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About Richard Sennett

Richard Sennett’s first book, The Uses of Disorder, looked at how personal identity takes form in the modern city. In the 1970s, Mr. Sennett founded, with Susan Sontag and Joseph Brodsky, The New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University. He served as an advisor to UNESCO and as president of the American Council on Work. In the mid 1990s Mr. Sennett began to divide his time between New York University and the London School of Economics. As the work world of modern capitalism began to alter quickly and radically, Mr. Sennett began a project charting its personal consequences for workers, a project which has carried him up to the present day. The first of these studies,The Corrosion of Character, [1998] is an ethnographic account of how middle-level employees make sense of the “new economy.” The second in the series, Respect in a World of Inequality, [2002} charts the effects of new ways of working on the welfare state; a third, The Culture of the New Capitalism, [2006] provided an over-view of change.Richard's website 

 

Articles by Richard Sennett

This week's editor

Constitutional conventions: best practice

This week’s theme: Failures of the Liberal State and responses on the ground

In thinking through the issues we were struck by how often failures happen at the level of the national state nowadays and remedies, responses, the making of solutions… all tend to happen at more local levels, from cities and villages to translocal networks and neighbourhoods.
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