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About Mishana Hosseinioun

Mishana Hosseinioun is an associate member of the Department of Politics and International Relations and St Antony’s College at Oxford University, where she earned her doctorate in 2014 at University College. She is president of global consultancy MH Group. Her forthcoming book is Before the Day Dawneth: The Paradox of Progress in the Middle East, published by Palgrave Macmillan.

Articles by Mishana Hosseinioun

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Sunny Hundal is openDemocracy’s social media editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Why the pussyhats are the death of women’s lib

The Women’s March is accused of a lack of self-awareness and worse, widespread co-option by systemic as well as ego-shielding psychological forces.

The original sin of US foreign policy in the Middle East

Trump’s policy attempts to apply a tourniquet to the perceived 'Muslim problem' that has been manufactured and now exacerbated by the west's wayward dealings in the Middle East.

A silver lining in the gilded age of Trump

The upsides of the United States presidential election, in seven points.

The middle east: a long-term view

The Arab world's problems of conflict and misrule are deeply rooted in the region's history. But its awakened peoples' demands for accountable government and a new social contract offer hope, say Foulath Hadid (1937-2012) & Mishana Hosseinioun.

A few days after this article was completed, its co-author - the respected Iraqi-born scholar and honorary fellow at St Antony's College Oxford, Foulath Hadid - died on 29 September 2012. The article is published here to honour his memory.

The middle-east path: towards awakening

The democratic mobilisations in Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen and elsewhere are lighting a beacon across the middle east and north Africa. The way ahead lies through peaceful protest against extremism and authoritarianism, say Foulath Hadid & Mishana Hosseinioun.

The middle east: the question of freedom

The much-recycled image of a region inhospitable to peace, human dignity and freedom has damaging effects in practice, say Foulath Hadid & Mishana Hosseinioun. 
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