Sweets Way Resists: a community reclaims 'regeneration'

Having been evicted, and facing demolition, the London Sweets Way estate campaigners have taken democracy into their own hands. 

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Sweets Way Resists: a community reclaims 'regeneration'

Having been evicted, and facing demolition, the London Sweets Way estate campaigners have taken democracy into their own hands. 

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

This week's editor

Rosemary Belcher-2.jpg

Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Hungary's future: anti-immigration, anti-multiculturalism and anti-Roma?

Hungary’s prime minister believes Hungary cannot cope with immigration as it has no experience of ‘multiculturalism’ - but Hungary must face up to its past and its future as a diverse nation.

America's not so exceptional foreign policy

What can explain the myopia of US policy towards Sudan, when it knows Sudan has been facilitating ISIS in Libya, Syria and Iraq, and other terror groups?

Internationalisation: lessons from the women’s movement

The internationalisation debate can learn a lot from women’s movements in terms of opening spaces and opportunities for the voiceless. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on internationalising human rights organizationsFrançais

Breastfeeding is a human right, but does society truly enable women to breastfeed?

We know breast is best, but the challenges of juggling work and motherhood still throw up insurmountable barriers for women.

Wales and the changing Union

Further devolution to Wales is necessary but must be considered as part of a shift to a federal UK. A constitutional convention is the way to make this happen.

Who’s afraid of Jeremy Corbyn?

Labour's right is discovering fast that the past doesn't always stay there.

Fake morals and forced identities for young migrants in Europe

Young migrants live dynamic lives, yet dominant conceptions only allow them two identities: ‘victim of child trafficking’ or ‘illegal migrant’. These identities are forced and based on fake morals.

Intersectional pain: what I’ve learned from hospices and feminism of colour

Might pain and oppression be like love—a simple thunderbolt at times, and in other circumstances complex and slow burning over generations? 

In Japan: controversial US army base sparks outrage among local population

It is time activists across the globe extended solidarity to those protesting to prevent the construction of a new military base in Okinawa, who are haunted by their memories.

District 205: what the Chernihiv elections mean for Ukrainian politics

Ahead of municipal elections in October, Ukrainian politics gets dirty, hot and local in the northern town of Chernihiv.

 

Against Letpadaung: copper mining in Myanmar and the struggle for human rights

Contention around a mine in Myanmar – especially police treatment of activists campaigning to close it – has grown into a challenge for the development of rule of law in that country.

The art of self-reliance: stories from the refugees who stay

Ending the 'migration crisis' means creating decent and liveable lives. The ability to become self-reliant in even the most disadvantaged of circumstances is worthy of illumination and support.

Film review: 'Moskvitch, My Love' (dir. Aram Shahbazyan)

As a testament to Soviet nostalgia, the plot of Moskvitch, My Love is peculiar: a father's blind pursuit of a car he can neither afford nor drive, hoping for a son who will never return.

 

The rise of Brazil's 'free journalists'

By disrupting common-sense narratives, Brazil’s alternative media is raising issues on behalf of a silent majority. But remaining independent is a challenge.

Red alert for the BBC: a response to Enders Analysis

The debate about the BBC's forthcoming Charter Renewal is inherently political.

Dreams of return find new meaning on Zaatari's third anniversary

The permanence of the Zaatari Syrian refugee camp in Jordan is not accepted by all, but is a truth that is transforming lives and attitudes inside the informal city.

Sweets Way Resists: a community reclaims 'regeneration'

Having been evicted, and facing demolition, the London Sweets Way estate campaigners have taken democracy into their own hands. 

Paying for human rights violations: perceptions of the Colombian peace process

New research shows that providing context for human rights issues yields a broader range of responses to peace talks in Colombia. A contribution to openGlobalRights’ debate on Public Opinion and Human Rights. Español

Lebanon's refugees: resisting hegemony through culture

Seenaryo, a small independent theatre project that starts this week with Syrian and Palestinian children, seeks to foster an alternative political proposal in a situation where politics has emphatically failed. 

Iran’s nuclear deal reconsidered

Business delegations are flying in daily, making the most of this opportunity to establish themselves in Iran when Republican opposition to the deal is compromising US prospects at this critical early stage.

A hotchpotch of hope

The Labour Party machinery has long been prone to imagining outcomes within the narrowest, safest, and statistically verifiable ranges of business as usual. No wonder it’s panicking over the ‘Corbyn surge’.  

Prospects for Paris

Where should the climate movement be focussing its energy?

Exposing the false prophets of social transformation

A growing group of elite storytellers present radical solutions to global problems, but their ideas actually inhibit real change and strengthen the status quo.

Turkey’s bombing campaign against the Kurds will affect domestic parliamentary politics

Strikingly, during the hastily convened NATO meeting on Tuesday, secretary general Jens Stoltenberg refrained from directly mentioning Kurdish militant groups.

Humanitarian pauses in Yemen?

To re-emphasise, it is now estimated that 80% of the country’s population, over 21 million people, are in need of assistance, 1.3 million officially displaced.

BBC Green Paper: red alert on funding

The government has promised a nit-picking examination of all the BBC does, focusing on how to redefine its mission as well as reform and improve its services in the internet age.

13 things about the Labour leadership election

What does the Labour leadership election tell us about the state of British politics?

Salvaging the luminosity of a lost city

While the murder of hundreds of women in Juárez, Mexico, eventually attracted international attention – and with it, sensationalist headlines – photographer Itzel Aguilera’s work engages with the complex realities of her city.

The previous sole superpower

A little history of Great Britain excerpted from Galeano's late-in-life masterpiece, Mirrors: Stories of Almost Everyone.

Australia's cruel treatment of gay asylum-seekers

Australia continues to resettle homosexual refugees in homophobic Papua New Guinea. Gay men seeking asylum are both required yet unable to declare their sexuality for fear of persecution.