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Job automation threatens peoples' livelihoods. Can universal basic income save the day?

Technological developments are rendering many jobs obsolete. Can implemeting a universal basic income provide a way of managing the social and economic implications of such a radical transformation?

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world
Flickr/machu. Some rights reserved.

Job automation threatens peoples' livelihoods. Can universal basic income save the day?

Technological developments are rendering many jobs obsolete. Can implemeting a universal basic income provide a way of managing the social and economic implications of such a radical transformation?

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world
Flickr/machu. Some rights reserved.

This week's editor

Adam Ramsay, Editor

Adam Ramsay is editor of oD-UK.

Worlds Beyond: how young adult fiction can explore the lives of the marginalized

Even in science fiction and fantasy, we're used to hearing the stories of the rich and the white. This represents an enormous failure of imagination. 

The end of the grant era

Asking donors for money and then implementing programs is an old model from which civil society must break free. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on funding and human rights.  Español

Slavery: memory and afterlives

What role does memory play in the politics of the present? How can we build better futures through politicising the past? The Brigstow Institute brings us a series reflecting on these questions.

Voices from the supply chains: an interview with the International Trade Union Confederation

BTS speaks with Georgios Altintzis of the International Trade Union Confederation on the lag between globalisation and governance that is devastating the global work force.

Got tagged? Get fined! Russia’s battle against “digital extremism”

In Russia, the fight against online extremism looks good on paper. But look closer and you’ll find many arbitrary and even absurd convictions. Русский

The world’s citizens need to take back control – with a Global Parliament

The Brexit vote is an anomaly and an irrational response. We can democratise international organisations - rather than leave them.

A revolution is not a dinner party

Does the word “revolution” mean the same thing to the Kurdish liberation movement and to American leftists who supported Bernie Sanders? A little history...

Job automation threatens peoples' livelihoods. Can universal basic income save the day?

Technological developments are rendering many jobs obsolete. Can implemeting a universal basic income provide a way of managing the social and economic implications of such a radical transformation?

Team GB's Olympic triumph is testament to the benefits of social democracy

Publicly-funded olympians have come home covered in glory, whilst the UK's neoliberal football clubs flounder on the international scene.

Moscow, August 1991: a world-changing failure

25 years ago, an attempted takeover by communist hardliners led to the Soviet Union's collapse. The reverberations still continue.

Adam Curle, peace scholar: a centenary symposium

Bradford University's pioneering department devoted to peace education and research is honouring its founding professor. The world's conflicts make it a timely event.

Turkey’s universities are being purged: we cannot afford to look the other way

We must keep in mind that as academics we are at our best, not when we agree to disagree, but exactly when we disagree to agree.

Where does the key to political change lie in the post-Soviet space?

Twenty five years after the fall of the Soviet Union, the post-Soviet world is caught in authoritarian stasis. How can grassroots movements find long-term success?

A new pathway to peace? Danger ahead for Sustainable Development Goal 16

What is needed is the operationalization of a universal principle into a set of diversified strategies aimed at different categories of countries, and uncomfortable partnerships.

Building a bridge to the future: towards a feminist UN

What will it take for the world’s women to shift the UN away from its paradigm of patriarchy and gender inequality and implement the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?

The last Russian prisoner at Guantánamo Bay does not want to go home

Fourteen years after arriving at Guantánamo, Ravil Mingazov is now due to be released. But returning to Russia could bring harassment, torture and the threat of further imprisonment.

The mainstreaming of post-truth politics in Britain, and what that means for America

Joining the dots between Trump and Brexit reveals a web of lies and social division. On both sides of the Atlantic, the left must confront this dangerous rhetoric.

Brexit: reflections from a Leave voter

Two months ago the EU referendum uncovered a deep split within the UK, and the passions and tensions that were released have not yet subsided. What does the future hold for an independent UK?

Britain must care for its carers

The UK was once a world leader in carers' rights. These days, it's falling dismally far behind other countries.

Is a feminist United Nations possible in our lifetime?

Hopes for a female, feminist UN Secretary-General look increasingly unlikely, but there are creative ideas circulating for feminist system reforms that would spur progress from the bottom-up.

From 'Tory values' to Soviet throwbacks: Who can claim victory over the UK's Olympic success?

The UK's Olympic triumph can be measured in more than bronze, silver and gold.

Voices from the supply chain: An interview with Tatiana Rojas Orellana

What are labour conditions like for sub-contracted homeworkers in Chile? What can be done to improve them?

The sexual politics of meat

Wings, thighs and breasts: menu choices, or an individual who matters so little that her body parts can be consumed for someone else’s enjoyment?

Disinterring the enslaved

Archaeology has incredible powers of detection, but it suffers from emotional sterility. When we unearth the bones of the enslaved, we must feel their humanity through the science.

Adding flesh to the bones: re-imagining stories of the enslaved through the analysis of human skeletal remains

Scientists can't always see the humans stories beneath their data, but turn that data over to creative writers and a whole new world opens up.

(Very) close to the bone

A dire alchemy; but nonetheless, an alchemy: ‘Literary Archaeology: Exploring the Lived Environment of the Slave’ is about archaeologising memories of slavery.

Literary archaeology: exploring the lived environment of the slave

Archaeology and creative writing are both powerful tools for understanding the past lives of slaves. What would happen if we brought the disciplines together?

Rio’s Olympic ruins

This week, when the Games are over and the flow of tourists begins to dissipate, the city will awaken to consequences of nearly a decade of Olympics-centered city planning and politics.

Two visions of politics in Turkey: authoritarian and revolutionary

Politics is not a mere choice between white and black, but rather a creative way of people running their daily lives in all their colourful richness.

Whose morality? Johann Hari on the future of the ‘war on drugs’

“If your morality doesn’t look at the actual practical effects of what you’re doing, it’s not a moral debate, it’s just posturing.”