This week's editor

James Ron

James Ron hosts this week's openGlobalRights theme: public opinion and human rights.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Why I will be voting YES in Sunday’s Greek referendum

I would vote yes as I do not want my objections to the way the crisis has been managed at home and in Brussels to be usurped by politicians that dream that they can give the Union a bloody nose by destroying the Eurozone.

Why are so many Syrian children being left stateless?

Syrian women advocates recognize the links between the crisis of statelessness and the lack of reproductive justice for women, and argue that control over their own fertility and legal status is paramount.

From the squares to power in four years, 10 days

How Spain’s skilful activists have transformed politics during the crisis years and how the full effects of 15-M are still emerging.

How I became pro BDS

Israelis will only wake up to their government’s discriminatory policies when they feel the effects of the BDS movement.

Refugees in the centre of Athens

A red line is crossed when you start thieving from refugees in order to survive or feed your addiction. ‘We can only survive as human beings through our solidarity.’ There is nothing else.

Haki Stërmilli’s 'If I Were a Boy': the first Albanian feminist manifesto

Haki Stërmilli 1936 novel If I Were a Boy portrays the contemporary problems of Albanian society that stem from a misogynistic mindset, and deserves to be (re-)read today.

A dilemma for Podemos

Bitter-sweet success in Spain’s regional and local election forces Podemos to choose - between joining with other left parties, following the example of Barcelona and Madrid, or going it alone in the autumn legislative election.

Exiled in Senegal

Damien Froidevaux’s Death of the Serpent God is not about politics, and yet it is a deeply political film. At the Open City Documentary Festival on 18 June 2015.

Chasing dreams in Guangzhou

Måns Månsson’s film Stranded in Canton straddles false promises and Sino-African culture clash. At the Open City Documentary Festival on 17 June 2015.

Digging deep into Turkish politics: what next for HDP?

Long regarded as the biggest threat to Turkey’s political system and territorial integrity, the Kurds have emerged as the champion of Turkish democracy and protector of the country’s parliamentary regime.  

HDP: focus of left-wing opposition beyond pro-Kurdish mobilization

HDP success cannot be understood without taking into consideration the ongoing Kurdish spring in Iraq, Syria and Turkey over the last decade.  

Relationship remembered

Andrea Luka Zimmerman’s film Estate, a Reverie, is an unruly celebration of extraordinary everyday humanity. At the Open City Documentary Festival on 21 June 2015.

The sea is full of bodies

Morgan Knibbe’s film Those Who Feel the Fire Burning offers up a powerful meditation on migrant deaths, the Mediterranean, and powerlessness. At the Open City Documentary Festival on 17 June 2015.

Estate of mind

Andrea Luka Zimmerman’s film Estate, a Reverie is a moving documentation of what gentrification really means to those affected by it. At the Open City Documentary Festival on 21 June 2015.

The market is a cruel taskmaster

Chloe Ruthven’s film Jungle Sisters hurtles through the complexity of industrial development in south India. At the Open City Documentary Festival on 18 June 2015.

Building cultural citizenship with women seeking refuge and asylum

Using participatory, biographical and visual methods, we got in touch with women’s ‘realities’ in a way that demanded critical reflection.

Face to face

As an anthropologist and ethnographer, I attempt to gain access to the participants’ memories in the way I would have liked to have been interviewed. 

Why photography matters

It is no longer the extraordinariness of the image, but rather its familiarity that lends credibility to the representation of how these immigrant women have made new lives in the city.

Gender and tax justice

The heart of tax injustice is gender dominance, the language of secrecy, and an industry and culture which under free-market rules has normalised the subjugation and exclusion of women.

Dalit women and village justice in rural India

Enjoyment of the rule of law requires judicial institutions which act with impartiality. For Dalit women in India’s villages, fat chance.

Abortion in Chile: addressing the false debate of "pro-life vs pro-death"

Chile is one of only four countries in the world that prohibits all abortion, but for the first time in 25 years a law on therapeutic abortion is being seriously considered.

Deciding how to decide: the Munduruku Indigenous Group and political participation in Brazil

The struggles of a variety of movements, peoples, communities and organizations have opened new and creative spaces for participation. Português

Rewriting (some of) the rules of the American economy: the Stiglitz Report

In this report as in the work of Piketty or Atkinson, there appears a new sense of confidence. But in adopting a middle class frame, it misses an opportunity.

A year of Modi Raj – India in crisis

Middle and upper class Indians see no crisis. The media fails to inform them that 75% upwards are too often suffering not only neglect but massive state violence and terror.

Suppressed at home, neglected abroad, Ethiopian migrants

The May 24 election, contrary to US Under Secretary of State Wendy Sherman’s misjudged and widely criticized comments, is a hollow piece of democratic theatre.

Brazil in decline?

The sluggish economic situation is much less worrisome to Brazil’s future than the measures being approved in the National Congress.

Europe’s migration crisis: central Europe’s dangerous game

Should a serious migration crisis erupt as a result of conflict escalation in Ukraine, the odds are that the V4 would need assistance through exactly the kind of EU solidarity mechanism they now oppose.

Hope's song: my companion in life's journey

On my way from Zimbabwe to Amsterdam I shared a seat with a man called Musi. He was curious about how I became a feminist and wondered if I was not borrowing western ideology...

Libya: "Rejoicing at our bloody democracy"

For sustainable peace, the UN must refuse to sanction militarism as the default response to unwanted migration and invest in grassroots women and youth human rights defenders.

From shore to shore: regional collapse and human insecurity

These are policies that, whilst having a humanitarian veneer, radically exacerbate the burdens of migrants and displaced persons from and in countries like Libya, Syria, Eritrea, and Somalia, alike. 

Russell Brand is a confused social democrat - his call to vote Labour makes complete sense

Like so many involved in the newer left, Brand's practical political programme is reformist. We need to develop a left in which ideas and traditions are worth more than revolutionary kitsch.

Ferguson to Baltimore: taking on institutionalized racism

What are our values? Equal opportunities? Freedom of expression? Protection of human rights principles? If so, the US is building a frightening track record of alienating and insensitive behavior.

From Tottenham to Baltimore, policing crisis starts race to the bottom for justice

What is it about the police and urban black populations in the US and the UK? The explanation starts with two of the most stretched social hierarchies in the developed world.

Liberty, Equality, Fraternity ... and welfare

How do the political camps map their favourite welfare policies onto political values? A report from the Ax:son Johnson Foundation seminar on the future of the welfare state

The masculinisation of complexity

You would think a peace movement would be the least patriarchal of all social movements but you can masculinise anything. Feminist understanding challenges what it really takes to make peace.

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