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November 21 - 27 on openDemocracy

Umut Özkirimli begins the week warning Europeans that they can no longer rely on outmoded distinctions between 'good' and 'bad' nationalism; Kirsty Hughes marvels at the UK’s influence in Europe vanishing without ‘any serious national debate’; and Paulina Tambakaki notices a curious convergence of views around the incompatibility of democracy and the eurocrisis, paving the way for a second excoriating analysis of our European ills translated for us by Ollie Brock - Democracy put to the test - by Jose Garcia Torreblanca.
5 December 2011

 

Paul Rogers’ tribute to the 'occupy' movements in World in Protest and celebration of non-violent social change through people power, is joined by Vicken Cheterian’s examination of how the Arab world may have torture on the run. Jean-Pierre Filiu, scholar and author of The Arab Revolution: Ten Lessons from the Democratic Uprising, discusses with Paul Hockenos the miracle birth of an Arab public sphere that flows from Morocco to the Gulf and deep into the diasporas. Treat the independent Arab media as they deserve, ‘as equals’, he urges – advice we hope to take on our new Arab Awakening page, where this week Moroccan boycotters join their Egyptian counterparts and new Tunisian voters in this ‘competition between the uprisings’, while Alina Rocha Menocal explores the next few critical months in Egypt’s transition.

We at openDemocracy are ‘part of this rising’, argues our founding editor, having this Monday launched a ‘disturbing new dossier’ on government lies about child detention in the UK. His appeal follows hot on the heels of an inspiring elaboration by Tony Curzon Price of a notion of 'free' that is central to this website’s future. This week, our membership scheme is launched, calling for a new era of involvement from our readers and supporters which will see us engaging fully with the tough cultural and intellectual fight for real democracy that lies ahead.

Besides the Middle East, our elections 2011 page is this week covering voter manipulation in Russia, Russia’s Far East, and Sergio Ramirez’ exposure of the ‘great farce’ of Nicaragua’s secret election, translated for us by Isabel Hilton. We also have a prediction of a repeat election victory for Zuma Inc. in South Africa in 2013. Our 50.50 section, too, is on fire, exploring 'the intersection of militarism and violence against women’ as its annual ‘16 days of activism against gender violence’ gets under way, and celebrating Mad Women on the March.

Don’t miss these three links:

Why Merkel remains opposed to euro bonds

John Waters on national crisis as the vultures circle

Pierre Nora on historians on nationhood: the desperate need for critical distance 

 

Peter Geoghegan: dark money and dirty politics

Democracy is in crisis and unaccountable flows of money are helping to destroy it. Peter Geoghegan’s new book, ‘Democracy for Sale: Dark Money and Dirty Politics’, charts how secretive money, lobbying and data has warped our democracy.

How has dark money bought our politics? What can be done to change the system?

Join us for a journey through a shadowy world of dark money and disinformation stretching from Westminster to Washington, and far beyond.

Sign up to take part in a free live discussion on Thursday 13 August at 5pm UK time/6pm CET

In conversation:

Peter Geoghegan Dark Money Investigations editor at openDemocracy and the author of ‘Democracy for Sale: Dark Money and Dirty Politics’.

Mary Fitzgerald Editor-in-chief, openDemocracy.

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