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This week's editor

En Liang Khong

En Liang Khong is submissions editor at openDemocracy.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

On centrism and independence in Spain

"Facing an increasingly self-centered centre, we stand for citizens who are open to the world and to the present time, capable of organizing and cooperating according to their abilities and aspirations."

The new journalism outfit that is shaking up Hong Kong’s establishment media

Launched in the wake of the city’s Occupy protests, Hong Kong Free Press aims to “shine a light in dark places”.

Facebook’s dominance deepens

Two recent Facebook initiatives, “Instant Articles” and “” are set to entrench the firm’s dominance. Is this a moral monopoly in the making?

Why 'backdoor' systems always fail

As the head of MI5 launches a push for unparalleled powers, will he answer challenging questions on why banning encryption, or weakening it through compulsory backdoors, won't make us all less safe?

Why do people reject climate change?

US Democrats did not come to support climate change because they sat down and confronted the evidence, read the scholarly journals, and evaluated the climate models.

A climate of conspiracy

What the Tea Party and Occupy movements have in common is that they don’t accept the official version of events any more.

Cameron’s hypocrisy on Muslim radicalization

If Cameron was serious about countering extremism, what better person to allow into the UK than Jeenah, who has much to say about the contributions of the west to the problem?

This time, it’s different

Paul Mason’s Postcapitalism is a book for our times—and the decades ahead.

Is counter-propaganda the only antidote to propaganda?

Russia Today is packed full of lies. But aren't there motes aplenty in our own eyes onto the world? Is media credibility shot, and can we hope to improve trust in news?  An academic conference this autumn in Prague aims to bring journalists and acdemics together to explore the problem

It's gettin’ kinda hectic

With a few hundred years of colonial rule under its belt, the British state has mastered the art of psychological intimidation, and that’s why they use it.

China's 'great firewall' just got taller

The recently released draft of the new ‘cyber security law’ formalises already existing censorship practices and gives greater authority to the Cyberspace Administration of China. 

Podemos’ dilemma and why leadership still matters

Running for office means engaging in an operation that is intrinsically reductive and hegemonic, whether we like it or not.

Beware the echo chamber: digital media and disaster recovery

Communication technologies can give victims of disaster a voice. But those who are most in need are not heard because they lack access to these technologies and the skills to use them.

Privacy under threat in Hong Kong

23,946 warrantless metadata requests raise privacy concerns for Hong Kong’s online activists. The loss of online privacy is not a price we want to pay.

From the squares to power in four years, 10 days

How Spain’s skilful activists have transformed politics during the crisis years and how the full effects of 15-M are still emerging. Español.

Os correios eletrónicos de Blesa: o fim de uma era

Espanha, Dezembro 2013: a filtração de 8000 correios eletrónicos enviados desde contas de correio eletrónico oficiais da “Caixa Madrid” entre 2000 e 2009, nos quais se reflete a conduta do seu antigo presidente, Miguel Blesa, foram essenciais para levar perante a Justiça a mais de 100 banqueiros e políticos. Apresentamos portanto a história por detrás dos correios de Blesa, republicados hoje. English

Blesa's e-mails: the end of an era

Spain, December 2013: 8,000 leaked e-mails sent from Caja Madrid corporate accounts, regarding the actions of former president, Miguel Blesa, have led to over 100 bankers and politicians facing trial. This is the inside story of Blesa’s e-mails, from those behind the leak. English

Who is the subject of digital rights?

Digital rights organizations already number more than ecological rights or animal rights movements at their height. Together, these bodies give us a glimpse of the incipient political subject of digital rights.

Are you cultivating knowledge or just consuming information?

Whether the internet is a mindless distraction or the greatest educational tool ever invented is all in how we use it.

Storming the digital barricades

Let us tell stories about resistance and adventure, from the margins of our cities to the edges of our online lives.

Exposing the invisible

We can take advantage of the flaws that run across our current data landscape in order to investigate corruption and abuse of power.

A year of Modi Raj – India in crisis

Middle and upper class Indians see no crisis. The media fails to inform them that 75% upwards are too often suffering not only neglect but massive state violence and terror.

Has the west given up on democracy?

Authoritarians are methodically cracking down on opposition elements, restricting civil society activity, swapping surveillance and censorship tips and technologies to keep domestic dissent at bay.

The UK's missing girls: preventing online radicalisation

Less than 4% of Muslim mothers who attended a programme in Britain to equip them with basic IT skills knew who ISIS were. Education is key to enabling them to prevent the online radicalisation of their children.

Atrocities in the frame

The film “No Fire Zone” gives voice to the victims of Sri Lanka’s civil war. Here, amateur video footage powerfully documents those caught in the killing fields.

Symbiotic Realism and just power

Four interlocking elements shape the global system: the neurobiological substrates of human nature (providing a more complex account of human nature), the persistence of global anarchy, which today coexists with conditions of instant connectivity and interdependence

Who is your phone talking to?

“The Secret Life of your Mobile Phone” is a stage show dedicated to probing how smartphones leak private information. Why are our phones so sneaky?

In new gods do we trust?

Do you expect the machine to solve the problems? In this wide-ranging interview with the Director of the Open Rights Group we discuss bulk collection, state bureaucracies, the pre-crime era and trust.

Scrutinising the Scrutineers: part 3

UK media coverage of EU issues is frequently superficial and plagued by basic errors. The BBC, and others, must work to change this.

The plurality deficit: public service broadcasting and institutional competition

Is institutional competition the answer to the ‘plurality deficit’ in public broadcasting? The evidence suggests no.

Why bother about digital rights? An absence in the election campaigns

Digital rights are too often reduced to questions of ‘security’. In their election manifestos none of the major British parties appear to have grasped their wider significance.

Internet journalism and the rise of a new satire

With a general election just round the corner, we should be wary of those who try to silence British satirists.

Freedom or dignity: media censorship in the new Turkey

Banning one photo from the internet might seem to reflect the paranoia of an increasingly authoritarian AKP regime but Erdogan’s grasp could really be weakening.

"Foreigner in my own nation": the politics of Italian hip-hop

As a new generation struggles to overcome the cultural legacy of Berlusconismo, rap remains one of the most important forms of Italian protest. 

Defending the global knowledge commons

Members are encouraged to use creative commons licensing and to join others in a pledge to be open by agreeing to review for and publish in mainly if not solely open access journals.

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