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Newest Debate: Evaluation and impact assessment in human rights

Human rights organizations face a difficult dilemma with regards to evaluation and impact assessment of their work. Although it is required and demanded by most donors, existing tools and methods are mostly unfit for human rights work. Read on...


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မြန်မာနိုင်ငံရှိ လူ့အခွင့်အရေးချိုးဖောက်မှုများနှင့် ဗုဒ္ဓဘာသာအမျိုးသားရေးဝါဒ၏အ
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Wai Yan Phone

Human rights mainstreaming in climate change policy: a glass half full

The UN’s human rights bodies can’t solve the problem of climate change – but that doesn’t mean they have no role to play in pushing for more ambitious action to meet this global threat. Español

When it comes to drones, do Americans really care about international law?

Is American public opinion on drones influenced by international law, or is it the low-to-no American casualties that have more sway? A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on Public Opinion and Human Rights. Español, Français

Human rights evaluation—who is it really for?

The human rights community should embrace evaluation not for our donors, but for our beneficiaries. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on evaluation and human rights. Español

The Common (Wealth) of Youth

Youth participation is vital to the global rights movement, yet institutions are not confronting obstacles facing youth. The Commonwealth organization and its programsmust strive for active youth involvement in agenda shaping.

ICC success depends on its impact locally

Delivering justice for victims is the raison d’etre of the ICC. But making justice count for victims requires much more than fair trials in a Hague courtroom. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on the International Criminal CourtFrançais

Making a case for change: the value of strategic plausibility in evaluation

By focusing on strategic plausibility, it’s possible to fulfil accountability needs while also favouring learning. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on evaluation and human rights.  Français

Law and politics at the International Criminal Court

The ICC should be above politics, but some of the rules found in the Rome Statute make that difficult. A contribution to openGlobalRightsICC debate.

 

Less money, more risk: the struggle for change in women’s rights

With fewer resources and greater risks, sustainable change in women’s rights internationally means supporting local women’s collective action and power. A contribution the openGlobalRights debate on internationalizing human rights organizationsEspañolFrançais

India’s environmental flashpoints

AAbannerEconomic progress is clashing with environmental rights in India, and proposed legal forms are shrinking democratic spaces—increasing the likelihood of violence. Español

When protecting civilians in humanitarian crises, how do we measure success?

Oxfam’s protection programme in the DRC shows how “signposts of change” can help us evaluate progress. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on evaluation and human rights. Français

Why framing matters—and polls only give you so much

Understanding how people think about human rights, not just what they think, is critical to effective communication. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on public opinion and human rights. Español

Losing girls: post Ebola in Sierra Leone

The effects of Ebola on Sierra Leone will be felt long after the country is declared Ebola-free, and girls are being particularly ostracized and stigmatized.

Human rights and health? The long road to the mainstream

Does framing health and access to medicine in rights-based rhetoric help or hinder the overall rights movement?

 

Human rights aren’t revolutionary? Good!

Human rights are no longer “revolutionary”, but that’s a good thing. EspañolFrançais


The realpolitik of rights and democracy

What happens when human rights and democracy do not only advance Western foreign policy, but also contribute to producing, not reducing, poverty? A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on internationalizing human rights organizations.

In Myanmar, polls are the beginning of a larger conversation

Many activists in Myanmar (Burma) are very skeptical of public opinion polling. But these polls are a key starting point for a larger conversation on democracy. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on Public Opinion and Human Rights. မြန်မာဘာသာ

Finding balance: evaluating human rights work in complex environments

In human rights work, how and what you measure determines what kind of organisation you become. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on evaluation and human rights.  EspañolFrançais

There is no women’s empowerment without rights

As “women’s economic empowerment” becomes a popular development term, we must examine whether such programs are actually ensuring women’s rights. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on economic and social rightsEspañolFrançais

Internationalisation: lessons from the women’s movement

The internationalisation debate can learn a lot from women’s movements in terms of opening spaces and opportunities for the voiceless. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on internationalising human rights organizationsFrançais

Paying for human rights violations: perceptions of the Colombian peace process

New research shows that providing context for human rights issues yields a broader range of responses to peace talks in Colombia. A contribution to openGlobalRights’ debate on Public Opinion and Human Rights. Español

Beyond liberal rights: lessons from a possible future in Detroit

Thirty thousand Detroit households have been denied access to water and sanitation, raising systemic questions about the liberal rights tradition. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on economic and social rights.  EspañolFrançaisالعربية

Are humanitarian aid and professional ambition mutually exclusive?

The professionalization of human rights organizations is only effective if management adapts their strategies. An amateur mentality simply will not work. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on internationalizing human rights organizations. Français