This week's editor

En Liang Khong

En Liang Khong is a submissions editor at openDemocracy.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Review - 'Benign Violence: Education in and beyond the Age of Reason'

Ansgar Allen's book traces our obsession with assessment, standards and measurement in modern education. It is both an unsettling history and a provocative call for resistance.

India hangs another despite pleas from eminent people

Possible innocence, the fact that guilt was never proven beyond reasonable doubt and that many impoverished accused are poorly represented - just a few of the reasons anti-death penalty campaigners cite.

New Labour is 'unelectable'

Anything other than a Jeremy Corbyn victory will signal a disaster for Labour, who will be tripping over themselves to superficially differentiate themselves from the Tories.

Varoufakis’ unspeakably shocking plan B

This Greek rule-bending ambition, from a position of weakness, violates the basic principles of financial realism.

Surreptitious symbiosis: the relationship between NGO’s and movement activists

For now, thanks to surreptitious symbiosis, it is possible to do sustained activism to bring about social change, without becoming part of a ‘civil society industry’.  From the Squares and Beyond partnership.

Renewing the Latin American connection

All the countries of those sitting around this table were born in genocide. In the case of Brazil, we were the world champion of slavery. So we are based on that! Sweet but violent. From the Squares and Beyond partnership.

Neoliberal realpolitik: choking others in our name

This lack of lived experience with the violence of our state entails an almost inevitable blindness to the deepening divide between those our states protect and those whose life it represses, expels, and humiliates.

Falling apart: a glimpse of life in Cairo

Maged Mandour

A personal account of returning to a profoundly changed city, and of worrying trends under military dictatorship.

 

A moron speaks...

According to a former adviser to Tony Blair, MPs who nominated Jeremy Corbyn for the Labour leadership are "morons". What does one of them have to say about a leading Corbyn policy, nuclear disarmament?

Did Kevin Spacey deserve his knighthood?

The Old Vic has become part of a network of dissenting theatrical voices that will not be easily silenced.

The idea of India

This is a concept that operates not by concealing the actual conditions, but by creating its own 'reality': the reality of communalism as a deviation from secularism and the constitution.

Is counter-propaganda the only antidote to propaganda?

Russia Today is packed full of lies. But aren't there motes aplenty in our own eyes onto the world? Is media credibility shot, and can we hope to improve trust in news?  An academic conference this autumn in Prague aims to bring journalists and acdemics together to explore the problem

Democratic dialogues: how to communicate with the people of Nuneaton

The 2015 General Election was a disaster for people and political parties that can loosely be called ‘progressive’. Rather than relying upon the one-way communication of ‘messages’ and ‘narratives’, they now need to learn how to engage in open-ended ‘Democratic Dialogues’.

Viento mexicano en Tehuantepec: la necesidad de alternativas comunitarias

El viento es un bien común localizado, como el cobre o el carbón. Su explotación debe respetar la propiedad y las instituciones de las comunidades indígenas del territorio. English.

Here we are

A Greek question to which the answer comes eventually from elsewhere.

Schooling ‘British values’: threatening civil liberties and equal opportunities

Attempts to secure ‘integration’ based on ‘British Values’ are not just infringing on civil liberties, but are also likely to damage student self-confidence and academic performance.

Budget 2015: A growing student movement has found its new hook

After the trebling of tuition fees in 2010, student movements suffered a major blow. Now they are rising up again.

Greece has two choices. And so do the creditors

After 13 July 2015, Syriza's Greece and, for that matter, the creditors have two choices. Modernise the Greek state; or let Greece default and risk disintegration not just of EMU/EU but also Nato.

Whatever is happening to the Egyptians? (Part three)

A response to questions raised by Hesham Shafick and Radwa Saad's piece, 'Whatever is happening to the Egyptians - part 2'.

Germany's demographic challenge

Germany is by no means an unstoppable juggernaut, and the re-erection of trade barriers across the continent and a return to a strong Deutschmark would ravage the economy.

The left returns to an old love – saying No to Europe

It is the politics of Europe’s current rulers that must be challenged, not the UK’s membership of the EU.

“What now for Greece? What now for the left?”

Logics of financial capital are all the more powerful blended with cultural logics. From now on, do Greeks need to keep their “orientalist radar” active wherever they go?

This year's student occupations: getting out of the box

Many student movements seem to fizzle out, but they build shared experiences and extended networks that lay the foundations for coherent, sustained resistance. 

German offensive, Greek resistance

Europe needs Tsipras to pass the agreement in Parliament, where there is a no majority without the bulk of Syriza votes.

The outline of a “deal”

Imagine if the US states had rejected the Constitution and opted to keep the Articles of Confederation; Europe remains in this embryonic, weak and unstable state.

Podemos’ dilemma and why leadership still matters

Running for office means engaging in an operation that is intrinsically reductive and hegemonic, whether we like it or not.

Momentous times for democracy in Europe

The shocking behaviour of the Eurozone leaders in punishing Greece for voting against austerity has alarming implications for the future. Is it too late to put democracy and Europe together again?

“I, too, could be here”: Pope’s benediction in Bolivia’s most overcrowded prison

What happens when a visit from His Holiness sheds a light on a ‘no go area’ for the Bolivian state in which there has been an almost total failure at reform?

How should we remember Waterloo?

Are anniversaries of historic events an occasion for serious assessment or simply a nostalgic indulgence that reinforce current prejudice? 

European Commission’s deregulation drive threatens EU nature laws

Deregulation is often packaged as a fight against red tape or a drive to improve efficiency by removing so-called ‘burdens’ on business or ‘barriers’ to trade. But such ‘burdens’ are the social and environmental standards that protect us all and the world we live in.

What kind of peace? The case of the Turkish and Kurdish peace process

Past experience suggests that this unclarity about the peace process may once again open the door for brutal conflict.

Post-politics and the future of the left

Those on the left need to open up debate on their future path. Here's a start.

The Turkish elections: the struggle within

Turkish politics has long been a site of antagonistic struggles between different republican ideologies. Today, a new ideological competition has resurfaced which has its roots in the past. 

Why I'm leaving London

“My family is moving to Los Angeles in two weeks. Many Londoners understand intuitively why we're going.”

Varoufakis’s dogma

Europe was not, and still is not, ready for the level of consolidation that the Greek Finance Minister suggested. On the other hand, Varoufakis was not ready to compromise his ideas either.

Syndicate content