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About Wajahat Qazi

Wajahat Qazi, a political analyst from Kashmir with an MSc in International Relations at the University of Aberdeen, is particularly interested in politics and religion, political economy, culture and identity.

Articles by Wajahat Qazi

This week’s front page editor

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Will diplomacy solve the Iran-US imbroglio?

Ayatollah Khamenei's recent declarations concerning the future of the Iranian nuclear dispute may sound belligerent, but they indeed reveal levers to be used for diplomacy. Acknowledging Iran’s role as a regional leader is a first step.

The case of the stolen children: notes on a Scandinavian state and society

The children of Indian citizens living in Norway may have been taken on the pretext of the rights of the child, but Norway’s handling of the issue reveals the dark side of paternalism as a fig-leaf for xenophobia

What lies beneath the US-Iran standoff?

The current situation reflects the bizarre politics of the region and the fluid nature of international politics, argues Wajahat Qazi

Arab Spring: political islam or democracy?

One-year on, the Arab revolutions continue to circle around the issue of whether Islam is compatible with democracy. This article asks the long-feared question: Is the Arab Spring, articulated in the democratic idiom of freedom, liberty and justice, doomed to a takeover by the Islamists?

Has India reached the limits to economic reforms?

The government of India’s decision to roll back legislation that would allow FDI in multi-brand retail is ill-advised. However, in the grand scheme of things it is but a hiatus that at worst merely derails the momentum of reforms.

Kashmir: from national to human security

It is about time that saner heads in the Indian national security establishment mull over the implications of the continuation of the Armed Forces Special Powers Act (AFSPA) in Kashmir, says Wajahat Qazi

Pakistan US relations: the straw that broke the camel’s back?

It behoves both the United States and Pakistan to reappraise the situation, take stock and course correct. World peace, or at the least regional peace, may depend on it.

Bin Ladenism: its prospects

The death of Bin Laden, hailed as a victory by the United States and the western world, rued and regretted in some parts of the Muslim world ends a chapter in world politics.

Musing on the death of western multiculturalism

Western countries should revise their model of citizenship by rendering it into an active model, allowing the impetus for integration to come from demonstrating the tremendous soft power of liberal societies.
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