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About L K Sharma

L K Sharma has followed no profession other than journalism for more than four decades, covering criminals and prime ministers. Was the European Correspondent of The Times of India based in London for a decade. Reported for five years from Washington as the Foreign Editor of the Deccan Herald. Edited three volumes on innovations in India. He has completed a work of creative nonfiction on V. S. Naipaul  His two e-books The Twain and A Parliamentary Affair form part of The Englandia Quartet.

Articles by L K Sharma

This week’s front page editor

Claire Provost

Claire Provost is editor of 50.50 covering gender, sexuality and social justice.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Elections diminish democracy in India

It was not always like that. Those tracking the progress of democracy in India should interview political activists above 90 years of age.

#MeToo movement rumbles on in India

Working up public outrage is an art and not all political parties are able to create mass hysteria.

#MeToo in a country that worships God as woman

During a festival celebrating the Goddess who kills a demon menacing Gods, scores of educated Indian women have unmasked their tormentors and sparked a mini-revolution.

Imran thanks Modi, and eyes joint Nobel Peace Prize

“India led by you would never think of undoing the Partition. Your party depends on Pakistan for its existence.” A secret letter accessed by the author.

Good Bye, Gandhi!

Writing on Gandhi in an India stricken by faux patriotism and jingoism causes gloom. A poem in Indian English provides an antidote.

Hyper-extremism tends to follow extremism

The Hindutva storm-troopers would feel let down, having been trained to abuse the secular Hindus, liberals, intellectuals, dissenting writers and a minority community.

Naipaul: an abandoned child looks and relooks at the motherland

Naipaul always felt that his books would stand the test of time. But which of his books on India, after multiple visits to his ancestral land, will stand that test?

Democracy eats its parents!

"If a principled yet powerful leader does emerge, he can only come from yesterday’s disempowered classes."

Subverting democracy without vote-rigging

Recent events in some prominent democratic nations have highlighted the internal threats that are hard to see and even harder to counter. A military dictator can be identified.

God votes in India, abstains in Britain, Part II

Unlike in India, British democracy, distorted by Mammon, is spared by God.

God votes in India, abstains in Britain. Part 1

Once Britain moved beyond religious nationalism, religion itself became a spent force, though not one prevented from speaking truth to power. Contrast India.

When Harry weds Meghan

Some bashed the monarchy and called the royal wedding a non-event. A minority voice claimed that the wedding was no big deal. (He was wrong).

Silence and din define Indian journalism

Ravish Kumar has recorded the Republic of Fear for posterity. These are the heroes of World Press Freedom Day.

The Queen rules the Commonwealth!

Many epithets have been used to run down the Commonwealth. The London summit may even be called the Commonwealth Games II…

The Commonwealth gets extra attention

Some 5,000 participants from government, business and civil society have arrived for the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM). The central theme of the deliberations is ‘Towards a Common Future’.

Cut-throat competition distorts democracy in India

So, what is the right measure of passion in politics that is good for the health of democracy? There has to be a right balance.

Remotely-controlled weapons hit democracy: killing from a distance

In the new information order, manipulated voters have come to outnumber threatened voters and bribed voters. The larger picture.

Statues are not safe in India

One cynic says that after every election, the new Government can spend its first year in uninstalling the statutes erected by the previous regime.

When faith fills ballot boxes

Ironically, the message of scientific temper, modernity, secularism resonated more in India when the rate of literacy was low. Distinctions between science and mythology and mythology and history keep eroding.

Of sacred cows and profane men

The cow has highlighted religious, regional, social and cultural differences. Some humans have been killed in the name of the cow.

Reimagining India in Britain

The Great India Show covers even science in India. It has been blessed by the two governments. Britain is out on a mission to rediscover India.   

Conversion of a Hindu priest in India

If religious passions are inflamed, it is election time. This is what every regular visitor to India has come to know.

Modi marches on amid hope and fear

Modi can get away with anything now. His public adores muscular Hinduism, majoritarianism, politicised nationalism and a neo-liberal development model which gives subsidized big corporates big incentives.

Trump & Modi hover over Jaipur Literature Festival

Since both Trump and Modi excite hearts rather than minds, they ought to be invited to the next Jaipur Literature Festival.

Another arrested revolution in the East

Donald Trump ought to thank Modi for showing the way to electoral success. More and more leaders are convinced that perpetual confrontation pays in politics.

A flashpoint in South Asia?

“You question India’s territorial integrity, I will question Pakistan’s. You interfere in our internal affairs, we will interfere in yours.”

Trump diminishes democracy

How the Americans vote in their presidential election should be only their business. But it cannot be so.

India falters in battle of ideas with Pakistan

The religious extremists in Pakistan love any outbreak of sectarian violence in India because that makes their task easier.

Nationalism fever strikes India

The debate in India about 'nationalism' or 'anti-nationalism' is essentially between the pro & anti-Modi forces. But the issues come and go...

The hugging Prime Minister fails Zuckerberg

India, according to the Facebook Director, would have been better off had it remained under British rule. Coming from an American, it was a bit ironical.

Long live Empire!

Indians don’t care whether the statue of Queen Victoria stays put or is consigned to a junkyard. Many agree with Ferguson that the British Empire had some plus points.

Writers get bouquets, not brickbats

The business model of the Jaipur Literature Festival will be studied as a case study, the two writer-directors having successfully yoked together the rival Hindu Goddesses of wealth and wisdom. 

India: roller-coastering democracy

The nation is sharply divided between those protesting against growing intolerance and those attacking them for seeing what does not exist and asking them to migrate to Pakistan.

Modi at Wembley – the empire strikes back

Modi and Cameron put on a great show, but to what end?

How not to counter Modimania

It has been India’s strength not to think in black-and-white terms. “If you are not with us, you are against us” is not what is normally heard in India. 

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