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This week's editor

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Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Subverting neoliberal slavery: migrant struggles against labour exploitation in Italy

In response to these conditions we are witnessing cumulative processes of politicization – struggles and organization involving migrant workers and activists setting out to build awareness locally, and link up globally.     

What causes the populist infection? How can it be cured?

In all countries, established political parties have the dangerous propensity to counter this electoral wave of populism by adopting the issues and language used by them.

Postscript to a letter to extremists

We can defeat extremism by building something beautiful together.

Sarajevo 25 years after: paradigm for the future

The dynamic and sometimes dramatic interplay between the essence and the fate of a city provides the key for a wholesome national reintegration process.

The EU’s self-inflicted traps undermine its ability to respond to Turkey’s creeping authoritarianism

European mainstream leaders often forget that the fight against far-right appeal requires a rather more systematic approach, with or without the cooperation of Turkey in tackling Syrian refugees.

Me, Turkey and our uncertainty

The trial of the Turkey representative of Reporters Without Borders resumes in Istanbul on March 21. Together with the head of Turkey’s Human Rights Foundation and the writer Ahmet Nesin, Erol stands accused of “terrorist propaganda”.

The fragility of the European project

One Dutch voter fears Holland's rejection of populism might be short-lived.

'More royal than the king': an encounter with French Zionism

The fabrication of lies and false accusations to intimidate their opponents is only to be expected from those willing to legitimize killing and torture in support of the Israeli occupation of Palestine.

Dutch elections: little to celebrate

It is the normalisation of racist liberalism that is the key to what is happening. While many have argued that Wilders is a break from Dutch liberalism, Wilders is actually a continuation by other means.

Ethnography in a time of upheaval – Egypt before and after the ‘Arab spring’

Even within the narrower parameters of public spaces, debates which might lead to issues around accountability and transparency are not hugely popular in the public eye.

Paper tiger law forbidding FGM in Sudan

While the law is a political compromise cleverly designed to please stakeholders, girls at risk of undergoing FGM remain unprotected.

Adding insult to injury: when Israel and Britain celebrate the historical trauma of Palestinians

Palestinians will not be silenced. We will voice our historical testimony and tell our narrative to make sense of the senseless grievances of colonialism.

The Dutch elections – making sense of its fractures

It was the al Qaeda attacks in 2001, followed in quick succession by two political murders, that completely altered not just the landscape but the logic of Dutch politics.

Turkey, sick man of Europe, reappears?

This is not a call for Europeans to do the work on the Turks’ or Kurds’ behalf - but a call to show solidarity with democratic forces of the country at a critical time.

The erosion of Dutch democracy

Ahead of Wednesday’s general election, an electoral campaign characterized by populism has masked efforts to grant arbitrary powers to the government that infringe on the rule of law.

An Arendtian approach to post-truth politics

Arendt warns that a claim to absolute truth in the political sphere, with no support from opinion, would threaten to asphyxiate politics. For debate constitutes the essence of the political. 

The Sky bid: battle commences

No significant business decision at Sky has ever – ever – been taken without Rupert Murdoch's approval. So what difference might 100% ownership of Sky possibly entail?

Uncertain comma Texas

A new film describes a world whose inhabitants have been broken, but offers the hope that all can be repaired.

We got this covered!

Our perspective on the freedom to wear a headscarf, especially at work, in the context of an upcoming ruling by the EU Court of Justice on prohibiting wearing a headscarf in the workplace (on 14 March).

Egyptian feminist movement: a brief history

The reinstatement of the 'deep state' only provides continuum for the further entrenchment of the overarching powers of the patriarchal state. These power asymmetries must be undone.

Doing it the Malaysian way

Ever since the wake-up call of 2008, and with more and more Malaysians online, the ruling coalition is well aware that cyberspace is an important battleground, but chooses its battles.

Responding to Brexit: returning to a social market model on migration

In the second part of the series on key inter-related aspects of the upheaval facing European countries and their citizens: how should the EU tackle the issue of internal migration?

Silent lunches: how do we get to educational reform in the US?

“As you well know, there is a lot of inequality in American schools and schooling…  and a whole emphasis on standardised tests, especially in schools of the kids of the poor.”

Democracy education under siege and now Trump

“Build the Wall! Build the Wall! BUILD THE WALL!” Update from the US professor of the philosophy of education who was president of the John Dewey Society 2009 - 2011.

In a world of hate, fear and ‘alternative facts’, education really does matter

“It cannot be right, that people can grow up and go to school and hardly ever come into meaningful contact with people from other backgrounds and faiths.” David Cameron, July 2015.

Back to the future: the rebirth of a classical approach to democracy and education in a post-modern society

Education – combined with technologies  – seems to have triggered a sea-change in the contract between government and those who are governed.

I went to a state grammar school but no they are not the answer

Does an 11 year old who has been told they have failed seem to you like someone who is really going to rally behind learning?

The failures of Holland’s pro-immigrant party 


Was it inevitable that Think became a negative force for liberalism? One Dutch citizen tries to hold onto the middle ground in a polarizing world.

Surviving sociology in Egypt and elsewhere

Strangely, although nationalism is a pervasive social phenomenon with immense effects everywhere in the world, it’s not a central preoccupation of sociology or any of the dominant social science disciplines. Interview.

‘The intellectuals don’t have the answers’: Lebanese documentary wins at Berlinale

"What can the ghosts of protests past tell us?" A particularly relevant question that Mary Jirmanus Saba's documentary, A Feeling Greater Than Love, asks, and tries to answer.

Fighting inequality in the UK has to start young

“Universality is key to sustainability and to acceptability of programmes of this kind.  Universal support also reflects our strong belief that parenting skills are not innate and all parents need support.”  

Prolier-than-thou: talking about identity

Who is right? Where should the left draw the line? Will the facts help us now?

Социалистическая любовь: от утопии к прагматизму

Когда в страну приходят танки, они не останавливаются на главной площади - они катятся дальше, прямиком в спальни и будуары мирных граждан. Пражская весна смела утопические идеи о любви - поставив на место мечты смирение. English

COP21: the climate movement’s last summit?

In Paris, by trying to lift off ‘planet summit’, its gravity became truly noticeable for the first time.

Mining in South Africa: radical resistance

The oppression and exploitation of mining communities means that even within our democracy, the legacy of the apartheid and colonial era mining regimes continues.

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