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The Week in 1 Minute: A series of strong stories (Aug 5 – 13 on openDemocracy)

The week is full of strong stories. Bruce Fireman discovers that the purchaser of radio stations in the UK has ties through its parent company to Nazi sympathizers. Peter Oborne and David Morrison ask why a BBC programme on Iranian nuclear capabilities and the potential for conflict is intent on ignoring the US intelligence consensus. And Jo Tyabji launches a new worldwide series for openSecurity, Whose Police? asking: Do the police serve the public, or are they a force of elite control?

4 August 2013

Where does security come from? Ali Winston sees no end in sight to the military grip on US domestic law enforcement, but we begin with Britain and Bahrain. John Horne and John Lubbock track what happened when Britain’s Assistant Metropolitan Police Commissioner went to advise Bahrain’s Ministry of Interior in December 2011. Marc Owen Jones’s history of British involvement in Bahrain’s internal security and Ahmed Ali’s report on holding its security sector to account, set the Bahraini context, while Val Swain looks at the latest in intelligence-led policing, UK-style, and Graham Ellison and Georgina Sinclair explore ‘entrepreneurial policing’ and the international export challenges. Don’t miss two short podcasts, and meanwhile, Koos Couvee’s look at deaths in British police custody since 2004 has ‘gone viral’.

There are rumbles of thunder throughout the Middle East with Paul Rogers looking again at Al-Qaida; Christopher K. Lamont  and Giuseppe Merone, sound the warning after political assassinations in Tunisia; Khaled Hroub warns of the liberals’ dark chapter in Egypt, while Rishita Apsani looks at the impasse for women, Adel Abdel Ghafar at the framing wars of June 30th, and Ahmad Alehossein wonders if Iran’s Rouhani could meet Morsi’s fate; and in Turkey, Burak Kadercan, Ahu Yigit and Ayse Bugra, in her in-depth account of what lies behind the protests, agree that Gezi Park is not over, but that all eyes are on the leader. Steven Zyck says the Al Qaida attacks in Yemen are the least of that country’s security crises; Nicolai Due-Gundersen describes an argument brewing in Jordan, and Rori Donaghy tells of punishment for thought crime in the UAE. While a new generation of Palestinians, sceptical of the next peace talks, contemplates a one-state solution, Federica Marsi reports on teenagers charged with up to life imprisonment for stone throwing, and Joyce Dalsheim takes such instances together with the Trayvon Martin trial, as the starting off point to ask how we are complicit in the ‘banality of legal’.

As summer reaches London, we consider dissent – oDRussia accompanies Alexei Navalny as his election campaign gets under way; Rebecca Johnson for 50.50 unearths the evidence on Britain’s Trident debate; Saurabh Dube ponders the unsettling artwork of dalit expressionist, Savindra Sawaker; Peter van Buren charts the culmination of Guantanomo-ized justice in the Bradley Manning case; and Stuart White thinks through for us what E.P.Thompson would have said about the dignity of dissent missing from the UK’s Labour party. Ayona Datta’s short film introduces us to wonderful people in Mumbai’s multicultural inner-city neighbourhood, surviving the race for global city status. Henrietta L. Moore gives our Transformation section a luminescent piece on the ethical imagination that inspires protest. We sit back to think about love 2.0 and marriage… only to read about what’s happening in Nigeria… thank goodness for Jim Gabour in Sunday Comics.

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