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Newest Debate: Closing space for civil society?

Civil society organizations (CSOs) worldwide are under significant pressure as restrictions on foreign funding, barriers to registration, intervention in CSOs’ internal affairs, and other forms of harassment have proliferated. The debate will examine the evidence and experience of closing space in different contexts and sectors and identify the innovative responses. Read on...


Our latest:

From taboo to empowerment: menstruation and gender equality

Menstruation and menstrual hygiene are emerging as pivotal issues for gender equality, human rights and development.

 

Accounting for human rights: lessons from Syria

If refugee advocates don’t shine a light on budgets, it will be nearly impossible to ensure sustained support for refugee protection efforts. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on the future of refugee protection. Español

Activists get creative in their push for Moroccan women’s rights

Partnering with a comedienne and taking to social media, Human Rights Watch is getting creative to gain traction on women’s rights in Morocco. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on public opinion and human rights.

Migrants are driving innovative campaigns for female refugees in Germany

Activists are using a multi-van in Germany to help female refugees cope with violence and harassment. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on the future of refugee protection. Deutsch

Does “de-Kirchnerizing” Argentina mean dismantling human rights policies?

A key concern for many Argentinians, among the numerous changes Mauricio Macri’s government has implemented, is the dismantling of hard-won human rights gains. A contribution to openGlobalRights closing space debate. Español

Beyond reconciliation and accountability: distributive justice and Sri Lanka's transitional agenda

If the transitional justice process in Sri Lanka ignores the indignities of poverty and everyday precariousness, can we really call it “justice”?

Broader view shows path to refugee reform

The refugee regime extends well beyond the 1951 Convention, and a broader contextual view is necessary in debates about change. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on the future of refugee protection. Español

Quantitative data in human rights: what do the numbers really mean?

Everyone loves numbers, but when we use them in human rights, how often are we misrepresenting the data?

The vicious spiral of economic inequality and financial crises

There is compelling evidence that economic inequality is both a result of, and contributor to, economic crises. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on economic inequality.

Crisis in Europe exposes failing refugee protection regime

The refugee protection regime works if it remains limited to those genuinely fleeing persecution — though the Syrian crisis proves again that ways must also be found to protect those at risk of generalized violence. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on the future of refugee protection.

Local funding is not just an option anymore—it’s an imperative

As local rights groups seek alternative funding sources, the closing space for civil society makes this even more imperative. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debates on closing space for civil society and funding for human rights.

Business lessons for human rights: borrowing evidence-based practices

The human rights field could learn a lot from evidence-based practices developed in business and medicine. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on evaluation and impact assessment in human rights.

Without adequate reflection, new refugee solutions risk failing

We have to stop pushing new refugee solutions without assessing where we have succeeded and failed so far. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on the future of refugee protection. Français

Who will take the lead on economic inequality, and who should?

Human rights lack the best language and tools to describe and solve inequality’s most pernicious impacts. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on economic inequality and human rights.

When national security trumps international humanitarian law, who wins?

International humanitarian law is not a diplomatic conversation devoid of real world implications, and ignoring it creates a free-for-all.

Old dogs and new tricks: rethinking human rights business models

In this climate of closing space, we have an imperative to rethink the business models for protecting human rights. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debates on closing space for civil society and funding for human rights.

Using budget analysis to confront governments: what practitioners need to know

Millions of dollars that could address socio-economic disparities are lost through illicit financial flows, but budget analysis could help. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on economic and social rights.

For Amnesty’s India office, raising local funds is all about membership

Amnesty International’s India hub focuses most of its fundraising efforts on domestic contributions, facing challenges as diverse as the weather to brand recognition. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate, Funding for Human Rights. Españolالعربية

Statelessness as forced displacement

When we think of forced displacement, we don’t usually think about the stateless. But we should. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on the future of refugee protection.

How to get inequality on the global policy agenda

The Panama Papers give NGOs a prime opportunity to talk about inequality. But how they do it matters. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on economic inequality and human rights.

Violent groups aggravate government crackdowns on civil society

Armed non-state actors, criminal elements and violent extremists—not just governments—are responsible for the increasing crackdown on civil society. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on closing space for civil society. Français

What drives the crackdown on NGOs, and how can it be stopped?

Foreign aid is always political, and elevates the risk of a government crackdown on NGOs. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on closing space for civil society. Español