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Developing a global privacy regime in the age of mass surveillance

Europe leads in the field of the protection of privacy, with legislators addressing head-on the fundamental human rights challenges posed by executive action authorising mass surveillance.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Developing a global privacy regime in the age of mass surveillance

Europe leads in the field of the protection of privacy, with legislators addressing head-on the fundamental human rights challenges posed by executive action authorising mass surveillance.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

This week's editor

VM

Our guest editor, Valsamis Mitsilegas, director of the Criminal Justice Centre at Queen Mary University of London, introduces this week’s theme: Privacy and Surveillance in 2016.

A law beyond improvement

Defining “political activity” may seem like an academic exercise, but in Russia, it is an existential one.

 

San Salvador, not Caracas, was the world´s most murderous city in 2015

With almost 200 murders by 100.000 inhabitants, probably San Salvador´s murder rate exceeds the violent death rate in many of the world´s most vicious armed conflicts. Español Português

Venezuela, where polarising is so easy

Politicians negotiate only when they are forced to. In a broken nation, the only thing that can make Chavism accept to negotiate with a tough opposition is social pressure. Español

It's time to make the progressive case for staying in the EU

Britain's exit from the EU wouldn't liberate us from neoliberalism. Only joint struggles across borders can do that.

The antidote to neoliberalism in Eastern Europe? A Nordic model based on justice

Only a strong Left will be able to challenge the hegemonic Right in Central and Eastern Europe. Scandinavian Social Democracy offers the model for this challenge.

Developing a global privacy regime in the age of mass surveillance: four key principles

Europe leads in the field of the protection of privacy, with legislators, particularly courts, addressing head-on the fundamental human rights challenges posed by executive action authorising mass surveillance.

Introducing this week's theme: Privacy and surveillance in 2016

Civil society and the judiciary slowly but steadily brought gains to the protection of privacy after 9/11 that political responses to the Paris attacks and the refugee flows in 2015 and 2016 could just sweep aside. How does the relationship between surveillance and privacy currently stand?

The role of independent supervision in upholding privacy in the age of surveillance

This independence is even more important in an age where surveillance of individuals takes place on a mass scale, also benefiting from the potential in big data use.

The politics of punishing war crimes in Sri Lanka

Prioritising the punishment of war criminals in Sri Lanka over other measures to achieve reconciliation risks re-empowering the extremists and undermining the government’s genuine reform efforts.

The Palestinian Museum: imperilled objects and unsafe ideas

Palestine’s first National Museum opens in the West Bank in May - a “cultural mothership” drawing together pieces from a scattered and censored Palestinian history.

Black ‘archival’ pain: the blurring of Black pasts and a Black present

Incessant Black death across American ‘history’ reveals an open-ended archive of anti-Black state violence. Black people keep dying, and while past and present differ they simultaneously blur.

Beyond Paris: avoiding the trap of carbon metrics

Instead of changing our economic system to make it fit within the natural limits of the planet, we are redefining nature so that it fits within the economic system.

Window on the Middle East – February 7, 2016

Arab Awakening's columnists offer their perspective on what is happening on the ground in the Middle East.

To the BBC: don’t give airtime to the Taliban’s threats

Afghanis inside and outside the country have been angered by the BBC's interview with a Taliban spokesman directly after a suicide attack, in which he announced a new target.

To the shores of Tripoli

Great Britain and Italy are preparing to send ground troops to Libya, and American troops will likely be involved eventually – ironic developments given western intervention helped create a failed state in Libya in the first place.

Reflections from Arab Spring to refugee crisis in Europe: an argument for measure and the rule of law

As we must find ways to deal with economic migration in all its variations and the effects it has on society and economy, we must offer a rights-based welcome to those who qualify for asylum.

'Commons sense’: you either see it or you don’t

Some of the debates regarding agency, change and commoning that flowed through openDemocracy in 2015.

Azerbaijan’s 2016: sink or swim?

Protests have broken out in Azerbaijan against rising prices and falling living standards. Will the regime respond with anything but brute force?

The DiEM25 manifesto: Democracy in Europe Movement 2025

On 9 February, activists and arguers from across Europe gather in Berlin’s Volksbühne to launch DiEM25, a manifesto for a democratic European Union. openDemocracy's founder introduces the manifesto and explains why it is so vital for Europe today.

Donald Trump’s Russian cousins

Seeing The Donald as an isolated, ‘American’ phenomenon misses the point. 

The only plan B for Europe is rebuilding power for change

Europeans today are caught between a failing and undemocratic EU and equally failing and undemocratic national states. As Yanis Varoufakis prepares to launch a new movement for the democratisation of the EU, what’s the way out of the impasse?

5 ideas for hacking television

The creator of the Capital City Project lays out five principles that can be used to radically democratise television.

The Pipeline Strikes Back: the audacity of TransCanada's $15b suit against the U.S.

The political saga of the Keystone XL pipeline is like a real-life version of The Force Awakens. So why are we giving the Dark Side even more power?

Rethinking progressive NGO funding in Israel

Marked as traitors by the dominant Right for relying on foreign aid, Israeli liberal NGOs need a wider base of local donors. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate, Funding for Human Rights. Español

Exhausted? Of course I am.

Jeremy Hunt's strategy seems to be to wear the striking junior doctors down with cuts and propaganda. Will it work?

Championing human rights on the internet — Part Six: Summing up, too much or not enough?

The hard work is only just beginning, that is the drip, drip, drip of legal, political and intellectual labour to ensure that future generations on this planet get the media and communications they deserve.

What we’ve learned from fifty years of Saudi arms deals

Arms deals with Saudi Arabia say a lot about British political culture and foreign policy. And not in a good way.

Googling Google – what tax do they owe?

Exact figures are hard to pin down, intentionally so. But it appears George Osborne celebrated a tax contribution from Google that was less than a tenth of what should have been owed.

Yanis Varoufakis – the origins of the European and global economic crisis

In this video, acTVism Munich interviews Yanis Varoufakis, a world renowned economist who was a former member of the Greek parliament. Español