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This week's editor

En Liang Khong

En Liang Khong is openDemocracy’s assistant editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Tibet and its neighbours: China’s stakes and India’s concerns

Tibet’s two giant neighbours, China and India, have a lot at stake in a meaningful settlement of the future of Tibet, and joint efforts need to be made for arriving at a mutually acceptable solution.

We need to talk about the 'Middle'

Addressing the problem of middle Britain today will prove key to the future of the country and its politics. The Labour party has begun to recognise this, but what path will it take?

Obama's liberal vision

At question is the basic American dream: the assumption that a decent life can be earned by hard work.

Divided we fall: intolerance in Europe puts rights at risk

The truth is discomforting: hatred and intolerance are moving into the mainstream in Europe. 

After Bretton Woods: from civic solidarity to political action

From Greece's Golden Dawn to America's Alex Jones, the populist right is utilising the global crisis as the ‘pragmatic’ smokescreen for a variety of backward-looking nationalisms. For the left, it is time to go beyond the civic victories of Occupy and focus on constructing a political alternative to the Bretton Woods institutions.

This week's window on the Middle East - February 11, 2013

Arab Awakening's columnists offer their weekly perspective on what is happening on the ground in the Middle East. Leading the week: How to be different together: Algerian lessons for the Tunisian crisis

Profiting from Injustice: challenging the investment arbitration industry

Corporations have been granted the exclusive right to sue states (states cannot sue corporations) at secretive international tribunals for action deemed to unfairly affect investors' profits.

Earning and belonging: Labour sets out a new direction

Labour must be about more than 'earn and own'. A quiet revolution is ousting the remote, condescending party of the past. So said Jon Cruddas in his speech this week, setting out the building blocks of a Policy Review to put Labour back at Britain's helm after its worst defeat since 1918.

Social democracy must radicalise to survive

Social democracy is at an impasse, bereft of an economic programme, but history is on the march. Democratic wealth-holding can give social democrats a new set of economic institutions and political power bases.

Cameron opens Europe’s Pandora’s box

As the dust settles on David Cameron's speech, what real impact has it had? Despite being met with scepticism throughout Europe, it has above all highlighted the need for an open discussion on the EU in Britain – and how the left has so far failed to address the European question.

This week's window on the Middle East - February 4, 2013

Arab Awakening's columnists offer their weekly perspective on what is happening on the ground in the Middle East. Leading the week: I can’t believe it’s not Qatar!: addressing the Brotherhood’s other patron

What lies beneath: the stifling of regime resistance in Algeria and its consequences

The lack of an organised and representative opposition, whether Islamist or not, serves to disadvantage the state; it cannot respond effectively to society's needs.

'Brexit': a view from Norway

Norway has often been cited as an example of what Britain's future relationship with the EU might look like. One of the most prominent Norwegian opponents to EU membership shares his thoughts on David Cameron's speech

Political corruption in Spain: will this be Rajoy’s Watergate?

As each day progressively reveals the extent of corruption inside the ruling People's Party, the Spanish people are disheartened by the conduct of their politicians, including that of Prime Minister Rajoy. But there are things that they can do.

The blacklisting of British workers

'It ruined my marriage' 'my wages were cut in half'... the blacklisting of workers ruins lives, as the latest scandal in the building sector shows. Now the fight is on to push for a public inquiry into the practice.

Taking back the economy: the market as a Res Publica

Republicans seek to protect and promote individual freedom. So do libertarians of the right. The difference? Republicans recognise that the market is constructed through political, public action.

Britain's European catharsis

Like Greece, Spain and Germany before, Britain now faces a cathartic moment when she needs to decide what price it is worth paying to stay in the European Union. Coolheaded rationality must prevail over emotion in the debate that is about to begin. 

Czech presidential vote: a society divided

This Saturday's election saw the victory of former PM Milos Zeman over current Foreign Minister Karel Schwarzenberg. The duel between a decried populist and an old-school aristocrat revealed a division previously unseen in modern Czech society.

Indian farmers trapped and desperate

A wave of suicides has swept through the Indian farming community in recent years as, driven into heavy debt by deadly competition, many small farmers don't see another way out. A market-fundamentalist Indian government has so far refused to take its responsibilities to stop this growing epidemic.

This week's window on the Middle East - January 28, 2013

Arab Awakening's columnists offer their weekly perspective on what is happening on the ground in the Middle East. Leading the week: It’s not me, it’s you: a bad Egyptian break-up

Sovereignty and the national question

The British media's sidelining of Scotland and its referendum is part of a history in which questions of nationality are smothered by the UK establishment. Today, it is increasingly clear that popular sovereignty is incompatible with the UK state. Yet avoidance is still the name of the 'British' game.

Can we cooperate our way out of trouble? A review of ‘The Resilience Imperative’

Embrace local and co-operative models to build a decentralized, steady-state economy. So says a new book by Michael Lewis and Pat Conaty, but does it convince?

Why the British left must engage with Europe

Labour needs to re-think its position on Europe. Time to blow off the dust from Tom Nairn's unparalleled 1972 essay on Britain and what was then an infant EU.

What do today's republicans have to say about work?

Historically, republicanism has failed to reconcile the principle of non-domination with the realities of economic life. What do contemporary republican thinkers have to say about work and domination?

A wimpish speech

By choosing to put party politics before national and European interests, David Cameron has above all shot himself in the foot.

Jordan’s year-long vote for regime or revolt

Jordan’s elections do not signal a shift towards a more open political system. They may provide a platform for opposition groups or usher in a weak government.

Election 2013: Reforming the City of London Corporation

In March, elections to the City of London Corporation take place. They could be used to challenge the unaccountable power wielded by this state-within-a-state.

Russia and China: aligned after all?

Are China and Russia destined to form an alliance against the West? Unlikely, thinks Thomas Koenig: any future relationship will be based on economics, rather than politics.

Papering over the cracks: China’s newspaper protests are a symptom of its core contradiction

As China digests its once-in-a-decade leadership transition, the Chinese media is at a crossroads: the old semi-censorship regime is an awkward one. This status quo is being increasingly challenged by citizens and journalists longing for more pluralism in the media.

Should we worry about global quasi-constitutionalization?

The Rule of Law may be being given away as Rule by Laws replaces a comprehensive system of democratically constituted judicial review.

Revolutionary France and the social republic that never was

After the 1830 revolution, French workers waited for the introduction of the republic into the heart of production. It never came. The struggle that ensued was to shape French politics during the Second Republic and after as republicans sought to reconcile work with the principle of non-domination.

2013 Italy elections: no winner, only losers

The run-up to the next national elections in Italy (to be held on 24/25 February) is marked by two trends that have already troubled the country's political life in the past years: fragmentation and political instability.

Ah la Françafrique!

The present crisis raises a number of crucial questions, for France, Mali, the EU and our globalised world.

Norman Tebbit exchange with John Mills - how to fix Britain's industry

John Mills and Norman Tebbit discuss Britain's approach to manufacturing, home-grown industry, foreign ownership of assets, the exchange rate, and re-examine the choices of former governments and how they have affected Britain's economy today.

Beyond carnival capitalism: London 2012 and its legacy of hope

London 2012 provided a key insight into the shifting relationships between global, national and local as residents with no material stake in the Games came together to participate in their success. How might the power of this already-existing ‘commons’ pave the way for an alternative legacy? 

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