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This week's editor

Dawn Foster, Co-Editor

Dawn Foster is Co-Editor at 5050 and a freelance journalist.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Terrorist slippery slope

The UK government should look to what is happening to free expression in Egypt and Turkey before broadening terrorist laws to include those who "spread hate".

Eleven theses on secularism

Secularism is a matter of life and death for democracy. A matter of survival for both is now a crescendo of equal, political and material, power – one that can no longer be postponed.

The politics of sorrow

David Foster Wallace is best known for his experimental fiction and comic essays, but a strong political current, deeply anarchist in sentiment, runs through his work.

The Hurricane and the Empire

On the tenth anniversary of Katrina, we republish an invitation to ponder the incapacity of the US government to respond to the disaster in New Orleans. What was at the root of that paralysis? From the archive, September 5, 2005.

No right to despair

As we enter into five years of Conservative rule, those of us who are relatively privileged need to be reminded of a vital principle: we have no right to despair. We won't pay the highest price.

The art of plagiarism

Zygmunt Bauman has been accused of ‘self-plagiarism’. Is it really a problem that the prominent sociologist has repeated passages across the many books he has published since retirement?

Women and the xenophobia narrative in South Africa

Women who are victims of xenophobia are seen as betraying their ‘nation’ by not conforming to their roles: and South African women are complicit in this narrative.

The siren song of financial realism

Financial realism has enchanted European polities. It is a song the powerful love to hear. But a song that will destroy all that is good and humane about Europe.

Hungary’s refugee policy: fencing off the country

The rapidly increasing influx of asylum-seekers poses a huge challenge to Hungary. The government responds with a complete lack of solidarity, massive demagoguery and arm-twisting in Brussels. 

Open up your eyes to 'Devo-Manc'

'Devo-manc' is part of the government's austerity agenda and its wider attack on the NHS.

Alternative democracy

Parliament, initiated in the 13th Century when the population was ill-educated, is now a self-perpetuating anachronism. What are the alternatives?

Objectivity, neutrality and the call for virtuous anger in academe

The problem with this perception of academic research as objective, dispassionate and free from emotion runs deeper. Neutrality, especially in social sciences does not exist.

Post-Suruc Turkey

“Today, it is from the collective efforts around the Kurdish movement that we are learning what a society made up of free individuals might look like in Turkey.”

In Japan: controversial US army base sparks outrage among local population

It is time activists across the globe extended solidarity to those protesting to prevent the construction of a new military base in Okinawa, who are haunted by their memories.

Lebanon's refugees: resisting hegemony through culture

Seenaryo, a small independent theatre project that starts this week with Syrian and Palestinian children, seeks to foster an alternative political proposal in a situation where politics has emphatically failed. 

A hotchpotch of hope

The Labour Party machinery has long been prone to imagining outcomes within the narrowest, safest, and statistically verifiable ranges of business as usual. No wonder it’s panicking over the ‘Corbyn surge’.  

Review - 'Benign Violence: Education in and beyond the Age of Reason'

Ansgar Allen's book traces our obsession with assessment, standards and measurement in modern education. It is both an unsettling history and a provocative call for resistance.

India hangs another despite pleas from eminent people

Possible innocence, the fact that guilt was never proven beyond reasonable doubt and that many impoverished accused are poorly represented - just a few of the reasons anti-death penalty campaigners cite.

New Labour is 'unelectable'

Anything other than a Jeremy Corbyn victory will signal a disaster for Labour, who will be tripping over themselves to superficially differentiate themselves from the Tories.

Varoufakis’ unspeakably shocking plan B

This Greek rule-bending ambition, from a position of weakness, violates the basic principles of financial realism.

Surreptitious symbiosis: the relationship between NGO’s and movement activists

For now, thanks to surreptitious symbiosis, it is possible to do sustained activism to bring about social change, without becoming part of a ‘civil society industry’.  From the Squares and Beyond partnership.

Renewing the Latin American connection

All the countries of those sitting around this table were born in genocide. In the case of Brazil, we were the world champion of slavery. So we are based on that! Sweet but violent. From the Squares and Beyond partnership.

Neoliberal realpolitik: choking others in our name

This lack of lived experience with the violence of our state entails an almost inevitable blindness to the deepening divide between those our states protect and those whose life it represses, expels, and humiliates.

Falling apart: a glimpse of life in Cairo

Maged Mandour

A personal account of returning to a profoundly changed city, and of worrying trends under military dictatorship.

 

A moron speaks...

According to a former adviser to Tony Blair, MPs who nominated Jeremy Corbyn for the Labour leadership are "morons". What does one of them have to say about a leading Corbyn policy, nuclear disarmament?

Did Kevin Spacey deserve his knighthood?

The Old Vic has become part of a network of dissenting theatrical voices that will not be easily silenced.

The idea of India

This is a concept that operates not by concealing the actual conditions, but by creating its own 'reality': the reality of communalism as a deviation from secularism and the constitution.

Is counter-propaganda the only antidote to propaganda?

Russia Today is packed full of lies. But aren't there motes aplenty in our own eyes onto the world? Is media credibility shot, and can we hope to improve trust in news?  An academic conference this autumn in Prague aims to bring journalists and acdemics together to explore the problem

Democratic dialogues: how to communicate with the people of Nuneaton

The 2015 General Election was a disaster for people and political parties that can loosely be called ‘progressive’. Rather than relying upon the one-way communication of ‘messages’ and ‘narratives’, they now need to learn how to engage in open-ended ‘Democratic Dialogues’.

Viento mexicano en Tehuantepec: la necesidad de alternativas comunitarias

El viento es un bien común localizado, como el cobre o el carbón. Su explotación debe respetar la propiedad y las instituciones de las comunidades indígenas del territorio. English.

Here we are

A Greek question to which the answer comes eventually from elsewhere.

Schooling ‘British values’: threatening civil liberties and equal opportunities

Attempts to secure ‘integration’ based on ‘British Values’ are not just infringing on civil liberties, but are also likely to damage student self-confidence and academic performance.

Budget 2015: A growing student movement has found its new hook

After the trebling of tuition fees in 2010, student movements suffered a major blow. Now they are rising up again.

Greece has two choices. And so do the creditors

After 13 July 2015, Syriza's Greece and, for that matter, the creditors have two choices. Modernise the Greek state; or let Greece default and risk disintegration not just of EMU/EU but also Nato.

Whatever is happening to the Egyptians? (Part three)

A response to questions raised by Hesham Shafick and Radwa Saad's piece, 'Whatever is happening to the Egyptians - part 2'.

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