This week's editor

Alex Sakalis, Editor

Alex Sakalis is associate editor of openDemocracy and co-edits the Can Europe Make It? page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Ayotzinapa: the events that shook the Mexican youth

These protests did not oust the government of Peña Nieto, although they demanded the resignation of the president, but they did force the government to react and try to explain what had happened. 

A year of Modi Raj – India in crisis

Middle and upper class Indians see no crisis. The media fails to inform them that 75% upwards are too often suffering not only neglect but massive state violence and terror.

Markets of the mind

Debt and guilt have much in common. It’s time we found better ways of organising both ourselves and the economy.

Suppressed at home, neglected abroad, Ethiopian migrants

The May 24 election, contrary to US Under Secretary of State Wendy Sherman’s misjudged and widely criticized comments, is a hollow piece of democratic theatre.

Brazil in decline?

The sluggish economic situation is much less worrisome to Brazil’s future than the measures being approved in the National Congress.

Scandal and silence in Lisboa

I am not an “austerity refugee”, the author tells our partners, Precarious Europe. In fact, my family has had a role to play in the suffering of millions of Portuguese workers.

Deficits in the EU that should worry Europeans

In Greece for the first time the EU authorities demand a government complete a programme that it has neither designed nor has a democratic mandate to implement.

In defence of wellbeing

Serious consideration of happiness is critical to the prospects of radical change in society: a response to William Davies.

Mercury rising: three crunch points on climate change this summer

There are major battles ahead for the climate movement. They can be fought – and won.

Europe’s migration crisis: central Europe’s dangerous game

Should a serious migration crisis erupt as a result of conflict escalation in Ukraine, the odds are that the V4 would need assistance through exactly the kind of EU solidarity mechanism they now oppose.

Smoke and mirrors over 'Brexit': key questions on the path to the EU referendum

Cameron has unleashed a process he won't be fully able to control, having major impacts on the UK's political dynamics and its constitutional future at home and in the EU over the next two years.

A ‘hero’ for the twenty-first century: meet the CEO politician

In the twenty-first century, politicians behave more like CEOs. When voters are seen as shareholder citizens, what is left for democracy?

Is social enterprise becoming a reactionary force?

Are 'benefit corporations' the harbinger of progressive change in the economy, or the soft edge of efforts to conserve the legitimacy of capitalism with a few marginal adjustments?

The dangers of a blanket ban: ‘hawalas’ in Kenya

The closure of Somali remittance firms in Kenya, as a direct response to Al-Shabaab, only means cutting off one of the few pro-poor financial systems that exist.

Negotiating the Greek public debt: wrong finance minister was fired

Expenditure reduction leads to falling household incomes, contraction in public services and a rising incidence of poverty, all without progress toward the professed goal, reduction in the nominal public debt.

Economic reforms for Tunisia in 2015 and beyond

It is just as important for Tunisia to address economic as security threats. Three key reforms can help maintain gains and fix pressing problems.

Nepal: natural disaster, unnatural suffering

Shockingly, none of the funds that have been pledged by international donors have actually been transferred to Nepal. We know rapid response is possible when security or economic interests are threatened.

Liberty, Equality, Fraternity ... and welfare

How do the political camps map their favourite welfare policies onto political values? A report from the Ax:son Johnson Foundation seminar on the future of the welfare state

BRICS from below: counterpower movements in Brazil, India and South Africa

While movements in Brazil and South Africa have been fueled by unrealized socio-economic expectations and by explosive growth in India, what they have most in common is the subordination of democracy to money.

Long view of the future in South America

What took the left to government in this part of the world should be understood as part of a process of exclusion of the poor strata of society from the socio-political arena. Español.

A new narrative on human rights, security and prosperity

It’s up to us to ‘reframe the narrative’ of development, to move beyond the historic thrust of capital and war and to say no impunity for the murder of Indigenous women. Jennifer Allsopp reports from WILPF's Centenary Conference in the Hague.

The British syndrome: an abdication of responsibility

There are glaring absences at the heart of the UK elections contest. The new preface to his ‘Essay on Britain, now’ - by one of Britain’s leading political thinkers tells us why. Remarkably, it suggests ways in which to free ourselves from the trap we are in.

Awaiting justice: Indigenous resistance in the tar sands of Canada

The Nation of the Lubicon Cree is on the frontlines of environmental destruction, as it challenges the forces behind resource extraction and environmental and cultural genocide, and seeks justice for all.

The plurality deficit: public service broadcasting and institutional competition

Is institutional competition the answer to the ‘plurality deficit’ in public broadcasting? The evidence suggests no.

The conflict at the heart of modern money

Making money into a positive force for social change requires detaching it from its role in storing value.

The renewable revolution

Four reasons why the transition from fossil fuels to a green energy era is gaining traction.

Where is another Europe now?

Europe either hangs together or - as the American revolutionaries liked to point out - the nations of Europe will be hanged separately.

Our Lives: Poverty then and now in the UK

A report launched today, Our Lives: Challenging attitudes to poverty in 2015, captures the humanity of the experience of poverty and calls for change as radical as the social reform in the 1940s.

Scrutinising the Scrutineers: part 2

Infuriated by the BBC’s lack of coverage of its work, The European Scrutiny committee is at the centre of a discussion about the ‘limits’ of the corporation's independence. 

The mirage of public-private water

The reality is the partnership of a city and a company in delivering the right to water always holds the tension of conflict because the mission of a government and company are completely different. 

Arab autocracy & revolution

Maged Mandour

Until now, the struggle between autocrats and revolutionaries has been confined within national boundaries. But as the trend shifts towards a pooling of autocratic regimes’ resources, any future confrontation must be regional. 

What happens to democracy in a cashless society?

New technology is transforming the way we pay for everything, but at what cost?

Fair business for Muslims?

Counter-terrorism regulation is having a corrosive effect on charity banking worldwide. International banks, under punitive US anti-terrorism laws, are increasingly terrified. And the real losers are Muslims.

The war in Yemen

International media talk constantly of Huthi forces, but in reality the main military force in Yemen is now that of ex-president Saleh who, wherever he is, is doing what he promised: destroying as much as he possibly can.

Rethinking basic income in a sharing society

A basic income derived from the value of collectively owned resources could empower citizens to transform their societies.  

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