only search openDemocracy.net

More from oDR:


1968: a revolution too early to judge

The events of 1968 have been stripped of their meaning and are now more a symbol of capitulation than revolution. Accepting this is the first step to making its legacy relevant again. RU

The uncomfortable truth about post-Soviet comfort foods

What nourishes us also destroys us: this old saying holds true not only for food, but also politics.

What are the real barriers to freedom of assembly in Ukraine?

Ukrainian far right routinely disrupt public LGBT, feminist and left-wing events. The police aren’t prepared to oppose this surge of right-wing violence. RU

Behind the wire: pride and paranoia in one of Russia’s closed towns

Thousands of Russian citizens live in “closed towns”. I visited one of them, Lesnoye, to find out how people live today. RU

The politics of police reform: dissecting the barriers to change in the post-Soviet world

According to a new book, destabilising episodes of violence and an experienced civil society sector are key parts of building consensus for police reform.

“There is a direct threat to life”: Russian theatre manager Alexey Malobrodsky hospitalised after court hearing

Alexey Malobrodsky, who has been charged in a high-profile embezzlement case, has spent 10 months in pre-trial detention. He is now critically ill. I spoke to the doctor who has been treating Malobrodsky to find out more. RU

As Russia ratchets up repression in annexed Crimea, Crimean Tatars deserve European support

Russia’s violations of international laws on humanitarian crises and conflicts in Crimea are a signal for further attention from the European Union.

Minorities in Kyrgyzstan: changed by revolution

Kyrgyzstan’s two revolutions have been followed by violence and discrimination against the country’s minorities.

"They put a bag on my head, cuffed my hands behind my back and tortured me with a taser": anarchist Svyatoslav Rechkalov on torture at the hands of Russian law enforcement

An attack on a United Russia office in Moscow in January has led to Russian anarchists being detained and, in one confirmed case, tortured. Here's what happened to me. RU 

Bidzina’s back

The return of Georgia’s richest man to open participation in this South Caucasus state's political life is designed to smooth over problems in the ruling party. RU

Fire and oil in western Kazakhstan's “spiritual renovation”

Post-independence Kazakhstan has seen a revival in Kazakh genealogies, sub-ethnic lineages and identities.

Saint Nick of Armenia: how protest leader Nikol Pashinyan “rescued” Armenia and made it merry

Armenia's intensive street mobilisation over the past month has taken many by surprise. Who is the man at the centre of these protests? 

“Down with the tsar”: Russian authorities ban Navalny supporter protest ahead of Putin's inauguration

Organisers across the country have been detained ahead of Vladimir Putin's fourth inauguration as president. 

On the edge: how rural Armenia is responding to the country's "Velvet Revolution"

While revolution is the preserve of the city, Armenia's rural population is watching and waiting to see what happens next. RU

A revolution of values: freedom, responsibility and courage in Armenia's Velvet Revolution

Armenia's emerging revolution isn't about geopolitics or foreign relations, but values. 

Moscow’s waste wars

The “rubbish riots” taking place in the Moscow area demonstrate Muscovites’ distrust of their regional government. RU

Invisible people: why Ukraine needs to take palliative care seriously

People facing their final days are often not treated at all, despite progressive legal provisions. RU

A frontline factory, an embattled oligarch and Ukraine’s industrial drift

For the future of this chemical plant in eastern Ukraine, trade policy with Russia looms large.

Seventy years on, the Kumyk people in Dagestan are still fighting territorial claims

In Russia's North Caucasus, wartime deportations influence the complex relations between ethnic groups to this day. RU

Can grassroots historical initiatives bridge the gap between Poland and Ukraine?

With politicians in both countries unwilling to back down over worrying historical legislation, it’s up to historians, activists and journalists to reshape Polish-Ukrainian relations.

Meet Illuminator, the online project making space for discussing LGBT issues in Russia

The Illuminator project showcases the human targets of Russia’s conservative turn. RU

Talented solidarity: why Russia’s oldest human rights journal is important today

TRowley author pic.jpg

The Soviet underground publication Chronicle of Current Events turns 50 today. Its mission is still relevant.

 

A real revolution? Protest leader Armen Grigoryan on what’s happening in Armenia

Armenia’s protest movement is going from strength to strength. I spoke to one of its leaders to find out how they made it happen.

“He’s not our tsar”: Navalny supporters prepare for new protest on 5 May

While a Russian state agency attempts to close down the internet, protests in Armenia are resonating in Moscow

Compassion fatigue: what happens in Eurasia when the world looks away

In Eurasia’s less geopolitically significant countries, democracy advocates are struggling to keep their priorities on the international agenda.

“The Network”: how Russian security services are targeting Russian anarchists and anti-fascists

Over a dozen people connected to Russian anti-fascism have been tortured since October 2017. According to the security services, they are a part of a plot to destabilise Russia. 

“You’re a normal guy, you understand everything”: Russian anti-fascist Viktor Filinkov on prison life under threat of torture

In January 2018, Viktor Filinkov was abducted in St Petersburg. When he resurfaced days later, he had been tortured by the security services and confessed to terrorism charges. This is the second part of his prison diary. 

A rifle stock to the heart, a fist to the gut: how left-wing activists are persecuted in Crimea

Though some groups may have supported Russian annexation, life under Russian rule has been far from sweet.

“It’s too early to talk about the 'fall of the regime'”: political scientist David Petrosyan on the sources of Armenia's protests

Processes designed to relegitimise Armenia's president Serzh Sargsyan have gone badly awry — with protesters taking to the streets and forcing him out of office. RU

Is Poland's Holocaust law changing US attitudes towards Ukraine’s memory laws?

Judging by a new congressional letter, Poland's recent "Holocaust law" is catalysing US lawmakers' perception of Ukraine's own "decommunisation" laws. 

The permitted and the forbidden: Ukraine’s security services turn their eyes to “banned” Islamic literature

For the first time since Maidan, Ukrainian Muslims have started speaking out about harassment from Ukrainian security services. RU

Armenia’s “permanent revolution”: why do the protests continue in Yerevan?

With the resignation of Armenia’s prime minister, it looks as if Armenia is line for radical change. But the Armenia’s entrenched network of power is not giving up so easily.

How the mother of a son with autism opened Karelia’s only studio for children with “special needs”

You can’t always find a place for your child in Russia’s education system. Sometimes, you need to make one yourself. RU

Black blood: a history of Kazakhstan’s oil sector

This new book provides a comprehensive overview of Kazakhstan’s oil business, but skips over the uncomfortable truth of privatisation deals.

Temirlan Ormukov, Kyrgyzstan’s blind satirist poet, is facing politically motivated prosecution

Ormukov's attempt to draw attention to paid protests by government-linked figures has landed him in detention. RU

Syndicate content