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Anatolia has always been at a crossroads of history. Hittites, Greeks, Celts, Romans, Turks...all have occupied this spit of land caught between Europe, Africa, and Asia. Now, this mixture of West and East has become a phenomenon unique in situation but universal in relevance.

Can Turkey's 'silent minority' rise in protest against the systems maintaining the government's power and the authoritarian cooption of space that it represents?


Turkey: the organic crisis of a post-populist moment

How can we make better sense of debates about populism. Can there be a progressive populism? Is populism really a danger for the survival of democracy or a key to democracy’s future?

Turkey: sharing what we learn through self-organisation in a war zone

An HDP activist in Istanbul talks about the recent elections, the Kurdish movement’s political strategies, and the need to organize locally in the social sphere. (Interview transcribed and translated from the Turkish).

The Turkish election as a warning against the irresistible charms of populism

We urgently need a constructive and open dialogue between different strands of thought within the populism theoretical oeuvre, if we are to develop progressive political strategies.

Turkey’s economy needs reliability and peace

The manifesto pledge on the economy of the Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) in the Turkish elections on June 24.

Can the Turkish Opposition beat Erdoğan?

The most likely challenger on June 24 is the CHP’s candidate Muharrem İnce who will have an uphill battle.

Can Europe save Turkey from sliding into authoritarianism?

The answer is no. It is not only within Europe that defects in European liberal democracy are aiding the rise of rightwing populism.

Turkey’s snap elections: a level playing field?

The question remains whether the next elections will be free and fair. In light of Turkey’s recent political development, this is highly unlikely: the end of democracy sometimes comes not with a coup but with a vote. 

Erdogan’s latest move towards autocracy

Elections do not equal democracy. Snap elections give opposition parties no time to recuperate, to groom candidates or to build a base of support. 

Why Turkey’s Erdoğan might actually lose the June 24 snap elections

The rise of authoritarianism in Turkey has gone hand in hand with a de-institutionalization, in favour of what many call the “one man regime”. How long can that last?

Chronic human rights problems of Turkey during the EU accession process

Will the European adventure that has continued for years with both sides escalating the tension and turning their backs on each other, finally end?

The Third Great Depression and rise of the far-right: experiences from Turkey

In Turkey the Islamist right garners support in rural areas by promoting social welfare and subsidy programmes. The left needs to put farmers and workers at the centre of class-based struggle.

Re-thinking EU-Turkey co-operation over migration

Turkey’s military offensive in Afrin is also an example of how refugees are instrumentalized to gain domestic support for foreign policy ambitions.

Story of an ‘unidentified’ detainee

From the Counter-Terrorism Division in Ankara, Turkey... The story’s named by others, but filled by women who resist the war. We live in a story whose title reads ‘unidentified’.

Long way to Afrin: Turkey’s strategic refugee policy aimed at electoral hegemony and regional political ambitions

Syrian ‘guests’ in Turkey have been used not only as political tools for foreign ambitions, but also for reinforcing the conservative and Islamist ideology promoted by Erdogan’s AKP.

Like Erdogan, Trump is using conspiracy theory to sabotage democracy: here’s what we learn from the Turkish experience

The accusation of conspiracy within the State is not just a red herring, it is a strategy meant to turn American democracy against itself. 

When bully boys dictate the West’s agenda, Turkey invades Syria with impunity

How can bully boys and aggressors label a resistance movement ‘terrorist’ when the whole question of Turkey’s accession to the EU turned around its democratic deficits?

Presenting an absence: the Armenian legacy in non-fiction film

In these films, the more intriguing instances appear in films made by Turkish directors, where the narratives of genocide appear, not head-on, but slipping through the cracks.

Unmaking and remaking everyday life in Diyarbakir: unease and uncertainty

How uneasy death has rearranged and redefined social life in the city whose UNESCO World Heritage site of Sur district has been destroyed during a three month long ‘cleansing operation’.

What happens after displacement? Syrians re-settling Istanbul through food

Successful food restaurants in certain neighbourhood of Istanbul, such as Fatih Malta Street, now create a hub for Syrians residing all around Istanbul to meet in the religious Fatih neighbourhood.

Combatting loss: refugees, employment and social entrepreneurship in Turkey

Turkey, at the crossroads of refugee flows, hosts 3.4 million refugees, while not granting them refugee status but a state of exception. Hospitality and hostility go hand in hand.

Turkophilia and the common life: a pledge, a bond, and a very special appeal

Exactly one hundred years to the day – the story of a British Scots-Irish family who learnt to love Turkey, of two rosaries and of a silver Koran. Bianet Turkish. Cumhuriyet.

The Cumhuriyet seventeen face hearing amid continuing press crackdown in Turkey

Two weeks ago, judges refused to release the five remaining journalists detained from Turkey's Cumhuriyet newspaper under false charges. Today, they face another hearing in a country where more than 100 journalists are behind bars.

Neocolonial geographies of occupation: portrait of Diyarbakir

The terms military zone and death zone trace the colonial dynamics which have compartmentalised the city, in order to unpack further the claim that Kurdistan is a colony.

How human rights are freeing journalists in Turkey – a prison for members of the press

Though some from Turkey's independent newspaper Cumhuriyet are still being detained, human rights mechanisms are being used successfully – even in this autocracy – to free many others.

Power relations in New Turkey and the naked truth

The power holders have almost unrestricted control over people’s freedoms and lives, as well as over how they perceive reality.

UNESCO’s normative failure: the case of Gülmen and Özakça

In the face of institutional failure in defending democracy and basic rights, civil society action is the last line of defence.

Is the world finally breaking its silence on Turkey?

"Members of my staff are sad not just for their friends, but for their country. What will it take for the world to break its silence?"

The trauma of the attempted military coup as observed from a college campus in Istanbul

“However over-optimistic it may sound, I focused on a growth mindset and transferred it to focusing on creating a change in our emotional state.”

Fear and loathing in Turkish academia: a tale of appeasement and complicity

Can fear explain the loathing that the victims of this ‘academic cleansing’ are exposed to, often by their own colleagues? Could insecurity justify the complicity?

Can mosques and minarets be tools for democracy?

If anyone has doubts about the predominance of a strain of political Islam in Turkey, this week they should be watching Turkey’s mosques. Part two of three.

The 'success' of political Islam in the Kurdish context

We need to go beyond the dichotomy between radical and moderate Islam to see how Islamist movements impose hegemony at local, national and international levels.

Media in Turkey before, during and after the referendum

Would giving the No campaign equal media access have changed the results of the Turkish Constitutional referendum? We will never know, but the damage was already done.

“A homeland that wants to kill us”

"This hatred overdose and systematic lynch campaign is something that none of us were prepared for. We are civilian citizens whose only 'crime' is to demand peace." An open letter.

Turkey: the rigged referendum and implications for economic fragility

Following in the footstep of the rating agencies, investment banks were busy building up a self-fulfilling prophecy before and after the Turkish referendum of 16 April, 2017.

"It was women who made the color of the referendum purple and its spirit NO!"

The secondary position to which women were relegated was endorsed, not silently and privately, but publicly and vocally, by high-profile dignitaries of the AKP, including Erdogan himself. This helped violence.

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