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TR, editor

This week Tom Rowley and the oDR team edit the front page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Davos’s time is up

Two of the most significant stories in human history are colliding against the hubris and misguided optimism of the global elite.

Fox/Sky: here comes the crunch

Fox acquisition of the other 61% of Sky may ‘act against the public interest, reducing media plurality’. Yet Sky shares rose when the ruling was published. What is going on?

“Fallout” – an alarming insight into the state of Britain-Trump relations

Tim Shipman’s latest political blockbuster is full of fascinating vignettes, particularly when detailing the horrified reaction of British politicians to Trump’s rise to power - and to his openness to “outside influence”.

Is our personal data fair game in the drive to create Theresa May’s “hostile environment” for migrants?

Patients are dying as politicians use the NHS crisis to undermine what we love most about it – a service for all, free at the point of access, that protects our confidential health data.

A day in the life of an NHS nurse - how our government is failing both patients and nurses

Last year 33,000 nurses left the NHS, 3,000 more than were recruited. There’s a simple solution - resisted by a government determined to press ahead with piecemeal privatisation.

Guardians of the Property: pop-up housing for pop-up people

Property guardians – a win-win for everyone (except squatters)? Or a new class of exploitation that’s taken root amidst the housing crisis in London and European cities?

Our circulation of the elite guard is no democracy

We've had quite enough of being ruled by lions - and by foxes. In 2018, we must build a people’s guard of meaningful, participatory democracy.

A 'Minister for Loneliness' is a sticking plaster for the ills of neoliberalism

Is loneliness the price we pay for an ideology that privileges individual freedom and ‘choice’ above the collective and communal; that sees attachment to others as an obstacle to the pursuit of profit?

Will the real rethinkers please stand up?

In a recent article in the Financial Times, Samuel Bowles applauded critics of economics education and praised calls for greater pluralism (diversity of viewpoints) within the discipline. He then we...

What can Michael Gove - and the rest of us - learn from a new poetry of the soil?

What happens when a poet (and lifelong vegetarian) spends a year on Britain’s stock farms during and after the Brexit vote - and what lessons do farmers have for both Leavers and Remainers?

Budging the male bias

It's time to end the sausagefest.

‘Happy 18th birthday! You’re out’

Tougher internal controls under Macron are only giving police more powers, allowing them to conduct identity checks in emergency shelters. Brutality towards migrants is likely to become even more common.

Darkest Hour - what does a rash of Winston Churchill portrayals tell us about Brexit Britain?

Are our finest hours all behind us? What of the untold Churchill stories? And who can speak for Britain, today?

From PFI to privatisation, our national accounting rules encourage daft decisions. It’s time to change them.

Countless daft decisions have been encouraged by national accounting rules which defy all economic logic. Taxpayers are now paying the price.

Fireworks nights

“There feels like a massive push towards ‘diversifying’ the arts. It makes me feel uncomfortable when at the centre of that push we find mainly white, middle class people.”

Out of time: the fragile temporality of Carillion’s accumulation model

Carillion is the epitome of the modern financialized firm. Its liquidation tells us much about risk in modern capitalism, and raises serious questions about state outsourcing.

How to stop the next Carillion - 7 steps to public ownership

Jeremy Corbyn is right - this is a ‘watershed moment’ for the ideology of privatisation that has plagued our public services for over 30 years.

Taking politics out of the NHS? Or constructing an elitist ‘consensus’?

As certain wings of the Labour party join calls for ‘consensus’ on the NHS, a reductive global healthcare consensus has already been established in the meeting rooms of Davos, McKinsey and the World Bank – with pivotal support from Blair-era peers and NHS appointees.

Carillion must now also face justice for blacklisting trade unionists

When you invite blacklisting human rights abusers to run the NHS and school meals, don’t be surprised when vampire capitalism attempts to suck the taxpayer dry.

Fighting in the left corner

“We are an organization with one staff member, and a limited amount of energy because nobody in the political and activist left wants to talk about Brexit! “

Shame on you, Sadiq Khan – London deserves better than more ‘stop and search’

The London Mayor's plan to increase stop and search won’t stop knife crime in London – but will further damage community policing already hit by cuts.

Imagination and will in the Anthropocene

How can we face up to the enormity of environmental collapse? How can we collectively build a politics for the Anthropocene? An interview with activist and former climate diplomat John Ashton CBE.

A second referendum on the deal with the EU: a multi-option poll

More than anything else, perhaps, the UK now needs something which is not just accurate but also inclusive.

Five demands for climate change justice

Two years on from the Paris Agreement, what should governments be doing to take climate change seriously?

Putting class back onto the UK's equality agenda

The directors of a new documentary about class stratification in Britain’s acting profession argue that class needs to be added back into the UK Equality Act.

Fracking giants grasp for dirty Brexit bonanza

The fracking industry is determined to limp ahead, despite record public opposition in the UK and fierce fightbacks from campaigners from North Yorkshire to Surrey and beyond.

Who’ll help the homeless this winter? The police? The NHS? The army?

A winter walk in the park brings a sorrowful and reflective encounter.

Birmingham and the emergence of inter-marriage

The last of four excerpts from the forthcoming ‘Our City: Migrants and the Making of Modern Birmingham’: on the emergence of live and let live.

H&M’s offensive advert is just one thread in the rotten fabric of a deeply racist industry

Will those angered by the H&M advert also support the fightback by the brave and resilient women of colour who produce H&M's clothes for poverty wages?

Former health secretary Andrew Lansley’s diaries finally released in (nearly) full

Insurers and private US healthcare giants are revealed to be amongst those on the inside track of creating huge NHS changes.

Johann Hari: Uncovering the real causes of depression, and the unexpected solutions

Interview with writer Johann Hari about his new book, Lost Connections

Birmingham: educating the kids

The third excerpt from the forthcoming ‘Our City: Migrants and the Making of Modern Birmingham’: on how to get a supplementary school up and running and why.

Not in it together: the distributional impact of austerity

New data reveals how the tax and benefit changes made since 2010 have disproportionately fallen on the poorest, ethnic minorities, women, children and the disabled. 

Birmingham and doing the work nobody else wants to do

The second of four excerpts from the forthcoming ‘Our City: Migrants and the Making of Modern Birmingham’: on the 3D jobs: dirty, dull or difficult.

Birmingham: a better city and a stronger economy

The first of four excerpts from the forthcoming ‘Our City: Migrants and the Making of Modern Birmingham’: on the move to white-collar jobs.

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