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The pillage of Egypt by Sisi and Britain Inc.

The twisted logic of this system protects the socialisation of the Egyptian economy in favour of a military clique, whilst condoning the wholesale imprisonment of its capitalists.  

The pillage of Egypt by Sisi and Britain Inc.

The twisted logic of this system protects the socialisation of the Egyptian economy in favour of a military clique, whilst condoning the wholesale imprisonment of its capitalists.  

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Bahrain on Arab Awakening

Why we should oppose British air strikes against ISIL in Syria

Britain’s Prime Minister says we should not undertake air strikes lightly – he is right: we need to think about legitimate state building, not replying to terror with terror.

Another ‘Dodgy Dossier’ for war

Undeterred by the disastrous results of ‘regime change’ in Iraq and Libya, western powers have for four years been determinedly trying to help regime change in Syria along.

Why the west cannot defeat ISIS

Maged Mandour

ISIS has emerged from the wounds of the Arab world—for which the west is to a large extent responsibleand current airstrikes are pouring salt into these wounds.

The aid crisis for Syrian refugees

As the war is prolonged, families are exhausting their savings. Without a massive re-thinking of how aid is delivered and distributed, refugees in the region are going to look for ways to leave.

The ISIS threat: terror, propaganda and ideology

Mainstream Muslim scholars must engage with reinterpreting passages of the Qur'an that seem to support ISIS' treatment of women. Translated excerpt from Trusselen fra IS: Terror, propaganda og ideologi.

The vicious cycle of pitiless violence

ISIS fighters must be held to account as criminals, not conventional military adversaries, for their violent crimes. Snared by geopolitical interests, post-9/11 interventions have too easily been captured by leading states.

Israel, ISIS and the Paris attacks

The recent spate of terror attacks around the world have given Israel an opportunity to showcase its military and intelligence capabilities—and to further crack down on Palestinians.

Where is the outrage on David Cameron’s scandal in the Gulf?

The UAE, we now know, was busy planning its own operation against Muslim Brotherhood affiliates at home while urging David Cameron to do the same in Britain.

International community neglects to act on Yazidi genocide

Mass murder, rape, slavery, and kidnapping; the situation for the Yazidi community is dire and the international community's reponse has been wholly inadequate.

Government failure to upgrade informal settlements in Egypt: a brief history

Is civil administration and planning in Egypt being run professionally according to research and analysis, or is it as ‘random’ as the housing it claims to improve?

Violence comes home: an interview with Arun Kundnani

ISIS’s recruits are not corrupted by ideology but by the end of ideology. More radicalisation, in the genuine sense of the word, is the solution, not the problem.

Yemen is not Paris: western media’s cold shoulder

Yemen is a failed state devastated by fighting, with thousands of civilians killed by a strong jihadist presence and widespread suffering. It has made very few headlines.  

The west vs ISIS: a new stage

A United Nations resolution will intensify the war against ISIS. Such an outcome carries three grave risks.

Window on the Middle East - November 20, 2015

Arab Awakening's columnists offer their perspective on what is happening on the ground in the Middle East. 

If ISIS uses chemical weapons, the west will be partly responsible

How can the international community respond effectively and promptly to this growing threat, not just to the Middle East region, but to the world?

Countering the logic of the war economy in Syria

The country has entered a vicious circle where Syria’s own resources are being used to destroy it, and where ordinary people have no choice but to rearrange their lives around the conflict and either join or pay armed actors to meet everyday needs.

Social resistance to IS in Syria: the case of Daraa

Areas that maintained a strong sense of social cohesion despite the 'new war' situation, such as Daraa, are far more resistant to the infiltration of both JAN and ISIL.

ISIL and governance

ISIL enters areas afflicted by weak governance, an active war economy, and ongoing conflict with the intention of changing this situation and imposing control to ensure the longevity of its rule. 

ISIL, JAN, and the war economy in Syria

The nature of ISIL and its ability to recruit based on economic needs is not something that can be countered by aerial bombardment.

Islamic State as the Saddam regime’s afterlife: the Fedayeen Saddam

In the Fedayeen—connected to the global Islamist terrorist movement, combining elements of Ba’athism with an increasingly-stern Salafism—is a microcosm of the Saddam regime’s mutation into Islamic State (ISIS).

Cairo landscapes: a battle over history

The reworking of urban spaces embodying the collective memory of the January 25 uprising is not a novelty, but part and parcel of the state's attempt to rewrite the history of the revolution.

ISIS wants to destroy the 'grey zone'. Here's how we defend it

After the Paris attacks, it is imperative that we safeguard this arena of co-existence, where people of all faith and none remain unified on the principles of common humanity.

Baathist/Syrian state institutions must be reformed

Assad is responsible for the damage being caused to Syria, but he is not the only one. Negotiators must reconsider their agreement over the fate of Syrian state institutions.

From Beirut to Paris, we are all hypocrites and selective grievers

In legitimately condemning selective grief, Lebanon (and the world) forgets that it selectively grieves all the time. We must acknowledge our ineptitude at dealing with human suffering and show solidarity with all.

Asking the right questions for the fate of Arab countries

Young people in the region are increasingly holding their parents’ generation responsible for their social and political exclusion, but it's never too late to start changing.

We are in pitiless times

After Paris, macho language about “pitiless war” defines the contours of leadership. Little else is on offer. It is red meat to our emotions.

The Paris atrocity, and after

ISIS's violent assaults in France's capital should lead to a political rethink among western leaders. But will they?

From Beirut, this is Paris: in a world that doesn’t care about Arab lives

There is a stark contrast in the reaction of the world to the horrific terrorist attacks in Lebanon and France. But in the world that doesn’t care about Arab lives, Arabs lead the way.

Normalising bloodshed: education and the dreams of the Marshall

What are the people in Egypt forcing themselves to believe in order not to deal with the harsh realities of the past four years – let alone the years before?

Gaza: walking ‘eyes wide open’ into another war

The ramping up of air strikes in Gaza combined with a humanitarian crisis compounded by a stalled reconstruction effort following last summer’s war, should compel us all into a heightened state of activism using BDS.

Syrian activists are repairing the fabric of civil society, even as it comes undone

Syria has seen the emergence of a powerful culture of resistance, from subversive graffiti to makeshift hospitals, which continues to operate despite the violent and politically fractured terrain.

Syria, another 'all-American' war?

The retreat of Washington's allies from the anti-ISIS campaign has disturbing echoes of its Iraq experience. 

Lebanon's foreign minister under fire: a comment on Gebran Bassil's real estate holdings

In order to promote accountability, the Lebanese public and journalists have to abide by a code of conduct that respects the right to a fair trial and the right to a defence. 

Update: Egypt’s Hossam Bahgat released from military intelligence

The award-winning journalist was released after being held for interrogation, sparking an outcry from local and international rights organisations.

From Mubarak to Sisi: the end of liberal autocracy

Maged Mandour

Unlike during the Mubarak era, the current regime lacks a reliable civilian ally to populate the legislative branch of the state.


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