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About Philippe Marlière

Philippe Marlière is a Professor in French and European Politics at University College London (UK). He is a regular contributor to Le Monde, Le Monde diplomatique and The Guardian and tweets @PhMarliere.

Articles by Philippe Marlière

This week's editor

Constitutional conventions: best practice

French tragedy or farce - 2: A ‘republican front’ against Marine Le Pen?

The truth is that the former economy minister has no solid constituency backing him, and no real popularity.

French tragedy or farce: the 2017 presidential election – 1

Why Jean-Luc Mélenchon’s late surge? Are we about to see de Gaulle's fifth republic replaced by a sixth? And in 2017, what does a Citizens' Revolution look like?

The strange death of social democracy in Europe

What happened to social democratic parties in Europe? And what is coming to take their place?

Charlie Hebdo and the dawn of French McCarthyism

After a short-lived phase of national unity, critics have stressed that France is now more intolerant. Furthermore, since last January, free speech has regularly been under attack by a peculiar brand of "French McCarthyism".

Yanis Varoufakis, James Dean of the European left

According to the distinction made by Max Weber, Varoufakis answers to his convictions while Tsipras holds the future of Greece in his hands for Greece and Europe.

Charlie Hebdo: justice for all

I am for leaving believers in peace. Believers are individuals like any other, neither superior, nor inferior to atheists or agnostics. 

Populism and the enchanted world of ‘moderate politics’

Why do some political scientists seem oblivious to the fact that the ‘moderates’ who let down their electorates are mainly responsible for their own demise? A reply to Catherine Fieschi’s Who’s afraid of the populist wolf?

The demophobes and the great fear of populism

One might note that the less represented the ‘popular’ classes are in political parties, in parliament or in government, the more ‘populism’ is branded a threat.

Alexis Tsipras - between radicalism and realism

According to Tsipras, one choice is available to Europe today: either persist in the neoliberal impasse, or choose democracy.

“Syriza is the expression of a new radicalism on the left”: excerpt of an interview with Stathis Kouvélakis in late May

The rise of Syriza is a profound transformation for a radical left that is still traumatized by the defeat of Greek communism in the last century. This radical left now wants to break with its position of being eternally in the minority - a force dedicated to nothing but “resistance”. 

4 May: I was expecting to bump into Doris Lessing

As the election campaign ends, the last instalment of Marlière Across La Manche foresees interesting but uncertain times for France and Europe.

Marlière across La Manche: a diary of the 2012 French presidential election

Charles de Gaulle once said that the French presidential election was “an encounter between the nation and a man” (sic). Big Charles may have been right in suggesting that this election is about personality politics. There is much more to it though. Through this election diary, I invite you to follow my journey into this historic European election: analysis of results, as well as personal thoughts on candidates, debates, the media, opinion polls and the “mood” of French voters.

3rd May: Nicolas Montana vs. François Mitterrand

In today’s instalment of Marlière Across La Manche, our author witnesses a cornered rabbit and celebrates a man of 'quiet strength'.

2 May: May Day gate-crashing

Workers' rights on the campaign trail: today’s instalment of Marlière Across La Manche on the (mis)appropriation of May Day

1 May: For Hollande, cracking jokes is no laughing matter

In today’s instalment of Marlière Across La MancheCity analysts are crying wolf at the “Mr.Normal” of French politics. How droll

30 April: Which infamy, Mr.President?

Sorting out the men from the boys. Today’s instalment of Marlière Across La Manche

29 April: Muammar Gaddafi’s ghost bites back

Today’s instalment of Marlière Across La Manche continues with a short survey of media coverage of the French elections from good to terrible, with a few self-publicists thrown into the mix.

28 April: Which Europe?

Europe has featured in most candidates’ speeches and proposals. But which one? Today’s instalment of Marlière Across La Manche 

 

26 April: Mass rallies are back

Despite previous predictions of voter apathy and dull campaigns, we are witnessing a real presidential race — with powerful oratory and a high turnout at rallies for France in 2012. Today’s instalment of Marlière Across La Manche

25 April: Marshall Pétain puts in a cameo appearance

The rapprochement of the traditional right with its extreme is progressing fast, with the “de-demonisation” of the Front Nationale, accompanied by a raid on past techniques of the far right, going back at least as far as Marshall Pétain. See Marlière across La Manche

24 April: What will Marine Le Pen’s voters do?

The president has confessed that if he had not matched Le Pen’s hard-right rhetoric, he would by now find himself in an even more desperate position. But could the strategy of his advisor, Patrick Buisson, be arithmetically flawed? Our diarist continues his coverage in Marlière Across La Manche.

 

23 April: Nicolas Sarkozy fights for his political life

Charles de Gaulle once said that the French presidential election was “an encounter between the nation and a man” (sic). Big Charles may have been right in suggesting that this election is about personality politics. There is much more to it though. In Marlière across La Manche I invite you to follow my journey into this historic European election: analysis of results, as well as personal thoughts on candidates, debates, the media, opinion polls and the “mood” of French voters.

The 2012 Parti Socialiste primary: a beauty contest?

More people have had a say in the Socialist candidate’s selection process thanks to the ‘open primary’ experiment. But this is not at all the same thing as the ‘democratisation’ of the decision-making process. In fact the kind of political contestation which can build new debates, and involve and engage new types of citizens, was systematically removed from the process.

Philippe Marlière

 

Capitalism as an economic system of production, as well as an ideology that produced social norms and shaped behaviours, was declared bankrupt ten years ago. Only parts of China remain capitalist today. Between 2030 and 2040, all civil societies carried out peaceful revolutions against the old regime. Karl Marx had long ago predicted that the collapse of capitalism was inevitable because it had within itself the flaws that would destroy itself.  He was right although his prophecy took more time to materialise that he initially reckoned.  At stake was the reclaiming of citizens’ democracy – only formal and flawed under capitalist regimes – and the defence of life on earth imperilled by the relentless aggressions against humankind, living species and the environment.  The large majority of countries which have opted out of their capitalist chains, have rapidly established egalitarian and safe societies. International relations have largely become peaceful: there are no more imperialist wars and, therefore, terrorist attacks against the ‘West’ have ceased altogether.

More importantly, the egalitarian ethos of the new post-capitalist societies has put an end to the millenarian male domination over our societies. All workers now receive an income according to their actual merit and work. Consequently, traditionally male dominated activities (politics, business) are now largely being managed by more dynamic and more competent female workers. New strictly enforced laws about pay equality in the workplace have seen a growing number of men adopt a more relaxed attitude to work. For the first time in modern history, there are more stay at home fathers than mothers.

 

Stay home fathers having a BBQ

The decline of Europe's social democratic parties

On previous occasions of decline, social democracy has bounced back in Europe, but this time the record includes ideological and cultural meltdown. What would it take to survive the current crisis?
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