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The spectre of female otherness is haunting athletics

DANIEL FLETCHER

Hyperandrogenic competitors are not men, and exceptional women shouldn’t be excluded on the grounds that ‘normal’ women feel threatened by their masculine traits. 

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Censoring the terrors of war

IAN MAHONEY
openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Who decides whether or not an image is fit for human consumption, and on what grounds?

What can be learned from recent studies on nonviolent action?

BRIAN MARTIN
openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Books about peace are rare when compared to books about war, but a raft of new work expands our understanding enormously (3k words).

The spectre of female otherness is haunting athletics

DANIEL FLETCHER

Hyperandrogenic competitors are not men, and exceptional women shouldn’t be excluded on the grounds that ‘normal’ women feel threatened by their masculine traits. 

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Censoring the terrors of war

IAN MAHONEY
openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Who decides whether or not an image is fit for human consumption, and on what grounds?

What can be learned from recent studies on nonviolent action?

BRIAN MARTIN
openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Books about peace are rare when compared to books about war, but a raft of new work expands our understanding enormously (3k words).



What can be learned from recent studies on nonviolent action?

Books about peace are rare when compared to books about war, but a raft of new work expands our understanding enormously (3k words).

The spectre of female otherness is haunting athletics

Hyperandrogenic competitors are not men, and exceptional women shouldn’t be excluded on the grounds that ‘normal’ women feel threatened by their masculine traits. 

I am a human, speaking to you

This is a collaborative article, written by a Syrian refugee minor with additional information from the refugee communities of Konitsa Refugee Camp, Greece, with support from a collective of non-aligned academics.

Censoring the terrors of war

Who decides whether or not an image is fit for human consumption, and on what grounds?

How democracy vouchers could combat big money in politics

Across the USA, voters are pushing for public-matching systems to replace the influence of wealthy bankrollers in elections.

Why should Bill Gates decide how our children should be educated?

Billionaire philanthropists are imposing their views on the rest of society with little accountability for their actions.

Preparing for power: Can Iceland's Pirate Party change system from the inside?

Consistently topping the polls ahead of upcoming elections, Iceland's Pirate Party have a real shot at power. If they do, they want to change the "ugly" culture of politics and create a society that honours people.

Set in stone? The architecture of colonialism

Can the physical reminders of British occupation ever be seen as home?

A new activist toolkit arrives in beautiful fashion

Lots of resources on nonviolent action come from the global north, yet courageous activists in the global south are living a whole other political life.

The green shoots of Russian grassroots activism (part 2)

Our story on Russia’s grassroots activism continues. From Moscow’s parks to federal highways, ordinary citizens learn the power of protest  and of solidarity.

The green shoots of Russian grassroots activism

What do two Moscow parks and a truck drivers’ trade union have in common? They have been the focus of protests that have shown that the Russian public may be losing its traditional passivity.

My body is not Syria

Cancer is not the Islamic State and IS is not a cancer, but both are symptoms of something that has gone terribly wrong in our way of life.

Catastrophism is as much an obstacle to addressing climate change as denial

Is our confidence in the unifying power of fear obstructing action to combat global warming?

After the violence and videos, therapists learn to treat racial trauma

From specialized clinics for African Americans to social media events that take the shame out of sharing, there's a growing movement to heal the psychological scars of racism.

Burkinis accepted: for a poor woman scrubbing France’s floors

The woman on the beach in her human quest to be visible, had the grace, understandably, to be bewildered. A large swathe of your citizens are bewildered, France. The world is bewildered, France.

Wildlife conservationists need to break out of their Stockholm syndrome

Instead of fighting a destructive economic system, international conservation NGOs are bonding with its brutality.

How storytelling can help to address police violence

Stories engage areas of the brain beyond those that simply process information, facilitating negotiation and creating coherence out of traumatic experiences.

Worlds Beyond: how young adult fiction can explore the lives of the marginalized

Even in science fiction and fantasy, we're used to hearing the stories of the rich and the white. This represents an enormous failure of imagination. 

The sexual politics of meat

Wings, thighs and breasts: menu choices, or an individual who matters so little that her body parts can be consumed for someone else’s enjoyment?

Disinterring the enslaved

Archaeology has incredible powers of detection, but it suffers from emotional sterility. When we unearth the bones of the enslaved, we must feel their humanity through the science.

Teaching values of collective prosperity

How the Zuni Tribe are strengthening communities through culture and sacred spaces.

In the fight for our genes, could we lose what makes us human?

There’s more to human beings than biology and physiology—and it shouldn’t be for sale.

Can a 'green growth' strategy solve climate change?

Ian Sinclair interviews Samuel Alexander about the limits of decoupling or 'green growth' in tackling climate change.

Love without monogamy

Expanding the meaning of marriage beyond heterosexual relations captures the spirit of the times but misses the pulse of the future.

Raise America inspires a new generation of organizing for low-wage workers

Labor unions are beginning to re-focus on continuous community organizing and agitation.

On the walls of Zollamtsstrasse refugee camp

The refugees who once lived in this Austrian shelter left plenty of traces, their voices echoing off the walls through dozens of messages and murals depicting hope, strength, love, and language class.

Does poverty cause crime?

Socio-economic determinism is inadequate as an explanation of criminality.

Why allies are welcome to criticise social movements

Being a member of an oppressed group is not a guarantee of wisdom or correctness.

Six books Muslim (and non-Muslim) women should add to their reading list

These books on faith and feminism will force you to reevaluate your stereotypes of Muslims. 

'Elmar the Elephant' in Arabic, and other experiences of integration in Berlin

Residents of a neighbourhood in Berlin engage with refugees through community arts and education initiatives, revealing personal stories of welcome and integration.

Is social justice fundraising an oxymoron?

Raising money is part of the struggle for social change, not something that rich people do on behalf of the poor.

What’s to be done with Oxfam?

Too small to influence economics, too bureaucratic to be social movements, banned from politics and removed from the societies they’re trying to change, where do NGOs go next?

The ugly and violent death of gender conformity

How long will it take for gender fluidity to be viewed as a healthy expression of human identity?

The experiences of British muslim women defy lazy stereotypes about Islam

Berenice Scandone interviews young British muslim women, who say that their faith provides them with a sense of confidence, belonging, and cultural understanding.

The political fury of Percy Bysshe Shelley

A lost work by a great poet has much to say about the state of politics today.

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