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Parks, patriarchy and propaganda: May 27– June 2 on openDemocracy

What started as a protest to protect a green space with a few trees in Istanbul met a brutal police response and grew to become much more. Celam Burak Tansel and Gulay Turkmen-Dervisoglu explain the situation, John McSweeney tells us this isonly the beginning, Dimitar Bechev adds perspective on what he calls a people-power tide and Charles Turner looks at PM Erdoğan’s character. We also bring a statement from the Müştereklerimiz network, which has been involved in the protests since the beginning, and an open letter from five Turkish citizens living in London.

6 February 2013

What started as a protest to protect a green space with a few trees in Istanbul met a brutal police response and grew to become much more. Celam Burak Tansel and Gulay Turkmen-Dervisoglu explain the situation, John McSweeney tells us this isonly the beginning, Dimitar Bechev adds perspective on what he calls a people-power tide and Charles Turner looks at PM Erdoğan’s character. We also bring a statement from the Müştereklerimiz network, which has been involved in the protests since the beginning, and an open letter from five Turkish citizens living in London.

More than a hundred women peace activists, policy makers and scholars from around the world have met in Belfast with six women Nobel Peace Prize laureates to analyse and strategise. Commissioning Editors Jennifer AllsoppHeather McRobie, plus speakers at the Nobel Women's Initiative conference onBeyond militarism and war: women-driven solutions for a nonviolent violent world have been writing this up for 50.50.

We publish Shirin Ebadi on what makes a democracyValerie Hudson on her book, Sex and World PeaceColonel Ann Wrighton protesting the US’ war policies; Amina Mama on challenging militarized masculinities - plus authors examining patriarchy and militarismpeacebuilding and the nation-state, how to build aculture of peace, alongside many other themes.

Daniel Levy and Julien Barnes-Dacey call on the west to use Geneva2 to de-escalate the Syrian conflict, and Peter Oborne and David Morrison issue a challenge to US and UK politicians and media: stop inventing myths about Iran which are designed to ramp up conflict, after the falsehoods on Iraq which David Owen reminds us of.

Mona Sheikh has a similar warning on the impact of US interests on PakistanSaeed RahnemaMoritz Pieper and Salam Kawakibiremind us of the nature of these regimes, while Paul Rogers predicts an unpredictable future for Israel, and Ahmad Khalidi contributes a comprehensive account of the shifting map of the Middle East.

Also on misrepresentation, Srećko Horvat, who hosted Slavoj Žižek and Syriza’s leader in his Subversive Forum, explains the reception of this event against a Golden Dawn background.Othon Anastasakis interrogates the theory of the two extremes of populism and Jon Wiltshire looks into Greece’s economic growth, while Eleftheria Lekakis conveys what fascism feels like to its critical publics.

Ireland gives us a new slant on Brexit. In a fine series investigating the nation-state, Marc Farrant looks at ‘time’, Dylan Hewitt-Page at technology, and David Goodhart tells us the British version is in rude health, while Deborah Padfield sees the holes in the fabric, Michael Skey checks out UKIP, and Colin Grant, the EDL. Euan Grant tells us why Russians love London, and Vladimir Pribylovsky gives us a tour of the Russian clans.


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