren't rich enough for love

A court ruling last month criticised the way that the government is implementing the minimum income requirement for those who want their partners to be able to live in the UK with them.

What happened in Northern Ireland last week and what next

Change in Northern Ireland has been a long time coming – and it isn't done yet.

Do you know who's watching you?

Britain now has more surveillance than any other Western country, with worrying implications for anyone who might want to question the authorities.

The battle of Samsung and what you can do about it

Samsung has been in more than a spot of bother over the last year. In October 2016, just two months after its release, the latest model in Samsung’s flagship Galaxy Note series was discontinued, as...

Responding to Brexit: breaking with neo-liberalism

The last of this series discusses how the damage caused by traditional left and social democratic party embrace of neo-liberal models of globalisation can be repaired, and social democracy reframed.

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