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The fault lines of Welsh politics have been redrawn

Plaid Cymru's leader argues that the UK parties are no longer pretending to represent Wales.

Police bring charges to your work place, bed bugs instead of torture and a hunger strike

The latest in freedom of assembly news from Russia, via OVD-Info. 

Heritage peacebuilding in Iraq

After years of funding being pumped to Iraq’s NGO sector based on US military needs, local civil society is rebuilding itself based on Iraqi priorities, not least of which is heritage.

Rebirth of a small dark stranger: The Black Dwarf, the British New Left, and 1968

The radical newspaper Black Dwarf burst onto the scene in 1968 with an iconic cover. It didn't last but its spirit lives on.

No monopoly on David Kelly’s death: Miles Goslett responds to David Aaronovitch’s criticism

The author of An Inconvenient Death asks why Aaronovitch has spent so much time on a book he believes worthless – and argues that Aaronovitch’s own writing on the subject does not stand up well to scrutiny.

Iran eyes Israel: the fire next time

How a military exchange gives Tehran insight into a sworn enemy.

For the frontrunners in the race to be mayor of Moldova's capital, city hall is no place for politics

32714373_1839874162718477_6334540156975972352_n.jpgThis Sunday, Chișinău votes in the first round of mayoral elections. But as oligarchic forces line up to take the city, one thing is clear: the public sphere has been cleared of real politics. 


“In two years of picketing, 15 miners of working age have died”: how Rostov miners are fighting against all odds for their wages – and respect

For two years, workers at a bankrupt mining company in southern Russia attempting to recoup their outstanding wages. All this in a town with 100% unemployment. RU

Owning the future: why we need new models of ownership

From the national to the firm level, new models of ownership can begin to reshape how our economy works and for whom.

Why misunderstanding identity politics undermines the goals of a just society

'Ideal citizens' should not be defined by a white patriarchal system.

Progressive politics must rediscover its moral purpose: a response to Michael Sandel

Michael Sandel is right: progressive politics has become too technocratic, writes Labour politician Jon Cruddas.

England is restless, change is coming

The Labour MP and senior shadow cabinet member calls for a constitutional convention to wrest power from the UK's unaccountable, neoliberal elite.

1968: a revolution too early to judge

Screen Shot 2018-05-18 at 10.06.28.pngThe events of 1968 have been stripped of their meaning and are now more a symbol of capitulation than revolution. Accepting this is the first step to making its legacy relevant again. RU


Yes, neoliberalism is a thing. Don't let economists tell you otherwise

On the list of ‘ten tell-tale signs you’re a neoliberal’, insisting that Neoliberalism Is Not A Thing must surely be number one.

The uncomfortable truth about post-Soviet comfort foods

What nourishes us also destroys us: this old saying holds true not only for food, but also politics.

Trade unions must stand, unequivocally, against anti-LGBTI discrimination at work

Unions have a key role to play in combating oppression and prejudice at work. This includes the ongoing fight for LGBTI equality.

Migrant workers fighting for freedom under Lebanon’s Kefala system

In Lebanon, a women-only group of migrant domestic workers have come together to fight for rights in the workplace. 

The bewildered progressive camp in Latin America and Europe

Something unites Latin American and European progressives: the struggle for survival and the need for broad, bold reforms to face global challenges. Español

Women, political power and gender equality law in Paraguay

Latin America has once again become void of female presidents and only 13.4% of local posts were occupied by women in 2016. Paraguay is no exception. Español

Paraguay’s indigenous peoples set their sights on Congress

Paraguay is in breach of domestic and international law – and lags behind its neighbours – in guaranteeing that the descendants of its pre-Columbian population have political representation. Español

What are the real barriers to freedom of assembly in Ukraine?

Ukrainian far right routinely disrupt public LGBT, feminist and left-wing events. The police aren’t prepared to oppose this surge of right-wing violence. RU

Book review: The Divide by Jason Hickel

A masterful guide to the reality of global inequality and its tangled roots.

Palestine: our history haunts our future

When Palestinians fight for their national rights, we are called “terrorists.” When we demonstrate in non-violent ways and are killed by the occupying forces, we are called “suicidal”.

The latest on OpenGlobalRights: connecting human rights with development and creating space for women rights defenders

Recently on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated the lack of action on connecting human rights and development and why a space for women human rights defenders is so important.

The latest on OpenGlobalRights: connecting human rights with development and creating space for women rights defenders

Recently on OpenGlobalRights, authors debated the lack of action on connecting human rights and development and why a space for women human rights defenders is so important.

Intersex rights activists challenge the roots of gender oppression – and we must support them

2017 brought promising developments for intersex rights. But with much work still to be done, feminist allies must do better at sharing resources and opportunities.

Lebanon: reflections on acts of refusal as antidote to post-election hangover

The refusal to be complicit in the state's self-preservation attempt is one of the few acts of resistance the working class could engage in without fear of vengeance by the state and its militias.

Lebanon’s elections: whose victory?

The political discontent of the country’s Sunnis is arguably the more important message from these elections. 

Behind the wire: pride and paranoia in one of Russia’s closed towns

Thousands of Russian citizens live in “closed towns”. I visited one of them, Lesnoye, to find out how people live today. RU