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The UK’s Investigatory Powers Bill is about to become law – here's why that should terrify us

The evidence that these powers are all needed is thin. And the cost to all of our privacy is huge.

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Showcasing the thinking and stories of people concerned with surveillance cultures.

The UK’s Investigatory Powers Bill is about to become law – here's why that should terrify us

The evidence that these powers are all needed is thin. And the cost to all of our privacy is huge.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Hidden Warfare 3: Special forces

While Britain’s conventional army is being slashed, Britain’s special forces are benefiting from special treatment. Their budget was doubled in last year’s Strategic Defence and Security Review.

Loomio and the problem of deliberation

One of the frustrations within the current political system is that most people are alienated from deliberation. The founders of decision-making software Loomio want to give everyone access to that essential skill. 

The Facebook President: fact trumps fiction

Did Facebook really turn Hillary Clinton from POTUS 45 into Al Gore 2016?

The free space for data monopolies in Europe is shrinking

If the new EU data protection regulation is enforced equally for EU and non-EU companies, supported by anti-trust and consumer protection laws, new types of data-based monopolization could be controlled.

Resisting the movement of control

We must fight for more transparency, and against technologies of decision-making. We cannot not do it. But this is not enough. We must learn the language of becoming other. A Tacit Futures interview.

Big Brother is about to be joined by his Crazy Cousin. The time for trust is over.

Whatever happens over the next few years, if there is to be a storm, then it is best to prepare. It is essential that western liberal democratic societies are resilient enough to uphold their fundamental values.

“Build democracy and it spreads like a virus"

A Q&A on Platform Co-ops with Nathan Schneider, as part of our focus on Platform Co-ops and the forthcoming open2017 conference.

openDemocracy offers you a 10% partner discount to the event here

Drones, Baby, Drones

Drama going beyond journalism at the Arcola theatre in London, until 26 November, Box Office: 0207 503 1646

Hidden Warfare 2: Drones

In an attempt to give them a better image, the British MoD has renamed them Protector rather than Predator.

Internet politics: a feminist guide to navigating online power

Recognising the political importance of our technical decisions is within reach, leading ultimately to reclaiming power and control of our activism in the digital sphere as well as in the offline world.

Hidden Warfare 1. Cyber

The UK agency would like to be known as on the front line defending UK interests from cyber attacks, rather than as an eavesdropping agency collecting data on individuals en masse.

UK re-elected to UN Human Rights Council despite worrying moves against press freedom at home

Press freedom in the UK is under threat as the Snoopers' Charter undergoes its third and final reading at the House of Lords today, 31 October.

Hyper-security, video-surveillance and borders: an interview with Catarina Frois

What types of democratic control of movement should we be fighting for?

Small steps in the struggle for digital rights?

In this rapidly expanding internet, the kinds of rights we need are often difficult to pin down – though pin them down we must if they are to be protected.

The UK’s Investigatory Powers Bill is about to become law – here's why that should terrify us

The evidence that these powers are all needed is thin indeed. And the cost to all of our privacy is huge.

European net neutrality, at last?

Article 3 of the Regulation defined the legal foundations of net neutrality in the EU, including the operators' obligation to "treat all traffic equally."

WashPost makes history: first paper to call for prosecution of its own source

News organisations usually owe duties of protection to their sources. The Washington Post is making history as the first paper to call for the prosecution of Edward Snowden, its own source, after accepting the Pulitzer Prize.

Drones, surveillance, population control: how our cities became a battleground

A new kind of warfare: how urban spaces are becoming the new battlefield, where the distinction between intelligence and military, and war and peace is becoming more and more problematic.

The Snooper's Charter: Will Britons' privacy be sacrificed for security?

The tools of mass surveillance and the suspension of privacy rights are normally reserved for use by dictatorships. Is Theresa May above the regimes and belief systems she seeks to oppose?

Into the unknown: Government surveillance after Brexit

We're living at the crux of two moments of political uncertainty. One is Brexit, and the other is the introduction of unprecedented surveillance powers. How might these uncertainties effect one another?

Governing Google

As for Google, without a more ‘joined up’ EU legal and regulatory framework integrating digital rights and economic concerns, users may need to look to solutions outside the law.

Posting baby photos on social media: parental pride or a perversion of privacy?

In the age of social media, digital identities are created without consent or much regard for privacy. But what happens when the perpetrators are well-meaning parents?

Belling the trolls: free expression, online abuse and gender

Freedom of expression is fundamentally about power: about who gets to speak or express themselves and on what terms and platforms.

With Anonymous' latest attacks in Rio, the digital games have begun

The hacktivist group has significantly ramped up its cyber attacks for the Olympic Games. But could a heavy-handed response put everyone’s digital liberties at risk? Español

China’s instrumentalization of terrorism

In China too, people feel less uncomfortable when told that police on the streets are there to protect them from dangerous “others,” rather than to protect the state from them.

Poland welcomes internet filtering

Any limits set for free expression online must be traced in pencil, not in ink, and not, and this is particularly important - within a hastily drafted piece of legislation.

Surveillance, power and communication

Coalitions of actors – scholars, activists, some politicians, and even some captains of industry, will need to collaborate if the pathway we pursue to a calculated, unequal future is to change.

Bitcoin: innovation of money and evolution of governance

All users play a crucial role in governance, as they are what ultimately gives Bitcoin value. People can choose to be equal under the law of mathematics.

Abu Dhabi announces launch of Israeli-installed mass surveillance system

The Internet of Things applies unique identifiers to objects, including people to be followed, and provides large amounts of data on all aspects of an individual’s movements and activities.

Jurisdiction: the taboo topic at ICANN

The issue of jurisdiction seems to be dead-on-arrival, having been killed by the US government. Meet the new boss: same as the old boss.

Online surveillance: we all have something to hide

Why continuing to shrug at mass data collection is lazy, irresponsible, and borderline stupid.

Fear of surveillance is forcing activists to hide from public life in Belarus

A visitor to Minsk might conclude from its calm appearance that the human rights situation had changed. But beneath the surface, the invisible threat of surveillance keeps civil society in check.

Democracy – a call to arms

David Bernet’s profoundly European film, Democracy, is that rare thing, a documentary about the complex system that is democracy, and a triumphant democratic law-making process at that.

The right to online anonymity

Human rights should be considered proportionally in any governmental policy related to the Internet, in a way which will hopefully spur the private sector to follow.

The truth about algorithms

Algorithms are not working for you and me – they are working for corporate interests, and their aim is to mould us into receptive customers. 

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