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Europe on the Edge - The Week in 1 Minute: May 12 – 18 on openDemocracy

This week on openDemocracy, Can Europe Make It? launches its series Joining the dots on state surveillance in Europewith five national case-studies and the introduction to a major EU study, as well as debate on this secret oversight, from vanguard countries caught red-handed, like the UK, to the many surveillance programmes still flying under the radar. This panorama coincides with the ruling by the Court of Justice of the European Union vindicating data protection.

17 May 2014

Young bloggers from BulgariaGreeceGermany and the EU’s smallest state, Malta, continue to offer local perspectives on Europe ahead of the European Parliamentary elections. Lotta Tenhunen and Adria Rodriguez look at the structural crisis of post-war European institutions, no longer adequate to assure social and economic justice.

As Jacopo Barbati questions the idea of a united Europe,Euroscepticism lurks further east in KazakhstanBelarus and Armenia. Camilla Toulmin urges us to vote Europe with an eye to the future and the looming challenge of climate change.Azerbaijan’s tenure as chair of the Council of Europe exposes discordant notes on the defining ideals of human rights within the regional bloc, while Spain’s liberal democracy continues to crack as it increasingly deploys violence to quell waves of discontent against austerity.

Poverty has a human face that remains remarkably invisible to the public eye as Rebecca Omonira-Oyekanmi and Deborah Padfield present searing reportage on what austerity meansfor real, and impoverished, lives in London. Emily Apple offers a singular experience of the sinister shadow of the state, arrested 75 times in protest, in the final piece from Transformation’s series on the politics of mental health

Both violence and peace in Northern Ireland have been seen as a male prerogative but 50.50 contributors demonstrate how a gender perspective is key not only to understanding the conflict but also to building the peace. Sondos Shabayek opens up a free and public space in Egypt for women to share their stories of struggle against a patriarchal state in turmoil. Narratives are further dissected with rare dialogue between the intractable camps of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict.

openSecurity’s editors dive far below the headlines and hashtag intervention to compile consistent coverage from the past two years of the sub-state security challenges posed to Nigeria by Boko Haram. Fellow editor Adam Ramsay continues to make good use of train journeys to come up with the definitive list of reasons to vote for Scottish independence. And if you’ve tired of text altogether, head to Lucie Kinchin’s illustrative inquiry into why no one likes Michael Gove.


Don’t miss:

  • Late justice is better than no justice: Pakistani citizen Yunus Rahmatullah finally released from Bagram Prison after illegal rendition and 10 years of detention without charge.

 

openDemocracy’s week in 1 minute is emailed to Members, Friends and authors who help pay for and create our great content. Please forward this to any contact you think might be interested and want to join or email us ([email protected]).

Stop the secrecy: Publish the NHS COVID data deals


To: Matt Hancock, Secretary of State for Health and Social Care

We’re calling on you to immediately release details of the secret NHS data deals struck with private companies, to deliver the NHS COVID-19 datastore.

We, the public, deserve to know exactly how our personal information has been traded in this ‘unprecedented’ deal with US tech giants like Google, and firms linked to Donald Trump (Palantir) and Vote Leave (Faculty AI).

The COVID-19 datastore will hold private, personal information about every single one of us who relies on the NHS. We don’t want our personal data falling into the wrong hands.

And we don’t want private companies – many with poor reputations for protecting privacy – using it for their own commercial purposes, or to undermine the NHS.

The datastore could be an important tool in tackling the pandemic. But for it to be a success, the public has to be able to trust it.

Today, we urgently call on you to publish all the data-sharing agreements, data-impact assessments, and details of how the private companies stand to profit from their involvement.

The NHS is a precious public institution. Any involvement from private companies should be open to public scrutiny and debate. We need more transparency during this pandemic – not less.


By adding my name to this campaign, I authorise openDemocracy and Foxglove to keep me updated about their important work.

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