Where are you, Arab intellectuals?

A plea for the poetic inspiration and vision needed to counter despair, complacency, repression and extremism.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world
Shawkan/Demotix. All rights reserved.

Where are you, Arab intellectuals?

A plea for the poetic inspiration and vision needed to counter despair, complacency, repression and extremism.

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world
Shawkan/Demotix. All rights reserved.

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Jihadists and activists: Tunisian youth five years later

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The limited effectiveness of US Middle East policy

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هل يمكننا بالفعل القضاء على ممارسة ختان الإناث في مصر بحلول عام 2030؟

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A solution for Syria (part 2)

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A solution for Syria (part 1)

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Seven trends dominating Egyptian media

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Why European countries can't stop selling warplanes to dictators

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From Gezi Park to Turkey’s transformed political landscape

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Bleak prospects for the Muslim Brotherhood

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Eradicating violent extremism from Tunisia? Dry up the sources

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North Sinai and Egyptian media

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Islamic State vs Britain

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Why are so many Syrian children being left stateless?

Syrian women advocates recognize the links between the crisis of statelessness and the lack of reproductive justice for women, and argue that control over their own fertility and legal status is paramount.

Tunisia's dangerous drift

The massacre of foreign tourists in the coastal resort of Sousse highlights the mismatch between perception and reality in Tunisia.

Where are you, Arab intellectuals?

A plea for the poetic inspiration and vision needed to counter despair, complacency, repression and extremism.

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