Our dirty little secrets

Peter Oborne’s revelations about the Telegraph and HSBC must be the beginning, not the end. Time for us all to come clean. I’ll start.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Our dirty little secrets

Peter Oborne’s revelations about the Telegraph and HSBC must be the beginning, not the end. Time for us all to come clean. I’ll start.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

This week's editor

Mary Fitzgerald

Mary Fitzgerald is Editor-in-Chief of openDemocracy.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

What’s gone wrong at HMRC?

'Managerialism' and cosy deals for big business have sucked the life from HMRC.

Antisemitism: the Middle East connection

On the connection between the upsurge in anti-Jewish sentiment and the Middle East conflict, the symptom, however deplorable, cannot be eradicated unless the principal causes are accurately identified and addressed.

What has gone wrong with reform in Ukraine?

International_Monetary_Fund_logo.svg_.png - Ssolbergj - Wiki.pngWhat has gone wrong with reform in Ukraine? There will be no IMF bailout without economic, political and social reform. So why do Ukrainian politicians drag their feet?

 


Albania: between a rock and a hard place

A recent spate of terrorist attacks in Albania has drawn virtually no international attention. But the consequences for the country could prove very serious indeed.

Grief and rage in India: making violence against women history?

There was uproar in India at the brutal gang rape of a 23 year old student on her way home from the cinema. Can we harness the international attention to this case to demand that the world's leaders commit themselves to a policy of zero tolerance of violence against women ?

Lives are being lost due to the heart-failure of marketised healthcare

MPs criticise the NHS for mental health failings this week - but the real problem is a competition-based focus on treatment rather than on care.

Georgian Muslims are strangers in their own country

Mosque in Chechla.jpgThe Republic of Georgia is an avowedly Christian country, but one out of every ten Georgian citizens is Muslim. 

 

UK immigration detention: the truth is out

Successive governments have ignored and dismissed complaints of suffering in UK immigration lock-ups. This week, in Parliament and on national television, fresh evidence has been heard.

Basic Income - basic respect

Basic Income is not a panacea for our woeful economic structure but it could certainly be a big step forward.

A mayor for all seasons?

The case for elected mayors has not been scrutinised sufficiently. The imposition of an elected mayor on Greater Manchester in particular risks undermining a delicate local political balance and is an act of elitism that might well backfire.

Voluntary services have succumbed to the privatisers

The Coalition is turning voluntary services into a cheap adjunct to privatisation - and far too many of those in voluntary services have been complicit.

Religion inspires in ways that international law does not

Using extreme examples to justify a purely secular human rights approach does a disservice to the many religious leaders doing progressive work. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate, religion and human rights.  العربية

Christian Zionism and Netanyahu's speech

The Israeli prime minister's purpose in Washington was to consolidate a vital and largely unrecognised political-religious alliance.

Modern slavery and the responsibilities of individual consumers

How can one be an ethical consumer in a globalised world? There are ways to mitigate our involvement in harmful global supply chains. Continuing with business as usual is unacceptable. 

The role of Assad in the rise of ISIS

Assad sees a proxy war as a better alternative to revolution—as do Arab Gulf countries—and has had a role in the rise of ISIS as a result.

The increasingly dangerous Israeli-Iranian front in Syria

Israel, Iran and their allies struggle over their interests in the fate of Syria, only adding to the instability in the region.

Our dirty little secrets

Peter Oborne’s revelations about the Telegraph and HSBC must be the beginning, not the end. Time for us all to come clean. I’ll start.

 

Terror arrives in Canada – but whose?

New anti-terror legislation will, according to its proponents, show terrorists that Canada will “never be intimidated.” But many Canadians themselves are more than a little intimidated by Bill C-51.

A tennis court oath for Europe

Europe has historically been a beacon of political experimentation. Has it now become structurally unfit for change? 

Indonesia regresses with the use of the death penalty

The prospect of execution of two Australians in Indonesia has caught international media attention, amid Australian protest. But these are part of a wider official spasm, in a country dominated by a ‘tough on crime’ narrative.

A question of sovereignty, justice and dignity: the people vs. the government on fracking in Algeria

The call for national mobilisation to oppose shale-gas exploitation in Algeria has been a success. But despite uninterrupted, growing protests and recent clashes, the Algerian government is pressing ahead with its shale-gas development plans.

Stand in solidarity with the struggle of the Greek people

I ask you to stand in solidarity with the just struggle of the Greek people, which is also the struggle of every citizen. Our people have been asked to go hungry to bail out debts created by a wealthy minority, not just in the country but internationally.

Internationalizing human rights NGOs is not a zero-sum game

Internationalizing human rights NGOs can benefit everyone; it’s not a zero sum game. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate, Internationalizing human rights NGOs: why, how, and at what cost? EspañolPortuguês

How European Union switchboard "demoicracy" works

The complexity of the changing nation-state under the duress of globalization is currently snagged on a simplistic drive to fast-forward the past, driven by the desire to stay local.

Is liberal Islam the answer?

If Islam needs to be seen through the eyes of the West in order to make sense of itself, how can it find the space for transformation on its own terms? 

Defending the rule of law against the UK government’s ‘slash and burn’

Chris Grayling, the Lord Chancellor, sworn to uphold the rule of law, hurtles down the road towards injustice for victims and defendants.

On the eve of Magna Carta’s 800th birthday, the British legal system is being ripped apart

A protest march against the Global Law Summit in London symbolises the relevance of the Magna Carta.

With corporate energy, we're stuck in the dark ages – let's switch to public ownership

Fuel poverty, constant price hikes, billions siphoned off to shareholders - the private energy market has failed in social terms. It's time for democratic control of energy.

Addressing forced labour in fragmented chains of production

What are the prospects for protecting workers in global supply chains? From UN principles to business and worker efforts, the range of initiatives is impressive – but many remain seriously flawed.