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About Laura Menin

Laura Menin is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Milano Bicocca. She has conducted research in Morocco since 2008, working on migration, love and intimacy, political violence during ‘the years of lead’, and ‘race’ and racism.

Articles by Laura Menin

This week’s front page editor

Claire Provost

Claire Provost is editor of 50.50 covering gender, sexuality and social justice.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Shadows of slavery: refractions of the past, challenges of the present

The past of slavery has many presents, and the present of exploitation many pasts. This collection brings together five years worth of research into how the legacies of 19th-century enslavement interact with contemporary bondage and exploitation.

Shadows of slavery part four: global capitalism and modern slavery

This fourth section of our collection Shadows of Slavery takes a step back from empirical case studies to explore neoliberal capitalism's reliance on an irregular, migratory workforce as a whole. 

Shadows of slavery part two: race, colour and origins in northwest Africa and the Middle East

This second section of our collection Shadows of Slavery explores how race, colour and origins shape social dynamics and political imaginations across northwest Africa and the Middle East.

“In the skin of a black”: Senegalese students and young professionals in Rabat

Even student and young professional Senegalese migrants have to navigate the legacies of slavery in Morocco as ‘Africans’.

Being 'black' in North Africa and the Middle East

Former slaves and their descendants in North Africa and the Middle East might be formally free, but the racial legacies of slavery continue to affect intimate, social and political forms of life.

The racialisation of marginality: sub-Saharan migrants stuck in Morocco

The everyday lives of sub-Saharan African migrants in Morocco are deeply affected by violent policies of border control. While existing laws create problems, the further burdens of history make things even worse.

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