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The BBC and its poetry

Defending itself from cuts is not enough. The BBC must forge a new identity based on collaboration, pluralism and the creativity of a global audience. 

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

The BBC and its poetry

Defending itself from cuts is not enough. The BBC must forge a new identity based on collaboration, pluralism and the creativity of a global audience. 

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

The BBC charter renewal, seen through a Nordic lens

The ex-Director General of the Danish Broadcasting Corporation compares the British and Nordic debates about the future of public service media. 

The BBC, the press and online news

Scaling back the BBC will damage the UK’s sole source of impartial, quality and trusted news, whose independence is valued by users in the UK and around the world.

The BBC and its poetry

Defending itself from cuts is not enough. The BBC must forge a new identity based on collaboration, pluralism and the creativity of a global audience. 

Britain’s creative kickstarter: the BBC

Want to know the value of the BBC to Britain’s £76.4 billion creative economy? Have a look at the unique impact of its Manchester investment.

Does the World Service have a future?

The editor of BBC World Service News until earlier this year argues that the funding of the World Service through the licence fee strengthens the corporation's hand in negotiations about a new charter. 

MyBBC: the problem with one to one news

The BBC’s vision of a ‘personalised’ news service, allowing the user to filter bulletins according to their interests, is at odds with the corporation’s public purpose.  

Red alert for the BBC: a response to Enders Analysis

The debate about the BBC's forthcoming Charter Renewal is inherently political.

BBC Green Paper: red alert on funding

The government has promised a nit-picking examination of all the BBC does, focusing on how to redefine its mission as well as reform and improve its services in the internet age.

Fair Game? The BBC and the future of sport on free-to-air television

Providing ‘free’ access to sport is one of the BBC’s vital public roles. If this function is to be preserved in a post-broadcast age it must be reinforced by state legislation.  

No broadcaster is an island

The fragility of the BBC’s independence from the state cannot continue to be ignored. Nor can its overall future be discussed in a silo.

BBC Charter renewal: invisible actors and critical friends

If the corporation is to defend itself against powerful vested interests it must work more closely with critical friends across the political spectrum. 

The BBC and the Tories: is it war?

By sabre-rattling with this government, the BBC is provoking an unnecessary battle that will most likely be to its disadvantage. A change of strategy is needed. 

Time to fight for the BBC

George Osborne and his neoliberal backers are not just attacking the BBC. They're launching a concerted assault on Britain’s democratic public culture.

Reimagining, not diluting the BBC in the next decade

Last week the government published a report that challenged the fundamental values of the BBC. The corporation must now defend its autonomy and articulate a renewed public purpose for the 21st Century. 

The BBC’s deal with the Tories: and the Tories’ deal with the BBC

The BBC’s addiction to the licence fee makes it an easy target for politicians seeking to off-load expenditure. But what does the latest deal mean, for the BBC and public service broadcasting?  

The Whittingdale Eight: war or wisdom for the BBC?

The government has set up an advisory panel for its review of the BBC Charter. So who will be leading this process? And how should the corporation approach the coming debate?     

Panorama and the NHS - the perfect missed opportunity

Last night's Panorama looked at the "Perfect Storm" now encircling the NHS - but failed to accurately diagnose either the problem or the solution. 

“Whose side are you on?” Public broadcasters and counter-terrorism

When it comes to state surveillance and “terrorism”, there is a long history of political pressure, control and manipulation over the arm of the media entrusted with the explicit mission of serving the public. 

“We cannot allow chaff to impact strategic direction”: an interview with the BBC’s Andrew Scadding

The Head of Corporate Affairs at the BBC talks about pressures and ambitions at the organisation ahead of next year’s Charter Renewal. 

Could a free-for-all web culture be the death of the BBC?

High quality content costs money. As households are squeezed by austerity the corporation must demonstrate the links between its funding mechanism and the democratic service it provides. 

The public has a right to memory

From broadcasting to libraries and museums, digitization is revolutionising the way we enjoy and share heritage. 

Still failing after all these years

Writers and producers of BBC television drama are being stifled by the corporation's top-down commissioning system. 

The BBC must not allow the press to dictate its agenda

Perceived pressure from the press and politicians is impacting on the BBC’s news coverage. In Britain's cynical media environment, those working inside the corporation must fight for its core values.  

Why is the BBC presenting RUSI as objective analysts of the Middle East?

The ‘Royal United Services Institute’ has close links with the British state and its military establishment. The BBC should not present its analysis as apolitical ‘fact’. 

From King John to Baron Bragg: celebrating Magna Carta

As the Queen is prepared to annoint the humiliation of King John with a witticism there is a gathering anger against the way Britain is governed.

Is the licence fee value for money?

On 19 May Radio 4’s “You and Yours” hosted a debate on whether the licence fee was thought to be value for money. It raised as many questions as it answered.

Rethinking ‘public service’ in a globalized digital ecology

As globalization transforms the nation-state and the forms of community associated with it, what are the implications for public service broadcasting? 

Why the Conservatives should be fighting to keep the BBC exactly as it is, and why they won't

The support of a widely mistrusted press is not enough to keep the UK together.

The BBC has little to fear from Britain’s new government

Britain’s new Culture Secretary will be rational and measured in his approach to the BBC's Charter Renewal.  

Newspapers, not the BBC, led the way in biased election coverage

Does Britain's partisan press have too much influence on broadcast news? 

John Whittingdale is not 'anti-BBC'

The appointment of John Whittingdale as culture secretary is a wise move by Cameron. His expertise will be vital in ensuring that next year's BBC charter renewal is properly debated. 

Social media has strengthened the authority of the BBC

Far from undermining its power, the new hybrid media environment has enabled the corporation to consolidate its news monopoly. 

Propaganda or professionalism on Pacific Quay?

How were political issues covered by BBC Reporting Scotland and STV News in the four months before UK General Election 2015? 

Business leaders, letters and the BBC

The corporation’s economics coverage has been relatively balanced in the run up to this election but it has failed to convey the extent of the Conservatives’ ties with big business. 

Pinkoes and Traitors: the deeper debate

Jean Seaton’s feisty reply to critical reviews of her book invites us to reflect on history when we think about the future of the BBC. It’s a challenge that deserves a wide response. 

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