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How I am voting

4 May 2005
People often asked me what openDemocracy actually stands for. I have always said (sounding ever more precious by the second) that it stands for openness, thinking hard, dialogue and, of course, democracy - but, as an organisation, doesn't support any political party or movement. But, I add, this does not mean that people who work at or with openDemocracy are , as citizens - or in the UK case, subjects - political eunuchs. This remains the case. openDemocracy does not endorse or support any political campaign or party. But those of us who work for it or with it may do so as individuals. I think we should be up front about about this. Make up your own mind but here's my view. I will be voting Liberal Democrat in the national election and Green in the local elections. Here's why. I support many Labour policies and actions, including their increased spending on science, health, education and overseas aid, but strongly disagree with or abhor others, including the aborted constitutional reforms that have concentrated even more power in the executive. And lying about the basis on which the country went to war is not acceptable - or at least was not in the case of the recent war in Iraq. I would like to see a future Labour government (the most likely outcome looks to be a reduced Labour majority of less than 100) held more accountable. I live in what is described as a marginal constituency: Oxford East. In the last election, Labour beat the Liberal Democrats by 19,681 to 9,337 - a majority of 10,344 (the Conservatives polled 7,446, all others combined 3,384). I could not vote Conservative in any forseeable circumstance (in this, I largely agree with an editorial by The Economist magazine, including on student fees and migration). I support the longer term growth of the Green Party along the strategy outlined by James Humphreys in his article for openDemocracy, and for this reason I will support them in the local elections. I know and like some Green candidates and sitting councillors, although I quite strongly disagree with some of their policies. I don't know or trust the local LibDems, although I do think their party has a handful of excellent MPs in the House. Because the LibDems are the only party with even a small chance of beating Labour I will vote for them. So Jacob Sanders, the Green candidate for Westminster, gets my support but not my vote. Steve Goddard, the LibDem, gets my vote but not my support. And Andrew Smith, the assiduous Labour MP whose speeches are like watching paint dry, gets the seat (probably).

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Chair: Mary Fitzgerald Editor-in-chief of openDemocracy

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