only search openDemocracy.net

About Kalypso Nicolaïdis

Kalypso Nicolaïdis is professor in international relations, and Director of the Center for International Studies at Oxford University as well as Chair of South European Studies at Oxford. Her last publications include: Echoes of Empire: Memory, Identity and Colonial Legacies, edited with Berny Sebe and Gabi Maas, IB Tauris, 2015; European Stories: Intellectual Debates on Europe in National Contexts, edited with Justine Lacroix, OUP, 2010 and Mediterranean Frontiers: Borders, Memory and Conflict in a Transnational Era, edited with Dimitar Bechev, I.B. Tauris, 2009.

Articles by Kalypso Nicolaïdis

This week's editor

Rosemary Belcher-2.jpg

Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Walking the grid of freedom

Venice may be sinking, Istanbul spinning, Beijing rising, Rio dancing, London globalising, Paris greying, but New York who grew beautiful by mistake is aging with chaotic grace.

A letter to my British friends: for Europe’s sake, please stay

The EU might be dysfunctional but it is still Britain’s home. Help us fix it from the inside.

Charlie Hebdo numero 1178: all is forgiven?

Mutual recognition between people and cultures moves in mysterious ways, the cartoon its Rorschach test. 

Turkey’s protests: the limits of hubris

Turkey is in turmoil. Hundreds of thousands are protesting on the country’s main squares against a whole set of grievances. They are facing extreme police brutality. But the AKP dream of unfettered economic growth and mounting regional power within a neo-Ottoman sphere of influence is over. 

EU 2.0? Towards sustainable integration

The European Union needs to undergo a revolution founded on “pragmatic wishful thinking” that will make it more modern, global, networked, and effective. But for “EU 2.0” to become possible, says Kalypso Nicolaïdis, there must be a new governing idea for the European project: sustainable integration.

Project Europe 2030: reflection and revival

“Project Europe 2030”, a report undertaken by the Reflection Group to explore the European Union’s choices over the next two decades, was published on 9 May 2010 and presented to the European Council. In the first of a three-part series, Kalypso Nicolaïdis - one of the group’s twelve members and a regular openDemocracy contributor - outlines the report’s scope and aims.

Why the European Union strengthens Turkish secularism

Many Turkish secularists are becoming ever more critical of the European Union. They should think again, say a group of prominent intellectuals led by Hakan Altinay & Kalypso Nicolaïdis: for there are seven ways in which Europe can still be an agent of Turkey's secularist progress.

Europe, Africa and EPAs: opportunity or car-crash?

A rethink of the agreements that govern European-African trade would benefit both sides, say Paul Collier & Kalypso Nicolaïdis

The “European Union presidency”: a practical compromise

A late improvement to the European Union's reform treaty would have benefited the EU's institutions, its member-states and its citizens, argue Simone Bunse & Kalypso Nicolaïdis.

A real compromise on the EU presidency, conclusion

Does the EU need a Caesar?

The design of the future EU Council Presidency is deemed to create confusion among European citizens. The forthcoming IGC can still do better without reopening the fundamentals of the new blueprint. Clarifying the notion of "EU presidency" could help safeguard the EU's founding principle of shared leadership, argue Director of the European Studies Centre at St Antony's College Oxford Kalypso Nicolaïdis, and Simone Bunse, Assistant Professor of Politics at the INCAE Business School. (See also Part 1, Part 2, Part 3)

"Rotation is dead: Long live rotation!"

We believe that the IGC can still do better without reopening the fundamentals of this new blueprint. We need to address both demands for more permanence and fears of concentration of power. We can - by presenting or labelling the current arrangements for rotation as the rotating presidency of the EU, a presidency for the EU as a whole that would put rotation not only below but also symbolically above the European Council. At the same time, as envisaged in the current Reform Treaty, the European Council would get its permanent chair and the EU would acquire its High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. Hence, the essentials of the existing bargain are left untouched.

A real compromise on the EU presidency, part 2

Does the EU need a Caesar?

The design of the future EU Council Presidency is deemed to create confusion among European citizens. The forthcoming IGC can still do better without reopening the fundamentals of the new blueprint. Clarifying the notion of "EU presidency" could help safeguard the EU's founding principle of shared leadership, argue Director of the European Studies Centre at St Antony's College Oxford Kalypso Nicolaïdis, and Simone Bunse, Assistant Professor of Politics at the INCAE Business School. (See also Part 1)

Before presenting a simple remedy to this problem, it is worth recalling how it came about - and why the reform treaty does well to retain a rotating presidency for the many configurations of the councils of ministers.

A real compromise on the EU presidency, part 1

Does the EU need a Caesar?

The design of the future EU Council Presidency is deemed to create confusion among European citizens. The forthcoming IGC can still do better without reopening the fundamentals of the new blueprint. Clarifying the notion of "EU presidency" could help safeguard the EU's founding principle of shared leadership, argue Director of the European Studies Centre at St Antony's College Oxford Kalypso Nicolaïdis, and Simone Bunse, Assistant Professor of Politics at the INCAE Business School.

Two years after the rejection of the Constitutional Treaty by the French and Dutch referenda, there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Everything looks set for a deal on the new ‘reform treaty' by the October 18-19 Summit - in time for the ratification process to conclude ahead of the 2009 EP elections. The draft text to be agreed by the IGC is already available on the web and no-one seems to want to reopen any of its clauses, for risk of seeing the whole enterprise unravel. Even Poland has fallen in line on the Council's new voting system.

Europe at fifty: towards a new single act

A fractious period in the European Union’s internal politics could end if a new, modest but realistic strategic objective could be agreed, argue Philippe Herzog & Kalypso Nicolaidis.

Europe and beyond: struggles for recognition

The services directive and the Mohammed cartoon affair each demonstrate the need for a spirit of managed mutual recognition in Europe and beyond, argues Kalypso Nicolaïdis.

"We the peoples of Europe..."

Why did the Brussels summit on the European Constitution collapse? Perhaps because it deserved to. The EU must move from government by elites who seek to manage, to one grounded on citizens’ support.

Who did it? Who is responsible for the failure of European heads of states and governments to agree to a proposed new Constitution at their inter-governmental conference (IGC) in Brussels on 12-13 December?

There is a temptingly easy answer.

Syndicate content