Why is the Corbyn campaign “gesture politics”?

And why is 'win at all costs' politics preferable?

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Why is the Corbyn campaign “gesture politics”?

And why is 'win at all costs' politics preferable?

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Apologists for terror or defenders of human rights? The Cage controversy in context

The attack on Cage is part of the more general assault on politically active Muslims and an attempt to push Muslim organisations to the margins of public life.

Fair Game? The BBC and the future of sport on free-to-air television

Providing ‘free’ access to sport is one of the BBC’s vital public roles. If this function is to be preserved in a post-broadcast age it must be reinforced by state legislation.  

Review - 'Benign Violence: Education in and beyond the Age of Reason'

Ansgar Allen's book traces our obsession with assessment, standards and measurement in modern education. It is both an unsettling history and a provocative call for resistance.

Architects for Social Housing: fighting a political 'crisis'

London’s housing ‘crisis’ is not a result of faceless economic forces: it has been carefully prepared and legislated over a number of years to serve the interests of those who benefit from it.

Why is the Corbyn campaign “gesture politics”?

And why is 'win at all costs' politics preferable?

Why the UK’s economy is still grossly out of balance

Investment is low, the trade deficit is growing, and what growth we have is largely driven by ultra-cheap money and asset inflation. This is unbalanced and unsustainable.

Communitarian governance: a public education challenge

A key goal of public education should be to foster a better understanding of the principles of good governance across all kinds of organisation.

New Labour is 'unelectable'

Anything other than a Jeremy Corbyn victory will signal a disaster for Labour, who will be tripping over themselves to superficially differentiate themselves from the Tories.

Homelessness in Manchester – the problem and the solution

Manchester city council has plenty of means by which to address its homeless crisis - it is just choosing not to.

Transforming the lives of women in trouble

Jobs, safe housing, childcare support. That’s what women need. Not prison.

A sad farewell - New Left Project closes

New Left Project has closed. Here the editors offer some parting reflections on their experiences running the site.

No broadcaster is an island

The fragility of the BBC’s independence from the state cannot continue to be ignored. Nor can its overall future be discussed in a silo.

Why selling healthcare isn't like selling underwear

The last thing the NHS needs is another supermarket-man selling 'market' solutions.

Why does the UK need a constitutional convention? An interview with Anthony Barnett

Phil England asks Anthony Barnett, founder of openDemocracy, about the UK's constitutional crisis and the relevance of Iceland's constitutional convention.

Video debate - the wealth delusion

Do we need a more equal society, and a global tax on wealth, or does wealth benefit us all as a driver of investment and growth?

Dozens of fathers among migrants to be forcibly deported tonight

Men with strong family ties to the UK are being forcibly removed on ghost flights, leaving pregnant partners and young children behind.

Whilst politicians go off on their holidays, let's unite and fight

OurNHS is the only media outlet that is fiercely pro-NHS. We break vital stories that other media miss. And now we need your help.

Fracturing democracy? State, fracking and local power in Lancashire

Fracking may have been rejected in Lancashire, but the battle reveals that power is being stripped from the people of Britain.

A moron speaks...

According to a former adviser to Tony Blair, MPs who nominated Jeremy Corbyn for the Labour leadership are "morons". What does one of them have to say about a leading Corbyn policy, nuclear disarmament?

Did Kevin Spacey deserve his knighthood?

The Old Vic has become part of a network of dissenting theatrical voices that will not be easily silenced.

What hope for Labour and the left? The election, the 80s and ‘aspiration’

To understand what a Corbyn win would mean we need to understand what happened in the 80s. Labour must start building beyond the party - it must be part of broader social currents.

A 24/7, transparent NHS – or the rise of the planet of the apps?

Is the English government's enthusiasm for health ‘apps’ and ‘data transparency’, for the benefit of patients – or markets? Or even a trojan horse for a pay-NHS?

The Conservative assault on industrial relations

While offering a higher new minimum wage, the Tories are trying to destroy the means by which workers across the spectrum bargain for decent wages. This is no route to a high wage economy.

Without realism Labour will achieve nothing but opposition

Unromantic as it may be, without a feasible alternative to capitalism it is capitalism we have to work with. At this time, a reformed and civilised capitalism is the best Labour can do, and it is what the public want.

Who owns the wind?

As nature's greatest commons powers ever more of our economy, is it time to start asking who owns it?

BBC Charter renewal: invisible actors and critical friends

If the corporation is to defend itself against powerful vested interests it must work more closely with critical friends across the political spectrum. 

What’s behind the Corbyn surge?

The wave of support for Jeremy Corbyn in the race to be Labour Party leader reflects a generation's search for a path beyond neoliberal austerity.

Democratic dialogues: how to communicate with the people of Nuneaton

The 2015 General Election was a disaster for people and political parties that can loosely be called ‘progressive’. Rather than relying upon the one-way communication of ‘messages’ and ‘narratives’, they now need to learn how to engage in open-ended ‘Democratic Dialogues’.

Why should we bother with the centre ground?

Labour needs to remember that a party going to the electorate saying ‘I promise I’ve changed’ risks the electorate simply replying ‘so what?’

The west, the Middle East and oil: a conspiracy theory?

Western governments do not always get what they want, but arguing that oil is the key factor behind western actions in the Middle East is one of the most evidence-based statements that one can make.

Why character development in education might not be such a good idea

A review of a Demos paper. They say: ‘Ways to encourage, incentivise and support every school to prioritise character development.’ We say: ‘More marketing material than research’

The BBC and the Tories: is it war?

By sabre-rattling with this government, the BBC is provoking an unnecessary battle that will most likely be to its disadvantage. A change of strategy is needed. 

A Magna Carta for learning disabled people

800 years of Magna Carta but learning disabled people remain 'villeins', denied rights against arbitrary power. What would a Magna Carta for learning disabled people look like?

Water cannon decision a welcome step – but what about the “more brutal alternatives” used by the police?

Now that the government has rejected water cannon, they should look at the impacts of the 'non lethal' weapons they do give to Britain's police.

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