A post-broadcast BBC: time for the public to speak?

‘Digital public space’ is an inspiring vision of the future of the BBC. Its full realisation, however, demands greater public input in the allocation of the corporation’s resources. 

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

A post-broadcast BBC: time for the public to speak?

‘Digital public space’ is an inspiring vision of the future of the BBC. Its full realisation, however, demands greater public input in the allocation of the corporation’s resources. 

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

The election debates: winners and losers?

The broadcasters appear to have settled on a format for the UK election debates. But who won and who lost in this stand-off?

'Pinkoes and Traitors': a tunnel vision of broadcasting history

Jean Seaton’s latest history of the BBC is mired by typos, inconsistencies and factual errors. Far from incidental, this is symptomatic of a broader carelessness that ultimately undermines her analysis. 

A post-broadcast BBC: time for the public to speak?

‘Digital public space’ is an inspiring vision of the future of the BBC. Its full realisation, however, demands greater public input in the allocation of the corporation’s resources. 

Welcome to the echo chamber

From Reuters to the BBC the future of journalism is being presented as cyber-utopia. For many in the industry, though, the reality is of poor quality content fuelled by dodgy ethics. 

"Nobody has a God given right to be heard": an interview with John Humphrys

John Humphrys, presenter of BBC Radio 4's Today programme, gives his view on the changing world of journalism and the challenges facing young people who wish to enter the industry. 

India’s Daughter: platforming rapists and ignoring activists

Udwin’s intervention has been true to her self-assigned role as an ‘amplifier’, but the only voice given an international platform here other than her own is that of the rapist.

Wolf Hall is a history lesson in power

Wolf Hall depicts the dehumanizing effects of power pursued for its own sake. Acting without impunity, irresponsible power undermines common morality for selfish motives. Jimmy Savile is a case in point.

The ‘Election Debates’ debate: is legislation the answer?

Ed Miliband has promised legislation that would see regulators imposing a debate structure at future general elections. Could it work? And is that the best answer? 

The problem of representation in ‘India’s Daughter’

Jyoti Singh, the real name of the woman in question, has not been allowed to be what she was, but made into what she had no say over.

The BBC's imaginary crossroads

Tony Hall’s speech on March 2 was full of invented threats. This was a denial of the imminent need for change: the BBC needs rivals and the UK needs more voices. 

The BBC, the licence fee and the digital public space

The Controller of the BBC’s archive strategy maintains the institution’s fundamental role within the media ecology and argues that the Licence Fee should safeguard a new democratic digital public space.

Could the BBC survive without the licence fee?

If licence fees are decriminalised, the BBC could lose £200 million a year in unpaid debts. Adopting a subscription system would be fairer and free it from political control

Public service broadcasting at a crossroads

The timing of today's report on the 'Future of the BBC' is vital to understanding its argument. The Corporation is likely to be a major issue in the coming elections. 

Lose the licence fee, abolish the Trust

A new House of Commons report sets out the issues for the forthcoming review of the BBC Charter. It calls for the abolition of the BBC Trust and a long-term replacement for the licence fee. 

Beyond our shores: Europhobia and the BBC

The BBC has been attacked from all sides about its European coverage. How it responds will have consequences far beyond the newsroom.  

Freedom of information: a smokescreen of accountability

If the entire BBC is protected from answering requests under the Freedom of Information Act who exactly does it remain accountable to?

Less velvet glove, more iron fist

The new Chair of the BBC Trust Rona Fairhead has given her first public speech which was widely reviewed. Now the dust has settled – but what did Rona say, and more importantly, what did she really mean? 

"There's a proper market for proper journalism": an interview with Robert Peston

Robert Peston gives his views on what it's like for entry level broadcast journalists in the BBC - and elsewhere - today. This is one of a series of features on, and by, young journalists. 

Leon Brittan and Channel 4: an unsung role

A role not mentioned so far in the obituaries. In memoriam.

Adam Curtis in the emperor's new clothes

Curtis has the glorious bounty of the entire BBC archives at his fingertips, he ranges across continents and across decades, and which voice dominates all of his programmes? The omnipotent narrator.

Leader debates: Cameron’s calculations

The broadcasters can't "empty chair" the Prime Minister - he may well get what he wants.

Speaking truth about the BBC and power

The BBC has never championed 'speaking truth to power' and its capacity for critical journalism is weaker than ever.

Speaking truth about the BBC and power

The BBC has never championed 'speaking truth to power' and its capacity for critical journalism is weaker than ever.

Speaking truth to power? Iraq & the BBC

For the media, as for the politicians, the ideal war is one that’s short and sharp, has good guys and bad guys, and has a clear outcome. Iraq in 2003 did not follow the script.

The BBC whitewashing our failures in Afghanistan

John Simpson's description of Afghanistan's progress couldn't be further from the truth.

This is getting silly

The English elite’s scare tactics in the run-up to the Scottish referendum involved promising to stop the game by taking away their balls – the pound, the pensions, Queen Elizabeth (1st of Scotland, notwithstanding) and, of course, the BBC. Some threats clearly addressed real matters of difficulty but, says Brian Winston, the removal of the BBC was merely silly.

Broadcasting and the referendum

Claire Enders, the redoubtable media analyst, has taken a pasting today from over one hundred Guardian readers angered by her pessimistic prognosis for Scottish media, should “yes” prevail on Thursday.

Liberalism, the media and the NHS

Standing at some ill-defined midpoint between three neoliberal parties is now deemed, by the BBC and others, to represent some sort of "impartiality". Though impartial in Westminster terms it is clearly not in public terms. The NHS paid a heavy price.

What do you do with a problem like ‘news’?

The BBC Trust has a new chair but the problems of the BBC’s constitutional position – problems which centre on news provision – are scarce likely to be solved by this appointment.

‘An Honourable Woman’: an argument in two parts on how to judge a political drama

Diane Langford is angered by a BBC2 drama that purports to reflect the political realities in the Arab/Israeli conflict, yet in its “even-handedness” inescapably misrepresents the issues. But perhaps we are being told: don’t take all this plot stuff too seriously – I am writing drama, not history or current affairs. 

The BBC and the Scottish referendum

Lord Birt suggests a yes vote in Scotland would be a threat to the BBC. It needn't be.

Unfair! The BBC is not 'lying'

Steve Barnett rebuts David Elstein's claim that the BBC's arguments for retaining the licence fee contain more smoke than fire.

The 40 lies the BBC tells about subscription

BBC's Head of Policy, James Heath, packs a staggering amount of untruths into a single post on the BBC blog.

Bigger or smaller? Who is right? Rupert or Tony?

An examination of the recent flow of speeches and deal proposals by leading media players, to see what clues to the future of the BBC they offer.

Smearing the windows of creative competition

Since its introduction in 1990, the statutory requirement that the BBC outsource 25% of its production has been elaborated. Now the Director General proposes instead a general free-for-all competition, not just for its own production budget but for all broadcasting. Why?

Syndicate content