About Jo Tyabji

Jo Tybaji is a former editor of openSecurity. She completed an MSc in Violence, Conflict and Development in 2011 after periods working in Jenin and Mumbai, and is a multidisciplinary theatremaker and facilitator. Tweets @JoTyabji

 

Articles by Jo Tyabji

This week's guest editors

What would you do in a revolution?

Our reviewer went to the theatre to find out. Coney, a British theatre company, have framed a political experiment that places an audience at a crucial juncture in a nation's history: the success of a revolution. 

Whose Police?

Do the police serve the public, or are they a force of elite control? openSecurity's series opens up this question to citizens, analysts and activists around the world: where does security come from?

Back from the brink

Our openSecurity Editor reflects upon the extraordinary wealth of projects in the different sections of openDemocracy and thanks you for supporting the platform that ensures this growth

Aggrey Tisa Sabuni on austerity, corruption and the G7+

In this short film openSecurity talks to the Economics Advisor to the President of South Sudan. The agreement signed in Addis Ababa on the 27th of September means the oil will start flowing again, but what does this mean for South Sudan's future economy, and stability?

Bordering on Peace?

%22Bordering"As we move towards the draw-down of foreign forces in Afghanistan, openSecurity asks Afghan, Pakistani and international experts what needs to happen in the region to establish peace.

In Memoriam Juliano Mer Khamis

Juliano was a man standing his ground with his arms wide open. openDemocracy salutes his memory.

What is Kony2012?

Invisible Children's controversial campaign highlights the pressing question of international engagement in conflict, which openSecurity seeks to address through our debate 'Peacebuilding from a Southern Perspective'.

For or against the London riots? It's not that simple

People assume we must take a stand against rioters in the city. But the reality is more complex.

The call of conscience

Six journalists humble audiences with their collective commitment to a calling above high office, fame, lucre and security. Theatre review.
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