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“We can’t use the war to justify anything”: photographer Yevgenia Belorusets on documenting Ukraine's most vulnerable groups

Displaced persons, migrant workers and Roma – in Ukraine, there are whole communities whose lives remain unknown to society as a whole. RU

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“We can’t use the war to justify anything”: photographer Yevgenia Belorusets on documenting Ukraine's most vulnerable groups

Displaced persons, migrant workers and Roma – in Ukraine, there are whole communities whose lives remain unknown to society as a whole. RU

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

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How to think about Russia without Putin

“Russia without Putin” is more than a slogan. It’s an analytical claim.

Director Sergei Loznitsa on the conflict in eastern Ukraine: “This is disintegration”

Sergei Loznitsa talks about his new film on the Donbas conflict, societal collapse and the post-Soviet individual. RU

Why Ukraine needs an investigation into the murder of activist Kateryna Handzyuk

Handzyuk's death has led Ukraine’s parliament to create a temporary commission to investigate violent attacks on civic activists. RU

Russian anti-fascist reveals violence, humiliation and threats in pre-trial detention

In Russia, the security services have arrested 11 anarchists and anti-fascists on terrorism charges. Yuly Boyarshinov, a defendant, describes the conditions in pre-trial detention – where prisoners beat, bully and humiliate others in league with investigators.

Could integration help Ukraine’s Roma?

In Ukraine, civil society campaigners are trying to stop discrimination against Roma communities by helping them organise and integrate. RU

Kyrgyzstan survives on money made by migrant workers, but it doesn’t know how to spend it

No country in the world is as dependent on remittances as Kyrgyzstan. But this money is often used by families to survive, and allows the state to avoid its obligations to its citizens. 

One year on from a planned “revolution” in Russia, dozens of people are facing jail time

In November 2017, hundreds of Russian citizens were involved in an apparent attempt to organise a new “revolution” in Russia. Thirty of them are now facing serious charges. 

Russia’s Mediterranean call: from Kerch to Palmyra, but without Constantinople?

How the Russian authorities are justifying the military’s pivot to the south east.

A new tale of migrant struggles in Moscow puts poverty, motherhood and hope on screen

This Russian-Kazakh film explores how people who migrate to Russia are often subject to forces far greater than themselves.

“We can’t use the war to justify anything”: photographer Yevgenia Belorusets on documenting Ukraine's most vulnerable groups

Displaced persons, migrant workers and Roma – in Ukraine, there are whole communities whose lives remain unknown to society as a whole. RU

“I’d prefer to die in Poland”: Chechnya’s most famous YouTuber in exile faces deportation to Russia

After fleeing Chechnya, blogger Tumso Abdurakhmanov came to command a million-strong audience online. But now he could become the latest person to face “secret” deportation from Poland.

Back in the USSR: meet the people calling for the restoration of the Soviet Union

Soviet passport-holders are agitating for a revival of the USSR and a takeover of the British crown. RU

Mimetic power: how Russia pretends to be a normal member of the international community

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When it comes to promoting its influence abroad, the Russian state relies on mimicry and imitation.

 

Draft legislation in Ukraine targets same-sex relationships

A Ukrainian MP has introduced legislation to criminalise same sex relationships and protect traditional values. RU

Abuse of power? On the trail of China's mystery millions in Kyrgyzstan

For over six months, Kyrgyzstan has been mired in a high-level corruption scandal: a disastrous $386 million project to rebuild Bishkek’s Power Plant, funded by Chinese state funds. RU

What we know about alleged elite corruption under former Kyrgyz president Almazbek Atambayev

As Kyrgyzstan’s new regime consolidates power, fresh allegations of corruption by Atambayev loyalists are emerging. 

Moscow is solving its waste problem – by sending it to Russia's regions

Waste disposal has become a political problem for Russia’s capital, and the authorities are now looking to transfer it to the regions. RU

Meet the editors of a new journal challenging prejudices about eastern Europe

The Bucharest-based Kajet journal was founded to challenge cliches about eastern Europe — a region that can be “more than a sheer pile of debris awaiting reconstruction.”

What went wrong in eastern Europe?

A new book sheds light on the early warning signs of illiberalism – and gives some modest hope for the future. 

Entrepreneurs of political violence: the varied interests and strategies of the far-right in Ukraine

For Ukraine's far right, violence has become a source of influence and power. 

In Russia’s North Caucasus, an unprecedented, peaceful protest

In Ingushetia, people have come out to protest land transfer to neighbouring Chechya. For now, the Kremlin is listening. 

Militarised society: memory politics, history and gender in Ukraine

In Ukraine, history could be used to help make sense of the brutal ongoing war, but it can also be instrumentalised for political gains.

How Hungary and Ukraine fell out over a passport scandal

Ukraine’s border region of Zakarpattya is home to the country’s Hungarian community – and is now the centre of a diplomatic row. RU

Meet the Ukrainian mothers battling for their sons held in Russian prison

Families of Ukrainian political prisoners in Russian jails are fighting for their release – and this struggle is changing them. RU

“We really need you, Anna!”: Svetlana Alexievich, Binalakshmi Nepram write to Anna Politkovskaya

To mark the 12 years since Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaya’s murder, two laureates of an award for women human rights defenders write letters to her.

The democratic future of Uzbekistan doesn’t depend on the politicians, but whether workers can mobilise

Uzbekistan’s transition to a market economy will require further worker suppression. But signs of worker mobilisation in the Karimov era can give us hope. RU

Why Russia should not enjoy impunity in the Council of Europe

Without fulfilling conditions set out in the Parliamentary Assembly’s resolutions, why should Russia be allowed return to the Council?

'Sexual liberation, socialist style': an overlooked women's rights story?

New research by Kateřina Lišková places eastern bloc countries at forefront of twentieth century push for gender equality.

Decentralising Ukraine: the view from Khmelnytsky

Three years of Ukraine’s most successful reform have produced results that are, at times, unexpected and ambiguous. RU

Ways to end the conflict in Ukraine’s Donbas: an interview with Serhiy Kudelia

The conflict in eastern Ukraine is at a stalemate. How do we break through it?

“Everyone is trying to get me to stop”: Russian student Vyacheslav Kryukov writes diary of his prison hunger-strike

10 people were arrested in Moscow earlier this year on fabricated extremism charges. Vyacheslav Kryukov is one of them — and is now on Day 16 of a hunger strike.

Kazakhstan’s invisible children

In Kazakhstan, children with special educational needs and disabilities are kept out of sight and out of mind. RU

Why does Kazakhstan turn a blind eye to Alzheimer’s?

In the developed world, Alzheimer’s disease is a major issue. But the situation in developing countries such as Kazakhstan is less satisfactory. RU

Fair but boring? An overview of Yerevan’s city council elections

This week’s elections to Yerevan city council have been markedly fairer than previous years — but that doesn’t mean there isn’t intrigue.

The struggle for Yerevan: how city elections became a referendum on Armenia’s revolution

For the first time since Armenia's revolution, citizens have been to the ballot box. But Sunday's vote is less about the problems facing the country's capital, and more about the legitimacy of the revolutionary agenda. 

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