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The untouchables: Egypt’s petty security officials

The regime has unleashed a wave of repression that it can no longer control. Power now lies in the hands of those that police local communities: Egypt’s new untouchables, the petty security officials.

The untouchables: Egypt’s petty security officials

The regime has unleashed a wave of repression that it can no longer control. Power now lies in the hands of those that police local communities: Egypt’s new untouchables, the petty security officials.

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On the spectacle of violence

Maged Mandour

Violence and repression are becoming more severe, and are symptomatic of the failure of Arab leaders to build a hegemonic vision they can use to control the citizenry. 

The Turkey–EU refugee deal and how to really solve 'the problem'

Unless there is mobilisation to provide a better life for those in underdeveloped parts of the world, the 'problem' of people's desire to migrate in search of a better life will persist.

Fred Halliday’s futurity

Six years after his death in Barcelona, the work of a protean internationalist scholar has never been more relevant. Español Português

A Syrian constitution by August: by whom and for whom?

Lasting constitutional settlements require a divided political community to arrive at a shared vision of their common future, and for the general public to support this vision. This takes dialogue, deliberation and time.

‘Killing a student is killing a nation’: Sudanese universities revolt

Seven Sudanese public universities have witnessed waves of protests during the past week: the crackdown on civil society has made them the only spaces left to exercise freedom of expression and peaceful assembly.

Palmyra and propaganda

Those who unthinkingly applaud the Assad regime for recapturing Palmyra run the risk of looking as though they care more for Roman ruins than Syrian lives.

The EU-Turkey deal: unjust and short-sighted

Sending citizens who are fleeing one authoritarian regime to another authoritarian regime will only result in more anger, frustration and extremism in the years to come.

Foreign funding restrictions: far more than just “an illegitimate excuse”

Those that justify restrictions on foreign funding for civil society have strong normative arguments that cannot be dismissed lightly. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on closing space for civil society. Français, EspañolDuetsche, العربية

Politics, racism and Israel/Palestine

If we need to be vigilant against the evil of antisemitism, we need to be equally vigilant against the kind of virulent racism which is gaining ground in Israel.

Yazidi women after slavery: trauma

Mental health care and support services are in short supply for the traumatized women who have escaped from ISIS slavery to the camps around Dohuk, exacerbating their long term trauma.

America vs ISIS, the prospect

The United States' military deployments in the Middle East augur escalating war – and a return to 'boots on the ground'.

Bombings in Turkey – a blip on your newsfeed?

The world is closer together than ever, conflicts spilling over state borders and challenging their very existence. It is time for resistance and solidarity to travel across borders with the same fluidity.

Where are the workers?

Maged Mandour

Even though the number of strikes and industrial actions in Egypt has skyrocketed since the mid 2000s, labour's demands have mostly been local and fragmented.

North Africa and Europe: aligning interests

Tunisia and Algeria are at the heart of the region's anti-ISIS strategy. In dealing with them, the west must be guided by equality not hegemony.

Inside Baghdad: the current state of play

The deal over cabinet nominations by PM Abadi and Sadr conclude months of intensifying protest in Baghdad’s famous Tahrir Square, demanding the reform of an ethno-sectarian political quota system.

A revolution for our times: Rojava, Northern Syria

Travelling in Rojava is to witness a revolution experimenting with a form of stateless, direct democracy with women’s liberation, race and class equality at the heart of it. Part 1.

"Economic peace" for Palestine?

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'We'll burn you like we burned the Dawabshehs' - life as a video activist in Hebron

The video camera allowed us to document attacks. The whole family started to film, and much of the neighbourhood. As Palestinians, we try to do things and speak for ourselves.

The troubling political economy of Iraq’s Sh’ia clerical establishment

Iraqi and Iranian Shia have been competing over Iraq's shrine cities of Najaf and Karbala since the invasion. Al Sistani's successor will have to cope with the fall-out.

The thin line between pride and shame

Professing national pride or hiding in shame are two extremes like black and white and do not fit in a moderate and multihued world. عربي

العِزّةُ والعَارُ ومابينَهُما

النباح بعزة الوطن، أو الانغماس في قلب الرمال لمحو عاره، ألوان حادة مثل الأسود والأبيض لاتسود العالم المتعددة ألوانه. English

After Brussels, ISIS's strategy

Tunisia, Paris, and now Brussels: escalating attacks on western targets reflect a shift of focus by ISIS.

Syrian lives matter

The suffering of Syrians is seen through four distorted lenses. But to find a sustainable political solution in Syria, we must move beyond clichés. 

العنصر المفقود في مصر: الشعور بالانتماء

مع عقود من السياسات النيوليبرالية ، تزايد الانقسامات الطبقية ، وهدم الساحات العامة ، قد اختفى الاحساس بالانتماء الاجتماعي في مصر ، والحاجة إلى استعادته عاملا مشتركا في التحركات الجماهيرية. English

The missing element in Egypt: a sense of belonging

With decades of neoliberal policies, growing class divisions, and the demolition of public space, social belonging has vanished. The need to reclaim it has been a common factor in Egypt's mass mobilisations. عربي

Egypt’s parliament crushes Nubian right of return to ancestral lands

The parliament has approved designating many of the villages to which Nubians wish to return no-go military areas, and Nubian activists have yet again taken to the streets to demand their rights.

The untouchables: Egypt’s petty security officials

Maged Mandour

The regime has unleashed a wave of repression that it can no longer control. Power now lies in the hands of those that police local communities: Egypt’s new untouchables, the petty security officials.   

Giulio Regeni, Egypt, and the deafening silence of Europe

Giulio Regeni's case is not only about academic freedom, but about the responsibility of EU states to protect their citizens: silence cannot be the response to his torture and murder.

Egypt: the stamp of the street on its children

Egypt's legal system does not protect vulnerable children and mainstream society is too self absorbed to reach out to those in need – but there are those doing all they can to help.

Spring into winter: Nasser, Sisi and the fate of Egypt’s revolution

Why would a country that showed itself so courageous in confronting Mubarak’s repression now be content to sacrifice its hard won gains, and accept a regime that has gone far further?

Why airstrikes on ISIS in Libya could worsen the situation in Tunisia

Concerns that bombing ISIS in Libya might destabilise Tunisia were tragically confirmed last week, as ISIS militants assaulted military and security facilities in Ben Guerdane, killing more than 50 people.

The other "Turkeys"

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Why many young Arabs join violent radical groups

The key to combating extremism is prevention. But what are the conditions that lead youth to become radicalised?

Nonviolent strategies to defeat totalitarians such as ISIS

Military might has little success against violent terror organizations. If nonviolent strategies seem impractical, it is an even greater naiveté to think armed solutions can be the answer.

Defeating Israel

Mohammed Al Qiq has recently ended a record 94-day hunger strike protesting his so-called administrative detention, a procedure Israel uses disproportionately against Palestinians, holding them without charges or due process.


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