only search openDemocracy.net

Method in Trump’s madness?

A look at Donald Trump’s 'travel bans' with an eye to the harvesting of personal data, and the EU-US Privacy Shield, now on life support.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world
digitaLiberties banner

Showcasing the thinking and stories of people concerned with surveillance cultures.

Method in Trump’s madness?

A look at Donald Trump’s 'travel bans' with an eye to the harvesting of personal data, and the EU-US Privacy Shield, now on life support.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Facebook needs to face up to the new political reality

Facebook should disclose data on how campaigns are using the platform for political advertising. This general election might be an opportunity to bring that ideal closer.

Smiling into the abyss: what is Facebook doing to our mental health?

Lazy and unconcerned, or buckling under the strains of late capitalism? A manifesto for the selfie generation asks whether we can break our addiction to social media. Book review.

Transatlantic data transfers and privacy protection: an ongoing battle

A meaningful legal response would be the establishment of global privacy standards – a ‘new universal law on surveillance’. Undoubtedly, EU law and case law could provide a guiding light.

Method in Trump’s madness?

A look at Donald Trump’s 'travel bans' with an eye to the harvesting of personal data, and the EU-US Privacy Shield, now on life support.

Apathy about privacy is a myth: why users do care about data collection

The burden of protecting online privacy should be placed on corporations and governments, not on citizens.

How Facebook and the New York Times corporatised 'fake news'

We often talk about far-right US publishers or Macedonia’s fake news industry plaguing our media landscape. But there’s another fraud that too often goes unseen: ‘black ops advertising’.

Why Facebook’s fake news filter won’t work

A range of solutions  –  including stronger independent media organisations  –  is going to be needed.

Ethics, technology and human rights: navigating new roads

When we incorporate new technologies into human rights work, we need to be acutely aware of agency, participation and consent. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on data and human rights.

Taking the battle for civic space online

As online spaces become increasingly restricted, human rights activists must stay aware of the risks and benefits of technological developments. A contribution to openGlobalRights’ closing space for civil society debate. Español.

The EU must keep up with new technologies

Surveillance technologies infiltrating computer systems of human rights activists can result in their imprisonment or death. The EU needs to put greater emphasis on working with activists.

The link tax threatens the internet as we know it

The EU Commission's proposed copyright directive poses a threat to the internet's fundamental interconnectedness.

The future of US net neutrality under Trump

Administrative decisions related to the country’s telecommunications policy often go unnoticed by the majority of the US citizenry. But now, net neutrality in its purest form is in peril.

Cybersecurity should protect us – not control us

In the race to secure against threats, human rights such as privacy, free expression, freedom of assembly are undermined rather than protected.

Doing it the Malaysian way

Ever since the wake-up call of 2008, and with more and more Malaysians online, the ruling coalition is well aware that cyberspace is an important battleground, but chooses its battles.

Cooperativism in the digital era, or how to form a global counter-economy

Can we transform the renting economy of Uber and AirBnB into a genuine sharing one? Platform cooperatives must become open and commons-oriented.

How do we break the filter bubble, and design for democracy?

Some designers have developed software that actually combat online filter bubbles. But how these designers interpret democracy – aggregating choice – limits these tools. Democracy is so much more.

Does digital democracy improve democracy?

Digital innovations may change the quality of participation and the nature of democracy. How? Español 

In Theresa May’s Britain, a proposed new ‘espionage act’ is alarming, but hardly surprising

It is part of a misguided trend of civil liberties being sacrificed in the name of security across Europe and the United States.

How can we create an ethical framework for journalism in an age of terror?

The issue, as always, is where to draw the line between public safety and public knowledge. A new book argues that it’s the job of journalists and intelligence agencies to negotiate a responsible middle-ground. 

Adhocracy helps create a future of political engagement

For us, it is already a democratic achievement if you have the possibility to participate.

Simplicity, openness, and modifiability

Governments, endogamic institutions since forever, are not used to opening up. But now there’s political will for it to happen, if a lot of trial and error in the process.

Obama may have commuted Chelsea Manning’s sentence – but his legacy on whistleblowers is not one of clemency

Obama should be remembered for his persecution of whistleblowers and presiding over a culture of intimidation. It’s a legacy that Trump’s administration will happily build on in the years to come.

State surveillance is a global threat to press freedom

The state should not have the power to secretly identify then persecute whistleblowers.

We need to remove free movement from the vicious circle of security

While freedoms, such as the principles of equality and non-discrimination, the presumption of innocence and respect for privacy, undoubtedly still exist, they have been relegated to the margins.

The media–technology–military industrial complex

In a world of so-called fake news and post-truth politics, the influence of largely invisible qualities of concentrated power over media, public and policy agendas, warrants renewed and urgent scrutiny.

A whistleblowing platform against corruption for the City Council of Barcelona

Corruption can’t be eliminated by institutions scrutinising themselves. Civil society must play a central, continuous role.

We design money with the blockchain

Would you design and run your own, fairer money system, with your own politics built into it, if only technology allowed?

End of the line: surveillance, precarity and resistance in the call centre

I spent six months undercover in call centres, researching how workers are subject to constant watch, psychological pressure, and what they do to resist. This is what I discovered.

Listen to a recorded audio version of this article on curio.io.

Representation is no longer enough - A Q&A with Michel Bauwens

A Q&A with Michel Bauwens, as part of our focus on Platform Co-ops and the forthcoming open2017 conference.

openDemocracy offers you a 10% partner discount to the event here

What would Twitter be if it adopted Wikipedia’s politics?

As Twitter drowns with trolls, dictators and profit warnings, could now be the time for a co-operatively run, open source alternative?

Part of our focus on Platform Co-ops and the February open2017 conference. we offer you a 10% partner discount to the event here

Algorithms: the villains and heroes of the ‘post-truth’ era

We often focus on the negative or positive impacts of algorithms. But is this a distraction from how power is actually deployed through them?

Expanding state power in times of ‘surveillance realism’: how the UK got a ‘world-leading’ surveillance law

A fragmented opposition, public resignation in the face of omnipresent data collection, and a dominant security discourse has created a social context for the Investigatory Powers Act to be passed largely unhindered.

The Court of Justice of the European Union has ruled against the UK government, but will they listen?

The court has ruled that the indiscriminate retention of electronic communications data by governments is incompatible with a modern democracy. But what will this mean following the Brexit vote?

Catalonian lessons: civil society has something to offer on the gaming tables of governance

A statement made before the Catalan Parliamentary Committee for the Study of Anti-Corruption Measures and for Democratic Regeneration.

Out of prison, Barrett Brown recommits himself to agitating against existing order

After four years behind bars on hacking-related charges, journalist and activist Barrett Brown, still plans a global platform by which to generate real, cogent, viable opposition to the state of things.

Syndicate content