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The Living Front of Stanislav Markelov

Ten years ago, activist lawyer Stanislav Markelov was murdered in Moscow. His legacy tells us why anti-fascism remains vitally important in Russia today.  

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

The Living Front of Stanislav Markelov

Ten years ago, activist lawyer Stanislav Markelov was murdered in Moscow. His legacy tells us why anti-fascism remains vitally important in Russia today.  

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

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In Azerbaijan, a hunger strike is the only remaining hope for justice

Mehman Huseynov, an Azeri blogger, is facing new fabricated charges in prison. But people inside and outside the country are coming together to try and free him.

Stanislav Markelov: Russia’s Trade Union Movement, 1990s-2000s

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Stanislav Markelov: F*** anarchy, there’s no future anyway

Ten years ago this month, activist lawyer Stanislav Markelov was murdered in Moscow. We publish his reflections on power, the state and revolutionary maximalism here for the first time in English.

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The Living Front of Stanislav Markelov

Screen Shot 2019-01-18 at 10.58.51.pngTen years ago, activist lawyer Stanislav Markelov was murdered in Moscow. His legacy tells us why anti-fascism remains vitally important in Russia today. RU



Stanislav Markelov: Times change but the stagnation remains

Ten years ago this month, activist lawyer Stanislav Markelov was murdered in Moscow. We publish his reflections on Russian society’s nostalgia for the Soviet period here for the first time in English.

How Russia’s security services try to recruit opposition activists

For Russian law enforcement, informal connections with the opposition can be anything from genuine information-gathering to ticking boxes in their monthly reports.

“They are collecting information on people involved in social activism”: Ukrainian anarchists targeted in series of searches

In December, Ukrainian law enforcement searched a series of activists' homes in connection with a violent assault on a Ukrainian war veteran. Activists believe this is part of a wider campaign against anarchists in Ukraine.

Abnormal normality: Alexander Hug about the present and future of Donbas

What role can civil society play in creating the dialogue necessary to end the war in Donbas? RU

“Electric shock is our way of doing things”

A number of Russian anti-fascists and anarchists have been tortured by the country's security services. The official investigation into this torture is yet to turn up results. Warning: graphic.

After Ukrainian filmmaker Oleg Sentsov receives an EU prize, what prospects for solidarity?

Ukrainian filmmaker Oleg Sentsov was recently awarded the annual Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought. This should put more pressure on the EU to rethink their relations to Russia, says Green MEP Rebecca Harms.

Phantom foreign investors for an open new Uzbekistan

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Dispossession and urban development in the new Tashkent

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“Propaganda disintegrates on contact with these things”: Kyiv and Moscow directors on the power of documentary theatre to create dialogue

Documentary theatre makers from Russia and Ukraine recently held a theatre festival in Kyiv. Here, two directors speak on documentary theatre, war and co-participation. RU

“We don’t need the State Department to hold a revolution”

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Rough justice in Kyrgyzstan

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Don’t let Russia leave the Council of Europe

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Crisis in the Azov sea: the fate of Ukraine’s naval personnel in Russia

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“It’s very difficult to investigate anything while the war continues”: Ukrainian human rights activist Yevgen Zakharov on investigating war crimes

Four years since the war in eastern Ukraine started, issues over qualification and investigation of war crimes are coming to the fore. RU

Gay life in Stalin’s Gulag

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Fighting for clean air in Kamianske, Ukraine

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The Central Asian valley where borders dissolve in grassroots cooperation

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The womanly face of war: the agency and visibility of Ukraine’s female soldiers

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No good choices in Georgia

Georgia’s presidential election has demonstrated, once again, that the country’s two dominant political platforms have little to offer regular citizens. 

How Christian conservatives are trying to influence the media in Ukraine

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A new memoir by Kyrgyzstan’s most prominent political prisoner takes readers back to the violence and impunity that followed the country’s 2010 revolution.

In pre-election move, Moldova takes aim at civil society-opposition nexus

As the European Union calls out state capture in Moldova, the authorities in Chișinău are rewriting the rules of the game for civil society and opposition politics. RU

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By taking their cases to the European Court of Human Rights, hundreds of Chechen men and women have thwarted the powerful Russian state’s efforts to sweep its abuses in Chechnya under the rug.

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Director Sergei Loznitsa on the conflict in eastern Ukraine: “This is disintegration”

Sergei Loznitsa talks about his new film on the Donbas conflict, societal collapse and the post-Soviet individual. RU

Why Ukraine needs an investigation into the murder of activist Kateryna Handzyuk

Handzyuk's death has led Ukraine’s parliament to create a temporary commission to investigate violent attacks on civic activists. RU

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