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In a privatised children's prison a care worker restrained a boy who died; G4S promoted him. A woman deported for profit by a British government outsourcer stood naked on an airport runway and took an overdose.

A minister who blamed food bank clients for their poverty lined his pockets using Parliamentary expenses. A single dad driving his son to school one day missed the JobCentre's call, so they docked him one week's money.

Shine a Light has sprung from our influential and hard-hitting work on child detention and encompasses G4S: Securing whose world?, Care and justice, Immigration detention and removal in the UK and The attack on legal aid.

Led by acclaimed investigative reporters Clare Sambrook and Rebecca Omonira-Oyekanmi Shine a Light exposes injustice, challenges official lying, and provides intelligence and ammunition to people working for policy change.



High Court blasts ‘outrageous’ assault by Tascor staff on torture survivor

Highly unusual punitive damages awarded to Felix Wamala, who was subjected to intensely painful, dangerous restraint techniques.

Fit to run a prison? G4S dodges difficult questions

At a locked down shareholders’ meeting, security company boss sidestepped hard questions, praised BBC exposé of abuse.

Children’s rights and the UK General Election 2017

A leading advocate calls for an Act of Parliament to enshrine children’s rights in law.

Theresa May’s tough line on immigration punishes British children

“To them it’s just another number, someone else being sent back. But when you’ve got three children being left without their dad …  it’s quite major.”

‘If I’d known what to ask for, I wouldn’t have gone hungry’

When Theresa May’s Britain grants asylum, a brutal 28 day countdown starts.

Money talks: Meet three people who want to live in the UK

Government visa fees tell would-be immigrants that in the UK, money talks ...

Violent and dangerous places: the rise in prison suicides in England and Wales

Cuts, overcrowding and understaffing have created a toxic mix of violence, death and human misery.

Refuse, retract, resist: boycott the schools census

As the British state tries to make a register of foreign-born children, parents should question a liberal trust in government and reject borders in classrooms. An interview with Gargi Bhattacharyya.

17 plead not guilty over Stansted deportation protest

Defendants contest public order charges arising from protest that stopped a Home Office removal flight.

Behave or get deported, says G4S

EXCLUSIVE: The world’s biggest security company, landlord to asylum-seekers, threatens tenants with expulsion from the UK.

5 reasons why we stopped a UKgov deportation flight to Nigeria last night

As a government ghost flight prepared for take-off, activists intervened.

Sheffield campaigner scheduled for life-threatening removal to Cameroon on Friday

Paul Blomfield MP works to avert deportation of Pride Mbi Agbor, a popular member of Yorkshire’s City of Sanctuary movement. 

Child was held for a staggering 151 days in men’s immigration lockup Morton Hall in Lincolnshire

Today’s inspection report reveals that children were detained among 400 adults. One detainee had been convicted of multiple offences against children. (See also: 'People come in here normal, but they get ill')

‘People come in here normal, but they get ill.’ Protesting against deaths at a UK migrant jail

Intrusive police surveillance deployed against peaceful protestors at Morton Hall. (See also: Child held for 151 days at Morton Hall)

Fighting to win asylum from rape: the case of Erioth Mwesigwa

Today, Monday 20 February, at 4.30pm, a protest has been called outside the Home Office against the removal and detention of Erioth Mwesigwa, a rape survivor from Uganda.

Fail, fail, and have another government contract

Security contractors G4S and Serco and housing company Clearsprings have for years supplied UK asylum seekers with shoddy housing. The contracts carry on regardless.

The end of domestic violence support for black and brown women in the UK?

Dedicated refuges were created to answer a desperate need. Now their survival is at risk. 

The seeds of post-Brexit racial violence lie in government policy

Racist attacks are condemned by politicians who stop short of examining their complicity. New research suggests policy ignites hatred.

Iraq abuse allegations: Resist, deny, hide

Theresa May has made it clear she intends to follow previous governments in tarnishing Iraq abuse allegations as false. Final day of our 7 day series.

Rising tide of allegations suggests ‘systemic abuse’ by British military

Rogue military personnel?  Or a deliberate policy of abuse? Day 6 of our 7 day series on alleged abuse by British soldiers in Iraq.

Welcome to my asylum home. I’d offer you a seat — if I had one

Meanwhile a parliamentary inquiry into asylum housing lumbers on over ten months . . . and today in Leeds the Home Office holds yet another 'consultation' on a sorry business.

British torture in Iraq and the state’s ‘corporate memory loss’

Hooding, sensory deprivation, stress positions. . . methods used illegally in 1970s Northern Ireland are deployed again. (Day 5 of our 7 day series).

From war to occupation in Iraq

The fall of Saddam Hussein and the death of Baha Mousa. (Day 4 of our 7 day series)

The Chilcot Report and the Politics of the Iraq War

Why, in our democracy, is there so little appetite for proper public scrutiny? (Day 3 of our 7 day series)

A drowned boy, an apology, an attack on ‘activist, left-wing human rights lawyers’

Today we explore the death of Ahmed Jabbar Kareem Ali. (Day 2 of our 7 day series) 

A conspiracy cooked up by ‘activist left-wing human rights’ lawyers?

Government and media have denied, dismissed and derided allegations of abuse by British soldiers in Iraq. Over 7 days we’ll interrogate a very British scandal. Day 1: Attack the lawyers.

Delayed lives — the hidden misery of stateless people locked up in the UK

Alienated, homeless, denied the right to work, criminalised.

Gavin MacFadyen (1940-2016): Why investigative journalism matters

The inspirational founder of the Centre for Investigative Journalism died on Saturday 22 October, 2016.  

Lost childhoods: age disputes in the UK asylum system

Children seeking asylum in the UK are regularly disbelieved about how old they are and can end up facing harmful, protracted disputes. The culture of disbelief so often criticised in the Home Office has now seeped into some local authorities.

When UK care workers fight back

Workers who provide essential services and compassion to vulnerable people are being forced to fight for the minimum wage.

England’s bonfire of children’s rights

A new bill threatens decades of carefully drafted laws designed to safeguard and promote the welfare of children in care.

Theresa May, this is not a ‘crisis of migration’, but a crisis of inhumanity

In a carefully coded speech, the UK Prime Minister categorises people on the move as “threats that we face” alongside war and global terrorism.

A special gift from UK to Nigeria: promoting human rights or secrecy?

At Lagos Airport, Nigerians deported from Britain are processed out of sight in a ‘reception centre’ given by Britain.

Rats in the yard: 4 years of UK asylum housing by G4S

Today, yet again, a Parliamentary committee will hear how commercial landlords are failing asylum seeker tenants. And then what?

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