About Nathalie Tocci

Nathalie Tocci is deputy director of the Istituto Affari Internazionali in Rome.

Articles by Nathalie Tocci

This week's editor

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Adam Ramsay is co-editor of OurKingdom.

Libya, Syria and the “responsibility to protect”: a moment of inflection?

Since the Rwandan genocide and the wars in former Yugoslavia, the idea of a “responsibility to protect” vulnerable populations has acquired currency. The Libyan and Syrian crises have, however, seen the value of that currency recalibrated.

A u-turn in Turkish politics? Gezi Park in perspective

The simmering dissent and dissatisfaction unleashed at Gezi Park may not be enough to topple AKP's majority, but it threatens their political agenda as well as Turkey's democratic consolidation.

Europe's Middle East policies: a southern European twist

More coordination and strategy are needed in Europe's response to the sinister signs of stolen revolution. The political-strategic impulse has come from the south in the past. In the current economic crisis this should be more the case, not less.

Israel Palestine and the end of the two-state road

The peace process has become the number one enemy of a just and lasting solution.

Partners in need: Turkey, the European Union and the United States face the Arab Spring

The Arab spring has cast Turkey back into the western fold and away from alternative alliance patterns which seemed to be in the pipeline only a few years ago. Turkey won't act in Syria without its western partners. Meanwhile it is the very incompleteness of the Turkish model which is of such interest to its neighbours.

Nathalie Tocci

In 2011 a wave of democratic uprisings swept across the Arab world. Overcoming authoritarianism in one of the regions in which it had been most deeply entrenched, sparked a broader trend of political change in the world. Against all odds, the mobilization, with the aid of new technologies, of a largely unorganized civil society, in the past suppressed by authoritarianism made this possible. Yet in order to overcome the resilience of authoritarianism, another change was necessary: the desecuritization of Western foreign policies and a genuine Western commitment to democratic change. Much like in Eastern Europe, in the Middle East too, the US and EU began seeing a congruence between their strategic interests and normative rhetoric and thus developed well-thought out policies to spur (or at least not hinder) a democratic transformation of the region.

Pharaos / Wikimedia Commons

Rethinking Euro-Med policies in the light of the Arab Spring

The uprisings across North Africa and the Middle East have swept away decade-old dictators, but not their regimes. It will take far more than protests to ensure that they are throughly replaced. Here's how the EU can contribute to this process.

The sea change in Turkey's middle eastern policy

Turkey's foreign policy realignment is nowhere more pronounced than in the middle east. Previously absent, Turkey is now taking a leading role as a mediator and diplomatic force in the region.
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