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Drones, surveillance, population control: how our cities became a battleground

A new kind of warfare: how urban spaces are becoming the new battlefield, where the distinction between intelligence and military, and war and peace is becoming more and more problematic.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Drones, surveillance, population control: how our cities became a battleground

A new kind of warfare: how urban spaces are becoming the new battlefield, where the distinction between intelligence and military, and war and peace is becoming more and more problematic.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

This week's editor

MM

Cameron Thibos is managing editor of Beyond Trafficking and Slavery.

Theresa May, this is not a ‘crisis of migration’, but a crisis of inhumanity

In a carefully coded speech, the UK Prime Minister categorises people on the move as “threats that we face” alongside war and global terrorism.

Don’t think we’ve forgotten: why Cambodia’s leadership needs to change its tune

Hobbes' state of “continual fear, and danger of violent death,” prevails for those thinkers and artists in Cambodia who dare to dream a different future.

Diversity - what Ofcom needs to do

Ofcom's new CEO has pledged to make diversity and inclusion a priority. The regulator needs to improve or it could face judicial review.

Refugee women in the UK: Pushing a stone into the sea

From personal experience I know that arrival in the UK for asylum seekers does not signal safety, but reform is a ‘chaser game’: refugee women are pressuring the Home Office to improve decision making and end detention, says Beatrice Botomani.

Sports diplomacy: Bahrain’s martial arts venture distracts from human rights abuses

While the use of successful sporting events is a persuasive approach to international relations, it is limited in its ability to disguise Bahrain's true nature.

Israel’s right to exist

The reason why the claimed ‘right to exist’ is problematic is a question of definition, not of dematerialisation. A reply to Mary Davis’ reply.

Russia’s security services are trying to reform their way out of the shadows

10838229_1015976098430355_7234058766256563378_o.jpgSweeping reforms to Russia’s power ministries show that the FSB has the country’s security monopoly in its sights.

 

If the UK intervenes in conflict, we must plan properly for peace

From Bosnia to Iraq to Libya, the UK has failed to learn from its disastrous history of neglecting post-war planning.

What can be learned from recent studies on nonviolent action?

Books about peace are rare when compared to books about war, but a raft of new work expands our understanding enormously (3k words).

A rule of law crisis overshadows the refugee one

This week Greek officials agreed to deport a Syrian refugee back to Turkey. Without guarantees that his rights will be protected this risks contravening the EU’s established rules on asylum and human rights. 

The familiar axes of politics are changing, with momentous consequences

Political identities have changed significantly, and politics has shifted with them.

A very Brazilian coup

In removing the elected president for ostensibly political reasons, the impeachment of Dilma is a coup against democracy. Español 

ISIS against, and in, the west

The retreat of the caliphate in Iraq-Syria signals a new phase in the 30-year war.

So, is it a refugee crisis?

“Not really. It’s a crisis of everybody’s values and everybody’s solidarity, and how far they’re willing to go to ensure human rights for everybody.”

Colombia: real peace in an era of phony war

While a "new Condor Plan" is rumoured to be stalking the region, Colombia might need more than a sideways glance from self-absorbed neighbours in the years to come.

Cutting the number of MPs could cut democratic scrutiny too

Fewer MPs risks less democracy.

Does the UK need a 'War Powers Act'?

In the wake of Chilcot, questions have been raised about the democratic accountability of the process involved in taking this country to war.

Deeper into democracy: the legitimacy of challenging Brexit’s majoritarian mandate

Would a second European referendum be democratic?

Anti-aging medical research must be our top priority

What is medicine for? Surely an easy question, right? Apparently not. I have always believed that the purpose of medicine is to alleviate the suffering caused by ill-hea...

Put public services into the hands of local governments

The push for public ownership of vital services should not be about a return to top-down state industries. We can’t go back to the past - and we want the public ownership of the future to be better ...

Growth is unsustainable. It's time to shrink the economy.

What would genuine economic progress look like today? The orthodox answer is that a bigger economy is always better. But this idea is increasingly strained by the knowledge that, on a fin...

Rebalance the economy away from London

London’s Garden Bridge will cost £60m of public money, and may even require a public bailout upon completion. Meanwhile, museums in Derby, Lancashire, Jarrow and Durham face closure. The cost of ke...

An 'Affordable Urban Density Fund' to build homes

I’ve lost count of the infrastructure stimulus funds I’ve seen from ministers – mainly Conservatives during the last two governments, and mainly fixated on road building – so here’s my ...

Post-conflict in Colombia (18) Amnesty and pardon in the peace process

The complex system of justice created at the negotiating table in Havana will require a great deal of effort for its implementation to meet the expectations. Español Português

The Joyce Girl and the mad wives of modernism

Annabel Abbs' debut novel explores the life of Lucia Joyce - daughter of James - whose desire for an independent life is denied, much like those of Zelda Fitzgerald and Vivienne Eliot.

Video: John Akomfrah on sea-migration, borders, and art

Acclaimed British artist John Akomfrah speaks on his new installation Vertigo Sea and explains the impact of recent migration on his art.

Green: at what price?

On the shores of Lake Victoria in southern Uganda, a parcel of land is pitting a Norwegian timber company against more than 10,000 villagers.

WashPost makes history: first paper to call for prosecution of its own source

News organisations usually owe duties of protection to their sources. The Washington Post is making history as the first paper to call for the prosecution of Edward Snowden, its own source, after accepting the Pulitzer Prize.

Series introduction: We need to rethink the British economy

Since 2008, Britain has seen a surge in alternative economic thinking. From community finance to cooperatives, public ownership to tax avoidance; land taxes to local currencies, GDP to the creation of...

Publicly fund the transition to a society beyond work

Technology has changed everything, now politics – and how we relate to each other – needs to catch up. Whether you call it post-capitalism or 'fully automated luxury communism', the essence of th...