only search openDemocracy.net

About Penelope Kyritsis

Penelope Kyritsis is an assistant managing editor for Beyond Trafficking and Slavery and a freelance researcher on global labour issues. She co-authored ‘Confronting root causes: forced labour in global supply chains' and co-edited ‘Domestic workers speak: a global fight for rights and recognition'.  Follow Penelope on Twitter @_penelopeCK.

Articles by Penelope Kyritsis

This week’s front page editor

Claire Provost

Claire Provost is editor of 50.50 covering gender, sexuality and social justice.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

No loopholes, no exceptions

Domestic workers and farmworker women join forces to end sexual violence in their industries, leaving no one behind.

Why boycott Wendy’s? Ask women farmworkers.

The time is up for corporate leaders who turn a blind eye to gender-based violence and labour abuses in their supply chain. 

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: where do we go from here?

A lot of work remains to be done in order to end forced labour. Thankfully, organisers and advocates around the globe are pioneering promising solutions. It's time to follow their lead.

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: governance gaps

Governance gaps help employers push problems of forced labour even deeper into the shadows of supply chains.

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: outsourcing

Outsourcing allows big brands to distance themselves from big human rights abuses, including forced labour.

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: irresponsible sourcing practices

Forced labour is illegal and its risks are widely documented. Yet so many companies continue to use irresponsible sourcing practices – established triggers of forced labour. Why is this the case?

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: concentrated corporate power and ownership

Multinational corporations are becoming increasingly powerful – and this has serious implications for workers at the bottom of supply chains. 

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: restrictive mobility regimes

Border restrictions are often justified as measures to protect migrants from "trafficking", but borders actually increase migrants' vulnerability to forced labour and labour exploitation. 

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: limited labour protection

Freedom from forced labour depends on workers' ability to access labour protections. Why are so many them unable to do so?

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: identity and discrimination

Social discrimination based on race, caste, gender and other factors is a crucial component of the forced labour equation. 

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: poverty

Poverty isn’t just about lacking money –  it interacts with the demands of the market society to shape people’s vulnerability to forced labour.

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: globalisation and the rise of supply chains

Too often, globalisation is viewed as inevitable. How does this shape our understanding of the link between globalisation and forced labour?

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: the meaning of freedom

Where does the force in 'forced labour' come from? Those who believe that poverty and globalisation are the root causes of forced labour need a broader understanding of freedom and coercion.

Confronting root causes: forced labour in global supply chains

Forced labour is all around us, but not how you think. 'Confronting root causes' pulls together research from across the world to explain where it comes from and what we can do about it.

The protection lotto against gender-based violence in the US

Women in the United States receive vastly different levels of protection against gender-based violence in the work place depending on where and who they are. 

Violencia de género en el sector agrícola centroamericano

Las trabajadoras del sector agrícola en Centroamérica buscan combatir la discriminación de género a través de los convenios internacionales. English

Gender-based violence in the Central American agricultural industry

Women workers in the agricultural sector to uphold international standards and combat gender-based violence and discrimination in Central America’s agricultural sector. Español

Surviving violence in a Bangladeshi garment factory

Laws against gender-based violence at work exist in Bangladesh, but their protective power is as thin as the paper they're printed on.

Trabajadores migrantes crean union independiente para combatir la discriminacion de género y proteger sus derechos laborales

El grupo Familias Unidas por las Justicia toma acción en el estado de Washington para defender los derechos de las trabajadoras. English

Why we formed an independent farm workers union

The Familias Unidas por las Justicia migrant workers’ union in Washington state is taking action to defend the rights of women workers. Español

Gender-based violence at work: when the boss is the threat

Treating gender-based violence as a type of discrimination leaves many women trapped under violent bosses with nowhere to turn.

Interview: the struggle for migrant workers' rights

How can migrant workers protect their rights when they are often excluded from collective action?

The fight for decent work: a need for new models

Workers usually organise within their sector, if at all. But in today’s economy, could a community-wide approach could be more effective?

The David and Goliath struggle in global supply chains

The only way to really bargain with brands is to bargain globally.

Interview: in pursuit of decent work

Why do states make it so easy for corporations to exploit their populations?

National trade unions in a globalised world

Transnational bargaining, corporate accountability, and a full revamp of the global labour architecture – these are the challenges facing unions as they seek to address exploitation in global supply chains.

An undisrupted status quo? Voices from the supply chain revisited

Not much has changed since the ILO began to discuss decent work in supply chains 12 months ago.

Justice for domestic workers: it’s about rights, not protection

Britain’s drive to limit migration has removed many of the rights migrant domestic workers once had in the UK. Could collective organising help bring them back?

“You won’t pacify us”

Domestic workers flooded the office of Donald Trump’s nomination for the Office of Management and Budget with baby pacifiers this week.

The all-purpose cop-out of ‘anti-competitiveness’

Companies, especially since the crisis, make the case that advances in workers’ rights lessen the competitiveness of an economy. Should we believe them?

The human rights of labourers

Companies haven’t earned our trust when it comes to protecting workers’ rights, so why do states give them the benefit of doubt?

Getting the state to switch sides in the fight for workers' rights

Workers can beat big business when they come together, but the fight would certainly be easier if the state were generally on their side.

Special rapporteur to UN: bring labour rights and human rights together

The state is the only force large enough to defend workers’ rights from big business, so why is it so often batting for the wrong team?

Syndicate content