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Rich Conversations at the World Forum for Democracy 2015 in Strasbourg (2)

The World Forum for Democracy 2015 ran 'lab sessions' on innovative initiatives connected to the Forum's key themes. Rich Conversations emerges from those sessions. On dance.

Pacifique Ndayishimiye
14 March 2016
wfd

In each case these conversations address the divides that afflict our societies in ways that help to heal them. Here, dealing with intercultural responses.

This lab wanted to highlight the intercultural responses to prevent misunderstanding between cultures, radicalisation but also to promote democracy among people with the use of education. The lab was moderated by Mr Denis Huber (France, Head of the “Co-operation, Administration and External Relations” Department and Executive Secretary of the Chamber of Regions of the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe.), who then presented Mr Pacifique NDAYISHIMIYE (Rwanda, Founder and President, Youth Service Organization (YSO)).

Rwandan_dancers.jpg

Rwandan dancers. Wikimedia/Fanny Schertzer. CC.Mr Pacifique NDAYISHIMIYE initiated a project in Rwanda with the Youth Service Organization called "Intercultural Dialogue Awareness Raising for Cooperation (IDARC)".

The initiative brings young people from different ethnic groups to speak with each other. The country faces migration issues and people have the feeling that their neighbours do not understand who they are. The project wants to reunite all those groups through traditional dance, aiming to create co-operation and community building. IDARC organizes daily, weekly or monthly training in which there are events where young people who share the same language can dance and socialise together, and can then start speaking about issues between themselves.

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