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About Cameron Thibos

Cameron Thibos is the managing editor of Beyond Trafficking and Slavery. He is a former research associate at the Migration Policy Centre of the European University Institute in Florence, Italy, and holds a D.Phil from the Department of International Development at the University of Oxford. 

Articles by Cameron Thibos

This week’s front page editor

Rosemary Bechler is a mainsite editor of openDemocracy

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Always an afterthought: women in the informal sector

Millions of women work in the Indian informal sector, but very few have a voice at the table. One labour organiser explains their challenges and what they really need from western allies.

A cage built with laws, not bars

Household and care workers in Lebanon are hemmed in on all sides by legal restrictions. How does one claim rights when one has none?

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: where do we go from here?

A lot of work remains to be done in order to end forced labour. Thankfully, organisers and advocates around the globe are pioneering promising solutions. It's time to follow their lead.

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: governance gaps

Governance gaps help employers push problems of forced labour even deeper into the shadows of supply chains.

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: outsourcing

Outsourcing allows big brands to distance themselves from big human rights abuses, including forced labour.

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: irresponsible sourcing practices

Forced labour is illegal and its risks are widely documented. Yet so many companies continue to use irresponsible sourcing practices – established triggers of forced labour. Why is this the case?

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: concentrated corporate power and ownership

Multinational corporations are becoming increasingly powerful – and this has serious implications for workers at the bottom of supply chains. 

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: restrictive mobility regimes

Border restrictions are often justified as measures to protect migrants from "trafficking", but borders actually increase migrants' vulnerability to forced labour and labour exploitation. 

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: limited labour protection

Freedom from forced labour depends on workers' ability to access labour protections. Why are so many them unable to do so?

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: identity and discrimination

Social discrimination based on race, caste, gender and other factors is a crucial component of the forced labour equation. 

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: poverty

Poverty isn’t just about lacking money –  it interacts with the demands of the market society to shape people’s vulnerability to forced labour.

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: globalisation and the rise of supply chains

Too often, globalisation is viewed as inevitable. How does this shape our understanding of the link between globalisation and forced labour?

Confronting the root causes of forced labour: the meaning of freedom

Where does the force in 'forced labour' come from? Those who believe that poverty and globalisation are the root causes of forced labour need a broader understanding of freedom and coercion.

Confronting root causes: forced labour in global supply chains

Forced labour is all around us, but not how you think. 'Confronting root causes' pulls together research from across the world to explain where it comes from and what we can do about it.

Informal, but organised: the 30-year success of the Self Employed Women's Association of India

Coming together as a collective is a proven way to improve the pay and labour conditions for informal workers in India.

Countering xenophobia through story-telling

Story-telling and communal art are powerful tools in the fight against xenophobia. In the age of the echo chamber we need to learn to listen again.

Leaving home to become a domestic worker

For women migrants from Bangladesh, education and technical skills can be real game changers.

Interview: the cat and mouse game of creating ‘safe passage’

As states fortify their external borders the calls for creating ‘safe passage’ are growing louder, yet the term is hard to define and the ways to dodge responsibility are many.

Interview: why do we think development will stop migration?

States are increasingly incorporating development aid into their strategies for controlling migration. But is this the right way to look at the issue, and does it have any hope of ‘success’?

The quiet resistance of domestic workers in Lebanon

The migrant women working in Lebanese homes have little in the way of protection or rights, but they find ways to carve out normalcy for themselves nevertheless.

Interview: how can better policy empower women on the move?

Women experience migration different than men do, and with the right policies that can be a source of empowerment more than a source of risk.

Interview: the dangerous invisibility of women migrants

Women migrate all over the world to work or to escape violence, yet in comparison to male migrants they are barely visible in policy and media discussions. This makes them vulnerable.

Interview: detention as the new migration management?

Immigration detention is becoming a preferred method for states to process and deter migrants, but there are many other options available out there.

Interview: is rights-based ‘good migration governance’ possible?

The director of the migration policy and research department at the International Organisation for Migration goes in-depth on global migration policies, the forthcoming global compacts, and the policy challenges going forward.

Global compacts, detention centres, and safe passage: can the world change course on migration?

The tragic spectacle of the past five years has pushed migration to the top of the global policy agenda, but it will take a lot of work to transform that opportunity into substantive change.

You, me, and the distance between us

A British actress uses songs, puppets and disarmingly introspective honesty to open a conversation on refugees, life in Europe’s camps, and the ambiguous role of privileged volunteers.

Introducing this week's special theme: 'Cities of welcome, cities of transit'

openDemocracy and its partners brought activists, academics, and policy makers together in Barcelona late last July to discuss a way forward for refugee-related activism and city welcome policies. 

The myths of migration

The conversation surrounding migration is full of disinformation. Challenging the resulting misconceptions is crucial to changing the everyday cost-benefit analysis of migration.

When refugees appear, we take them to the art museum

The German city of Karlsruhe uses art to bring new arrivals together with local citizens, creating a dialogue that is the foundation of integration.

Welcoming refugees despite the state

Cities and activists across Europe are fighting their national governments to better welcome refugees.

Toward a more reasonable European asylum system

National governments must cede some control over immigration to EU-level institutions if migrants are ever to be received and dealt with humanely.

Barcelona: city of refuge

Barcelona seeks to welcome refugees and migrants into the fabric of the city, but its efforts have been stymied by the national government.

#ILC2016: What happened? What’s next?

This year’s International Labour Conference could represent a turning point in the struggle to regulate global supply chains.

The will of Idomeni

The individuals stuck in Greece have begun a hunger strike, their determination challenging the arbitrary distinction between refugees and migrants. How long must they sit there?

Border games and their pawns

Balkan borders dominoed shut last week, ostensibly to block ‘economic migrants’, and now only Syrians, Afghans and Iraqis may pass. Those trapped, however, have come too far to stay quiet.

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