Tony Benn really was ‘dangerous’ – to the establishment

Hilary Wainwright looks back at how Benn's frustrations in government spurred him to spend his life fighting for real democracy.

Tony Benn: a memoir

Stuart Weir was an early Bennite in the 1970s, fell out with his hero over Tony Benn’s campaign against the Labour Party leadership in the 1980s, and fell for him again when he became a popular sage after 2001.  Here he explains a complex relationship with Labour’s  most inspiring politician.

British citizen, British justice?

The British home secretary can deprive of their citizenship individuals whose presence in the UK she deems “not conducive to the public good”. For one man, this has become a Kafkaesque nightmare.

The future of care.data hangs in the balance

Government amendments on care.data have done little to reassure critics of the project - could an alternative amendment still buy some time to sort out the mess?

The Scottish Yes parties are the political winners from the referendum, and other lessons from last week's polls

Polls last week show how damaged the Better Together parties have been by their negative campaigns in Scotland, while an English UKIP Euro victory could boost the yes campaign.

The myth of the keyboard warrior: public participation and 38 Degrees

Preliminary findings after completing an ethnographic study of 38 Degrees suggest that this is a new type of organisation.

Citizenship deprivation: A new politics of nationalism?

As instances of citizenship deprivation rise in Britain year on year, we face a situation in which rather than the governed choosing their government, governments choose who they wish to govern. Agnes Woolley reports from an event at Middlesex University. 

States of imagination

People at once both despise and desire the state, and unpicking the paradoxes within attitudes to the state is essential to understanding how to move the state forward.

'Democratic Wealth': clearing a path to the future

The left must move from sharing spoils to shared control of the economy if they are to clear a path towards the future. We publish the afterword to the free e-book Democratic Wealth: Building a Citizens' Economy, published today by openDemocracy and Politics in Spires (universities of Oxford and Cambridge).

This market isn't working. UK government contractors exploit secrecy and weak competition

The government keeps taxpayers in the dark about billions paid to private contractors. A Parliamentary watchdog demands transparency and proof that competition exists.

Podcast: 2014 matters: debt and economic justice in Scotland and the world

What would Scottish independence mean for debt and economic justice? A panel came together in Aberdeen to discuss what the referendum means for Scotland's place in the world.

Do not be frightened, divided or demoralised, Tony Benn speaks to the Convention on Modern Liberty

In 2009 Tony Benn who died this morning made a video for the Convention on Modern Liberty, organised by openDemocracy and the Guardian. 

The big question: who ‘lost’ Scotland?

Whatever the result of the referendum, the idea of independence has been normalised, with even Better Together failing to make the case for the union. In a sense, Scotland has already been 'lost'. How has this happened?

Five thoughts on abolishing the Met

Whilst seemingly necessary and incisive, recent calls to 'abolish' London's Metropolitan police do not go nearly far enough.

Key NHS recommendation to "put patients first" rejected by government advisors

Government advisors today rejected the main recommendation of the QC who investigated failings of care at NHS hospitals - to re-write the NHS Constitution to make clear "patients come first". 

The violence of denial

Twenty-one years since the racist murder of Stephen Lawrence in South London, the criminal justice system maintains a reflex to deny racism. This amounts to the routine denial of justice.

'Fair pay' at universities, as long as you're full time

'Fractional Staff' appear to be severely underpaid and neither the universities nor even the unions seem at all interested. Worse, at times, they are actively hostile.

It's more complicated than you think

The digital world is more complicated than is understood by those holding our public institutions to account. In the somewhat arcane context of the Information and Record Management Society 2013 conference, Tony Ageh gave a sense of what is really at stake in the BBC's (and our) digital future.

Bad science, health risks, and the EU/US trade treaty

Whether on GM foods, pesticides, or pharmaceuticals, the EU/US trade treaty aims to strip away higher European regulations that protect public health but hinder corporate profits.

Austerity - update from the front line

The cumulative assault on economic security unleashed by this government have left many just a small mishap away from a cascade of misery. The reality for most claimants is very different to inflammatory media protrayals.

The EU/US trade deal is a threat to democracy, but even MEPs don't know what's going on

The Transatlantic trade deal will get rid of vital protections for people in Europe and allow corporations to sue parliaments for passing laws they don't like. Yet even the European Parliament barely knows what's being discussed behind closed doors.

Outsourcing cancer care - the biggest and most reckless NHS privatisation yet?

Outsourcing over a billion pounds of cancer and end-of-life services is reckless and shows just how threadbare government promises of ‘no NHS privatisation’ have become.

Privacy campaigners team up with leading public health professor to fix Hunt's 'complete nonsense' on care.data

Hunt's fix for the troubled 'care.data' project - debated by MPs today - is "complete nonsense" according to medConfidential. They have teamed up with public health professor Allyson Pollock to propose an alternative fix to the troubled care.data project.

How local is local justice now in England and Wales?

For centuries the relationship between a local magistracy and local populace has mattered. In five years the government has closed 166 courts. A barrister writes.

Universities must resist the military industrial complex

Health professionals call upon British universities to take an ethical approach to research funding.

Syndicate content