Kristine Goulding

Kristine Goulding is a research analyst at the UN Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD) working on Gender and Development. A former Fulbright scholar, she writes on gender-egalitarian policy changes, women's political participation and gender politics in North Africa and the Middle East.

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    Published in: 50.50
    Tunisia: Arab Spring, Islamist Summer
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    Written by: Kristine Goulding All articles by Kristine Goulding

    Tunisia has voted in the first open and fair election in the region. In part two of a three part article Kristine Goulding warns against framing Islamism in direct opposition to women's rights. The Arab Spring redefined the roles of both women and the Islamist al-Nahda, and the two cannot be seen as mutually exclusive

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    Published in: 50.50
    Tunisia: Feminist Fall?
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    Written by: Kristine Goulding All articles by Kristine Goulding

    Nine months after the overthrow of the former president, Tunisia has voted in the first open and fair election in the region. In the final part of a three part article Kristine Goulding argues that if a 'feminist fall' does not come to fruition, it will be because the citizens of Tunisia have shown democratically that feminism is not consummate on their agenda.

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    Published in: 50.50
    Tunisia: Women's winter of discontent
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    Written by: Kristine Goulding All articles by Kristine Goulding

    Nine months after the overthrow of the former president, Tunisia has voted in the first open and fair election in the region. In part one of a three part article Kristine Goulding asks: Is a Tunisian feminist fall, driven by local, national and international support, possible? Or will countervailing forces of politics, social pressure and religion prevail?

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    Published in: 50.50
    Tunisia: will democracy be good for women's rights?
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    Written by: Kristine Goulding All articles by Kristine Goulding

    History reveals an abundance of democratic paradoxes: cases in which progress on women’s rights regressed in the aftermath of revolution. Coming to terms with the battle between secularism and Islam – a dispute long silenced by Ben Ali’s rabidly secular policies – will require a redefinition of women’s rights. Are the secularists or Islamists ready for that step?

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