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About David Whyte

David Whyte is Professor of Socio-legal studies at the University of Liverpool. He contributes regularly to openDemocracy and has written for The Guardian, The Herald, The Age and Red Pepper.  His most recent book is The Violence of Austerity (Pluto, 2017, edited with Vickie Cooper).

Articles by David Whyte

This week's editor

“Phoebe

Phoebe Braithwaite is openDemocracy’s submissions editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

One law for the poor at Grenfell Tower

In austerity Britain, can justice and accountability be served for the victims of the Grenfell fire? Or are our laws already too much shaped to the needs of the business class?

Government austerity demands that we die within our means

Most people still don't fully understand the true scale of the human cost that government imposed austerity has unleashed.

Trump’s first one hundred days: corporate rights trump human rights

Trump's administration has disdain for all rights, except, of course, the rights of corporations. Over the past 100 days, he has taken this enduring tendency to new extremes.

Chilcot's blind spot: Iraq War report buries oil evidence, fails to address motive

When the UK invaded, Iraq had nearly a tenth of the world's oil reserves -- and government documents "explicitly state" oil was a consideration before the war. Why didn't Chilcot explore it further?

Where’s the corruption Mr Cameron? Look behind you!

Bribing might be rare in Britain, but that doesn't mean corruption isn't rife.

The missing link in the UK general election - corruption

However much we like to pretend that corruption is something that happens in other, lesser countries, the reality is that corruption is now rife in Britain. Why is no one talking about it?

Overburdened (once every forty years)

Yesterday's Queen's speech foregrounded a commitment to 'freeing up' Britain's businesses from health and safety legislation. But with Britain rapidly heading to the bottom of the OECD's national rankings for workplace safety, the effects of deregulation could be far from liberating. 

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