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Our democracy isn’t working – it’s time to fight for it

Corporate power has captured the centralised state – but Labour’s commitment to a Constitutional Convention offers root and branch reform, writes Jon Trickett.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Our democracy isn’t working – it’s time to fight for it

Corporate power has captured the centralised state – but Labour’s commitment to a Constitutional Convention offers root and branch reform, writes Jon Trickett.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Who is bankrolling Britain's democracy? Which groups shape the stories we see in the press; which voices are silenced, and why? Sign up here to find out.

Brexit is taking our food policy in the wrong direction

One of the key roles of government is protecting us from ill effects of food that can take years to appear. But Brexit could undermine that.

Our democracy isn’t working – it’s time to fight for it

Corporate power has captured the centralised state – but Labour’s commitment to a Constitutional Convention offers root and branch reform, writes Jon Trickett.

Race, porn, and education: will the UK’s 2020 sex education update rise to the challenge?

The state must abandon all prudery in the interest of rectifying the time-lag leaving a whole generation of young people open to the unfettered excesses of the porn industry.

We have the answers to Brexit’s causes

British voters were right to demand radical change – those in power owe them action to rebalance our unequal society.

The news is dead – long live the news?

In a media world where the Big Five digital players are calling the shots, Jim Chisholm sees hope emerging from a growing breed of “new newsers”.

The Natural History Museum has been used by the Saudi regime

At a time when the Saudis are intensifying their crackdown on human rights, yesterday’s reception gave all the wrong messages.

Workhouse to Westminster – a review

Stuart Weir reviews a new autobiography of Lord Smith, an energetic crusader for democracy and social justice - and a vital ally during stormy times at the New Statesman magazine.

Why our media is wrong to say proportional representation helps the extreme right

The UK media likes to blame far right gains elsewhere – as in Sweden’s recent election – on PR. In fact the evidence shows disproportional voting systems give more power to the extreme right.

We need to raise ‘wealth taxes’ to fund the NHS

How will the Chancellor find the £20bn a year Theresa May has promised for England's NHS? 

Of Tories, charity... and Islamophobia

Muslims know they have a duty to support the poor. Tories can't claim this mantle - especially whilst they're riven with Islamophobia.

‘Gay cake’ cases show strength of Christian right legal armies on both sides of the Atlantic

In UK and US supreme courts, freedom of speech has been the defence of bakers who oppose same-sex marriage. It’s no coincidence.

Young workers know they're being ripped off - and that unions are the answer

Last weeks global food strikes show young workers get what trade unionism is about - and bringing new forms of digital organisation into play.

Police still not investigating Leave campaigns, citing ‘political sensitivities’

Exclusive: Months after Scotland Yard received ‘substantial’ evidence of potential criminality by pro-Leave groups, nothing has happened. Is the police probe destined for the political long-grass?

Film: Albion’s Call: Brexit, democracy and England

Brexit has ignited a fire under Britain. It is altering forever the way we see ourselves. This has to be confronted boldly and in an open-minded way

Is the tide turning on regulating Facebook and Google?

Facebook and Google are modern utilities - and natural monopolies - so they need a utility regulator.

From Windrush to Universal Credit – the art of ‘institutional indifference’

This government is 'institutionally indifferent' - to evidence, to criticism by the UN, MPs and inspectors, and most of all, to the suffering of those affected by its ignorant policies.

Immigration and the impact of a no-preference post-Brexit deal

In theory, a skill-based immigration system could work to reduce skill shortages in certain UK industry sectors but there are some key implications that remain unresolved.

‘Go Home?’ – five years on

On bordering, the referendum and Windrush: "It might be a dangerous moment but it is a moment when the old tricks of government cannot be repeated." Chain letter between UK researchers, June – September, 2018.

Forget early votes, do the maths, and start building for 2022

The lessons from conference season? Forget an early election – or a People’s Vote – the real prize to work for is a 2022 election that will be as era-defining as ’45 or ‘79.

A peculiarly British nationalism? – book review

Labour’s attitudes to nationalism, Britain’s changing role in the global economy: myths of left and right are punctured in David Edgerton’s magnificent The Rise and Fall of the British Nation: A Twentieth Century History.

Our governments share responsibility for the Cambridge Analytica crisis… and here’s how they should fix it

Government must regulate before privatised military propaganda firms interfere with any more elections

To fix the climate crisis, we must face up to our imperial past

It’s time to join the dots between our overlapping crises of – and shared solutions to – environmental degradation, damaged health, racial oppression and gender injustice.

A US-inspired reorganisation is about to hit England's NHS – 'help us stop it'

NHS plans due to take effect next spring could make general healthcare as difficult to access as mental healthcare already is – and lock future governments into long contracts with private firms, warn campaigners.

The UK just sent three men to prison for peaceful civil opposition

A closer look at the case that gave fracking protesters an excessive jail sentence.

Russia, the internet and "political technologists" - is this the future of democracy?

As more revelations emerge about Russian interference in Western democracies, Nick Inman reviews a BBC broadcast that asks if Russia is merely where 21st century ideas of democracy died first.

Costing the country: Britain's finance curse

Don't believe the bankers' spin. The City of London cost the UK economy £4.5 trillion between 1995 and 2005.

How the Electoral Commission turned blind eye to DUP's shady Brexit cash

Emails reveal elections regulator was ‘concerned’ by revelations about mysterious £435,000 donation – but closed the case quickly without investigation.

Blair to Corbyn: the new now

Today's British politics resemble the 1990s. But Corbyn's Labour is set to change that.

Fox/Sky, Murdoch and Comcast: winners and losers

On October 11th, the US cable giant Comcast acquires full control of Sky plc. For the first time since he launched Sky, Rupert Murdoch will have no say. But should we be careful what we wish for?

Investigate the Birmingham Trojan Horse affair

The Birmingham Trojan Horse affair has had serious consequences for public policy, but now the parliamentary standards committee is being asked to investigate possible governmental misconduct in its handling.

Labour’s new broadcast channels Trump to good effect

If billionaires can profit from invoking empty factory floors, then Labour certainly can too.

Why the distribution of wealth has more to do with power than productivity

According to a new OECD working paper, Britain is one of the wealthiest countries in the world. Net wealth is estimated to stand at around $500,000 per household – more than double the equivalent fi...

Brexit has revealed the Northern Powerhouse as a colonial enterprise

The Tories’ “Northern Powerhouse” has always relied on historical tropes about bootstrap industrialisation. But it now owes more to the Highland Clearances and Peterloo.

Financing a Labour government

A new government must strike the right balance between taxation, monetisation and debt issuance.

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