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Re-shaping Britain must include the BBC

In the next few years, the UK’s constitution will be re-shaped. This includes the BBC. A new book, from openDemocracy and Commonwealth Publishing, rethinks what Britain in the 21st century needs from its public media.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Re-shaping Britain must include the BBC

In the next few years, the UK’s constitution will be re-shaped. This includes the BBC. A new book, from openDemocracy and Commonwealth Publishing, rethinks what Britain in the 21st century needs from its public media.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Rethinking the Public: A book launch

Prominent thinkers on the BBC joined Our Beeb for an evening of debate in London.

Why is the BBC giving licence fee cash to the companies who have slashed local journalism?

Under its new charter, the BBC will be subsidising Britain's biggest newspaper publishers.

Our Beeb - Book Launch and Drinks Reception

Limited space is available for an evening with some of the country's top experts and influential thinkers on the BBC.

Aberfan and Orgreave: The BBC in moments of national trauma

During moments of national trauma, the public turns to the BBC for shared experience and understanding. But how well is the corporation doing at honouring the experiences of the victims?

Review: The Fall, series 3

The much-praised – but also much-criticised – BBC2 drama series “The Fall” has completed its third and final run. How far did its strengths out-weigh its weaknesses?

Re-shaping Britain must include the BBC

In the next few years, the UK’s constitution will be re-shaped. This includes the BBC. A new book, from openDemocracy and Commonwealth Publishing, rethinks what Britain in the 21st century needs from its public media.

Channel 4: a national treasure?

Channel 4 has been named Channel of the Year at the Edinburgh International Television Festival. But what does the future hold?

The draft BBC Charter is “distinctively” fishy

The latest twist in the Bake Off saga is a reminder of why we should be suspicious about the draft BBC Charter’s emphasis on “distinctiveness”

The BBC must improve its religious affairs coverage

The BBC looks set to keep its religious coverage, but in a society where people increasingly identify as irreligious, how can it remain relevant?

Facebook has become a public service. It needs to start acting like one.

Facebook has created an echo chamber by only showing its users what they want to see, which means political polarisation, hyper-partisanship and culture wars. Facebook needs to face up to its responsibilities.

This piece is part of our What is public service? series.

The Great British Bake Off defects to Channel 4 - what does it all mean?

How did a baking show become the BBC's biggest hit? And how risky is it for Channel 4 to bid £10 million a year more than the BBC was willing to pay to poach the programme?

Introducing our new series: what is public service?

Today Our Beeb launches a new series on public service in the post-Brexit age. Here editor Ellie Mae O'Hagan explains what inspired the series.

Lessons from Rio: how can the BBC compete with bigger sports broadcasters?

As the Rio Olympics draws to a close, we take a look at the how the BBC can protect itself from losing out to broadcasters like Sky and BT Sport.

The BBC must improve how it reports statistics

The BBC has a unique position in British society, with a reputation for fairness, impartiality, and usefulness.

Public service austerity broadcasts

Public service broadcasters are implicated in legitimising neoliberal policies in response to political and economic crisis. The coverage of RTÉ, for example, invited Irish viewers to cheer on the forces of technocratic fiscal responsibility.

Independence Day for the BBC?

In an uncertain ‘Brexit Britain’, we must ensure that the BBC remains a public broadcaster, as free as possible from state interference.

How the BBC can create a better digital public sphere

The BBC’s remit is not just broadcast. It has the power to improve our experiences online, and to realise the digital public sphere we want.

The case is building for an end to BBC 'balance'

The BBC is required to provide impartial analysis of public affairs. It invented “balance” to avoid this obligation. It has been found out; it must mend its ways; or else.

Chilcot: the Kamel that broke Straw’s back

Who should have scrutinized government assertions on Iraqi WMD with greater commitment, demanding evidence? Other MPs? The BBC?

Was truth the casualty of the BBC’s impartiality rules?

Following a referendum campaign in which the UK media has been accused of failing in their duty to educate, momentum is building to scrap, or revise, the BBC's impartiality rules.

If dissensus is the new normal in Britain, we need a new media

An inquiry into the future of public service broadcasting in Britain launched its report days after the Brexit vote. It holds important clues to how we deal with the current breakdown of consensus.

Lord Puttnam: the BBC must confront a "total" loss of trust

The film producer and chair of a major inquiry into the future of public service broadcasting calls on the BBC to help rebuild trust in Brexit Britain.

The press didn’t divide us – we were already divided…

Britain's divisions weren't invented by the media.

The history of channel 4: separate tables

Part of a series of irreverent sketches by David Lloyd, on his personal experience of Channel 4's early years. 

The history of channel 4: spirit and purpose

Channel 4 was born with a remit to innovate and experiment, values that are now under threat. No drastic changes should be made without a wide-ranging public debate. 

The history of channel 4: how David beat Goliath

The long battle to create Channel 4 was an unequal one that pitted the public interest against giant corporate and political forces. Remarkably, the little guys won. 

The history of channel 4: a twenty year gestation

When Channel 4 was born in 1982, it owed its conception to creative visionaries who had been lobbying, briefing and cajoling for nigh on two decades. 

Is the BBC safe in Ofcom’s hands?

Ofcom may soon regulate the BBC, yet we know it already struggles to treat the public as citizens and not just consumers.

Don’t shoot the messenger: a response to Leah Borromeo

Years of budget cuts have hindered the documentary world’s freedom to invest in new voices. A new funding structure is needed across the industry to support working class talent.    

The BBC’s Question Time can no longer be a megaphone for lies

If the BBC is to take balance seriously, during the referendum period and beyond, it can’t leave panellists to voice untruths, unchecked.

The fate of public service broadcasting

Uncritical defenders of public service broadcasting have turned a blind eye to its decline. This is not a time for conservatism but for long overdue transformation. 

Paying to beg at the Sheffield Doc/Fest

From extortionate ticket prices to networking events for the privileged the UK’s biggest documentary festival excludes many talented filmmakers. This is particularly ironic given the democratic concerns of the form. 

Podcast: how might privatisation affect Channel 4?

A discussion about Channel 4 with its CEO David Abraham reveals much about privatisation plans and possible futures for British broadcasting. 

TV Diversity: there may be trouble ahead

A briefing to MPs on the government’s plans for tackling inadequate representation in British broadcasting.  

The BBC is failing the public in its coverage of government surveillance

Historically close to Britain’s national security state, the BBC is still its friend today.

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